Ecosystem Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Forests and Fens

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23474565

Ecosystems

Exploitation

Forests have long been exploited. They are harvested for their timber, or cleared for agricultural land, both activities being entirely destructive to the ecosystem. The fen exists typically within the forest, and is not usually subject to exploitation until the forest itself is, because the forest acts as a natural barrier for the fen. The destruction of forests for timber is arguably the lesser of the two forms of exploitation, at least in countries with active silviculture programs, as the forests will have the potential to regenerate. However the destruction of forest ecosystems is associated with several negative outcomes. The biodiversity of the forest system is reduced, and this effect is stronger the more forest is cleared. Destruction for agriculture is permanent, which means that the loss of biodiversity is permanent. Endemic and endangered species are rendered extinct, or their numbers reduced (Chediack, 2008).

Fenland is often exploited…… [Read More]

References

Breward, N. (2003). Heavy-metal contaminated soils associated with drained fenland in Lancashire, England, UK, revealed by BGS Soil Geochemical Survey. Applied Geochemistry. Vol. 18 (11) 1663-1670.

Chediack, S. (2008). The effect of forest exploitation on structure, diversity, and floristic composition of palmito-dominated Atlantic forests at Misiones, Argentina. Rev. Bio. Trop. Vol 56 (2) 721-738.

Fredeen, A. (2007) . Climate change and the mountain pine beetle. University of Northern British Columbia. Retrieved April 27, 2015 from http://www.unbc.ca/releases/2007/climate-change-and-mountain-pine-beetle

Sasaki, N. & Putz, F. (2009). Critical need for new definitions of forest and forest degradation in global climate change agreements. Conservation Letters. Vol. 2009, 1-7.
View Full Essay

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Words: 3470 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19913828

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Modern day examples of human modification of an ecosystem

Module 01 Question 01: Preservation of the existing ecosystems

Various measures have been put in order to modify and contain the natural state of the ecosystem. Preservation is one of the approaches that have been used to foster equitable management of the ecosystem. Through preservation, it has become evident that the ecosystem has taken a different understanding from the avenue of human perception. For instance, rules and regulations that help to protect the ecosystem have changed the entire perception of the ecosystem globally. Initially before the establishment of preservation approaches, the ecosystem was getting devastated gradually. Nonetheless, modification has come with the introduction of laws and regulations that work towards protection and preservation of the available avenues in the market.

Through the rules and regulations created, the ecosystem has achieved a new state of protection in…… [Read More]

References

Callan, S., & Thomas, J.M. (2010). Environmental economics & management: Theory, policy, and applications. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.

Corwin, J. (2009). 100 heartbeats: The race to save earth's most endangered species. New York, NY: Rodale.

FAO/IRRI Workshop on Judicious and Efficient Use of Insecticides on Rice, International

Rice Research Institute. & Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
View Full Essay

Technology and Global Exosystem

Words: 2489 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32847362

Technology and Global Ecosystem

An Analysis of the Implications of Technology and the Global Ecosystem

The 21st century promises to usher in innovations in technology that cannot yet be imagined, and the advancements to date have provided many in the world with unprecedented standards of living. Improved methods of transportation and communication, combined with more leisure time than ever in which to spend it has resulted in many people developing a keen appreciation for technology and what it promises for mankind; an unfortunate concomitant of these innovations in many parts of the world, though, has been an intensive assault on the globe's ecosystem in an effort to bring emerging nations into line with the productivity being experienced in the developed nations of the world. As a result, a debate over whether or not technology threatens the integrity of the global ecosystem has emerged in recent years, and pundits warn that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anton, Philip S., James Schneider and Richard Silberglitt. The Global Technology Revolution:

Bio/Nano/Materials Trends and Their Synergies with Information Technology by 2015.

Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 2001.

Bjornerud, Marcia. (1997). "Gaia: Gender and Scientific Representations of the Earth." NWSA
View Full Essay

Fate of Carbon in a

Words: 4902 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48440011



The fact is that numerous rooted macrophyte structures are not full of naturally strong and healthy particles and sediments and nutrients. It is because of the restriction or absence of these particles, sediments and nutrients that the study of these systems has not been as extensive and thorough as the concentration on the terrestrial structures when understanding the fate, sources and sinks of Co2 levels in the ecosystems and the plants structures (e.g., Drake and Leadley 1991). Researchers assert that "rooted macrophyte systems can be sources of CO2, Chapter 4 and other gases through microbial processing of organic matter in the sediments and direct emission from leaves" (Delaune et al. 1990).

Table 1. Total net primary production (NPP) from world systems (Modified from Valiela, 1984)

Area

NPP

Tot. NPP1

% of Total

% of Total

106 km2

gC m-2 y-1

X106mTC y-1

System

Global

Marine System:

Open Ocean

46

15,355…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abel K.M. (1984) Inorganic Carbon Source for Photosynthesis in the Seagrass Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb.) Aschers. Plant Physiology 76, 776-781.

Adam, P. 1990. Saltmarsh ecology. Cambridge Univ. Press. Cambridge. 461p.

Agren, G., R.E. McMurtrie, W.J. Parton, J. Pastor and H.H. Shugart. 1991. State-of-the-art of models of production-decomposition linkages in conifer and grassland ecosystems. Ecological Applications. 1:118-138.

Anderson, J.M. 1991. The effects of climate change on decomposition processes in grassland and coniferous forests. Ecological Applications 1:326-347.
View Full Essay

Predators in Three Different Types

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58869027

(Lynne, Kelly.)

Crocodiles are appreciated for their self preservation capacity and for their apex predator position. However, hundreds of people are killed every year as a result of their encounter with the beasts. In order to control the problem, people resorted to having crocodiles removed from human-inhabited areas. In spite of the fact that the situation ameliorated as a result of crocodiles being removed, people are still easy victims for stealthy crocodiles. (Lynne, Kelly.)

The Australian government is determined to put an end to crocodile attacks. Considering the fact that tens of thousands of crocodiles are found on the continent, people believe that it is virtually unavoidable for others to fall victims to crocodiles. (Lynne, Kelly.)

hile it is generally believed that only carnivores can be apex predators, omnivores can also be true killers. Brown bears, for example, have no natural enemy within the ecosystems that they reside in, and,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Lynne, Kelly. Crocodile: evolution's greatest survivor. Allen & Unwin, 2006.

2. Prugh, R. Laura, and Stoner, J. Chantal, and Epps, W. Clinton, and Bean, T. William, and Ripple, J. William, and Laliberte, S. Andrea, and Brashares, S. Justin. "The Rise of the Mesopredator." Bioscience Vol. 59, No. 9.

3. Whyte Macdonald, David Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio. The biology and conservation of wild canids. Oxford University Press, 2004.

4. "Wolf Management Strategies." Wisconsin Departament of Natural Resources. 25 Nov. 2009
View Full Essay

Wetlands Are the Main Link Between the

Words: 1905 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50992842

etlands are the main link between the land and the water, and as such are vitally important to the ecology. etlands have been misunderstood and abused throughout the history of the United States -- and elsewhere in the world -- and that has led to enormous environmental losses. This paper explores all pertinent information with regard to wetlands.

hat are etlands?

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wetlands as those "…transition zones where the flow of water, the cycling of nutrients," along with the sun's energy, all meet in order to create "…a unique ecosystem characterized by hydrology, soils, and vegetation" (EPA). The four categories of wetlands are swamps, bogs, fens and marshes. The EPA describes marshes as wetlands that are "…dominated by soft-stemmed vegetation"; swamps are quite different, as they are composed of "mostly woody plants."

As for bogs, they are freshwater wetlands that were formed by glacier-made lakes;…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Environmental Protection Agency. (2008). Wetlands Overview: What is a Wetland? Retrieved

July 23, 2012, from http://www.epa.gov.

