Economic Geography Essays (Examples)

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Economic Activity in Japan Classification Categories and

Words: 1304 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21158249

Economic activity in Japan [...] classification, categories, and types of economic activity in Japan. Japan's economy is one of the world's strongest economies, and it can influence other economies around the world. It is an industrial economy based on high technology and manufacturing. This is primarily because of geographical factors that limit the area that can effectively be farmed.

Japan's agricultural industries are not as prevalent as many others in the world, but what they do have they utilize quite effectively. The Japanese import large amounts of wheat, sorghum, and soybeans, but they grow enough rice to feed their people with a small surplus, and they also are beginning to export specialty agricultural items such as Kobe beef. Other agricultural industries in the country include fishing and poultry production. ice is so important to the Japanese that in ancient times, it was used as money, and it still plays an…… [Read More]

References

Editors. (2004). Economy of Japan. Retrieved from the Wikipedia.org Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Japan14 June 2004.

Editors. (2003). Japan statistical yearbook. Retrieved from the Japan Statistics Bureau Web site: http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/nenkan/index.htm14 June 2004.
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Economics Optimal Currency Area an

Words: 2259 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50405286

Thus, a region or nation experiencing economic depression will be unable to use the interest rate lever to boost the economy. Similarly a country with high inflation will be unable to independently raise interest rates to contain inflation. Moreover, Islamic countries, which form a large part of the geography, do not believe in interest rates.

Political barriers -- Political differences between nations make it extremely difficult for them to adopt a common currency. It can lead to a loss in political sovereignty as monetary interests would need to surpass political interests. This is unlikely to be acceptable to most of the nations and the idea of a single currency may be difficult to implement (Gimp, 2008).

Will Pros and Cons change Over Time? Depending On the Country?

The economic conditions to determine a monetary union depend on: the openness and size of the economy involved to trade; the free movements…… [Read More]

Bibliography

BBC. (1997, November 21). European monetary union - pros and cons. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from BBC News: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/special_report/single_currency/25081.stm

Filho, F.F. (2003). Is it possible to achieve a monetary union in MERCOSUR? (South America). Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Vanderbilt University: http://sitemason.vanderbilt.edu/files/egnZLy/Ferrari%20Filho%202.pdf

Frankel, J. (1999, August). No single currency regime is right for all countries or at all times. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Princeton University:  http://www.princeton.edu/~ies/IES_Essays/E215.pdf 

Gimp, F. (2008, June 27). A world currency - pros and cons and can it become a reality. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Piponomics:  http://www.babypips.com/blogs/piponomics/a_world_currency_pros_and_cons.html
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Economics Crisis as an Inevitable

Words: 4733 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43936576



The U.S. is a property owning civilization and a number of the people wanted land and housing. Americans however scarcely ever create savings. "The country itself lives on other countries' savings by issuing bonds to finance its excessive consumption. The current crisis began with cheap housing loans offered by banks. Banks provided loans but instead of holding the loan in their books, they packaged them into collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and sold them to other agencies. These agencies passed them on to others and spread them globally as assets" (the Current Economic Crisis, its causes, its impact and possible alternatives, 2009).

Interest rates were lowered and housing loans went up with construction activities leading to land prices increasing. The real estate was booming, generating employment and incomes. But as the rate of interest on housing loans came down, banks started to compete to get more business. Because of low interest…… [Read More]

References

Avizius, R. 2009. Financial Crisis Big Picture: What has the Government Response Been? [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article9229.html . [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Centeno, M.A. & Cohen, J.N. 2012. The Arc of Neoliberalism. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/transitionstomodernity/papers/CentenoCohen.pdf. [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Crotty, J. 2009. Structural causes of the global financial crisis: a critical assessment of the 'new financial architecture' . [ONLINE] Available at:  http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/4/563.full . [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Esteva, G. (n.d.). The Meaning of the Global Crisis and "Recovery" for Study Abroad: What are we Preparing Students for? [ONLINE] Available at: http://digitalcollections.sit.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1110&context=faculty_symposium. [Accessed 22 May 2012].
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Economic and Geographical Restructuring of

Words: 1667 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1880304

However, when it comes to the long-term effects, the policies are exacerbating social problems, by forcing the poor and middle class from their homes. This is because many of these communities are targeted by wealthy developers. Over the course of time, this causes large projects to be constructed that are not economically viable. At which point, many governments are facing the twin forces of having to maintain such facilities, while seeing an increase in social assistance from those who lost their homes. In order to prevent this situation from becoming worse, alternative policies need to be coordinated with members of the community. There also needs to be a long-term economic viability studies conducted in the initial stages of planning, where various members of the community and businesses should play a major role. This will help to determine if such projects are sustainable in the community. If these two elements can…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Poor People Skills Threaten Urban Renewal." BBC News,  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/file_on_4/4327431.stm  (accessed June 21, 2010)

Funck, Bernard. Labor, Employment and Social Policies. Washington DC: World Bank, 2001.

Kok, Herman. "Restructuring the Retail Property Market in Central Europe." Multi-Development, AW Gouda, 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/w4179688574042h8/fulltext.html (accessed June 21, 2010)

Mucha, Thomas. "Greek Debt Crisis." Global Post,  http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/commerce/100505/greek-debt-crisis-unrest  (accessed June 21, 2010)
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Economics Country Analysis

Words: 3685 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10554050

Economics - Country Analysis

Country Overview and Current Events (News)

Ethiopia, traditionally known as Abyssinia, is a landlocked Sub-Saharan country located at the Horn of Africa in East Africa, bordering Somalia, Kenya, Eritrea, Djibouti, Sudan, and the newly-created South Sudan. It covers approximately 1,126,829km2 of land; about the size of the state of Texas, and was, until the split of Sudan, the second-largest country in Africa. Being landlocked, Ethiopia largely relies on the port of Djibouti, to which it is connected by both rail and road. Economic elements such as this, together with the country's history, population, geography and economic performance have been explored in the subsequent sections of this text.

Population: the U.S. Census Bureau, in June 2013, estimated Ethiopia's population to be 93,877,025; a figure that makes the country the second-most populous in Africa, after Nigeria (orld Bank, Index Mundi). Ethiopia's population has been on a steady increase…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AFDB. "Inflation Dynamics in Selected East African Countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda." AFDB Brief, 2012. Web. 18 March 2014 http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/07022012Inflatin%20East%20Africa%20-%20ENG%20-%20Internal.pdf

This article analyses the trend in Ethiopia's inflation rates vis-a-vis those of other countries in the Sub-Saharan region and was a valuable source of regional statistics, which formed the main basis for comparison.

Broussar, Nzinga, and Tekleselassie Tsegay. "Youth Unemployment: Ethiopia; Country Study." International Growth Center, 2012. Web. 18 March 2014  http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/07022012Inflation%20East%20Africa%20-%20ENG%20-%20Internal.pdf 

This article analyzes the trend in Ethiopia's employment patterns. It reinforced my arguments that unemployment is more prevalent in urban Ethiopia, and that the country's informal sector contributes more to GDP than the formal sector.
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Economics Politics Trade Geopolitical Base

Words: 7721 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22923523

For the period of the late 1960s and early 1970s, West Germany strived to assist the dollar. The United States and many other nations pushed West Germany to reassess so as to make up for the dollar excess. (Germany in the World Economy)

At last, after escalating waves of conjectures, the retton Woods system had a collapse in August 1971. All through the post-retton Woods period, the deutsche mark stayed under pressure. In order to relieve strain within Europe, West Germany and other European states assented to peg their currencies to a special system of comparatively narrow exchange rate bands officially named the 'European narrow-margins agreement' but unofficially identified as the 'snake'. The United States and West Germany performed main roles in attempting to organize a new global monetary system. but, in spite of its willingness to make small exchange-rate alterations for the benefit of new currency arrangements, West Germany…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Little German Reform Would Go a Long Way" (Dec 1, 2003) Business Week. Issue: 3860; pg. 22. Retrieved from home.uchicago.edu/~gbecker / Businessweek/BW/2003/12_01_2003.pdf Accessed on 24 November, 2004

Economic Survey - Germany 2004: Main issues and policy challenges"

Retrieved at http://www.oecd.org/document/17/0,2340,en_2649_201185_33633425_1_1_1_1,00.html. Accessed on 24 November, 2004

Economy of Germany" Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_GermanyAccessed on 25 November, 2004
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Geographies of Global Change 1

Words: 2794 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35757888

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice or maize) undermines other native crops. Routledge writes, "The project destabilized traditional farming methods, which further rationalized the use of new technologies from the West, and the displacement of traditional foodstuffs by the HYVs" (316). The whole agro-food system has damaged the soil fertility and made dependent the poorer nations, who are compelled to use the seeds of the manufacturers and their means of industrial growth (fertilizer, experts, credit, etc.). People are viewed as irrational and a hindrance to progress. State control over natural and financial resources consolidates the power of the national ruling party who serves the interests of transnational corporations. Routledge writes, "In the process, traditional subsistence economies and their associated cultures are being destroyed; people face displacement from their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, R.J., Peter J. Taylor, and Michael J. Watts, eds. Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World at the End of the Twentieth Century. 2nd edition. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 2002; reprint, 2007.
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Economic Dependency Neo-Liberal Path to

