Emotional Intelligence Essays (Examples)

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Emotional Intelligence
hat am I going to do when I learn that a classmate has basically stolen my story idea and is winning a contest using my story? hat should I do if I discover that a classmate had used the plot and theme of a story I wrote a few months ago, and simply changed the names of my original characters and changed the place in which my story was set? This paper responds to that challenge and brings emotional intelligence into the issue.

My story and the plagiarized version of my story

Some months ago I published a short story on an Internet site that got a great deal of positive response from those visiting the site. It was a story based on a major blizzard that hit western Minnesota. Emma, the wife of the protagonist Victor, was isolated in her home by a winter storm that dumped two and a….

Emotional intelligence Leadership - What makes a good leader?
Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the capability to recognize, manage and assess emotions. Some researchers propose that emotional intelligence can be learned and reinforced, while others claim it is an innate trait (Cherry, 2011). Emotional Intelligence has become a crucial part of how today's leaders meet the significant challenges they face everyday. Emotional Intelligence can help leaders in an increasingly difficult leadership role, one that fewer and fewer people seem capable of fulfilling (Childs, 2011).

Emotional Intelligence does not fit the characteristic historical models of leadership. These models typically are associated with great figures of military history and summon up charismatic and sometimes dictatorial images. Nonetheless, people frequently use the same language for leadership today. Leaders must be brave, daring and tough with a strong sense of purpose and determination. Yet, this does not fit today's needs, for the reason that today's workforce….

Emotional Intelligence in Law Enforcement
Emotional Intelligence for Officer in a Law Enforcement Environment

Law enforcement officers constitute exceptional and diverse personnel that experience a broad range of emotions. They therefore encounter numerous and strange challenges. Because of the nature, perception and significance of the services these officers offer to the public, their occupation is always under scrutiny and expected to portray high level of public standards. In addition, due to the demands and high expectations from the public, it is imperative to know whether emotional intelligence is vital in identifying the competence of law enforcement officers. The very important element in law enforcement field is the expertise of emotional intelligence competence.

This report illustrates that for an officer to manage the moods and emotions that emanates from the nature of their profession, self-awareness and leadership styles are significant because they tend to increase the perceptions and enhance future efficiency and success. Furthermore,….

Armed with such information, transformational leaders can respond appropriately thus effectively averting possible fallout. This is a clear indication that they possess empathy. Empathy according to Goleman (2004) is "the ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people." By easily identifying with the thoughts and concerns of their followers, transactional leaders can better take a group's pulse while at the same time correctly reading its concerns and thoughts.
Further, as I had earlier on indicated elsewhere in this text, Daft and Lane (2009) are convinced that when it comes to the management of change, transformational leaders perform relatively well. This is an indication that as compared to transactional leaders, transformational leaders do possess social skills. The hallmarks of social skills according to Goleman (2004) include but they are not limited to persuasiveness and effectiveness in change leadership. As drivers of change, transformational leaders have superior interpersonal skills and team….

In other words Emotional Intelligence means that the individual is capable of: (1) Accurately perceiving emotions in oneself and others; (2) Uses emotions to facilitate thinking; (3) Understands emotional meanings; and (4) Manages emotions well. This model is referred to as the 'ability' model of emotional intelligence. (Mayer & Salovey, 1997)
DANIEL GOLEMAN-PERSONAL & SOCIAL COMPETENCE

Daniel Goleman proposed the model of emotional intelligence based on the Personal and Social competencies of the individual. This work will look at each of these areas of competency for the individual in their 'personal' and 'social' interactions.

The Personal Competence Model

Within the framework of the personal competence model are the elements of:

1) Self-Awareness, 2) Self-Regulation, and 3) Self-Motivation.

The following chart illustrates these categories and the respective sub-categories that comprise each of the three in the Personal Competence model.

PERSONAL COMPETENCE MODEL

SELF-AWARENESS

I. Emotional Awareness is the recognition on one's own emotions and their effects. Those who possess….

To empathize will not even require a person to understand the reason why some people feel that way, or feel different. Empathizing, as a component of emotional intelligence, is just mere knowing and/or being aware of how they feel and nothing more (Anderson, 1985).
The fifth and last component of emotional intelligence deals with handling relationships. This component is parallel to the management of various emotions to others, socialization, and handling conflicts and difficult issues (http://students.cup.edu/dup2093/components.htm,2006). ith such aspect of relationship-handling, this component of social intelligence clearly suggests a cognitive portion of human being. To successfully and efficiently handle relationships, one needs to know what kind of relationship he/she is looking for and what type of personality he/she has as compared to the type of personality of the other people he/she wants to meet, befriend, work with, etc. This is of course a task of analyzing (Omdahl, 1995). There should….