Moreno-Mateos, David, Power, Mary E., Comin, Francisco A., and Yockteng, Roxana. (2012).

Structural and Functional Loss in Restored Wetland Ecosystems. PloS Biology, 10(1), 1-8.
View Full Essay

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Words: 1007 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98603012

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Preservation of the existing ecosystems

Accumulating evidence suggest that sustainable agriculture should be promoted. The growth and development of agriculture will still be the driving force of the loss of ecosystems in the 21st century. In specified areas, the growth and development of agriculture poses a danger to ecosystems, establishment, evaluation, and technological diffusion. This could see the rise of the food production sustainably per unit area with the absence of trade-offs relating to excessive water consumption or nutrients and pesticides use, would lessen pressure significantly to ecosystems. For many cases, the required technologies are in place, and they could be implemented in a wider variety, but the nation is facing financial constraints and lacking intuitional capabilities to use and gain the stated technologies. In areas where technology is predominant of the landscape, maintenance of ecosystems within the landscape is a very significant constitute of…… [Read More]

References

Hayden, J. (2009). Introduction to health behavior theory. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett.

O'Donnell, M.P. (2008). Health promotion in the workplace. Albany: Delmar Thomson Learning

Scutchfield, F.D., & Keck, C.W. (2009). Principles of public health practice. Clifton Park: Thomson/Delmar Learning

Stephens, C. (2008). Health promotion: A psychosocial approach. Maidenhead: Open University Press
View Full Essay

Environmental Policies Give an Example

Words: 7072 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3648279

The 1980s (the period when onald eagan was the U.S. President) witnessed a series of government measures targeting environmental regulations. This resulted in public outrage against the anti-environmental policies of the government leading to a renewed interest in nature clubs and groups and the formation of radical groups who led strong movements to protect the environment. (vii) the post- eagan resurgence (1990s onwards) - President Bush and President Clinton did not take the radical stance of their predecessor. However, President George W. Bush has taken many measures which have weakened the environmental movement instead of strengthening it. This includes opposing curbs on greenhouse emissions via the Kyoto Protocol, supporting oil drilling in the ANW or Arctic National Wildlife ange, weakening clean air standards and lifting the ban on logging in forests.

3) How does economics determine the public's opinion regarding environmental issues? Discuss the values of the dominant social paradigm…… [Read More]

References

Bocking, Stephen. Nature's Experts: Science, Politics, and the Environment. Rutgers University Press. 2004.

Palmer, Mike. Pathways of Nutrients in the Ecosystem - Pathways of elements in ecosystem. http://www.okstate.edu/artsci/botany/bisc3034/lnotes/nutrient.htm

Redclift, M. R; Woodgate, Graham. The International Handbook of Environmental Sociology. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2000.

Schmidtz, David; Willott, Elizabeth. Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, what Really Works. Oxford University Press U.S., 2002.
View Full Essay

Snake River Is Part of

Words: 3074 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30363227

Among the animals found in these relatively lush riparian zones are elk, deer, bear, sheep, and mountain lions. In addition, smaller animals that live and feed along this biologically vital corridor may include birds (like the ring-necked pheasant, grouse, geese, falcons, great blue herons, hummingbirds and warblers), small mammals (such as longtail weasel and striped skunk), reptiles (garter snake and the western painted turtle), and amphibians (red-legged frog and the Pacific giant salamander). The flora and fauna often include many threatened, endangered, or sensitive species, among which could be the bald eagle, peregrine falcon, and kit fox (The Columbia iver Basin watershed and its ecosystems 2005).

The plant life along the river can also has an effect on the health of the species living in the river by maintaining the health of the river by influencing the amount and kind of sediment in the river. The vegetation along the side…… [Read More]

References

Columbia River (2005). Center for Columbia River History. Retrieved September 10, 2005 at  http://www.ccrh.org/river/history.htm .

The Columbia River Basin watershed and its ecosystems (2005). Foundation for Water and Energy Education. Retrieved September 9, 2005 at http://www.fwee.org/crb.html.

How a hydroelectric project can affect a river (2005). Foundation for Water and Energy Education. Retrieved September 9, 2005 at http://www.fwee.org/hpar.html.

Human history in the Tetons (2001). Grand Teton History, retrieved September 10, 2005 at http://www.americanparknetwork.com/parkinfo/gt/history/.
View Full Essay

Preservation and Conservation

Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10779259

Ecological Study

Preservation and Conservation

Conservation, Preservation & Natural Regulation

Te purpose of tis paper is to define te difference between "conservation" and "preservation" and to researc "natural regulation" and define tat as well and to examine te results of "natural regulation" in terms of animal population, forest fires and any oter results wic may be discovered due to "natural regulation."

Te 'conservationist movement' was born in te decade of te 1960's and grew strong in te 1970's. Tere was a smaller movement of preservationists tat was bot ally and enemy to te conservationists in teir pursuits. Te survival is eac plant and animal in te ecosystem, or teir demise as a species if by te process of natural selection is only accomplised troug maintaining biodiversity in te ecological system of te eart. Biodiversity as been described as te "structural and functional variety of life forms at genetic, species, population,…… [Read More]

http://www.nfp.co.tz/studies_report/ecosystem/ecosystem.htm

Covering of the Tree Tops

This paper to be used for reference purposes only
View Full Essay

Status and Distribution of Fish

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98330327

Fewer predators (i.e. fish) without simultaneous declines in reproduction would mean an increase in the number of insects in the area of acidification. This can increase the number of pests in the area, affecting crops. It could also lead to an increase in disease carrying insects, such as mosquitoes, leading to higher disease rates among other animals, including humans. This could affect populations of these other animals, affecting populations of other species that prey on or are preyed upon by these species, and so on.

Ecosystems are incredibly complex things; the interconnections between the disparate elements are so intertwined and so complex that it is almost -- perhaps completely -- impossible to know the effects of changing or removing a single element. Even more complex and unknowable are the indirect effects on portions of an ecosystem from other sources. The acidification of the Hubbard Brook is almost certainly a result…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Biome Interdependency

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60540242

Interdependency of Species in the Food Web

The concept of the food web is useful when one wants to understand the interdependency of species that live in a particular biome, and, further, how events in one biome can cause ripple effects that impact life in other biomes. This demonstrates the interdependency of all life, not just life in a particular biome. In order to understand this, it is important to understand what one means by the concept of a food web. Previously, people envisioned a food chain, with species being characterized as food or the one doing the eating. This helped people understand the relationship between different organisms and how some organisms formed an intermediate link between other organisms.

However, the idea of a food chain is actually overly simplistic. At different stages in their life cycles and at different opportunities, various species serve as both predator and prey, an…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Managing the Mekong River

Words: 1539 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24685618

Mekong River Delta

The Management of the Mekong River has long been an issue of great debate and inquiry. The body of water is essential to the livelihoods of millions of people and must be managed accordingly. The purpose of this discussion is to illustrate human-ecosystem conflicts. The research will analyze the nature of the conflict, the impacts on the natural ecosystem involved (you need to include raw scientific data that show human impacts), a description of the stakeholders involved, the options for dealing with the conflict (is this a good example of a sustainable solution to the conflict, the option selected and an evaluation of whether this is working including an update for the older case studies.