Words: 1676 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30290914

He also said that it was high time that every person in the world stopped being economically defensive and started to become politically courageous. At the same summit, the Minister of Sustainable Development and Planning and Head of the Economic and Social and Ministerial Council of Bolivia said that a responsible community would make up and constitute the very basis of global sustainability and stability, and sustainable development was what had helped Bolivia survive through all the years of economic instability and political unrests that it had been subjected to all the previous years. (esponsibility for each other- as Johannesburg's High-Level Segment Begins)

However, though it is widely accepted that Bolivia is indeed heading in the right direction today, it is still lacking in clear markets, and in a complete access to the various technologies that exist in the world today, and also in a guiding mechanism that would help…… [Read More]

References

Background Note: Bolivia. (August, 2004) Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. Retrieved at  http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/35751.htm . Accessed on 22 February, 2005

Background Notes, Bolivia. (March 1998) U.S. Department of State. Retrieved at  http://www.state.gov/www/background_notes/bolivia_0398_bgn.html . Accessed on 22 February, 2005

Bolivia, Geography. Retrieved at  http://reference.allrefer.com/world/countries/bolivia/geography.html . Accessed on 22 February, 2005

Nicholls, Peter. (Autumn, 2003) Bolivia, between a rock and a hard place. Capital and Class. Retrieved at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3780/is_200310/ai_n9324747/pg_3Accessed on 22 February, 2005
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Economic Development in Honduras A Banana War

Words: 2008 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90285447

Economic Development in Honduras: A Banana ar Legacy

An Analysis of Economic Development in Honduras from 1820 to Present

In many Latin American countries such as Honduras, the historical emphasis that has been placed on agriculture as a money industry for export purposes has resulted in the term, "banana republic" (Nash & Jeffrey 1994). Following their independence, most Latin American countries continued to depend on the export of raw materials for their revenue, rather than investing in an economic infrastructure that would provide value-added services, which only further contributed to this pattern of dependence on foreign states. This is largely what has taken place in the Republic of Honduras as well, and the country continues to suffer from sporadic and inequitable foreign investment, much of which has illegally diverted into private hands rather than infrastructure development. This paper provides an overview of the Republic of Honduras, an assessment of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bates, Stephen. (January 8, 1999). Good friends slip on a banana skin. New Statesman,

128(4418):23.

Befus, David R., Debbie L. Mescon, Timothy S. Mescon and George S. Vozikis. (1988).

International Investment of Expatriate Entrepreneurs: The Case of Honduras. Journal of Small Business Management, 26(3):40.
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Economic System of Mexico Mexico Which Is

Words: 2017 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2668196

Economic System of Mexico

Mexico, which is officially United Mexican States, is a country that is bordered by the United States, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea; elize and Guatemala; and the Pacific Ocean (Concise Columbia, 2000). The country's capital is Mexico City and its other main cities include

Guadalajara, and Monterrey.

Mexico's landscape is predominantly mountainous. While lowlands lie in the southeast and along the coasts, the heart of the country is the extensive Mexican plateau, with elevations generally above 4,000 feet.

Mexico's government consists of an executive, legislative and judicial ranch. The executive branch is ruled by the president and must rule according to the law. The legislative branch is in charge of the making of laws, and discussing the countries problems with other countries.

In Mexico, a new president is elected every six years by means of election. The current president is Vicente Fox. The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Concise Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia. Columbia University Press. 2000.

Mexico Economic Survey, OECD Paris, 1999.

Mexico's Historical Figures, http://www.mexconnect.com/mex_/history/mexicopeople.html, Mexico Connect, 1996-2000.

Krauze, E. Mexico: Biography of Power. Rutgers, 1999.
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Socially Constructed Geography

Words: 1925 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4034831

Social Geography

Socially Constructed Geography

As a society, humans by nature relate to the world and define norms by identifying with the environment around them. In America for example, the foundation for the society was built on idealisms that suggested that the first entrants into this society were pioneers, overcoming a vast wilderness and pristine landscape in order to build the foundation upon which modern society now reigns supreme. People by nature identify with social constructed realities that bring them together in a communal and socially responsible manner. In order to help civilians learn about society and social norms, it is often necessary to deconstruct and reconstruct the geographic landscape of a land to build a culture from a blank template.

Human beings have socially constructed the view that the landscape of this nation prior to discovery was naked, raw, virgin; basically one might conclude that it was a pristine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bogaards, Peter J. "The Underlying thinking of how people learn, acquire knowledge and understand." BogieLand Information. September 2003. {Online}. Available:  http://www.bogieland.com/postings/post_construct.htm 

Denevan, William M. "The Pristine Myth: The Landscape of the Americas in 1942." Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin. 2004.

Dicken, P. "The Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography." Economic Geography, Vol. 70, 1994

Hanson, S., Lawson, V., McDowell, L., Nagar, R. "Locating Globalization: Feminist readings of the subjects and spaces of globalization." Economic Geography, Vol, 78, 2002.
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Impact of Local Economic Development Initiatives

Words: 4311 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43161334

Local Economic Development Initiatives

THE IMPACT OF LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Concept of Sustainable ural Communities in Local Areas

The Concept of ural Development in Local Areas

The Concept of Endogenous Development Initiatives in Local areas

Transformation is key when it comes to local economic development initiatives. Ever since World War II economies in so many different rural areas have been faced with the rising harsh economic circumstances that have been threatening people's everyday existence. A lot of the situations that they are going through have a lot to do with depopulation resulting for the most part from low growth in job opportunities, out-migration, an aging population, underemployment rate, high unemployment and low family income, lack of socio-economic infrastructure ( shopping centers, health centers, schools, power and electric supply water supply,). esearch show that the rural economy in both developed and developing nations countries has also gone through a big…… [Read More]

References

Andolina, R. (2012). THE VALUES OF WATER: Development cultures and indigenous cultures in highland ecuador. Latin American Research Review, 21(12), 3-26,231,235.

Blignaut, J. & . (2011). The impact of water scarcity on economic development initiatives. Water S.A., 34(12), 123-145.

Cole, M.A. (2009). imits to growth, sustainable development and environmental kuznets curves: An examination of the environmental impact of economic development. . Sustainable Development, 12(4), 23-67.

Gordon, T.M. (2009). Bargaining in the shadow of the ballot box: Causes and consequences of local voter initiatives. Public Choice, 23(14), 45-56.
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EU and the Economic Development of Holland

Words: 1315 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73992054

global in nature. Economies, businesses and even individuals are now becoming more interconnected. What once were isolated events in a foreign country now have a rippling effect throughout the world. The recent financial crisis of 2008, indicates how countries are now becoming more dependent on each. Holland is no different in this regard. As a burgeoning economy, Holland boasts strong catalysts for future economic growth.

A strong incentive for investment in the Netherlands is its market economy. As a member of the EU the Netherlands has an average tariff rate of 1%. This bodes well for Holland as goods and services can freely and easily matriculate through the region. With low tariffs industries with comparable advantages will be better able to import or export their goods. The top two main exports from Holland are very price sensitive as it relates to international competition. Table 1 below presents the top four…… [Read More]

References

1. Hart, Jonathan (2008). Empires and Colonies. Polity. pp. 201 -- . ISBN 978-0-7456-2614-7.

2. Lambert, Audrey M. The Making of the Dutch Landscape: An Historical Geography of the Netherlands (1985); focus on the history of land reclamation

3. Meijer, Henk. Compact geography of the Netherlands (1985)

4. Riley, R. C., and G. J. Ashworth. Benelux: An Economic Geography of Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg (1975)
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Economic Systems Are Quite Complex

Words: 2096 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75693277

Plus, if the world is tied together economically, there is more impetus to prevent hyper-inflation, to help other countries in times of natural disaster, and to form a more humanitarian-based society. It seems that the idea of globalism was also assisted with new macro-trade agreements combine with the easy communications brought about because of the advances in cellular technology and the Internet. This rapid growth of the global economy affects modern economic development, stability, labor, and the environment in a dramatic way. Developing countries did not, in most cases, have the long tradition of the Industrial Revolution, so they are now trying to rapidly modernize; to build their economies in years or decades when it took the West centuries. This is in part due to the need for satisfaction of the populace, in part because of the way information is shared, and in part because on a regular basis, the…… [Read More]

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Geography on Political Cultural and Economic Development

Words: 994 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81771943

Geography on Political, Cultural, and Economic Development of Early Civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley

The focus of this study is the effect of geography on the political, cultural, and economic development of early civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley. The characteristic that Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley all have in common is that they were all river valleys. Therefore, the geography of these locations was very much alike and likewise their culture, political landscape, and economic development were all very much the same.

Statement of Thesis

The civilization of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley were highly affected by the geography of these regions, which resulted in rapid expansion, and growth of these civilizations and which affected the cultural, political, and economic environment of these areas of the world.

