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Taking English in the US

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69456379

English Class In the United States

My Personal Experience

Before coming to the United States, I went to Dasman Bilingual School in Kuwait where I graduated high school. I chose this program because I have always dreamed of traveling the world and knew at an early age that I would one day leave Kuwait. English has become one of the most spoken languages in the world, due to the fact that much of international business uses English, and I had hoped that the English program at the Dasman Bilingual School would prepare me to a world traveler as well as study at an international university.

After high school I studied facts about many international university programs all over the world. I was not completely sure which one I wanted to go to and which one's would accept me. I also did not know how well I would do at a…… [Read More]

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English Have Learned Valuable Communication

Words: 631 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61913462



A appreciate the fact that this English course also included sections on writing effective narrative papers. I found narrative papers to be fun to write because they involve storytelling and rich descriptive language. I feel more creative writing narrative papers, which is why I prefer writing them, as opposed to research papers. When we write narrative papers, I can draw from personal experience, which makes the writing process easier than it is during the process of writing a research paper. Also, the techniques of writing narrative papers differ from the techniques of writing research and persuasive papers. Organization and focus is important, but the paper can be less formal in a narrative essay.

A found literary analysis papers to be among the most difficult to write. I found it very helpful to encounter some of the common techniques for approaching literary criticism. Learning about the different formats such as MLA…… [Read More]

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English -- the Cv Professional Communication Skills

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33955993

English -- the CV

Professional communication skills in English

Looking back over your portfolio and the course as a whole, what have you learned (about yourself/your strengths/weaknesses/the job application process/employer expectations/interviews etc.), and what ideas/information will you use in future internship and job applications? Why? (If you feel you have not learned anything, please explain why you feel that is, and explain what would have changed that).

One of the most important things I have learned this semester is the difference between casual and professional English. When communicating with English language speakers on a casual level, I often find it easy to be understood, provided that my intention is sincere. Friends are willing to overlook bad grammar and poor choice of vocabulary. I can restate what I mean, use body language and gestures, and laugh at my own lack of comprehension. During a job interview, however, an employer is assessing…… [Read More]

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English Literacy My Experience With

Words: 1545 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 30730980

It is more likely that there will continue to be many varied and constantly changing definitions of the American family, and this will continue to confuse those learning English as they attempt to make concrete connections between words and concepts from their own language and those of the new -- and constantly developing -- culture and language they have adopted.

hen making cultural comparisons, it is important to refrain from qualitative judgments, and I do not mean to imply any here. The Korean concept of the family and its responsibilities is more concrete than the American cultural and linguistic definitions, but this does not necessarily make it better. The American ideals of freedom and self-determination lie at the root of the American family, and lead to very different cultural and linguistic perspectives. It is the difference in vantage point, and not in any perceived difference in quality, that proves a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Graff, E.J. "What Makes a Family?" Frame Work. Ed. Gary Columbo, Bonnie Lisle, Sandra Mno. Boston: Bedford, 1997, 26-38.

New York Daily News. "American Role Models." 6 November 2008. Editorial: pg. 32

Tan, Amy. "Four Directions" Frame Work. Ed. Gary Columbo, Bonnie Lisle, Sandra Mno. Boston: Bedford, 1997, 124-127.

Wetzstein, Cheryl. "American Family Needs Some Help." Washington Times, 8 March 2009, M15.
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English by Time

Words: 3444 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 45578320

(60)

The Norman conquest had forever altered the face of history and the face of the English language.

Middle English

The period thought of as the Middle English period roughly from 1150-1500 is a period that is demonstrative of the massive changes associated with the Norman conquest. Though there is some evidence that French did not completely overtake English in common or official use the language had a great influence upon English via the Normans and the elasticity of the language at its source.

The Middle English period (1150-1500) was marked by momentous changes in the English language, changes more extensive and fundamental than those that have taken place at any time before or since. Some of them were the result of the Norman Conquest and the conditions which followed in the wake of that event. Others were a continuation of tendencies that had begun to manifest themselves in Old…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baugh, Albert C. A History of the English Language. 2nd ed. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1959.

Emerson, Oliver Farrar. The History of the English Language. New York: Macmillan, 1894.