The Mekong River

The Mekong River is a perfect example of human-ecosystem conflict. According to a report entitled "People and ecosystems: The fraying web of life" the Mekong River is the 12th…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baird I.G. Mark S. Flaherty1 and Ian G. Baird2. Mekong River Fish Conservation Zones in Southern Laos: Assessing Effectiveness Using Local Ecological Knowledge. Environmental Management. Volume 36, Number 3 / September, 2005

Friederich, H. 2000. The biodiversity of the wetlands in the Lower Mekong Basin. Paper submitted to the World Commission on Dams, Presented at the Commission's East/Southeast Asia Regional Consultation, Hanoi, Vietnam. 26-27 February

Hoa, Le Thi Viet, Nguyen Huu Nhan, Eric Wolanski, Tran Thanh Congb, Haruyama Shigeko. The combined impact on the flooding in Vietnam's Mekong River delta of local man-made structures, sea level rise, and dams upstream in the river catchment

Kummu M., Varis, O. (2007) Sediment-related impacts due to upstream reservoir trapping, the Lower Mekong River. Geomorphology 85 (2007) 275-293
View Full Essay

Restoration of Central Park Reservoir

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1383467

Stated examples include: "cessation of mining or farming or causes of erosion, restricting livestock from riparian areas, removing toxic materials from soil or sediments, and eradicating invasive exotic species; (4) restoration of processes/disturbance cycles and this involves restoration of important ecological processes including natural flooding or fire regimes so that natural integrity is restored; (5) rehabilitation of substrates which may be any type of activity focused on repairing soil texture or chemistry that has been altered or the restoration of hydrological regimes or the quality of water; (6) vegetation restoration which may include direct revegetation of a site and generally with species that are native to the local conditions of the environment. This involves collection of seeds or cuttings from various sources in the local region; (7) Maintenance and monitoring the restoration site across time is required to ensure that objectives are being met. Observation assists in knowing when something…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ecological Restoration Option (2014) Humboldt State University. Retrieved from: http://humboldt.edu/environment/programs/environmental-science/ecological-restoration-option

The Croton Waterworks (2014) Retrieved from: http://crotonaqueduct.wordpress.com/field-notes/individual-structures/jacqueline-kennedy-onassis-reservoir/

Vaughn, K.J., Porensky, L.M., Wilkerson, M.L., Balachowski, J., Peffer, E., Riginos, C. & Young, T.P. (2010) Restoration Ecology. Nature Education Knowledge 3(10):66. Retrieved from:  http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/restoration-ecology-13339059
View Full Essay

Aquatic System & 8226 Describe Climate Affects Selected

Words: 541 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44968039

aquatic system • Describe climate affects selected ecosystem. • Explain, based laws thermodynamics, energy flows selected ecosystem. • Examine matter transported selected ecosystem due biogeochemical cycles, carbon, hydrologic, nitrogen, phosphorus.

Aquatic ecosystems

Aquatic ecosystems are mainly responsible for assisting energy transfers across the planet and for making it possible for all life on earth to exist. Depending on the area where it is located and on the substances that it contains, a body of water can have more or less living beings in it. Climate has a strong impact on water and on the organisms that directly depend on it. Climate change has had a severe effect on bodies of water all around the planet and this is obvious especially when considering melting glaciers and the energy that they release.

Thermohaline circulation is one of the most important circulation systems present on the planet and it is largely in charge…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Franks, Felix, "Water: A Matrix of Life," (Royal Society of Chemistry, 19.07.2000)

Juuti, Petri, "Environmental History of Water: Global Views on Community Water Supply and Sanitation," (IWA Publishing, 30.01.2007)
View Full Essay

Wabash Watershed and Global Warming

Words: 2323 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19619410

Wabash Watershed and Global Warming

Global warming is the gradual increase in the average temperatures of Earth caused by an increase in Greenhouse Gases (GHG) in Earth's atmosphere. An unprecedented increase in GHG has induced the warming up of Earth. Since global warming impacts entire biosphere and ecosystems, watersheds are also distorted through warming of climate. The paper defines watersheds, their role in ecosystem, and explanation of changes that have taken place in Wabash watershed. Wabash watershed is composed of smaller watersheds such as Upper Wabash Watershed, Lower Wabash, Little Wabash Watershed, Middle Wabash-Busseron, and Middle Wabash-Little Vermilion Watershed. Human agency has caused the global warming to increase over a period of last two decades, though its signs are obvious much before that. Increases in average lower temperatures, precipitation, and stream runoff are some evident outcomes of global warming. Wildlife, water resources, agriculture, and human health will have an adverse…… [Read More]

References

EPA. (2013). Midwest Impacts & Adaptation. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved form: http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts-adaptation/midwest.html

Goudie, A.S. (2005). The human impact on the natural environment: past, present, and future. Wiley-Blackwell.

Gregersen, H., Ffolliott, P., & Brookes, K. (2008). Integrated watershed management: Connecting people to their land and water. CABI.

IPCC. (2013). Climate Change 2007: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability.IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007. Retrieved from:  http://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg2/en/ch19s19-3-6.html
View Full Essay

Law Help Protect the Environment and What

Words: 2725 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96804056

law help protect the environment and what steps can citizens take to ensure that the law accomplishes this goal?

Protection of the environment is important for our health, but humans affect the system through various means such as through polluting water and atmosphere with toxic gasses, with oil, with car fuels, and with debris that is plunked into the waters as well as depleting the fisheries and filling the air with smog and the earth with pollution.

It is for this reason that legislation is put into effect to curb our destruction and to teach us how to look after the environment in better ways. The state employs its own regulations, but it needs a synthesis of both state, business and citizen involvement to safeguard the environment, and motivation from both business and citizen is not always forthcoming. The following essay discusses policies that have been implemented to help protect…… [Read More]

References

Amos, W. (2011) Development of Canadian Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling: Lessons from the Gulf of Mexico RECIEL 20 (1)

British Columbia v. Canadian Forest Products Ltd., [2004] 2 S.C.R. 74, 2004 SCC 38

Bruce, JP (2011) Protecting Groundwater: The Invisible but Vital Resource C.D. Howe Institute

DeMarco, Jerry V;Valiante, Marcia;Bowden, Marie-Ann (2005) Opening the Door for Common Law Environmental Protection in Canada Journal of Environmental Law and Practice 15, 2
View Full Essay

Globalization and the Environment This

Words: 2597 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40046980

Of the top 150 medications that are sold by prescription in the U.S. 118 of these are medications that are either "derived from or modeled on naturally occurring substances." (SEAM Global, 2005) Some of the medications that count on habitat presently being destroyed are "aspirin, morphine, vincristine, taxol, digitalis, and most antibiotics."(SEAM Global, 2005)

VI. Internet/Networking: Role Played in Preservation

Through global and subglobal assessments of the ecosystem and monitoring of data in relation to global changes information may be shared from one region to another and earlier attempts made in changing, slowing or altogether avoidance of more extreme conditions. As stated on the web page of "GreenFacts.org": "Some ecosystem problems have been reduced by innovative local responses...Therefore institutions are needed at multiple levels to strengthen the adaptive capacity and effectiveness of sub-national and local responses. (GreenFacts.org, 2005)

VII. Globalization and Changes in Production

Changes have been seen in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Globalization's Effects "A World Connected" Online available at http://www.aworldconnected.org/article.php/231.html

Shah, Anup (2005) Effects of Consumerism 2005 April 18 Online available at http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Consumption/Effects.asp

Globalization: Negative Effects of Development (2005) Walon Laboratories Online available at http://whalonlab.msu.edu/Student_Webpages/2003_EC_Projects / Globalization/page_6.html.

Robbins, Richard H. Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism. Allyn & Bacon. Copyright: 2002.
View Full Essay

Rim Discuss This Product in Terms of

Words: 2239 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48793072

IM

Discuss this product in terms of its repositioned target market demographics using U.S. Census Data.

In regards to U.S. Census Data, the target market demographic show promise. The repositioned product will focus on high level and medium income level people. These individuals tend to be high lifestyle and business professionals. The product is full of applications and latest operating system that is helpful for professionals and other business persons to accomplish their tasks on the phones. This demographic is experiences positive change. For instance, consumer confidence for the past three months has risen in this segment. Discretionary income for individuals making $100,000 or more has risen 12% over the past decade. This positive trend allows consumers to spend more on IM's products and services. The smartphone industry overall is growing at an annual rate of 9% per year with adoption rates increasing at a corresponding amount.