Mesopotamia & Egypt

What is known as the Urban revolution occurred in Mesopotamia and Egypt…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ancient Civilizations to 300 BC Introduction: The Invention and Diffusion of Civilization (2006) The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Retrieved from: http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/lecture_ancient_civ.htm

Guisepi, R.A. (nd) The Indus Valley and the Genesis of South Asian Civilization. Retrieved from:  http://history-world.org/indus_valley.htm
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Economic Social and Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Thailand

Words: 2817 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24347583

Tourism in Thailand

Economic, Social, Cultural and Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Thailand

Urban and rural tourism in Thailand accounts for around 7% of the total GDP. There are various factors, social, economic, environmental and cultural factors which affect the tourism industry in Thailand. Also, the rural tourism in Thailand needs more work. This report has some strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of Thailand's tourism industry. In the end, recommendations are given on how to improve the tourism industry in Thailand.

Thailand

Tourism in Thailand

Impact of Environmental, Economical, Social and Cultural Factors on Tourism in Thailand

Environmental Factors

Economical Factors

Social Factors

Cultural Factors

ural Tourism

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

ecommendations

Conclusions

eferences

Introduction

Tourism is one of the world's fastest growing industries, and this industry has been identified as a means of generating national income (Pender, & Sharpley, 2005). Thailand, a beautiful country at the heart…… [Read More]

References

Chon, K, Singh, A, & Mikula, J. (1993). Thailand's tourism and hotel industry. The Cornell hotel and restaurant administration quarterly, 34(3), 43-49.

Elliot, J. (1983). Politics, power, and tourism in Thailand. Annals of tourism research, 10(3), 377-393.

Forsyth, T, (2002). What happened on the "the beach"? social movements and governance of tourism in Thailand. International journal of sustainable development, 5(3), 326-337.

Gold, J, & Revill, G. (2004). Representing the Environment. Routledge, London
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Geography in the Middle East

Words: 1736 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62410766

There will always be terrorist organizations such as Hamas, it seems, but with the Palestinians and Israelis getting along diplomatically, it could lead to better relationships with other countries, as well, and it could lead to a much stronger unity between the countries in the Middle East. This should be a long-term goal of the peace process, to bring an end to tension throughout the entire region, so they can concentrate on other elements of society and government.

In conclusion, the oad Map for Peace in the Middle East still seems to be a long way from conclusion. Israel has stopped all construction in East Jerusalem, another are under contention in the peace process, and talks are still going on bi-weekly between the two parties (as of the end of February, at least). A lasting peace would bring a new decade of hope to the region, and a new peace…… [Read More]

References

Bush, George W. "Joint Understanding Read by President Bush at Annapolis Conference." WhiteHouse.gov. 2007. 9 June 2008. http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2007/11/print/20071127.html

Editors. "A Performance-Based Road Map to a Permanent Two-State Solution to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict." 2002. UN.org. 9 June 2008. http://www.un.org/media/main/RoadMap122002.html

Migdalovitz, Carol. "Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: The Annapolis Conference." 2007. U.S. Department of State. 2008. 9 June 2008.  http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/98093.pdf 

Rice, Condoleezza. "Press Conference." U.S. Department of State. 2008. 9 June 2008. http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2007/12/97945.htm
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Economic and Environmental Benefits of Short Sea Shipping

Words: 1828 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84089767

Sea Shipping Services in Europe

The study aims to identify the impact, benefits, and drawback of implementing a short sea shipping policy within Greece. Within the paper, arguments have been made for supporting the adoption of the policy, and there have been clear facts presented. The paper also attempts to make comparisons between the different modes of transport available with an aim to show how cost effective and environmentally friendly short sea shipping is to a country. The results presented are backed by previous research that has shown the impact of marine transportation and made comparisons with road or rail transportation.

Short Sea Shipping is defined as the movement of passengers and cargo by sea, between ports that have a shared coastline without crossing an ocean. Short seas shipping has been at the forefront of the European Union's transport policy mainly because it offers the potential to reduce road congestion…… [Read More]

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World Regional Geography

Words: 1755 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26051413

Geography

Questions On World Regional Geography

Generally speaking, African colonies during the colonial period were seen as expensive liabilities by the great European powers, especially in relation to trading concessions. Toward the end of the 19th century, the attitudes of these powers altered as rival industrial nations like Great Britain, Germany, France and Belgium, attempted to locate and develop overseas markets for their goods. In 1885, the Berlin Conference was convened to resolve conflicts of interest in Africa by allotting areas of exploitation to these colonial powers. As a result, the so-called "scramble for Africa" began in which these powers sought to establish their "rightful" claims to vast expanses of land.

When this conference was convened, most of Africa was under colonial control and was subsequently broken up into numerous states, made up of some fifty separate countries with very irregular geographical boundaries. One major problem linked to this break-up…… [Read More]

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History of Economic of the 4 Periods in Ancient Civilization

Words: 5166 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16341967

Economics in Ancient Civilization

It is said that "Rome was not built in a day." Indeed, the Roman Empire was the last of a series of civilizations to emerge in the Mediterranean by the First Millennium, B.C. Precursors to the culture most identified as the seat of estern political economy, the Ancient Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks, Syrians, Carthaginians and Phoenicians all had contact with the Romans, and eventually were incorporated through territorial expansion of the Empire in Asia Minor, Cyrenaica, Europe, and North Africa. Prior to the Roman period, Europe was primarily occupied by Barbarian tribes; societies where no written language, legal system or alternative mechanism of governance was in place. hen we discuss the advancement of Ancient civilizations, then, it is through the transmission of law, literacy and polity that we find source to retrospect on early economic forms. In Feinman and Nicholas (2004), Perspectives on Political Economies, the difficulties…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Buck-Norss, S. The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1991.

Benjamin, W.(1927). Das Passagen Werken. Notebooks.

Bitros, George C., and Anastassios D. Karayiannis. "Morality, institutions and the wealth of nations: Some lessons from ancient Greece." European Journal of Political Economy 26.1 (2010): 68-81.

Boyazoglu, J., I. Hatziminaoglou, and P. Morand-Fehr. "The role of the goat in society: Past, present and perspectives for the future." Small Ruminant Research 60.1/2 (2005): 13-23.
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How Geography Matters to Egypt Israel and Greece

Words: 1028 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34405124

Geography as a Determinant of History In Egypt, Israel and Greece

Geography is important in history. For an individual to properly examine and understand history, he/she must learn or understand geography. This implies that without geography, it is relatively difficult and nearly impossible to understand history given the role of geography in history. Actually, geography has shaped history in various diverse ways, which reflects its importance in understanding nations. The significance of geography in history is demonstrated in how it matters to Egypt, Israel, and Greece. The history of these countries is understood through geography, which played an important role in the formation of these nations. Apart from being an important aspect, there are various limits of geography as a determinant of history in Egypt, Israel, and Greece.

How Geography Matters to Egypt, Israel and Greece

As previously mentioned, the history of Egypt, Israel, and Greece was largely shaped by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chan, Michael J. "Egypt." Oxford Biblical Studies Online. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 15

Dec. 2015. .

Hicks, Derek. "Geography and the Early Greeks." Selinsgrove Area School District. Selinsgrove Area School District, 2013. Web. 15 Dec. 2015. .

Zank, Michael. "Israelite History in the Context of the Ancient Near East." Boston University.
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World Regional Geography

Words: 1682 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88229337

postindustrial transformation of the United States and Canada? What are its impact on the human geography of this realm?

The term "postindustrial transformation" can be thought of as the alteration of an area in response to an ending of the age of industry. This postindustrial age is dominated by the production and manipulation of information, technology, and highly skilled workers. This age indicates that the area manufactures and operates on a global scale, rather than retaining a framework of regional business interactions. The transformation that occurs in this postindustrial age is one in which new business and regions emerge, while older businesses and regions attempt to reinvent their concepts and ideas to appeal to the new global market. These alterations to human geography are accompanied by an alteration of the use of space, since technology advancements create the possibility of new ways to create and sustain space.

In terms of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Girhard, S. (2005). Chapter 2: Europe. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Alamo Community College database. Web site: http://www.accd.edu/sac/earthsci/sgirhard/1303.090/chap2.htm.

Lehner, B. (2003). Europe's Hydropower Potential Today and in the Future. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from the Institute for Applied Technologies database. Web site: http://www.iset.uni-kassel.de/abt/w3-w/projekte/europes_hydropower_bernhard.pdf.

Rodriguez, F. (2005). North America: The Post Industrial Transformation. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Delmar College. Web site: http://www.delmar.edu/socsci/Faculty/Rodriguez/pptlecture/PPTLECNAM.htm.

Vershbow, A. (2003). The Reflections of the U.S. Ambassador to Moscow on the U.S.-Russian Partnership. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Center for Defense Information. Web site:
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Water and Sustainability Economic Approaches

Words: 3130 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85679247

Although the Murray-Darling River covers only about 14% of Australia's irrigated land, 50% of Australia's sheep and 25% of Australia's cattle rely on this source. Also, 40% of the nation's rice crop and 80% of its canned fruit product relies on the Murray-Darling River Complex. In all, three-quarters of Australia's water comes from the Murray-Darling River (Hussainy, p. 205).

Of course there are conflicts when so much is at stake. For one, the river carries about 2.5 tons of sale into South Australia "every minute," Hussainy writes. Inflows of saline groundwater are attributable to the problem -- and also, the removal of "native vegetation" and irrigation causes the salt to become a problem. hen the native vegetation is replace with shallow rooted crops, it is bad ecologically. The authors say that "sustainable development ecology should be regarded as part of economics" but the "myopic view of technocrats" views ecology and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, F. Lee. "Water Markets and Traditional Water Values: Merging Commodity and Community Perspectives." Water International Vol. 22 (1997): 2-5.