McCrum, Robert & MacNeil, Robert. The Story of English: Third Revised Edition. New York: Penguin, 2003.

Spreading the Word; Restore VOA's English-Language Broadcast Funds." The Washington Times 15 Feb. 2006: A19.
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English Only Legislation Is 'English

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25669338

Language continually reminds one (or not), and underscores and reinforces (or not) one's roots, identity, and authentic self. That is, I believe, the real reluctance of those who would cling, too stubbornly, it has been argued by Hayakawa and others, to their first, original tongue. That is also why much of the intimacy, energy, comfortableness, and fun instantly evaporated from the Rodriguez family atmosphere the afternoon one of Richard's teachers suggested to the children's parents that the family speak more English, and less Spanish, at home.

Along with one's language of birth (whatever it is) come feelings of being understood and accepted; and from those spring a sense of one's own selfhood and identity. In my opinion, that is the main, underlying, reason why 'English Only' Legislation is not a particularly practical solution to multilingualism in the United States (if multilingualism needs a "solution"). This is not because such legislation…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crawford, James. "Introduction." Language Loyalties: A Source Book on the Official English Controversy. James Crawford (Ed.). Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1992. 1.

Hayakawa, S.I. "The Case for Official English." In A Meeting of Minds: A Brief Rhetoric for Writers and Readers. Patsy Callaghan and Ann Dobyns

Eds.). New York: Pearson Longman, 2004. 446-452.

Headden, Susan, et al. "One Nation One Language: Only English Spoken
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English Civil War There Is

Words: 2541 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 37698414

" (Stoyle, 2005)

While the hope was that following the retreat of the Scots was the "...resurgence of English power" would ensue, these hopes were in vain because in October 1641 "Ireland - whose inhabitants were simultaneously appalled by the prospect of a puritan Parliament achieving political dominance in England...burst into rebellion." (Stoyle, 2005) Resulting was that in just a few weeks the power of the English in Ireland "had been reduced to a handful of coastal enclaves." (Stoyle, 2005)

The English government was "paralyzed by internal quarrels" and nothing was left that could remedy the situation. Stoyle writes that "by early 1642 both Scotland and Ireland had achieved a de facto independence, and English power in the Atlantic archipelago was weaker than it had been for centuries." (2005) the self-confidence of the English is stated to have "crumpled beneath the impact of these successive hammer-blows and, as they watched…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ashton, Robert and Parry, Raymond Howard (1970) the Civil War and After, 1642-1658. University of California Press, 1970.

Donogan, Barbara (2008) Civil War in Three Kingdoms: Huntington Library Quarterly. Vol. 71 No. 3, September 2008.

Gelderen, M.V. And Skinner, Q. (2002) Classical Liberty and the English Civil War. Cambridge University Press 2002.

Hughes, Ann (1998) the Causes of the English Civil War. Macmillan, 1998.
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English Comp Internet Writing Instruction

Words: 1404 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79112608

(Fisher & Frey, 2003, p. 396)

There is little that demands that all the instruction be given by a single teacher. In fact the supplementation of writing instruction directly from a teacher by a timeline program that guided progress of a package/driven writing assignment could be very fruitful.

Fisher & Frey point out that students often benefit in unexpected ways from processes such as journaling, (Fisher & Frey, 2003, p. 396) which can bee seen as a first brainstorming session, where students express their ideas and then narrow their ideas to a single topic. (Steele, 2008, NP) if the process of writing was more guided and offered both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, such as the scoring and direct interaction functions of the Steele proposal more writing would likely take place in a functional way. Another manner in which to motivate students in a systematic writing style is through the utilization…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, N. (2002). Getting Rid of the Yawn Factor: Using a Portfolio Assignment to Motivate Students in a Professional Writing Class. Business Communication Quarterly, 65(3), 42.

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2003). Writing Instruction for Struggling Adolescent Readers: A Gradual Release Model Because New Accountability Systems Focus on Writing, Struggling Students Need Daily, Coordinated Instruction That Is Meaningful. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 46(5), 396.

Kuriloff, P.C. (2004). Rescuing Writing Instruction: How to Save Time & Money with Technology. Liberal Education, 90(4), 36.