Emotional Intelligence in Organizations
he term "emotional intelligence" refers to a person's ability to identify and regulate his own emotions, as well as the ability to identify and respond appropriately to the emotions of others. he notion that emotional intelligence is linked to professional and commercial success has been around since the 1930s, when psychologist Robert horndike coined the phrase "social intelligence," essentially referring to intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills. In 1948, the Office of Strategic Services developed the first assessment of "non-cognitive" brain functions, and in 1956, A& became the first corporation to utilize this assessment as a tool of measuring employees' emotional sensitivity, social communication skills, interpersonal skills, and the inclination to take initiative in social situations. In 1959, psychologist J.K. Hemphill and the Ohio State Leadership Studies "suggested that 'consideration' [of others emotions, desires and needs] was an important aspect of effective leadership," and in 1983, Howard Gardener….

It is: "Intelligence comprises the mental abilities necessary for adaptation to, as well as shaping and selection of, any environmental context" (Quoted by Pfeiffer 2004 p. 138). Although Sternberg's concept notes that individuals act intelligently when they can adapt to their environment, but also when they can alter their environment to meet their needs; this was seen as consistent with a basis in a "common core of mental processes, irrespective of culture or environmental context" (Pfeiffer 2004 p. 138).
Also identified were those core mental processes. They were:

Recognizing the existence of the problem

Defining the nature of the problem

Constructing a strategy to solve the problem

Mentally representing information about the problem

Allocating mental resources in solving the problem

Monitoring one's solution to the problem

Evaluating one's solution to the problem (Pfeiffer 2004 p. 138).

These have a lot in common with the components proposed by Akers & Porter.

Pfeiffer also identified the existing EQ (EI) tests available.….

Emotional Intelligence is a concept of current interest, largely communicated to the public through Goleman's bestselling book on the subject, Emotional Intelligence. The book itself is based on psychological theories and research that date back as far as the 1920's. To understand emotional intelligence it is necessary to consider the psychological research that supports the book.
The concept of emotional intelligence first surfaced in the psychology literature in 1920, as what was then defined as 'social intelligence.' Thorndike described three types of intelligence: abstract intelligence; concrete intelligence; and social intelligence. Social intelligence was defined as "the ability to understand and manage men and women, boys and girls -- to act wisely in human relations" (Thorndike 228).

In the 1940's, Wechsler distinguished between 'intellective' and 'non-intellective' abilities and also predicted that the 'non-intellective' factors would be a greater predictor of success in life than 'intellective' factors,

The main question is whether non-intellective, that is….

This is however not entirely the case. Working in physical isolation does not mean that there is no need for effective communication. Indeed, communication in such a case becomes even more important, as the lack of a physical workplace creates extra reliance upon communication. Workers still have to communicate with supervisors and customers, even if this is only in the virtual environment. Providing services to human customers will then sometimes necessitate a sufficient amount of EQ to handle possible problems.
Goleman's work represents a new awareness of the importance of EQ in the workplace. It furthermore provides the basis for future research not only in workplace intelligence, but also in implementing strategies for increased EQ in children and students at tertiary institutions. His work brings home the importance of personal and social competence in the workplace, and how these can be used to create an optimal integration of intellectual, intra-….

Emotional Intelligence and Midwife Practice
There are many different kinds of knowledge and intelligence, and while scientific/medical knowledge is often considered paramount in pregnancy and birthing scenarios another kind of intelligence can actually be just as important, if not more so. Though there is some controversy over the exact definition and use of the term, emotional intelligence -- which can be basically understood as the ability to recognize and effectively respond to the emotions of others and of oneself -- has been recognized as a very useful and even necessary asset and knowledge area in many endeavors (Matthews et al., 2004; Wharam, 2009). A high level of emotional intelligence, which is to some degree inborn but which can also be achieved through practice, conscious awareness, and increasing openness and receptiveness, can ease many situations and lead to more comprehensive and effective decision-making (Wharam, 2009). There are also many aspects of midwifery….

Emotional intelligence has for many years been an accepted skill in business, if one tough to measure. Emotional intelligence is a predictor of managerial success, and that it can be measured through performance analysis, rather than through testing. As business today has become more oriented towards teamwork, there has been a push to analyze the level of emotional intelligence in the team setting. There are multiple dimensions to emotional intelligence -- self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills. The same skills that lead to a high EI level are the ones used in teams -- since teamwork is defined by a high level of social interdependence. Positive, effective interpersonal relationships are an important element of successful teams. A high EI contributes to such relationships. Assessing the EI of teams therefore rests on the ability of management to assess these particular traits within the team and its individual members.
One of the….

2008). Interestingly, this study also showed that the age and length of service for nurses was also related to their experience of work related stress independently of emotional intelligence, with younger and less experienced nurses reporting lower levels of stress than those with longer service records (Landa et al. 2008). While emotional intelligence is a major part of dealing with stress occurring in the workplace, then, it is not the sole factor in determining how this work stress is experienced or dealt with, but rather other life factors must be taken into account, as well.
This is the reason that work stress is such a prevalent problem in the current period; work is intimately related to many of the external stressors affecting many people today, concerning their financial standing and their future prospects (Froman 2010). Working to increase emotional intelligence, while not able to correct these external stressors nor to….