Global Water Partnership / Technical Advisory Committee. "Integrated Water Resource

Management. TAC Background Papers No. 4.

Gopalakrishnan, Chennat, Tortajada, Cecilia, and Biswas, Asit K. Water Institutions: Policies,
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Economies Economic Growth in East

Words: 1700 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28201702

"Both the U.S. side and the Mexican side replicate the political, economic, social, and cultural systems of their respective nation-states. At the same time, borderlanders have blended the structures, institutions, and life expressions of the two societies to create something novel and entirely theirs -- the ambiente fronterizo, or borderlands milieu. Today the area stands as a prime example of binational interdependence, providing striking evidence of the trend toward closer ties among the world's nations and societies" (Martinez, 1994)

eferences

Coleman, M., 2005, U.S. Statecraft and the U.S. - Mexico Border as Security/Economy Nexus, Political Geography, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp. 185-209

Hackenberg, ., 1997, the U.S.-Mexico Borderland in Century XXI, Culture and Agriculture, Volume 19, Number 3

Longley, ., December 2004, Illegal Immigration Costs California Over Ten Billion Annually, About U.S. Government Info

Martinez, O.J., 1994, Human Interaction in the Texas - Mexico Borderlands, University of Arizona, http://www.humanities-interactive.org/borderstudies/text/essay.html. Ast…… [Read More]

References

Coleman, M., 2005, U.S. Statecraft and the U.S. - Mexico Border as Security/Economy Nexus, Political Geography, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp. 185-209

Hackenberg, R., 1997, the U.S.-Mexico Borderland in Century XXI, Culture and Agriculture, Volume 19, Number 3

Longley, R., December 2004, Illegal Immigration Costs California Over Ten Billion Annually, About U.S. Government Info

Martinez, O.J., 1994, Human Interaction in the Texas - Mexico Borderlands, University of Arizona, http://www.humanities-interactive.org/borderstudies/text/essay.html. Ast accessed on March 28, 2008
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World Geography and Economics

Words: 915 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91149918

Geography & Economics

Common Market of the South: "Mercado Comun Sur"

This work intends to explore Mercosur and understand the goals and objectives, economic significance as well as the advantages and disadvantages for the countries involved and to identify the method used in dispute resolution. Finally, to identify future plans and objectives of Mercosur.

Mercado Comun Sur" or, Common Market of the South in English, is a marketing structure composed of four Latin American Countrys who have through complementation agreements, a type of trade agreement, managed to find cohesiveness together. Argentina and razil have long been rivals in the world of trade. However, along with Uruguay and Paraguay established an environment of cohesive streamlined trade and the reward is having a competitive edge in today's volatile and troubled global market. Officially established in 1995, the Common Market of the South operates under the established guidelines of the Assuncion Treaty.

I.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Mercosur" [Online] available at http://www.falkland-malvinas.com/Detalle.asp?NUM=4296

EU Talks Deadline in Doubt" [Online] available at http://www.falkland-malvinas.com/about.asp?TEMA

Castilo. Marta R. (2004) "EU - Mercosur FTA: An Evaluation of the Vulnerability of Mercosur Imports" Chaire Mercosur" de Sciences Po [Online] available at http://chairemercosur.sciences-po.fr/discussion_papers/discussion_ paper_4.pdf

O'Keefe, Thomas Andrew "Dispute Resolution in Mercosur" [Online] available at http://www.mercosurconsulting.net/Articles/article10.html
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California Geography Fresno The Desert

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16494747

1). Ironically, these workers who feed others are often hungry themselves, even when they bring home some of the rejected crop they harvest to feed their families. A 2007 study of agricultural workers in the area found that nearly half (45%) met the criteria of food insecurity. 34% of respondents were food insecure without hunger while an additional 11% were food insecure with hunger (irth et al. 2007, p.1). "Nearly half (48%) of eligible respondents reported utilizing the food stamp program, which is comparable to 53% of eligible Fresno County residents. However, food stamp participation varies by season. hereas 55% of eligible respondents utilized the program in the winter, only 37% of eligible respondents did so in the summer. Many respondents interviewed during the summer believed they were not eligible for this program because they were working or earned too much" (irth et al. 2007, p.24). They had little or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fresno California. Greenwich Mean Time. February 29, 2009. November 29, 2009.

http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/time-zone/usa/california/fresno/index.htm

Drury, Pauline. "Fresno." Ancestry.com. November 29, 2009.

 http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hummingbird/Fresno-County/fresno_county.htm
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World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
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Postcolonial Geography Post-Colonial Geography Questions

Words: 2507 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16647719



Question 3:

In some regards, the idea of 'culture' is highly mutable and subject to widespread variations in characterization. Quite in fact, the concept of culture is highly implicated in the weaponzation of words that may be used by one nation to subjugate another. Ideas about how cultures interact, about which cultures are superior and indeed about whether or not the practices of some peoples should even be called 'cultures' have been subjected to rationalization as colonialist nations have subjugated various parts of the developing sphere. It is this understanding that inclines Said's (2002) perspective in "The Clash of Definitions."

Here, Said opposes the idea that there are distinct incompatibilities which persist between civilizations. Instead, he argues that this is the impression which has been foisted upon us by the shifting notions of what is meant by culture, particularly as this depends upon the perspective of hegemonic ethnic groups. This…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bederman, G. (1995). Manliness & Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bender, T. (2006). A Nation among Nations: America's Place in World History. New York: Hill & Wang:

Cabral, A. (1973). National Liberation and Culture. In Return to the Source: Selected Speeches of Amilcar Cabral. New York: Monthly Review Press: 39-56.

McClintock, A. (1995). Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. London: Routledge.
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Social Geography of the Los

Words: 1242 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3147336

57). This makes the idea that the minority communities that are using the community as a "springboard" for assimilation because there are less of the domestic non-Hispanic whites in the areas in which immigrants would typically assimilate.

There has even been the development of what is referred to as planned communities. Irvine California serves as a good example of such a development. Irvine was developed from ranch lands from a single developer that constructed "urban villages" in Orange County (Maher, 2004, p. 782). The particular site selected for this 1-997 study was in many ways a "typical" Irvine neighborhood. A planned community developed in the mid-1970s, Ridgewood comprised 246 single-family homes on a collection of cul-de-sacs connected by three public through streets: on average, residents were highly educated- 39% had graduate or professional degrees- and most of those who were employed worked in professional, managerial, technical, or sales positions (Maher,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maher, K. (2004). Borders and Social Distinction in the Global Suburb. American Quarterly, 781-806.

Zhou, M., Tseng, Y., & Kim, R. (2008). Rethinking Residential Assimilation: The Case of a Chinese Ethnoburb in the San Gabriel Valley, California. Amerasia Journal, 55-83.
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Environmental Economics

Words: 2913 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16139129

Environmental Economics

Economics and Nature Conservation

From early childhood, one is taught of the importance of the surrounding environment in all human activities. Forests for instance are crucial sources of fresh air and clean water, as well as raw commodities that support life. Nevertheless, mankind continues to trash the woodlands, and as such jeopardize the future of the next generations. In a context in which next to 5 million hectares of forests are lost on annual basis due to deforestations and fires, causing a multitude of environmental, economic and social effects, the global authorities must intervene to better regulate the sector.

The modern day individual is characterized by a myriad of features, such as the reduced time to cook and the obvious tendency to either eat out, either grab some fast food. Other elements refer to the increased pace of technological development, with which he has to keep up; the…… [Read More]

References:

Bratkovich, S., Gallion, J., Leatherberry, E., Hoover, W., Reading, W., Durham, G., Forests of Indiana: Their Economic Importance, United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,  http://na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/forestprod/indiana_forest04/forests_of_IN04.htm  last accessed on November 24, 2009

Burgees, P., Cheek, K.A., Policy Review

Johnson, K.N., Holthausen, R., Shannon, M.A., Sedel, J., Case Study

Nelson, J.E., Management Review
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Role of Tourism on Economic

Words: 1865 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49799367

2% of the total GDP and 2.9 in the employment; the proportions are expected to increase and are still considered relatively low in comparison to other countries, generally due to the tardy response of the Japanese authorities. "As the tourism market continues to grow steadily, tourism industry is expected to become the leading industry of Japan throughout the 21st century" (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 2002).

eferences

Balassa, B.A., Noland, M., 1988, Japan in the World Economy, Peterson Institute for International Economics

Cochrane, J., 2008, Asian Tourism, Elsevier Science and Technology Books

Hiroko, T., 2004, the Political Economy of eproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life, outledge

Hiroyuki, H., 2003, Between Preservation and Tourism: Folk Performing Arts in Contemporary Japan, Asian Folklore Studies, Volume 23

Hudman, L., Jackson, ., Essa, E., 2002, Geography of Travel and Tourism, 4th Edition, Cengage Delmar Learning

Ishikawa, N., Fukushige, M., 2006, Impacts…… [Read More]

References

Balassa, B.A., Noland, M., 1988, Japan in the World Economy, Peterson Institute for International Economics

Cochrane, J., 2008, Asian Tourism, Elsevier Science and Technology Books

Hiroko, T., 2004, the Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life, Routledge

Hiroyuki, H., 2003, Between Preservation and Tourism: Folk Performing Arts in Contemporary Japan, Asian Folklore Studies, Volume 23
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Disaster Recovery Economic Impact of

Words: 4492 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65796263

There is a modern emphasis, which has resulted from the experience of the economic impact of disaster, on a more extensive and 'distributed' mode of thinking about disaster recovery. This is an important factor that should be stressed as it has direct implications in terms of the economic aspects of disaster recovery planning in an increasingly networked and technologized contemporary working environment. This aspect is cogently expressed in a White Paper on this issue.