The Mayfield Handbook of Technical and Science Writing (2001) "The Writing Timeline" Retrieved April 12, 2008 at  http://www.mhhe.com/mayfieldpub/tsw/wt.htm
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English in Thailand Teaching English

Words: 4751 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54473182

2002, 108)." By 1996 the teaching of English in Thailand was compulsory for all primary children from the first grade.

Teaching English as a Second Language in Thailand

Although the teaching of English as a second language has been present in Thailand for quite some time, there are still many issues that arise as it pertains to teaching English in Thailand. In some ways it may appear that English language pedagogy is still in its infancy. For instance many people in Thailand have low degrees of proficiency in English (Laopongharn & Sercombe, 2009). This is particularly true as it pertains to the speaking and writing of English. The problems present in Thailand as it pertains to Teaching English as a foreign language has many different causes (Laopongharn & Sercombe (2009). For the purposes of this discussion, Thai culture will be explored as an impediment to the teaching of English as…… [Read More]

References

Adamson, J., 2003. Challenging beliefs in teacher development: potential influences of Theravada Buddhism upon Thais learning English. Asian EFL journal, 5 (3), 1-21.

Adamson, J., 2005. Teacher development in EFL: what is to be learned beyond methodology in Asian contexts?. Asian EFL journal, 7 (4), 74-84.

Chou, C. 2000. Chinese Speakers' Acquisition of English Conditionals: Acquisition Order and L1 Transfer Effects. Second Language Studies, 19(1), pp. 57-98

Forman R. (2008) Using notions of scaffolding and intertextuality to understand the bilingual teaching of English in Thailand. Linguistics and Education 19-319 -- 332
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English Literature - Stereotypes Common

Words: 1280 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72643865



In fact, most lawyers practice neither criminal law nor personal injury law; they assist individuals prepare wills, set up their businesses, protect themselves from financial risks, purchase homes, patent inventions, and respond to IS tax audits. Most lawyers spend long hours working at their desks and never actually see courtrooms or accident victims (Haskell 1998). Certainly, some lawyers are dishonest people without moral scruples or ethics who will do almost anything to make money. But more often than not, that is a function of the type of person they are, just as some schoolteachers, postal carriers, and even members of the clergy are dishonest and immoral.

Telemarketers:

Telemarketers suffer from common stereotyping as being dishonest, rude, inconsiderate liars who care only about making a sales pitch. As with other stereotypes, some telemarketers may fit those negative characterizations, but assuming them to be true about everyone who happens to earn a…… [Read More]

References

Conlon, Edward. (2004) Blue Blood. New York: Riverhead

Gerrig, R.J., Zimbardo, R.G. (2005)

Psychology and Life 18th Ed.

New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
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English Literature Today's Society Has

Words: 1272 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72645287

There must a connection between the teacher and the student beyond the traditional system of work. As stated by Ozer, there are several levels for implementation ranging from class/teacher level to the community level (2006); more precisely, a particular system of teaching must be set in place because preventing school crimes is a complex issue which takes into account both the school environment and the community one.

Research analyses have shown that results in these programs vary. On the one hand, several programs which included the development of a violent prevention curricula registered positive results in the sense that there was a clear reduction in the use of violence in hypothetical conflict situations, "frequency of use of violence in the past thirty days, and frequency of physical fights in the past thirty days" (Scheckner, 2002). More importantly however, the research conducted showed that the conflict resolution programs were more effective…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gottfredson, D., G. Gottfredson. (2002) "Quality of School-Based Prevention Programs:Results From a National Survey." Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. Vol. 39, no. 1.

Ozer, E. (2006) "Contextual Effects in School-Based Violence Prevention Programs: A Conceptual Framework and Empirical Review" the Journal of Primary Prevention. Vol. 27, no. 3.

Scheckner, S. (2002) "School violence in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of current interventions." Journal of School Violence.

Sherman, W. et al. (1998) "Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn't, What's Promising." U.S. Dept. Of Justice.
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Successful in English I Am

Words: 609 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30985740

Although my family is not made up of English speakers, they have always stressed that succeeding in school is an important part of being successful in life. It is not just grades that are important. The lessons a student learns in school will help the student succeed later in life.