Determine the types…… [Read More]

References:

1) Robert J. Gordon (1988), Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy, 2nd ed., Chapter 22.4, 'Modern theories of inflation'. McGraw-Hill.

2) Susan Mallik (2010). Hossein Bidgoil. ed. The Handbook of Technology Management: Supply Chain Management, Marketing and Advertising, and Global Management, vol 2 (1 ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley @ Sons, Inc.. p. 100- 104. ISBN 978-0-470-24948-2.

3) John T. Phelan, Jr. P.E. "Guest Column: Knowing When a WMS or WCS Is Right for Your Company." Supply & Demand Chain Executive. Enom, Inc. http://www.sdcexec.com/web/online/FulfillmentLogistics-Trends/Guest-Column -- Knowing-When-a-WMS-or-WCS-Is-Right-for-Your-Company/15$10,982

Product Innovation
View Full Essay

Environmental Impact of Seaport Development

Words: 1846 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55802230

Dubai should be thinking about sustainability, since the seaport expansion and modernization has been damaging to the environment over the past decade. AS more and more ships begin to use the Dubai port, and as commerce and economic activity return after the global economic recession, the environmental challenges surrounding the port will likely increase as well.

eferences

Bagaeen, Samer. (2007). "Brand Dubai: The Instant City; or the Instantly ecognizable

City." International Planning Studies. Vol. 12, No. 2. Pp. 173-197.

Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens. (2008). "Dubai -- a star in the east: A case study in strategic destination branding." Journal of Place Management and Development. Vol. 1, No. 1. Pp. 62-91.

Betriebswirt; Dipl. And Noack, Sascha MBA. (2007). Doing Business in Dubai and the UAE. GIN Verlag: Berlin.

Burt, J; Bartholomew, A.; Usseglio, P; Bauman, A. And P.F. Sale. (2009). "Are artificial reefs surrogates of natural habitats for corals and fish in…… [Read More]

References

Bagaeen, Samer. (2007). "Brand Dubai: The Instant City; or the Instantly Recognizable

City." International Planning Studies. Vol. 12, No. 2. Pp. 173-197.

Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens. (2008). "Dubai -- a star in the east: A case study in strategic destination branding." Journal of Place Management and Development. Vol. 1, No. 1. Pp. 62-91.

Betriebswirt; Dipl. And Noack, Sascha MBA. (2007). Doing Business in Dubai and the UAE. GRIN Verlag: Berlin.
View Full Essay

Natural Resources and Energy

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28885450

Natural Resources and nergy: Florida verglades

ffects of Agriculture

The verglades' freshwater ecosystem supplies vital services to the local population, such as the maintenance of South Florida's agriculture and drinking water (National Wildlife Preservation, 2012). However, these services are rarely accounted for in decision making in regards to land use and planning. As a result of the natural services being taken for granted, Agricultural scientists agree that modern agriculture faces an environmental calamity. Specifically, " the very nature of the agricultural structure and prevailing policies have led to this environmental crisis by favoring large farm size, specialized production, crop monocultures and mechanization" (Altieri, 2001).

The absence of diversifications and rotations of crops, necessary for the self-regulating process, induces the agroecosystems to rely on vast amounts of chemicals, such as fertilizer nutrients. Moreover, crops ineffectively absorb the chemical fertilizers, thus contaminating the surface and ground water. According to Altieri (2001), "In…… [Read More]

Effects of Human Population

In July 2010 the World Heritage Committee placed the Everglades on the "List of World Heritage in Danger" as a result of the reduction in natural water flows and the introduction of various pollutants from urban growth that reduce the nutrients necessary for ecological balances to occur naturally. Excess water flows at given times is also a problem for nesting animals that build in areas that would normally be elevated during dryer seasons. The Everglades is an aquatic ecosystem and the loss of the habitat for all the species that inhabit or migrate to the area is critical. Furthermore, the Everglades represents a dynamic region where saltwater meets freshwater. This acts to provide a replenishment area for the Biscayne Aquifer which in turn accounts for most of the freshwater supply for Southern Florida.

The increase of construction and related activities after hurricanes Katrina and Andrew have increased the amount of pollution emitted into the local system which in turn further increases the environmental threats for 14 endangered species, over 400 birds, and many mammals,
View Full Essay

Living Things Are Characterized by the Following

Words: 4492 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61564004

living things are characterized by the following seven characteristics namely mobility, respiration, excretion, sensitivity or response to external stimulus, growth, feeding, and reproduction. Though there may be variations between animal and plant kingdom (ex, plants take in carbon dioxide and prepare their own food), these characteristics are commonly observed among all living things.

iology is a very broad field that encompasses the study of characteristics of living things. It includes botany, zoology and all other sub-disciplines that range from microbiology to evolution and ecology.

Evolution is the branch of biology that deals with the study of natural development of living organisms and the changes in them over time. Evolution refers to the heritable changes that occur in a population over a period of time. All the diversity that is observed currently in plant and animal kingdom can be ascribed to evolution over a long period of time.

Atoms are the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Mark Rothery, "Cells," Accessed on Sep 20th 2005, Available from  http://www.mrothery.co.uk/cells/cellnotes.htm
View Full Essay

Pessimists Believe That Nothing Will

Words: 1090 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14813505

This writer intends to have children and a family life and to keep abreast of technology and scientific advancements that occur over the next 25 years. Furthermore, sustainable living is an interest of this writer and therefore the writer will be committed to participating in such initiatives that serve to bring about more sustainable and healthier living.

The houses of the future are much more likely to be more practicable than are today's houses and are likely to have features that are if not unheard of in the present, are at least presently not viable features due to the constraints of the cost of such features. However, over the next 25 years, just as the computer and other technological advances have become affordable the new products of the future will also become more affordable as time goes on.

V. Ecosystem

The ecosystem 25 years from now will likely have undergone…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Sacramento Basin the Project Is

Words: 2629 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46188822

The Delta is also a habitat for many species of fish, birds, mammals, and plants, and it supports agricultural and recreational activities while also being the focal point for water distribution throughout the State.

The development of the Delta as it exists today started in late 1850 when the Swamp and Overflow Land Act transferred ownership of all swamp and overflow land, including Delta marshes, from the federal government to the State of California. In 1861, the State Legislature created the Board of Swamp and Overflowed Land Commissioners to manage reclamation projects, and in 1866, the authority of the Board was transferred to county boards of supervisors. The Delta now covers 738,000 acres interlaced with hundreds of miles of waterways, with much of the land below sea level, relying on more than 1,000 miles of levees for protection against flooding. 20

White sturgeon is one of the most spectacular native…… [Read More]

References

1. Northridge, S.P. An updated world review of interactions between marine mammals and fisheries. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 251, Suppl. 1. Rome,

FAO. 1991. 58p.

2. DeMaster, Douglas P., Fowler, Charles W., Perry, Simona L. And Richlen,

Michael F. Predation and Competition: The Impact of Fisheries on Marine-Mammal
View Full Essay

Georgia's Environment the Ecologies and Environment From

Words: 803 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96262053

Georgia's Environment

The ecologies and environment: From the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Plateau, Georgia is a very diverse state in terms of its ecology and geography. The state is the largest east of the Mississippi River, and its elevation ranges from sea level to more than 4,700 feet. The New Georgia Encyclopedia reports that there are five distinct "physiographic provinces" in Georgia: the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, the Appalachian Plateau, the Ridge and Valley, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. In the extreme northwestern part of the state, the Appalachian Plateau has historically been a region where mining has taken place. That Appalachian Plateau actually connects some parts of Georgia with Tennessee and eastern Alabama.

The cities in Georgia are located in the Piedmont region, which is highly industrialized, and includes the sprawling megalopolis of Atlanta. The "fall line" in Georgia is the place where the coastal plain meets the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baxter, Tom. (2012). Georgia becomes Ground Zero for energy, environmental issues. Atlanta Business Chronicle. Retrieved March 3, 2012, from  http://saportareport.com .