Many organizations have strong business recovery plans for their mainframe and mini-computer systems. but, as more and more critical applications are migrated to distributed systems, companies are becoming concerned about how they can protect these systems in the event of a disaster. Chances of a disaster increase significantly as systems are moved away from traditional central computer facilities that have hardened security and environmental controls.

(Disaster ecovery - a White Paper)

This emphasizes a cardinal issue…… [Read More]

References

Bielski, L. (2002). Thinking the Unthinkable: Often Dismissed as Mere "Insurance," Disaster Recovery Ought to Be Considered Part of the Lifeblood of Any Business. ABA Banking Journal, 94(1), 44+.

This article focuses on the subject of disaster management in the banking industry. It provides insight into actual situations where disaster recovery plans were effective in preventing large-scale economic loss. It also provides examples of what can occur when there is a poor or recovery plan. This is also a good background study that provides insight into the economic effects and implications of disaster in the it context.

Carlson, S.J., & Parker, D. (1998). Disaster Recovery Planning and Accounting Information Systems. Review of Business, 19(2), 10+.

This was a very useful article in that it provided an extensive and well written overview of issues surrounding disaster recovery and management. The article was particularly focused on the effects and implications in economic terms of the failure of disaster management planning. These aspects were compared to the effect of good and well thought out disaster planning.
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Nation's Economic Development Can Depend

Words: 2024 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96970881

Citizens in the region's poorest countries, Paraguay and Honduras, make just above $4,000 per year, while those in the wealthiest countries, Chile and Mexico, make almost $15,000. The institutional legacy in the region is one clouded by inequality and corruption. In its brief on the region, the World Bank emphasizes the role of institutional development to alleviate poverty among vulnerable groups, a result in part of the lasting legacy of inequality due to colonial influences.

Asia. This region ranges widely from very poor nations such as Nepal (GDPpc of $1,100) to very wealthy nations like ingapore ($51,600). Because colonial dominance of this region was carried out by a relatively few European settlers, it was ultimately incomplete, leaving many of the region's own institutions intact or enhanced. The World Bank's comments on how governments across the region are reacting to the recent economic turndown are in line with an expectation that…… [Read More]

Sources of Economic Growth in China, 1952-1998. Issues in Political Economy, Vol 17.

World Bank. (2009). Regional Briefs. www.WorldBank.org. December 13, 2009. Retrieved from  http://www.worldbank.org/ .

Appendix 1

Relation Between IPRI and GDP Per Capita by Region

Source: International Property Rights Index, 2009. (http://internationalpropertyrightsindex.org/UserFiles/File/ex4_9relationbtwniprigdpbyreg.pdf).
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Water Geography - Definitions -

Words: 2268 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15979937

They can also enable countries to become more self-reliant rather than relying on international sources of energy. In these five ways, dams may prove very beneficial to countries utilizing them.

Many cities that build dams take advantage of damns as a resource for tourism and revenues. Because dams often pose a majestic view, and provide the opportunity for recreation in the form of boating and camping, many cities use them as a secondary source of revenue. In this sense dams are positive because they attract commerce in cities that need additional capital or revenues. However, along with these advantages come some disadvantages or problems, discussed below.

Disadvantages

As with anything dams also have many disadvantages. For every five advantages dams provide, five disadvantages may be defined. For example, Qing & Sullivan (1999) note that while dams can stimulate economic growth and provide greater energy and power for a city, they…… [Read More]

References

EPA. (2006). Safe Water Drinking Act. Environmental Protection Agency, Retrieved October 16th, 2007: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/sdwa/index.html

Mayhew, S. (2004). A dictionary of geography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved October 16th, 2005:

 http://www.answers.com/topic/cloud-seeding?cat=technology 

University of Texas. (2005). Water surplus and deficit. UTexas.com. Retrieved October
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History Geography During the Beginning of Ancient

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14863458

History Geography

During the beginning of ancient times, Classical civilization still lived as hunters and gatherers. They used the resources available to them and learned to gather grains, berries, and other plant foods and store them for the winter. This required them to live where the geography and climate could support them, and where supplies of water were easily available. Early settlements clustered around rivers and streams for this reason. y the end of the Classical Era, The Roman Empire had fallen. European cultures had been influenced by Rome's accomplishments, however, and Europeans knew how to build aquifers to bring the water to them. They had learned to build both roads and bridges. They had tamed livestock and used them for transportation. y the Classical Era, many of geography's limitations had solutions. Thus people could live in villages, towns and cities, farm the surrounding countryside and transport it to where…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Garraty, John A., and Gay, Peter, Eds. The Columbia History of the World. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1999.
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Ngos Geography Groundwork and Initial Steps for

Words: 3166 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 263798

NGOs

Geography

Groundwork and Initial Steps

For this research and analytical paper, we have chosen to work as the members of a small NGO and conduct a research as an executive director of a small non-governmental organization that would utilize its funding of one million dollar donation by establishing its branch in Pakistan, a third world country in order to improve and strengthen the country's educational arena. In this phase, we first had to decide a third world country that actually deserved a good financial aid in the form of a million dollar donation to improve its educational facilities. I came up with Pakistan, because this is one country that unfortunately has one of the most appalling literacy rates and percentages. So, in order to solve the problem at hand that is to answer the question as to where invest the donation, I chose Pakistan. Since, we have twenty years…… [Read More]

References

Bryson, J.M. (1995). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

State of Education in Pakistan, Care. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.care.org.pk/pakistan_facts/state_of_education.htm

Coffman J. (1997). Private Higher Education in Pakistan: The Need for Order. Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/soe/cihe/newsletter/News09/text2.html

Ecotourism Society Pakistan (1999). Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Pakistan.
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PESTLE Analysis Macdonald's Step Analysis Technological Economic

Words: 1719 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17190169

PESTLE analysis?

MacDonald's STEP analysis

Technological

Economic

In this paper, we explore the concept of STEP analysis by means of illustration. We perform an elaborate STEP analysis of McDonald's, the world's fast food giant. This is then followed by a recommendation on what actions McDonald's can do in order to take care of the issues that have been exposed via the STEPanalysis.

McDonald's is a food and beverage franchise that by 2001 boasted of close to 28,700 outlets spread in 120 nations Karen,2005). The company's food outlets are very popular among the youth. It offers an environment which is perceived to be safe for families as they can enjoy quality food at an affordable price in a clean environment. The food chain offers its client a familiar environment that is characterized by a McDonald's clown as well as stunning interior worldwide as pointed out by Debres (2005). The company has…… [Read More]

References

Aswathappa, A (2006): International Business: Tata McGraw-Hill: p, 226

Barriaux, M (2007).McDonald's goes green - but not all customers are lovin' it. The Guardian

Greider, W (2003): Victory at McDonald's: The Nation: 277 (5): p, 8

Daniels, K (2010). PESTLE analysis  http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/pestle-analysis.aspx
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Homebuilding Industry the Industry Dominant Economic Features

Words: 3729 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6231972

Homebuilding Industry

The Industry Dominant Economic Features

Market Size and Rivals:

Pace of Process and Product Technology Change

Economies of Scale in Purchasing

PORTER'S FIVE FORCES

Industry Competitors

Threat of New Entrants

Substitutes

Suppliers

Buyers

THE DRIVERS OF CHANGE IN THE INDUSTRY AND THEIR IMPACT

Demographics

The Economy and Interest Rates

COMPANY POSITION

Centex Corporation

Horton

Pulte Homes

KEY SUCCESS FACTORS FOR COMPETITIVE SUCCESS

Understanding the Markets

Understanding Local Regulations

Reputation

INDUSTRY'S ATTRACTIVENESS, LONG-TERM PROFITABILITY AND CONCLUSION

HOMEBUILDING INDUSTRY

The homebuilding industry plays a major role in the United States economy, as a significant employer and cash generator. Each year the industry hires more than 3.5 million workers and the housing investment and consumption accounts for one-fifth of the United States' gross domestic product (GDP). Recent figures support the role of homebuilders as vital to the American way of life (AzPath). In 2001, the homebuilders were responsible for building 1,602,700…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AzPATH Research Series Report No. 03. Del E. Webb School of Construction. "Supply Chains in Residential Construction." 2.2. "Integrating the Supply Chain." December 2001. Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://construction.asu.edu/azpath/Documents/Reports/Report03.pdf.

Grey, Joseph. "Construction and Building Materials." Hoover's Online. 2001. Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://www.hoovers.com/industry/snapshot/profile/0,3519,14,00.html.

Handley, John. "Boomers Shun 'R' Word" May 18, 2003. Baltimore Sun www.sunspot.net.Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://www.nbnnews.com/NBN/issues/2003-05-26/bnc2c.html#5.