Learning English is an immediately useful skill. When I am learning algebra or chemistry, sometimes I wonder how these subjects can help me in my everyday life. When I am learning English, I know that I can use the language to communicate more effectively with others. I know that what I am learning in class can help me improve my writing for all of my classes. And someday, I would like to write stories that are just as exciting as the books I like to read.

I will succeed in English 1A because of my previous preparation, my determination, and…… [Read More]

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Teaching Revision in Freshman Composition Class

Words: 2605 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78893671

eager freshman English writer comes to the process of composition with many pre-conceived, previously successful methods for editing a first draft. A favorite teacher's well-intentioned message, a parent's unskilled assessment, or the student's own perceptions can stymie the editorial and revision process.

Not just another line item to be ticked off a list of 'to dos' when completing a well-crafted paper, revision is a key element to the desired end result of quality, thoughtful discussion, and scholarly dissection. Problematic, therefore, is overcoming several societal expectations of the writing craft -- i.e., doing it well, with structure and individuality.

Learning to properly revise in an English class can support scholarship in subjects from Calculus to Macular iology. The revision process is not limited to the prosaic essay or doctoral dissertation; understanding how to communicate in a concise, clear, and well-thought out manner is important to a successful educational career.

Revision and…… [Read More]

Bibliography for Teachers of Writing." Bedford/St. Martin's. .

Bishop, Wendy. Elements of Alternate Style: Essays on Writing and Revision. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1997.

Brown, H. Douglas. Principles of language learning and teaching. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1980.

Fasheh, Munir. "From the Soils of Culture: The Qalb el-Umour Project in the Arab World." Vimukt Shiksha. Special Issue: Unfolding Learning Societies: Deepening the Dialogues, Shikshantar. 2001.

Fregeau, Laureen. "Using dialogue and reflective journals." Writing across the Curriculum Newsletter V2 (1996): n1, 3.
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Effects of Mathematics Instruction in English on ELL Second Grade Students

Words: 3174 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74903495

Mathematics Instruction in English on ELL Second Grade Students

J. Elizabeth Estevez

Educ2205I-Content Research Seminar

Mathematics is a powerful tool for interpreting the world. Research has shown that for children to learn how to use mathematics to organize, understand, compare, and interpret their experiences, mathematics must be connected to their lives. Such connections help students to make sense of mathematics and view it as relevant. There has, however, been controversy with regard to children from non-English backgrounds and the best ways to get them to make those connections. Questions are raised regarding how to instruct these children who are referred to as English language learners (ELL's). Should they initially be taught in their native language with gradual exposure to English in language classes, or should they be immersed in English as early as possible. Based upon ideas presented in research studies and my own ideas as a former bilingual teacher,…… [Read More]

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Internet Class Why Have You

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38238202

But what better introduction is there to writing than to be judged solely upon one's critical writing? Although one does not interact personally with other student writers in the online class format, one does not have the ability to interact with the writers of the texts one reads, either. One judge a classical essayist based on his or her quality of prose, and in an Internet forum one can judge a fellow student opinion based on the same standard, the quality and fluidness of the prose and the soundness of the student's opinion. Also, without the pressures of personal interaction, one is likely to be more honest about one's opinions and to take more risks about expressing one's own, potentially risky thoughts about a controversial subject.

True, Internet classes don't offer the one-on-one human interaction that can make a class exiting for someone with a personality who enjoys social interaction.…… [Read More]

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English Civil War

Words: 965 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56305858

English Civil War of the 17th century. Specifically, it will look at what the most important results of the English Civil War were, and how England in 1700 differed from England in 1600. The results of the English Civil War changed England forever, and altered many cultural aspects, from religious to government. Before the Civil War, England was divided from the inside, and after, it was more united, but stronger too, because of a better working relationship between the monarchy and the Parliament.