Environmental Protection Agency. (2010). Climate Change and Georgia. Retrieved March 4,

2012, from http://www.epa.gov.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (2009). Georgia's Natural Resources. Retrieved March 4, 2012, from  http://www.gadnr.org/resources .
View Full Essay

Conversation Biology

Words: 882 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 855098

Conservation Biology

Explain what conservation biology is and highlight its goals.

Conservation biology is a branch of biological sciences which is primarily concerned with the preservation of life on earth including organisms which are classified as plants and animals. It examines biodiversity and ways and means in which the biodiversity of life on Earth can best be sustained (Sahney 2008,-page 759). This branch of biological study began as a reaction to the growing concern over extinction of species and disruption of habitats because of natural disasters and/or the actions and behaviors of human beings and industrialization. Interactions between species, particularly the interaction between humans and native populations is of particular interest to conservation biologists, particularly in terms of negative effects of human interaction.

The goals of conversation biologists are to protect various species as well as their habitats and ecosystems. They also want to prevent the extinction of species and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fujikawa, T. & Dougherty, J. (2010). The value of biodiversity and its impact on human health.

David Suzuki Foundation.

Sadava, et al. (2011). Life: the Science of Biology Volume 2. 9th ed. Sinauer: Gordonsville, VA.

Sahney, S. & Benton, M. (2008). Recovery from the most profound mass extinction of all time.
View Full Essay

Designing Fish

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22576844

Sustainable Development

This is a case study that defines sustainable development. It explains the importance of sustainable development, why it is a catch phrase for countries, why it is promoted as a primary solution to protecting the environment, and some pros and cons. Sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations. (Shah, 2009) It encompasses a number of areas, such as industry energy efficiency, climate change, and industrial policy, and highlights sustainability as the idea of environmental, economic, social progress, and equity, within the limits of natural resources.

While all humans depend on nature and the ecosystem, the ecosystem has been decreased by growing demands for food, water, fiber, and energy. There has been improvement for some, but conditions are worse for others because nature's ability to purify water and air, protect from disasters, and provide medicine has been weakened. Some of the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Living Beyond Our Means. (n.d.). Retrieved from Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: http://news.bbc.us/2/shared/bsp/hi/pdfs/30_03_05_boardstatement.pdf

Shah, A. (2009, Nov 18). Sustainable Development Introduction. Retrieved from Global Issues:  http://www.globalissues.org/article/408/sustainable-development-introduction 

Sustainable Development. (n.d.). Retrieved from Water Enclyclopedia: http://www.waterencyclopedia.com/St.-Ts/Sustainable-Development.html

Turner, R.K. (n.d.). Sustainable Development: Ethics and Economics. Retrieved from CSERGE:  http://www.cserge.ac.uk/sites/default/files/pa_1992_09.pdf
View Full Essay

Hoover Dam

Words: 428 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88449352

Natural esources

The Hoover Dam was built in the 1930s as a major infrastructure project to help create jobs during the Great Depression and to help meet the energy needs of a growing Southwest. The human population has grown considerably in the region since then, putting a strain on a number of different resources. The dam actually helped to facilitate an increase in the human population in Nevada, particularly in Las Vegas, by providing a source of electricity. The dam actually created a means of controlling the water supply along the Colorado iver, which in turn allowed for a lot of the growth in the population of the area (ONE, 2014).

This growth has been a challenge to the local ecosystem, however. The Hoover Dam is located in the Mojave Desert, and desert ecosystems are typically quite fragile. A lot of this ecosystem has been overrun for urbanization that the…… [Read More]

References

Crook, H. & Fudge, T. (2010). How has Hoover Dam impacted the growth of the American west? KPBS. Retrieved May 31, 2014 from  http://www.kpbs.org/news/2010/jun/09/how-has-hoover-dam-impacted-growth-american-west/ 

ONE. (2014). Hoover Dam's impact on Las Vegas. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. Retrieved May 31, 2014 from  http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/hoover-dams-impact-las-vegas
View Full Essay

Force of the Winds Is

Words: 2142 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71762344

Speed here is of essence and spices like flying fish are able to jump out of water to escape predators. Others that lack like jellies are transparent. Turtles will have a shell to protect them. Gills enable animals to manage different water pressures like the sharks while whales have the capability of holding their breaths for longer periods. On the other hand, since the benthic zone does not allow sunlight to reach it due to its depth (beyond 600 feet), some fish and crustaceans, at this level do not see, in fact half of the species at this level are blind. In this sense, the organisms have adapted to produce their own lights from their specialized parts in their bodies known as photophores. In addition, since there is lack of phytoplacton to start the food chain, life is limited and fish have adapted to fulfill their needs. For instance, some…… [Read More]

References

Crouse, R. (n.d.). Waves: Tsunamis/Seismic sea waves. Water encyclopedia. Retrieved from  http://www.waterencyclopedia.com/Tw-Z/Waves.html 

Gardiner, L. (2010, January 8). Surface ocean currents. windows.ucar.edu. Retrieved from http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/earth/Water/ocean_currents.html

Lee, H.J., and Normark, W.R. (2009). Earth science in urban ocean: The Southern California continental borderland. New York, U.S.: Geological Society of America.

Makai. (n.d). Threats to marine ecosystems. Waianae ecological characteristics. Retrieved from http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/czm/initiative/wec/html/sea/marine/threats.htm
View Full Essay

Arlington Virginia -- Environment &

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59706372

" The report claims that the soft shell clam and oyster fisheries "have collapsed" and the commercial harvest of striped bass is now restricted to protect the survival of that species (Virginia Environment). In the last 30 years, according to the Executive Summary of the Arlington "Urban Forest Master Plan" (UFMP) Arlington County has lost "a significant amount of acreage with heavy tree cover"; this has had "a dramatic effect on the overall canopy coverage." Of the 16,500 acres of forests more than 3,000 acres have been "converted from heavy tree cover of over 50% to low tree cover of less than 20%" (UFMP).

How might global warming affect local ecosystems in and around Arlington? The rising level of the Atlantic Ocean is considered a major risk in terms of global warming. Already the rising waters have submerged several islands in the Chesapeake Bay. "The region's coastal habitats and the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Natural Resources Management Plan. (2008). Natural Resource Conservation Areas. Retrieved March 8, 2011, from   http://www.arlingtonva.us  /departments/parksrecreation/documents/file76445.pdf.

National Wildlife Federation. (2008). Sea-Level Rise and Coastal Habitats of the Chesapeake

Bay: A Summary. Retrieved March 8, 2011, from  http://www.nwf.org .

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources. (2010). Fort C.F. Smith -- History. Retrieved March 7,
View Full Essay

World's Oldest Largest and Deepest

Words: 2674 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39017351

134). In addition, ussian authorities have also joined with the international community to protect the lake. In this regard, Hudgins adds that, "Increased awareness of such threats to the unique ecology of Lake Baikal has prompted a number of international organizations -- including the Sierra Club and Baikal Watch in the United States -- to join the ussians in their efforts to protect this natural wonder of the world" (1998, p. 135). According to the Sierra Club, "Lake Baikal, arguably ussia's most significant environmental treasure -- it contains a fifth of the world's unfrozen freshwater and is a UNESCO World Heritage site -- is being polluted by toxic waste from a paper mill that Vladimir Putin ordered reopened for economic reasons" (Pollutin' Putin, 2010, para. 2). In fact, the recently reopened paper mill disposes of toxic wastes directly into Lake Baikal's fragile biological system (Hoare, 2008). While the Sierra Club…… [Read More]

References

Current programs. (2010). Baikal Watch. Retrieved from http://www.earthislandprojects.org / project/campaignPage.cfm?pageID=7&subSiteID=1&CFID=43926225&CFTOKEN=32

975106.