Hoover's Online. "Centex Corporation." 2003. Retrieved June 6, 2003 at http://www.hoovers.com/co/capsule/8/0,2163,10308,00.html.
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Growth of Tourism Capitalism as an Economic

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39468573

Growth of Tourism

Capitalism, as an economic system, is doing much of what democracy, as a political system could not. China has long been known as a communist country, but this truly applies to both political and economic policy, although the Marxist idea was originally economic. However, during the reign of Mao and the communists, the country sank deeper into poverty, and instead of being a world leader as it had been for centuries, it became a third world country. For the past three decades, the government in China has been slowly implementing economic reforms and these have been paying immense dividends. One of the most lucrative decisions made was that to allow tourism to begin again within the country. China has become a good example of what tourism can do for a failing economy, and how it can stabilize one that is emerging and volatile. The example China provided…… [Read More]

References

Bunten, A.C. (2010). More like ourselves: Indigenous capitalism through tourism. American Indian Quarterly, 34(3), 285-311.

Diaz-Guerra, B.B. (2008). New networks for the old paradise. Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, 9, 43-50.

Henken, T. (2000). Islands of capitalism in a sea of socialism: Cuban tourism and workers in the second economy. Retrieved from  http://lasa.international.pitt.edu/Lasa2000/Henken.PDF 

Ketter, W.B. (2008, Sept 17). Vietnam today: Capitalism, tourism and technology draw country out of past. Cumberland Times-News. Retrieved from http://times- news.com/archive/x1540433642
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American Dialects Geography in Linguistic

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34607933

Thus, when it comes to vowels, this short comparison led me to believe the southern dialect uses longer, more rounded, looser vowels than the inland North dialect.

Consonant sounds also differ between the two regions; or perhaps it is more accurate to note that consonants are used in different ways in the southern and inland northern areas of the United States. Take, for instance, the word "white." While I pronounce this word with a defined, voiced [j] sound at the end, the southern speaker allows it to conclude by lengthening the [a] vowel, as in father. This difference leads to southern words sounding softer and more rounded than the hard, tight edges of Northern words. Although there is a great deal of bias regarding the Southern dialect in the United States today, with some saying it sounds uneducated, listening to the features alone reveal it as a beautiful, if different,…… [Read More]

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Effect of Electoral Rules and Socio Economic Changes

Words: 736 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94096540

Electoral ules and Socio-Economic Changes on Elections and Winners Thereof

One should never be deceived to think or imagine that electoral rules are mere formalities. These rules have a major influence on the choices that voters make during an election in a democratic set up. Electoral rules can be defined as a set of rules that determine who votes, who vies and how votes are cast for representation at the various levels and how such votes are translated to electoral seats in such assemblies. Therefore, it is clear from the definition that electoral rules and systems are only part of a wider structure commonly referred to as electoral regulations. Electoral systems discussions tend to exclude other aspects such as the right to vote, transparency and fairness elements (Vampa).

Voting behavior and attitudes are influenced by socio-economic factors. Therefore, social groups exhibit differences in voting patterns. Some patterns are age-old but…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. "Voting Behavior." 2012.  https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/instructors/setups2012/voting.jsp . Accessed 26 October 2016.

Htun, Mala and Powell, Bingham, G. Jr. "Task Force on Political Science, Electoral Rules, and Democratic Governance." September 2013. American Political Science Association.  http://www.apsanet.org/electoralrules . Accessed 26 October 2016.

Vampa, Davide. "What impact, if any, does the electoral system have on the shape of the party system?" 2016. Academia.  https://www.academia.edu/4137776/What_impact_if_any_does_the_electoral_system_have_on_the_shape_of_the_party_system . Accessed 26 October 2016.
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Gender Sexuality Economics and Sociology

Words: 2266 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85328477

Latin American woman who is interested in a cultural studies program. This has not changed, and in fact, this course has helped me to deepen my understanding of diversity and helped me to understand more about gender roles and norms from a cross-cultural perspective. I have learned that there are no universal constants, and that even within cultures there can be a great diversity of experience as we saw with Monday's Girls and the difference between Florence and Azikiye. Likewise, the differences between the rich and poor gay men in Manila shows how even within the same culture, there can be a great variety of experiences and points-of-view. The most difficult concept for me as I continue my studies will be cultural relativism or ethical relativism. It is difficult to withhold judgments, especially when we believe that a way of life or worldview is harmful. On the one hand, there…… [Read More]

References

Cairoli, M.L. "Factory as Home and Family."

"Gender and the Global Economy." Chapter 11.

Response One: Liam

It is true that capitalism has generally benefitted the "owners of the means of production," as Marx had put it. Since the age of imperialism, Western Europe has been exploitative. More specifically, the men in positions of power have exploited laborers. This is as true for men as for women. Capitalism has allowed for tremendous innovations and greater overall productivity, but it has resulted in anomie and a detachment between the labor and the finished product. Few workers have shareholding capacities in the companies they work for, creating a system in which the laborer who creates the product does not share in the fruits of the very work that he or she performs.
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Large Scale Restructuring Has Taken Place in

Words: 1544 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67659632

Large scale restructuring has taken place in major urban centers of the worldthat included London, Singapore, San Francisco, Vancouver, and may more. 'Inner city' assumes much importance in the regional economics as the impact of globalization and rapid transformation in land use occur at inner parts of these cosmopolitan cities. "The New Economy of the Inner City: Restructuring, Regeneration and Dislocation in the 21st Century Metropolis" by Thomas A. Hutton addresses the critical issues of place and process in the development of 'new economies' in postindustrial cities. Thesis agenda of the book asserts that restructuring initiatives in cosmopolitan cities, specifically London, have enabled the emergence of creative enterprises in the 'new inner city' and thus has dislocated traditional industrial and manufacturing oriented regional economy (Hutton, 2009). Urbanization, migration, policy shifts in land use, restructuring initiatives, clustering of industries, and change in production-consumption has transformed the 'inner city economy'. The book…… [Read More]

Bibliography

DaCosta, M.N. (2010). A Review of "The New Economy of the Inner City: Restructuring, Regeneration and Dislocation in the Twenty-First-Century Metropolis." Journal of the American Planning Association, 76(4), 521-522.

Graham, S., & Marvin, S. (2001). Splintering Urbanism, Networked infrastructures, technological motilities and the urban condition. Journal of Urban Technology, 9(3), 109-113.

Hutton, T. (2008).The new economy of the inner city: restructuring, regeneration and dislocation in the 21st century metropolis. London: Routledge.

Hutton, T.A. (2006). Spatiality, built form, and creative industry development in the inner city. Environment and Planning, 38(10), 1819-1841.
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Opportunity Costs How a College Education Increases

Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93810342

Opportunity Costs

How a college education increases one's human capital

It is a universal belief that a more educated workforce leads to an incredible human capital. Therefore, the thought of retaining higher educated graduates is important towards regions and cities maintaining competition among themselves. This eventually leads to technological and economic growth. While there has been a compilation of data from many regions and states in educational achievement, there also exist relentless research studies showing the impact universities and collage have (Frank, 2005).

A study by New York federal bank published in their Economic Geography journal in 2011 demonstrates that universities and colleges increase Human Capital in their regions. Utilizes educations Department data as from 1999 down to 2000 and also 2006 shows the magnitude of volume of college degrees attained in metropolitan regions. It also makes use of survey by American Community's data in estimating levels of human capital…… [Read More]

Reference

Frank, R.H. (2005). The Opportunity Costs of Economics Education. The New York Times. Retrieved February 18, 2011 from:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/01/business/01scene.html
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Globalization Plays a Major Role in the

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20356971

Globalization plays a major role in the economy and sociology today. It is important to understand what globalization is, how the world-systems theory explains inequalities between different parts of the world, and what is meant by core, semiperiphery and periphery. It is also important to understand the relevance of the history of European colonialism.

Defining Globalization

Globalization "describes the increased mobility of goods, services, labor, technology and capital throughout the world. Although globalization is not a new development, its pace has increased with the advent of new technologies, especially in the area of telecommunications (www.canadianeconomy.gc.ca/english/economy/globalization.html)."

orld-Systems Theory

The development of the world system served to "increase trade in the 15th and 16th century; led to the colonialization of the Americans with the extraction of gold and silver, conquest and slave labor; and created the plantation economy in the Americas and South-East Asia with a monocrop production to supply Europe (www.clas.ufl.edu/users/bkimura/worldsystemfall.htm)."…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cefalu, Paul A. Rethinking the Discourse of Colonialism in Economic Terms:

Shakespeare's The Tempest, Captain John Smith's Virginia Narratives, and the English

Response to Vagrancy. Shakespeare Studies. (2000): 01 January.

(Development of the World System. (accessed 04 February, 2005).
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Systemic Risk Management in the

Words: 1514 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56822843

Real time information needs to be synthesized with traditional balance sheet approaches in order that regulators and industry leaders have a better sense of the systemic risk in the system. Measuring risk is the first step. Beyond that, risk management systems must be implemented. These have not changed much lately -- they still focus on liquidity and portfolio diversification. Derivative instruments in particular run the risk of distorting the finances of banks because of their leverage. On the systemic level, then, finding ways to curtail the enthusiasm for these instruments is the best course of action. hether this means an increase in direct agency intervention or whether it means a reversal of the too big too fail policy that encourages risk-taking behavior is subject for further study and consideration.

orks Cited:

Huang, X; Zhou, H. & Zhu, H. (2009). A framework for assessing the systemic risk of major financial institutions.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Huang, X; Zhou, H. & Zhu, H. (2009). A framework for assessing the systemic risk of major financial institutions. Journal of Banking and Finance. Vol. 33, 11, 2036-2049.