The English Civil War was really a series of wars fought during the mid-1600s in England, but also exacerbated by battles with the Scottish, the Irish, and the Welsh. In fact, modern historians often refer to the Civil War by several names, including, "Puritan evolution', 'English evolution', and more recently 'British Civil War(s)'" (Ohlmeyer, 1998, p. 16). It was a result of many things, including despotic rule…… [Read More]

References

Cannadine, D. (1995). Chapter 2 British history as a 'new subject.' In Uniting the Kingdom? The Making of British History, Grant, A. & Stringer, K.J. (Eds.) (pp. 12-28). New York: Routledge.

Ohlmeyer, J. (1998, November). The wars of the three kingdoms. History Today, 16.
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English Grammar Spelling Is Important Why Is

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71351813

English (Grammar, Spelling) is Important

hy is it important for a student (and any writer) to use proper grammar and spelling? This paper delves into that subject and provides research that is pertinent and helpful.

hy is Grammar Important?

Beverly Ann Chin is professor of English at the University of Montana, and she explains that when papers, letters, essays, journalism and research papers do not use proper grammar those reading those writings may have "…preconceived notions about the value of its contents" (Chin, 2000).

hen the writing shows poor grammar, no one will take it seriously, Chin explains. She also mentions that good grammar helps to "…guarantee clarity" and it also brings "…a level of order and elegance into the language." But why does it really matter? Bad grammar suggests bad writing, she continues, and when a reader sees flaws in the grammar he or she tends not to take…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aston University. (2012). Graduate Advantage highlights the importance of spelling and grammar for graduates. Retrieved January 12, 2013, from  http://www1.aston.ac.uk .

Chin, Beverly Ann. (2000). Why Do We Care About Grammar? Huff Post Teen. Retrieved January 12, 2013, from  http://www.uwplatt.edu .

Chin, Beverly Ann. (2008). The Role of Grammar in Improving Student's Writing. Sadlier-

Oxford. Retrieved January 12, 2013, from
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English Humanities Honors Class Teacher Mrs Vogt

Words: 1502 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78692362

English Humanities Honors class. teacher Mrs. Vogt, period 1, Spring 2012. questions, call [HIDDEN]

Gun laws around the world

Gun laws are a particularly divisive issue around the world, as they are often associated with more or less alarming crime levels. hile people are generally inclined to support the expression "guns don't kill people; people kill people," it is only safe to assume that crimes are largely dependent on gun laws. Some countries are known to express zero tolerance regarding gun ownership while others promote the belief that it is perfectly normal for guns to be accessible to the masses. Particular groups believe that harsh gun laws are imposed by bigoted politicians who are unable to understand matters from an objective point-of-view and certain communities consider that gun ownership needs to be controlled using severe means. All things considered, gun laws worldwide differ on account of Constitutions and depending on…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Cukier, Wendy, Sidel, Victor W. "The global gun epidemic: from Saturday night specials to AK-47s," (Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006)

Braun, Yury, "A Comparison Between the German and the United States Law Concerning the Differences in Gun Laws," (GRIN Verlag, 2009)

Hongju Koh, Harold, "LECTURE A WORLD DROWNING IN GUNS," Retrieved March 28, 2012, from the Yale Law School Website:  http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2738&context=fss_papers 

Liptak, Adam, "Gun Laws and Crime: A Complex Relationship," Retrieved March 28, 2012, from the New York Times Website:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/29/weekinreview/29liptak.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all
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English 2nd Lang I Was

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38408588

I had no idea that black people were brutally assaulted for just sitting on the wrong bench or that the police were part of the problem at that time.

The new appreciation for the factual understanding of what the American civil rights era was about scared me in some ways because it reminded me that human beings have a certain natural capacity for illogical group loyalties and prejudices. It is something that I also recognize in my country of origin and also between different Asian races of people as well. The course also changed my view of the way that white and black Americans may view one another. Even in today's era of civil rights, racial equality, and appreciation for cultural diversity, there must be some resentment remaining in many black Americans, especially those who remember life in the U.S. before the 1960s.

2.

To be perfectly honest, I think…… [Read More]

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English System of Measurement Is

Words: 1433 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87138003

(Source: http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newtongrav.html).

Assignment 2-1 -- a- Radiation may be considered information from space; different types of information from different sources. These are: 1) Light as a wave and particle, 2) Electromagnetism, 3) Cosmic Rays and 4) Ultraviolet radiation.