Gladkochub, D.P., Donskaya, T.V., Wingate, M.T., Poller, U., Kroner, a., Fedorovsky, V.S.,

Mazukabzov, a.M., Todt, W. & Pisarevsky, S.A. (2008). Petrology, geochronology and tectonic implications of C. 500 Ma metamorphic and igneous rocks along the northern margin of the Central Asian orogen. Journal of the Geological Society, 165, 235-237.
View Full Essay

Nepa and Seqra the National Environmental Policy

Words: 1276 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34243129

NEPA and SEQA

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was ratified in 1970. It is a federal law that is designed to assess the damage to the environment from various projects. This was in response to decades of neglect to the ecosystem and its effect on the general public. Under the law, any project that is initiated by the federal government must conduct some type of evaluation to determine the impact of its activities on nature. This takes place by having all federal agencies conduct Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Studies prior to implementation. These tools are helping to provide an objective analysis of the proposed project on the ecosystem. It is at this point, that the effects will clear by taking into account a number of perspectives (prior to beginning). What these regulations do is to create a standard that must be utilized…… [Read More]

References

"National Environmental Policy Act." CEQ, 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

"State Environmental Quality Review Act." ELR, 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012

"SEQR." DEC, 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012

"Village of Pomona v. Town of Ramapo." New York Court of Appeals, 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012
View Full Essay

Wetlands Regulation in USA

Words: 8001 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63050849

Stress: Regulation of etlands in the United States

Regulation of etlands in the United States

Defining etlands and their Value

A wetland refers to a place where water covers the soil. A wetland is a saturated land that comprises of swamps or marshes. Lewis defines a wetland as, "an ecosystem that depends on constant or recurrent, shallow inundation or saturation at or near the surface of the substrate" (p.3). He further ascertains that the minimum necessary qualities of a wetland are sustained inundation, saturation or recurrent at or near the surface and the existence of chemical, biological and physical facets that reflect recurrent, saturation and sustained inundation (Lewis 3). The major diagnostic wetland features include hydrophytic vegetation and hydric soils. These characteristics present biotic, anthropogenic or physicochemical features apart from where the growth of these aspects has been blocked (Lewis 3). The wetlands are located near rivers, oceans, lakes or…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Beermann, Jack. Administrative law. Texas: Aspen Publishers Online, Jul 2, 2010

Connolly, Kim Diana, Johnson, Stephen, Williams, Douglas. Wetlands law and policy:

Understanding. New York: American Bar Association, Dec 30, 2005.

Gaddie, Ronald Keith, Regens, James. Regulating wetlands protection: Environmental federalism and the states. New York: SUNY Press, 2000.
View Full Essay

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Words: 2664 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8454350

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Module 05 Question 01: explain the rationale behind the federal government's approach to regulatory containments in food.

The federal government's approach in relation to the regulation of the containments in food, aims at protecting the consumers on food insecurity through elimination of food pathogens. It is the role of the government to enhance the health system and conditions of its citizens through adoption and implementation of various rules and regulations in relation to the containments in food. The food supply of the United States integrates multi-faceted production system and delivery components. Some of the critical or essential components of this system include production, processing, preparing, packaging, labelling, distribution, and consumption of the food components (Fortin, 2011).

There is a risk in relation to the concept of each stage of the food supply system in the context of the United States. This makes it ideal for…… [Read More]

References

Marco-Barba, J., Mesquita-Joanes, F., & Miracle, M. (2013). Ostracod palaeolimnological analysis reveals drastic historical changes in salinity, eutrophication and biodiversity loss in a coastal Mediterranean lake. Holocene, 23(4), 556-567.

Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Y., Liancourt, P., Gross, N., & Straile, D. (2012). Indirect facilitation promotes macrophyte survival and growth in freshwater ecosystems threatened by eutrophication. Journal Of Ecology, 100(2), 530-538.

Riplett, L., Engstrom, D., & Conley, D. (2012). Changes in amorphous silica sequestration with eutrophication of riverine impoundments. Biogeochemistry, 108(1-3), 413-427.

Gareca, E.E., Vandelook, F., Fernandez, M., Hermy, M., & Honnay, O. (2012). Seed
View Full Essay

Cetaceans the Feeling That This

Words: 1735 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10852501



The attempts to penetrate the cove seems to be more thrilling to timepiece, as individual may be able to see the very real danger the creatures were subjected to due to the system or methods used in capturing them which did range from revolutionary, at night they indeed they used thermal-imaging to scout out the location.

Conclusion

There is No doubt that such a sturdy mix of factors has been involved in the reformation of the AME food web with which both climate alter and exhaustion of acme and middle atrophic level of genus playing a part which brings us to this question of whether we should seriously re think the relative contributions what it is that we actually measure or manage in the whole observed trends of SO organization

eferences

Johnston, E. "Mercury Danger in Dolphin Meat," Japan Times, 23 (September 2009).

Leigh, E.G., S.J. Wright, E.A. Herre, and…… [Read More]

References

Johnston, E. "Mercury Danger in Dolphin Meat," Japan Times, 23 (September 2009).

Leigh, E.G., S.J. Wright, E.A. Herre, and F.E. Putz. 1993. The decline of tree diversity on newly

isolated tropical islands: A test of a null hypothesis and the implications. Evol. Ecol. 7:76-102.

"Mercury levels of whale-eating town's residents 10 times average," Japan Today: Japan News
View Full Essay

National Fire Plan & Community

Words: 4014 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24111281

The apathy of private landowners discussed earlier may be due to the feeling that one may not feel that individual efforts are important. However, the case in Waldo, Florida demonstrates just how important the actions of one individual can be in averting danger.

Bend, Oregon has developed large community efforts to help reduce fuel in the area. They open up the landfill several times a year free of charge to allow citizens to dispose of debris from thinning and pruning (NCS, 2003). Thinning and pruning around houses creates a barrier of defensible space should a fire threaten. The landscape and fire resistance efforts in Bend have become a social factor.

These case studies demonstrate how communities can be spurred into action. The study conducted by eams, Haines, & enner et al., (2005) found owner apathy as the number one obstacle that they faced in preparing communities in case of a…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(2005) Snapshots: Successful BLM Projects Supporting the National Fire Plan. May 13, 2005. Retrieved February 23, 2009 at http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/etc./medialib/blm/nifc/snapshots0/2005.Par.64322.File.dat/05-13-05.pdf

Davis, C. (2001). The West in Flames: The Intergovernmental Politics of Wildfire Suppression and Prevention. The Journal of Federalism. 31-93): 97-110.

FireWise. (2009). About Firewise. National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved February 21, 2009 at http://www.firewise.org.

FireWiseCommunities/USA. (2009). Fire wise Communities/USA. National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved February 21, 2009 at http://www.firewise.org/usa/index.htm
View Full Essay

Disappearing Wetlands of the United

Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32269356

The study revealed that pollution in the are run off water was measurably reduced after running through the ecosystem. Ron Turco, a soil microbiologist and senior researcher of the project had this to say, "Golf courses are a perfect place for constructed wetlands used as part of a water management system, because wetlands can filter chemicals out of surface water, and they can also store excess water during storms," ("Cleaning ater and Controlling Flooding with etlands" 53) So there may be some hope on the back nine for some wetlands after all. But all kidding aside, this is the type of project, smaller and more immediate, that needs to be funded along with the philosophy of co-habitation of wetlands and human beings kept in mind. This kind of thinking helps to counter the "manifest destiny" concept that the American culture has in regarding land and their possession of it. It…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blumenauer, Earl. "Water Vision 2001." Forum for Applied Research and Public Policy 16.1 (2001): 82.

Cleaning Water and Controlling Flooding with Wetlands." Journal of Environmental Health 68.1 (2005): 53.