Kaufman, G. (1996). Bank failures, systemic risk and bank regulation. Cato Journal. Vol. 16, 1. Retrieved December 4, 2009 from http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cj16n1-2.html

Hendricks, D., Kambhu, J. & Mosser, P. (2006). Systemic Risk and the Financial System. Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Retrieved December 4, 2009 from https://www.newyorkfed.org/registration/research/risk/background.pdf
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Deindustrialization in the Rust Belt

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52745716

Deindustrialization

When an urban area undergoes deindustrialization there are several things that happen to the urban and social geography. In general, there is often a transition from an industrial economy to a service economy, which has significant socioeconomic implications. While it has been argued that deindustrialization has done little to change the basic disparities between core and periphery in the global economy, this argument is not entirely true. While it is true that industrialized nations have mostly been able to transition to a post-industrial economy, there has also been a transfer of wealth from those nations to newly-industrialized nations. eal wages in many Western nations have stagnated, while they are increasing rapidly in many parts of the developing world, reducing disparities.

It should also be noted that deindustrialization and the move to the service economy is not necessarily done on even terms geographically. Some formerly-industrialized areas have struggled with this…… [Read More]

References

Bluestone, B. (2013). Detroit and deindustrialization. Dollars & Sense. Retrieved November 10, 2014 from http://dollarsandsense.org/archives/2013/0913bluestone.html

Hobor, G. (2012). Surviving the era of deindustrialization: The new economic geography of the urban Rust Belt. Journal of Urban Affairs. Vol. 35 (4) 417-434.

Russo, J. & Linkon, S. (no date). The social costs of deindustrialization. Youngstown State University.
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Kinder Togs Has Been an

Words: 483 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83803127

To completely retool our image is a daring act on the part of the company, but the executive management team is confident that this is the best step to take, albeit untraditional (Maclachlan 130).

Appendix I

Bibliography

Hisey, Pete. "Marketing support for lifestyle merchandising - K mart's Fresh New Face."

Discount Store News. 17 Dec. 1990: 1-4.

Maclachlan, Ian. "Plant Closure and Market Dynamics: Competitive Strategy and Rationalization." Economic Geography 68.2 (1992): 128-142.

Pennington, April. "Designer Babies: Munchkin Couture Is All the Rage With Hip

Parents." Entrepreneur. Sept. 2005: 1.

Outline

Situation Analysis

Objectives

Company Strengths

Management style

Loyal employees

Slow, steady marketing

Long-term existence

Relationship with wholesalers

Established plants

Established distribution channels

Company Weaknesses

Military style technique

Developing trendy atmosphere in traditional New England

Cost of living increases by unions

Risk of radical makeover

Opportunities

Regain #1 rating

Secure future

Higher profit

Diverse product line

Freshness of product

Good…… [Read More]

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Globalization Fostered by Free Flow of Information

Words: 1644 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35048602

Globalization, fostered by free flow of information and rapid progress in technology, is a driving force that no country can turn back. It does impose market discipline on the participants which can be harsh, but is the mechanism that drives progress and prosperity. Globalization emerged as a buzzword in the 1990s but the phenomena it refers to are not entirely new. As a ubiquitous term, what does "globalization" mean? Some observers emphasize the rapid and free flow of capital as the essential element. Others emphasize labor-that capital flows to where labor is highly productive while relatively cheap, that different parts of the production process can be performed in various far flung places by multiple sources of labor, and that workers themselves move within and between nations often and more easily.

According to Micklethwait and Wooldridge there are "three engines" driving globalization today. The first of those three engines is technology.…… [Read More]

References

Bowring, Philip. Thinking at Cross-Purposes About Globalization., International Herald Tribune, 02-01-2001.

Godfrey, B.J. 1984. Inner-City Revitalization and Cultural Succession: The Evolution of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury District. Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 46: 79-91.

1985. Ethnic Identities and Ethnic Enclaves: The Morphogenesis of San Francisco's Hispanic Barrio. Yearbook of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers 11: 45-53.

Godfrey, Brian J., Urban development and redevelopment in San Francisco. (California). Vol. 86, The Geographical Review, 07-01-1997, pp 309(25).
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Culture Is Playing on International Business This

Words: 2607 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94473161

culture is playing on international business. This is accomplished by comparing cultural traditions of elgium and South Africa using Arcelor Mittal. Once this occurs, is when we are able to understand how the firm is able to utilize these factors to give them an advantage in the global marketplace.

Over the last several years, globalization has been having profound impact on firms. What has been happening is corporations, have been seeking out those areas that can provide them with the lowest costs. This is part of an effort to increase productivity and their overall profit margins. As a result, a variety of different firms have been establishing operations around the world to deal with these underlying challenges. Evidence of this can be seen by looking no further than the fact that 47% of American and European companies are outsourcing some aspect of their operations. (Sears, 2009) This is important, because…… [Read More]

Bibliography

About. (2011). Arcelor Mittal. Retrieved from: http://www.arcelormittal.com/index.php?lang=en&page=9

Belgium. (2011). CIA World Fact Book. Retrieved from:  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/be.html 

Belgium. (2011). KWI Essential. Retrieved from:  http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/belgium-country-profile.html 

Financial Highlights. (2010). Arcelor Mittal. Retrieved from: http://www.arcelormittal.com/rls/data/upl/658-4-0-ARC_FB10.pdf
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Demographics and World Commerce the

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33395850

That completely changes commercial patterns because customization becomes not special but standard. On the other hand, because reaching these markets of one is so direct and precise, it eliminates the waste involved in mass marketing. There is no need to send sales forces out in cars, or to waste untold hours cold-calling, in theory.

That, of course, raises one of the most significant advantages of the current trend toward increasingly technological sales and fulfillment to increasingly highly identified markets; less environmental damage. Granted, it may be that a buyer in Singapore wants an item only created in Istanbul, so shipping is involved. On the other hand, it is likely, applying Moore's Law to commerce as well as technology, that before long, mini-factories will spring up across the globe to fulfill desires close to the locus of their creation. It will be demanding: Marketers in such a commercial environment "will have…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, a. And J. Hagel III. 1995. Real profits from virtual communities. The McKinsey Quarterly 3, 127. Retrieved 24 May 2005 from www.questia.com.

Armstrong, a.G. And J. Hagel III. 1997. Expanding markets through virtual communities, McKinsey Quarterly 1, 140+. Retrieved 24 May 2005 from www.questia.com.

Beck, J.C. And P.D. Lynch. 2001. Profiles of Internet buyers in 20 countries: Evidence of region-specific strategies. Journal of International Business Studies 32(4), 725+. Retrieved 24 May 2005 from www.questia.com.

Goss, J. 1995. 'We know who you are and we know where you live': The instrumental rationality of geodemographic systems. Economic Geography 71(2), 171+. Retrieved 24 May 2005 from www.questia.com.
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Globalization the Intent of This

Words: 1581 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59953415



In summary, globalization is essential for global economies to continually grow. Protectionism is allegorical to a person going on strike and not working; it is imperative for nations to not pursue this strategy and instead realize that each of them competes on a global playing field every day. While the critics of globalization voice their fears, they need to realize that the many aspects of competing globally have been in existence within economic systems for centuries, and that the gauntlet of efficiency and ability to respond quickly and accurately to customer's needs, no matter where they are, is the gauntlet any company must pick up if they hope to survive in the 21st century.

eferences

Friedman, (1999) - the Lexus and the Olive Tree. Anchor Press. May 2, 1999. New York, NY

Friedman, T. (2005) - the World Is Flat. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. New York, NY. Published 2005

Geert…… [Read More]

References

Friedman, (1999) - the Lexus and the Olive Tree. Anchor Press. May 2, 1999. New York, NY

Friedman, T. (2005) - the World Is Flat. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. New York, NY. Published 2005

Geert Hofstede (1983). The cultural relativity of organizational practices and theories. Journal of International Business Studies (pre-1986), 14(000002), 75. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 83259133).

Hall, Peter V (2005). Globalizing L.A.: Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development. Economic Geography, 81(3), 329-330. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 884511621).
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Entrepreneurial Leadership Styles - Comparative

Words: 13285 Length: 48 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37823170

As a result, economic development was redefined in terms of reduction or elimination of poverty, inequality, and unemployment within the perspective of a growing economy (Mamede & Davidsson, 2003).