Part 2-1-B- Light may be measured by telescopes; other space radiation by radio waves; x-ray machines may absorb cosmic and x-ray energy.

Part 2-1-C- Stars and Planets emit electromagnetic; Sun emits UV, Electromagnetic and light; light intensity, etc. Measuring radiation from objects tells us numerous things; age of object, comparative data between object, distance, intensity, level of danger, potential changes within object over time.

Part 2-1-D- Spectrographs, radio frequency detectors, x-ray machines.

Part 2-2-a -- an atom is the smallest unit of matter; ions are types of atoms in which the protons and electrons (parts of the atomic structure) are not equal. Ions can exist independently in solution, while atoms may or…… [Read More]

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English Topic Steroid I Specific Details Topic

Words: 2834 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40751721

english topic Steroid. I specific details topic Steroid Use Sports. steroid ? famous types steroid sport function type. good bad effective steroid athletes steroid ? steroid affect short-term long-term.

Steroids: are they a necessary evil?

Society traditionally encouraged people to experience progress in any field that they possibly could and this made it difficult for some to keep up with the fact that the world was constantly changing. In their struggle to keep up and even to be recognized for their contributions, some individuals have turned to using controversial methods. Athletes are provided with difficult choices as they feel the need to satisfy the needs of their fans. Society is indirectly responsible for the fact that some athletes use steroids because of the pressure that it puts on their shoulders. Many athletes today use steroids at the expense of their own health because they know that this is one of…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Dilingham, Michael, "Steroids, Sports and the Ethics of Winning," Retrieved December 4, 2011, from the Santa Clara University Website:  http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/ethicalperspectives/steriods-ethics.html 

Dodgshon, Robert, The Age of the Clans: The Highlands from Somerled to the Clearances (Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2002)

Hecht, Annabel, "Anabolic Steroids: Pumping Trouble," FDA Consumer Sept. 1984

Sender Aaron J. "Anabolic Steroids for non-therapeutic use," Retrieved December 4, 2011, from the New York University Website: http://www.nyu.edu/classes/jaeger/anabolic_steroids.htm
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English Grammar Letter From Birmingham

Words: 4733 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 60817463

The first independent clause begins in a strong active voice, with a strong decisive verb, (Graff, 2006).

This represents his shift from true passiveness to a form of non-violent action. Then, the dependent clause "realizing that except for Christmas," begins with a gerund. The verb to realize is transformed into a noun with the adding of a "-ing." This is aimed at showing the general modality of the speaker. The speaker and all involved had a previous knowledge of the realization involved in the process. Then King Jr. refers back to the object Easter with the subject and verb of "this is." This is a form of a relative clause which is therefore a form of adjective clause, (Lewis, 1986).

The next sentence continues the modality of the gerund verb. This sentence is a dependent attached to an independent clause first beginning with a gerund, "Knowing that a strong economic…… [Read More]

References

King, Martin Luther Jr. (1963). Letter from Birmingham jail. University of Pennsylvania. African Studies. 12 June. 2008.  http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html 

Lewis, Michaels. (1986). The English verb: an exploration of structure and meaning.

Language Teaching Publications.

Strunk, William & White, E.B. (1999). The elements of style. Longman Publishers.
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English B A Place That

Words: 1169 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97817001

He treated the other residents with dignity as he was working. He said that while there were many residents in the shelter, none of them was alike but people insisted on treating them the same way. Often, residents will find reasons to fight and argue with one another but he wanted to be above that kind of behavior. He was sensitive to the fact that all of them had rough experiences and were just like him in that they were trying to make things better. He would comment that all the residents were citizens of the country and they all deserved the same rights as anyone else, whether they had a home or not. He would rally around residents when they suffered an injustice and try to work toward an amiable situation with them if her could. In "Theme for English B," the wants to know more about the human…… [Read More]

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Class Standards

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68708146

CLAS Standards

Non-English speaking patients present a challenge for those working in the healthcare industry due to the difficulty in accurately assisting and assessing the patient's needs. Because of this, it is required that interpreters be provided for patients who are non-English speakers.