Emotional Intelligence
Jack Watson

Self-Awareness

Jones has a self-image that is born out of significant life accomplishment and tremendous ability. As a consequence, the impression he gives is one of extreme confidence to the point of arrogance. But Mr. Jones is not arrogant, he is simply confident in a way that corresponds to his achievements and his age. As a young man, Mr. Jones has not had the number of years behind him that would have tempered the impact of his meteoric rise on his image of himself. These factors make him less capable of relating to his direct reports even when he attempts to do so with genuine effort. It is clear that he has a difficult time with meaningful interaction with those who are under him in the organization because of the stiff and rigid way in which he attempts to interact. Interestingly, despite his amazing accomplishments in his life, Mr.….


But although the theory of emotional intelligence as one of the components of human intelligence has made inroads into academia, specifically in morals education in the lower grades, adult people in the competitive workplace in organizations, despite all discussion of teamwork, are often judged by overly rigid criteria that bear little relation to their ability to relate to, work well with, or objectively evaluate their colleagues. Even when emotional intelligence assessments are made in the workforce, this is rarely done in relation to self-examination and to encourage self-awareness of the worker's own biases. The idea of emotional intelligence in business is still more often outwardly directed, in terms of phrases like 'getting to know one's colleagues better,' rather than to better understand one's own strengths and weaknesses. However, self-knowledge of cultural and psychological biases remains lacking in business today, and is particularly critical, especially during recruitment of new employees, as….

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4 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence What Am I Going to

Words: 1514
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Emotional Intelligence hat am I going to do when I learn that a classmate has basically stolen my story idea and is winning a contest using my story? hat should…

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8 Pages
Essay

Leadership

Emotional Intelligence Leadership - What Makes a

Words: 2676
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

Emotional intelligence Leadership - What makes a good leader? Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the capability to recognize, manage and assess emotions. Some researchers propose that emotional intelligence can be…

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8 Pages
Essay

Leadership

Emotional Intelligence in Law Enforcement Emotional Intelligence

Words: 2196
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

Emotional Intelligence in Law Enforcement Emotional Intelligence for Officer in a Law Enforcement Environment Law enforcement officers constitute exceptional and diverse personnel that experience a broad range of emotions. They therefore…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Leadership

Emotional Intelligence and Leadership in

Words: 1637
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Armed with such information, transformational leaders can respond appropriately thus effectively averting possible fallout. This is a clear indication that they possess empathy. Empathy according to Goleman (2004)…

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33 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence Issues in Theoretical

Words: 9097
Length: 33 Pages
Type: Term Paper

In other words Emotional Intelligence means that the individual is capable of: (1) Accurately perceiving emotions in oneself and others; (2) Uses emotions to facilitate thinking; (3) Understands…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence Also Known as

Words: 3624
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

To empathize will not even require a person to understand the reason why some people feel that way, or feel different. Empathizing, as a component of emotional intelligence,…

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7 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence in Organizations

Words: 2284
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Emotional Intelligence in Organizations he term "emotional intelligence" refers to a person's ability to identify and regulate his own emotions, as well as the ability to identify and respond appropriately…

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8 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Words: 2645
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Term Paper

It is: "Intelligence comprises the mental abilities necessary for adaptation to, as well as shaping and selection of, any environmental context" (Quoted by Pfeiffer 2004 p. 138). Although…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence Is a Concept of Current

Words: 933
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Emotional Intelligence is a concept of current interest, largely communicated to the public through Goleman's bestselling book on the subject, Emotional Intelligence. The book itself is based on psychological…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence the Importance and

Words: 1247
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

This is however not entirely the case. Working in physical isolation does not mean that there is no need for effective communication. Indeed, communication in such a case…

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3 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence and Midwife Practice There Are

Words: 856
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Emotional Intelligence and Midwife Practice There are many different kinds of knowledge and intelligence, and while scientific/medical knowledge is often considered paramount in pregnancy and birthing scenarios another kind of…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence Has for Many Years Been

Words: 804
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Emotional intelligence has for many years been an accepted skill in business, if one tough to measure. Emotional intelligence is a predictor of managerial success, and that it can…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence and Work-Related Stress

Words: 619
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

2008). Interestingly, this study also showed that the age and length of service for nurses was also related to their experience of work related stress independently of emotional…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Business - Management

Emotional Intelligence Jack Watson Self-Awareness Jones Has

Words: 807
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Emotional Intelligence Jack Watson Self-Awareness Jones has a self-image that is born out of significant life accomplishment and tremendous ability. As a consequence, the impression he gives is one of extreme confidence…

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1 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Emotional Intelligence An Overview --

Words: 425
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

But although the theory of emotional intelligence as one of the components of human intelligence has made inroads into academia, specifically in morals education in the lower grades, adult…

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