Eating Disorders According to the Term Paper

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This includes self-vomiting and/or the misuse of laxatives, diet pills, diuretics (water pills) excessive exercise or fasting." (2000) the American Psychiatric Association states of individuals with Bulimia Nervosa, that while they may "...may frequently diet and vigorously exercise, individuals with bulimia nervosa can be slightly underweight, normal weight, overweight or even obese." (2005) the individual with this condition will consume an unbelievably high volume of food and do so by eating it quickly and with no enjoyment of eating being experienced. Upon having consumed this great amount of food, the individual with bulimia nervosa will experience guilty and a feeling of being out of control. At this point, the individual with bulimia nervosa will make themselves vomit. This cycle may repeat many times a week or during the month. Generally, the family of these individuals does not know that their loved one is affected by this disorder. The following symptoms have been stated to be associated with this disorder:

Chronically inflamed and sore throat;

Salivary glands in the neck and below the jaw become swollen. Cheeks and face often become puffy, causing sufferers to develop a "chipmunk" looking face;

Tooth enamel wears off, teeth begin to decay from exposure to stomach acids;

Constant vomiting causes gastroesophageal reflux disorder;

Laxative abuse causes irritation, leading to intestinal problems; and Diuretics (water pills) cause kidney problems;

Severe dehydration from purging of fluids (APA, 2005)

Complications that may develop due to bulimia nervosa are those directly due to electrolyte imbalance and loss of potassium "due to vomiting" and include an increased risk for heart attack as well as esophagus inflammation because of vomiting and tooth decay due to the enamel being eroded. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000) Included in complications are clinical depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder as well as problems with drug and alcohol addiction.

III. BINGE-EATING

Binge eating disorders or BED "is the newest clinically recognized eating disorder. BED is primary identified by repeated episodes of uncontrolled eating." (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000) the individual with binge eating disorder does not, like those with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, exhibit behaviors of vomiting or excessive exercise or use of diuretics or laxatives. Binge eating disorder is difficult to pinpoint, as it is much like other disorders, which cause the individual to be obese. Complications from binge eating disorder are primarily problems with obesity which include high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and diabetes "as well as an increased risk for gallbladder disease, heart disease and some types of cancer." (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000) Individuals with binge eating disorder are known to have very high rates of depression.

CONCLUSION

The three eating disorders reviewed in this study all have the potential to result in great and lasting harm to the health of individuals with these eating disorders. While these eating disorders have been documented by medical science, there are other eating disorders which are simply labeled the 'eating disorder not otherwise specified' or ENDOS which include any eating disorders that fail to meet the criteria which has been set for the primary three known eating disorders reviewed in this study. One might ask indeed just how many eating disorders have been yet to be identified?

Bibliography

Eating Disorders (2000) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women's Health. February 2000.

What is an Eating Disorder? (2005) Let's Talk Facts about Eating Disorders. American Psychiatric Association. 2005.

Grohol, John M. (2006) Anorexia Nervosa. Psych Central. 7 Sep 2006. Online available at http://psychcentral.com/disorders/sx2.htm

Farley, Dixie (1992) on the Teen Scene: Eating Disorders Require Medical Attention. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA consumer magazine. March 1992. Online available at http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/eatdis.html

Eating Disorders (2008) National Institute of Mental Health. National Institute of Health 3 Apr 2008. Online available at http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/eating-disorders/complete-publication.shtml

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Eating Disorders (2000) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women's Health. February 2000.

What is an Eating Disorder? (2005) Let's Talk Facts about Eating Disorders. American Psychiatric Association. 2005.

Grohol, John M. (2006) Anorexia Nervosa. Psych Central. 7 Sep 2006. Online available at http://psychcentral.com/disorders/sx2.htm

Farley, Dixie (1992) on the Teen Scene: Eating Disorders Require Medical Attention. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA consumer magazine. March 1992. Online available at http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/eatdis.html

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