Gale, Thomas. "Wetlands." Gale Encyclopedia of Science. 2001:

Grant, Dave. "Disappearing Wetlands." Underwater Naturalist 26.4 (April 2004): p11
View Full Essay

Global Warming and Climate Change

Words: 2402 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45380201

Thus, since we are a major contributor to the problem, we need to be the first to step up with global solutions.

In addition, the country (and the world) needs to start to encourage the development of alternative energies on a large scale. Homes that utilize solar, geothermal, and/or wind power should receive tax breaks, and there should be significant incentives to build "green" in the future. In addition, we need to stop our dependence on foreign oil NOW, as the recent spike in oil prices clearly indicates. We need to develop alternative fuel sources, alternative power sources, and much more environmentally friendly ways of generating the power we need for our homes, schools, and businesses, and we need to do it as soon as possible.

There is mounting evidence that extreme weather events that have recently occurred are at least partly due to global warming. There have been studies…… [Read More]

References

Author not Available. "About the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change." IPCC.ch. 2008. 14 March 2008. http://www.ipcc.ch/about/index.htm

Editors. "Climate Change." EPA.gov. 2008. 14 March 2008. http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/

Johansen, Bruce E. The Global Warming Desk Reference. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2002.

Jordan, Stuart. "The Global Warming Crisis." The Humanist Nov.-Dec. 2005: 23+.
View Full Essay

Little Rock Arkansas Is Located in the

Words: 708 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35517356

Little ock, Arkansas, is located in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains, on the south bank of the Arkansas iver. Lake Maumelle is northwest of Little ock and provides the city's drinking water. The city lies in a humid, subtropical climate zone. Winters are mild, with temperatures in the coldest months, December and January, hovering around fifty degrees Fahrenheit. Summers are hot and humid, with July and August temperatures averaging well above ninety. Little ock averages over one hundred inches of rain per year and typically gets around four inches of snow.

Ecology and Environment

The residential area in which I live is within city limits. The neighborhood is predominantly single family homes on small lots. Most people maintain typical home landscapes comprised of shrubs, annual and perennial flowers and small vegetable gardens. The wildlife is not very diverse. The trees in the neighborhood attract song birds and squirrels, as…… [Read More]

References

Little Rock, Arkansas. (n.d.) from Wikipedia. Retrieved February 6, 2011 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Rock,_Arkansas.
View Full Essay

U S Sugar Deal Purchase for

Words: 1549 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68291345

What would make you decide to put an end to th e project/

What are you solutions for dealing with the problem?

Part of the problem of cost and procrastination is the continuous spate of law suits. What can be done, if anything, to resolve conflicts between the opposing parties and to make opposing parties more amenable to th ugar deal?

Further resources

Learn & Teach About the Everglades

http://www.evergladesplan.org/education/index.aspx

Everglades Foundation

http://www.evergladesfoundation.org/

Florida's Water

http://www.protectingourwater.org/watersheds/map/everglades/

Water's journey Everglades

http://theevergladesstory.org/

ources

Burnham, Michael. (2010). Energy and Environment News. Energy by the Acre.

http://www.eenews.net/special_reports/everglades/energy_by_the_acre/

Caperton Morton, Mary. (May 20, 2010). Land Deal Likely to Improve Everglades, Ecologists ay. Inside cience News ervice.

Freechild, a. (2010).ugar Barons and takeholders:the Impact of the U.. ugar Deal on Everglades Restoration

http://www.nyu.edu/brademas/pdf/AFreechild.EvergladesUugarDealpaper.pdf

Eye on Miami Blog. (2010) Kendrick Meek's sweet tooth could doom his political campaign for U.. enate.

http://eyeonmiami.blogspot.com/2010/03/kendrick-meeks-sweet-tooth-could-doom.html

National Research Council of the…… [Read More]

Sources

Burnham, Michael. (2010). Energy and Environment News. Energy by the Acre.

http://www.eenews.net/special_reports/everglades/energy_by_the_acre/

Caperton Morton, Mary. (May 20, 2010). Land Deal Likely to Improve Everglades, Ecologists Say. Inside Science News Service.

Freechild, a. (2010).Sugar Barons and Stakeholders:the Impact of the U.S. Sugar Deal on Everglades Restoration
View Full Essay

American Planning in the Next

Words: 3215 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88334151

The state has really took out half of the $300 million cost that it took to build the Hudson River Park (150 acres land/400 acres open water) with yearly assumptions that are around $20 million to $25 million. 20 years from now it might be a hard challenge keeping this up with the anticipated climate change.

Climate Change: Precipitation

The third reason why climate change will be affecting America in the next 20 years is because of the local precipitation. In addition to impacts on temperature and wind, the urban heat island affects local precipitation patterns. Both comparatively warmer air and higher attentions of particulates over the cities that can cause little more frequent rain events (Ahrens 2006).

About 20 years from now, this will become an issue because the Human-made modifications of the natural environment are affecting the thermal stratification of the atmosphere that is located above a city…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ahrens, C. David. Meteorology today:an introduction to weather, climate, and the environment. Eighth edition. Florence, Ky: Brooks/Cole., 2006.

Lin, Q., and R. Bornstein. "Urban heat island and summertime convective thunderstorms in Atlanta.." Atmospheric Environment 34.5 (2000): 507-516.

Nowak, David J. The effects of urban trees on air quality. 5 March 1995. 30 April 2011. .

Oke, T.R. Boundary Layer Climates. London: Methuen, 2003.
View Full Essay

High Performance Work Systems the

Words: 2717 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78048415

The Shared Information Principle is also the most reliant on technologies, with the Human esource Information Systems (HIS) and communications technologies being the most crucial within this specific principle.

The Principle of Knowledge Development

The most strategically important aspect of any HPWS, this principle is where the greatest value is delivered to an enterprise. Knowledge Development is heavily dependent on the training aspects of an organization, including instruction in broad skills, cross-training, problem solving and team training. This phase is also heavily dependent on gain sharing, profit sharing and skill-based pay. Its most important aspect from a workflow standpoint is the development of empowerment, another aspect of effective transactional leadership (Fitzgerald, Schutte, 2010).

This is where the highest performing HPWS concentrate their efforts, creating a very high level of personal ownership of knowledge capture, classification, taxonomy definition and knowledge sharing (Wood, de Menezes, 2011). This is also the principle that…… [Read More]

References

Boxall, P. (2012). High-performance work systems: What, why, how and for whom? Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 50(2), 169.

Birasnav, M., Rangnekar, S., & Dalpati, a. (2011). Transformational leadership and human capital benefits: The role of knowledge management. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 32(2), 106-126.

Jorg Felfe, & Schyns, B. (2004). Is similarity in leadership related to organizational outcomes? The case of transformational leadership. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 10(4), 92-102.

Fitzgerald, S., & Schutte, N.S. (2010). Increasing transformational leadership through enhancing self-efficacy. The Journal of Management Development, 29(5), 495-505.
View Full Essay

Forest Fires and Suppression Fire and Smoke Control

Words: 2754 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33560116

Forest Fires and Suppression

Fires are a powerful, natural phenomenon that can have a huge impact on the ecosystem and the people living in the area. A forest fire (more commonly referred to as wildfire) is any fire that may occur in a combustible vegetative environment or wilderness area. Forest fires can be ignited by either natural forces or by man's negligence. Other causes are all man-made. Fires are instigated by fuel and sustained by oxygen and heat. In forests, the trees and bushes serve as fuel. Although in a very small percentage, some forest fires are caused by spontaneous combustion. Every object has a temperature at which it ignites. This temperature is known as Flashpoint. [1: Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Third Edition. (2008). Cambridge University Press.]