Research indicates that entreprenuership can be both the cause and effect of economic development in the sense of wealth distribution. Countries in which wealth is concentrated in the hands of a small fraction of the population face greater difficulties in coordinating the major components of progress (Mamede & Davidsson, 2003). hese three components are labor, capital, resources and innovation. According to Mamede and Davidsson (2003), considering that the three driving forces of entrepreneurial success - founders, opportunity recognition, and resource requirements - are more likely to occur in a combined way, there are better chances to prosper in regions in which wealth is more equitably distributed. hese researchers have also observed that members of such societies are in a more favorable…… [Read More]

The 2002 GEM report also indicates the changes in the percentile of the growth of gross domestic products over a three-year period. Sweden's percentile of growth in gross domestic products for 1999 was 4.51%, in 2000, 3.61%, and in 2001, 1.21%. The change from the previous year for Sweden was -.90% from 1999 to 2000, and -2.40% from 2000 to 2001. Sweden's total entrepreneurial activity for 2001 was 6.68%, and for 2002, 4.00%. China's statistics were not located on the 2002 GEM report.

The GEM report also indicated a constantly negative relationship between the quality of the infrastructure and the level of necessity entreprenuership, as well as the lack of relationship between framework conditions (Reynolds et.al, 2002). Necessity entreprenuership was most prevalent in developing nations such as Thailand, India and China, where financial support, education, training, and infrastructure are clearly absent (Reynolds et.al, 2002). Entreprenuership-enhancing programs and policies implemented in a number of developed countries, principally in the European Union, have only resulted in modest levels of necessity entreprenuership (Reynolds et.al, 2002). This research indicates that there is substantial uniformity across the GEM countries with regard to the concepts, language, and judgments utilized. Additionally, it supports the notion that this uniformity is especially prominent among the more developed nations and may have evolved very similar infrastructures in support of entrepreneurial activity.

Most new firms receive their initial financial support from informal investments made by family, friends, and associates. An extremely small proportion of the most promising firms receive funding from venture capital firms, which are a specialized form of formal investment. Informal flows were estimated in the 2002 GEM report by means of asking all those in the adult population surveys if they had made an investment in a new firm, not their own, the past three years. The 2002 GEM report indicates the amount of venture capital invested as a percent of gross domestic product for each of the countries on the report. Nations that enjoyed year-to-year increases included Sweden, with a 101% increase. A large portion of all businesses are owned and managed by families or groups of relatives. Sweden was one of the 10 countries in which family owned businesses were started with family sponsored entreprenuership. In Sweden, the low estimate of family sponsored entrepreneurships was 26%, with the high estimate being 52%. Again, China was not included in these statistics.
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Technological Progress Ever Overcome Scarcity

Words: 3016 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29163652



Levine also notes that the result of the government patchwork of funding is that private firms jump into the technological progress market, with even worse economic results. "Private firms focus their research efforts according to short-term, market-driven priorities, motives which often contradict long-term sustainable development and economic growth" (Levine 1998 675). Result=inequality/scarcity.

Further, Levine (1998 675) notes that large academic institutions that are more likely to consider long-term concerns are put in the position of directing national innovation systems; please see above for the problems inherent in that (turf wars).

Despite all that, Levine does still believe technological progress is the answer to scarcity, at least in environmental arenas. Levine notes that "As far back as 1911, Joseph A. Schumpeter integrated innovation into economic development theory by showing a positive correlation between involvement in a commercial transaction and the generation of new products, devices or systems" (1998 675). But in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bakker, Karen J. "Privatizing Water, Producing Scarcity: The Yorkshire Drought of 1995" Economic Geography 76.1 (2000): 4. Questia. 3 Dec. 2004 .

Caselli, Francesco. 'Technological Revolutions." American Economic Review 89.1 (1999): 78-102.

Clark, Charles M.A. 'Wealth and Poverty: On the Social Creation of Scarcity." Journal of Economic Issues 36.2 (2002): 415+. Questia. 3 Dec. 2004 .

Dosi, Cesare, and K. William Easter. "Market Failure and Role of Markets and Privatization in Alleviating Water Scarcity." International Journal of Public Administration 26.3 (2003): 265+. Questia. 3 Dec. 2004 .
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What Has Led to the Change in Custom Jewelry in Last 5 Years

Words: 13278 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23005687

Change

This study analyzes outsourcing trends in the next decade. The study assesses this by focusing on the past and current trends, problems and issues in outsourcing via semi-structured interviews. Major trends and processes will be revealed and assessed for their relevancy, depth and breadth.

Companies belonging to most industries are very much considered to be the units that are vertically integrated, or so-called usual industrial firms (Stigler, 1951), where activities in all links in value chain have been internally conducted. For example, gasoline of its own is delivered by 7-Eleven and it is also used to make ice and candy, also it had cows for producing milk which it previously used to sell (Gottfredson et al., 2005). At present, it is not delivering gasoline and ice or candy is not being made by it neither does it posses any cows. Contrarily, IBM used to make the computers containing their…… [Read More]

References

Adams, R.J., 2002. Retail pro-tability and sweatshops: a global dilemma. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 9, 147-153.

Alexander, C., 1964. Notes on the Synthesis of Form. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.

Alexander, M., Young, D., 1996b. Outsourcing: where is the value? Long-Range Planning 29 (5), 728-730.

Ashkenas, R., Ulrich, D., Jick, T., Kerr, S., 1995. The Boundaryless Organization. Breaking the Chains of Organizational Structure. Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco.
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Colombia Gold Colombian Gold Mining

Words: 1956 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20640569

Spiegel & Velga (2010) report that a new international effort is underway to regulate the diffusion of mercury into the environments contextualizing mining operations. According to Spiegel & Velga, the world community has recently developed a set of International Guidelines on Mercury Management in Small-Scale Gold Mining. As Spiegel & Velga report, "commissioned by the United Nations Global Mercury Project, the purpose of the guidelines is to assist policymakers, practitioners, researchers, miners and the public in developing strategies for reducing mercury use, eliminating major pollution point sources and reducing risks." (p. 375)

This points to the worldwide interests that are implicated by the current conflict between miners and environmental advocates in Colombia, which over the course of the country's gold-mining boom, has become a template-setter for how national and world governments must balance mounting economic opportunity with the threat of environmental destruction.

orks Cited:

AFP. (2010). Deep in Colombian Jungle,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

AFP. (2010). Deep in Colombian Jungle, a First in Eco Gold. The Independent.

Angenent, M. (2010). Artisanal Gold Mining in Colombia Co-Creating a Sustainable Future. Fair Jewelry Action.

Associated Press (AP). (2010). Colombia Shuts 18 Gold Mines. Straits Times.

Colombian Solidarity Campaign (CSC). (2007). Gold Mining in Colombia; Cauca Assembly in Resistance. Colombia Solidarity.
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Diversification in Small and Medium Enterprises

Words: 2100 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10951417

Diversification in Small and Medium Enterprises

Adjustment and enewal in the Aftermath of the Iraq War: A Case Study of Strategic and Functional Orientation for Diversification in a SME

In this chapter, discussion will further explore how National United Group's (NUG) location decisions and its position in an industrial cluster are critical to understanding its strategic orientation, and also the design, implementation, and outcome of its diversification strategies in the post Iraqi war period. The results of the study are discussed as they relate to the theoretical models and framework examined in the literature review. This section addresses the findings related to the fundamental questions asked of study participants, NUG managers and NUG employees, and the findings related to the examination of archival information.

The chapter discussion is organized according to the frameworks and theoretical models that were introduced in the literature review, and discussion explicitly refers to the questions…… [Read More]

References

1. Bagchi-Sen, Sharmistha and Kuechler, Linda. Strategic and Functional Orientation of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises in Professional Services: An Analysis of Public Accountancy. Service Industries Journal, July 2000, Vol. 20, 3, pp. 117-146.

2. Carter, Nancy M. Small Firm Adaptation: Responses of Physicians' Organizations to Regulatory and Competitive Uncertainty. Academy of Management Journal, June 1990, Vol 33, 2, pp. 307-333.

3. Chapman, Keith, MacKinnon, Danny and Cumbers, Andrew. Adjustment or renewal in regional clusters? A study of diversification amongst SMEs in the Aberdeen oil complex. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers. September 2004, Vol. 29, 3, pp.382-396.

4. Morgan, Neil A., Kaleka, Anna and Katsikeas, Constantine S. Antecedents of Export Venture Performance: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Assessment. Journal of Marketing, Jan. 2004, Vol. 68, 1, pp. 90-108.
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Business Organizational Behavior Theory and

Words: 2417 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45459971



In this context, the learning curves followed by the collective of entrepreneurs place that collective of entrepreneurs within the still larger setting of the global marketplace. Taylor and Asheim refer to an economic geography that is more than merely a map of where economic activities take place (Taylor & Asheim, 2001, p. 315). A modern learning organization integrates itself on virtually every conceivable level. Much as its individual members make use consciously and unconsciously of a variety of learning techniques in order to work together as a unit, so too do all of their learning paradigms combine to make them a single, effective player on a larger global stage.

Taylor and Asheim encourage firms to immerse themselves in the concept of economic geography, to complete, as it were, the learning curve, by employing their cognitive abilities vis-a-vis the global marketplace, and so use that marketplace as a source for policies…… [Read More]

References http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009563626

Chen, G. (2005). Management Practices and Tools for Enhancing Organizational Learning Capability. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 70(1), 4+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002492408

Chrisman, J.J., Chua, J.H., & Steier, L.P. (2002). The Influence of National Culture and Family Involvement on Entrepreneurial Perceptions and Performance at the State Level. Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice, 26(4), 113+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5011099975