The Flashpoint for wood is 572 degree Fahrenheit. hen wood heats up to a temperature 572 degree Fahrenheit, it produces a gas that…… [Read More]

Work Cited (Australia), V.P. Press conference: Bushfires death toll revised to 173. Media Release. 2009.Ambrosia, V.G. Disaster Management Applications -- Fire. NASA-Ames Research Center . 2003.Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Third Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008.China Makes Snow to Extinguish Forest Fire. FOXNews.com. 2006.Chronological List of U.S. Billion Dollar Events. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite and Information Service.Fok, C.-L., Roman, G.-C., & and Lu, C.W Mobile Agent Middleware for Sensor Networks: An Application Case Study . 2004.Group, N.W. (March 2003). The New Generation Fire Shelter .Laboratory, M.F. Fire Behavior and Danger Software. 2008. Retrieved 2012, from http://www.firemodels.org/Pyne, S.J. (n.d.). How Plants Use Fire (And Are Used By It). Retrieved from Nova Online:  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/fire/plants.html Schroeder, D. Evaluation of Three Wildfire Smoke Detection Systems. Advantage (Forest Enginerring Research Institute of Canada) . 2004.Specification 5100-304c Long-Term Retardant, Wildland Firefighting. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service . 2007.Townsend, H. City swelters, records tumble in heat. Melbourne: The Age. 2009.]

As the old saying goes, "prevention is better than cure." It is imperative that there is effective wildfire prevention methods employed in order to minimize the risk of eventual suppression. Prevention has its benefits as it reduces the threat of fire to the lives, environment and nearby land and buildings. It also aids in the reduction of the fire damage that is caused and reduces the costs of suppression. Smokey, the Bear was created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, in 1944. He was created as a fire preventive messenger to warn unaware novice campers of the dangers of their careless actions. Other prevention techniques involve the supervising authorities in the area to manage the air quality and maintain the ecological balance of their region in order to prevent conditions that lead to the ignition of forests.

End Notes
View Full Essay

Macroeconomic Theories and Nickel and

Words: 1683 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1337146



Bronfenbrenner's four systems consist of microsystems (i.e. nuclear family, neighborhood, schools, etc.); mesosystems (i.e. The specific connections between the individual and microsystems); exosystems (i.e. external environment and circumstances such as the work experiences of the parents); and macrosystems (i.e. The larger elements of society such as national culture and political climate). The additional (fifth) system is the chronosystem (i.e. The long-term patterns that describe the lifetime experiences of the individual in society such as in relation to the other four systems).

Ehrenreich's observations and conclusions seem to most exemplify the influence and effects of Bronfenbrenner's exosystems and chronosystems. Specifically, the exosystems concept explains how damaging to the child it can be for a parent to work in demeaning and backbreaking work day after day, especially without realistic hope of improving the life circumstances of the family. The privations of poverty are compounded by the various detrimental consequences of primary caretakers…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Environment Lake Victoria Is a

Words: 1940 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62453065

Still, it is not unimaginable, within a lake as large as Victoria that they might also divide into separate populations along very subtle lines of variation -- like mating behaviors or feeding preferences.

This sort of interpretation of the situation in Lake Victoria, however, rests upon the notion that the species of cichlid found there evolved from a single ancestral species. Yet, even Meyer acknowledges that this might not be the case: "Within the past decade, however, morphology has increasingly emphasized the view that the flock may be polyphyletic." Put differently, it is possible that the species of cichlid that have evolved in Lake Victoria came from a group of distinct, but closely related, fish that colonized the region several thousand years ago. If this is the case, then the scientific importance of the Victorian cichlids would be somewhat diminished, because a less explosive series of adaptive radiations could explain…… [Read More]

Reference:

Goldschmidt, Tijs. 1998. Land-Use Changes and NIS in Lake Victoria. Bright and Lodge, 1998.

Kolar, Cynthia S. And David M. Lodge. 2000. Invasive Species in a Changing World. Washington D.C.: Island Press.

Meyer, Axel et al. 1990. Monophyletic Origin of Lake Victoria Cichlid Fishes Suggested by Mitochondrial DNA Sequences. Nature, 347.

Office of Protected Resources. 2005. Endangered Species Act of 1973. NOAA Fisheries. Available:
View Full Essay

Medium Sized Watershed in Holland

Words: 2434 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91915120

The promising areas of Dutch expertise are in modeling, risk management, water quality management and also institutional strengthening. The Dutch stakeholders across the board can also contribute through a cooperative and integrated approach to river basin management. All of this has to be taken into account as well as the spatial aspects of water for te new water management to be effective. It is a recognition of the need for wetlands as a water retention resource that has to be maintained in the balance. Then, there will not be a crisis. The water-shed will be most sustainable if it can be developed as a protective barrier ("aterland Information Network") .

The Biesbosch is also becoming as an economic as well as a water retention resource. The future of the area lies in the field of sustainable tourism. In the history of the place, man has worked both with and against…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Biswas, Asit K. Water Management in 2020 and Beyond. 1st. New York, NY: Springer, 2009. 190.

De Velliers, Marq. Water: The Fate of Our Most Precious Resource. 1st. New york, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2001. 3.

Hobbelen, P.H.F., J.E. Koolhaas, and C.A.M van Gestel. "Risk assessment of heavy metal pollution for detritivores in floodplain soils in the Biesbosch, the Netherlands, taking bioavailability into account." Environmental Pollution . 129. (2004): 40919. Print.

Hopkins, Anna. "Communities and Waterpoint Management." The Chapter Buzz. / blogs.ewb.ca/annahopkin, 21 Oct 2011. Web. 25 Oct 2011.
View Full Essay

San Gorgonio Wind Farm Is One of

Words: 1238 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37771251

San Gorgonio ind Farm is one of three major wind farms that provide 95% of California's wind generating capacity (and 30% of the world's wind generating capacity). This amounts of 4258 million kilowatt hours of electricity, or 1.5% of the state's total electricity production (California Energy Commission, 2011). ind energy is considered to be one of the 'clean' energy sources, as opposed to fossil fuel production and nuclear energy production in particular. However, wind farms have their own drawbacks as well from an environmental perspective. ind farms can be devastating to the local environment as they have a massive footprint. This is especially troublesome in desert environments such as that occupied by San Gorgonio. There are also visual impacts, noise produced by rotor blades and potentially high degrees of avian/bat mortality (INDEIS, n.d.). This paper will analyze the benefits and impacts of the San Gorgonio ind Farm, in particular with…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

California Energy Commission. (2011). Overview of wind energy in California. California Energy Commission. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from  http://www.energy.ca.gov/wind/overview.html 

ECW. (2000). Wind power and the environment. Energy Center of Wisconsin. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CEEQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ecw.org%2Fprod%2F433-3.pdf&rct=j&q=wind%20farms%20environmental%20issues&ei=nSV-TubMLYjmiAKu1uG5Aw&usg=AFQjCNGRg1s_hHtoaAJ8K6l2ulKPhoMhlQ&cad=rja

Palm Springs.com (2011) Palm Springs wind energy. Palm Springs.com. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from http://www.palmsprings.com/services/wind.html

Pasqualetti, M. (2011). Opposing wind energy landscapes: A search for a common cause. Annals of the Association of American Geographers. Vol. 101 (4) 907-917.
View Full Essay

Science What Are the Steps of Scientific

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12724373

Science

What are the steps of scientific method? What good is it? Does it prove anything? What's a variable? What a control vs. An experimental factor? What makes a good experiment?

Steps of scientific method:

Ask a question

Do background research

Construct a hypothesis

Test your hypothesis

Analyze your data

f. Communicate your results

The scientific method is good because it allows other scientists to repeat your experiment and all researchers to use the same method of investigation.

A variable is the thing in an experiment which varies from subject to subject.

A control in an experiment is the thing that remains the same. Experimental factors are the factors that are being tested and are changing.

e. Good data and accurate experimentation make a good experiment.

How does evolution explain the diversity of life we see today? What is natural selection and how does it work? What do we mean…… [Read More]