Medical Language Interpretation Tools

There are six commonly used medical interpretation tools that hospitals can select from when serving patients. The first tool is a trained professional medical translator. This resource is optimal for larger hospitals that are serving a large amount of a certain group of people. For instance, an area with a large number of French speaking patients should have a French medical translator on staff. The second option is using a phone medical translator. When using a phone translator, the doctor, patient, and translator are all on the phone at the same time and work together to discuss the circumstances. The third option for…… [Read More]

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English Protestant Clergy in Literature

Words: 3374 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86316964

Adams, Primrose and Yorick: A Comparison of 18th Century Church of England Clergymen

One of the clearest features shared by Fielding's Adams in Joseph Andrews, Goldsmith's Primrose in The Vicar of Wakefield, and Sterne's Yorick in A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy is relentlessness that the characters demonstrate, as though by sheer force of will they may manage affairs to a happy conclusion. In spite of their sometimes obtuse qualities, their evident pride in themselves, their naivete, their innocence, their ability to bungle their way into all manner of episodic conundrums, their resolute good humor through it all ensures the reader that whatever grace they do possess will be sufficient to make all well by the end of the narrative. Such is true of all three clergymen, and to the extent that all three clergymen represent the pastors of the Church of England in the 18th century, one could…… [Read More]

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English Language Arts observations report

Words: 992 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82746474

High school student leader English Language Arts (ELA) observations report

Observations

• Incorporates major content components and aids pupils in applying higher order thinking skills within learning.

• Displays the capability of relating current content to prior experiences, future learning, practical application and other disciplines.

• Displays correct knowledge regarding the topic taught.

• Displays abilities that are pertinent to the lesson.

• Centers teaching on objectives which echo superior expectations and a grasp of the discipline.

• Undertakes realistic time-planning in the areas of pacing, transition and subject mastery.

• Undertakes efficient differentiated instruction planning.

• Ensures pupils' involvement and dynamic learning.

• Builds on pupils' current skills and knowledge.

• Makes use of instructional technology for improving pupils' learning.

• Communicates explicitly and confirms student understanding.

• Applies various valid evaluation tools and approaches relevant to the pupil population and content.

• Employs evaluation tools for summative as…… [Read More]

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English Men Women and Children

Words: 1659 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29075406

The scientists could then begin a genealogical study to exclude the possibility of a later introduction of the Y-chromosome into the family line (DNA Project website).

An archaeological dig was begun last summer at the oanoke site to see if any additional information can be determined about what took place. Scientists have done several excavations since the late 1940s, finding artifacts undoubtedly left by the colonists such as remains from Hariot's science laboratory. In 2000, National Park Service archaeologists with ground-penetrating radar found rectangular-shaped objects buried beneath several feet of sand. Yet they have not found the site of the colonists' village. Since some relics have found under water, it is possible that what is left of the settlement has eroded and is under water. Disagreement exists about this between researchers (National Geographic).

Despite their debates about where the colonial village may have been located, the experts agree that the…… [Read More]

References Cited

DNA Project. Roanoke Colony. 2 November 2005.  http://papayne.rootsweb.com/Lost-Colony  / DNA Project

Drye, Willie. America's Lost Colony: Can New Dig Solve Mystery? National Geographic News. March 2, 2004. 2 November 2005.  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/03/0302_040302_lostcolony.html 

First English Settlement in North Carolina. 2 November 2005 http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/nc/ncsites/english1.htm

Kupperman, Karen Ordahl. Roanoke, the Abandoned Colony. New York, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1984.
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Class Struggle

Words: 2233 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62104369

portrayed in 'Lady Chatterley's Lover'. The book is quite old and the period of happening in the book is that of the First World War. The book was written by David Herbert Lawrence, an author who did not have a very high reputation as a classic writer in English. His intention was only to make money by way using his writing skills. Considering the period in which this book was written, he had probably gone a little too far from the limits which were prevalent in those days and the book was banned from sale in many countries as it was being considered to be obscene. In some countries, the ban even progressed to exist till the period of the 1960s. The reason was due to the prevalence of obscenity in the book and that was the primary reason to make the book extremely famous.

People were not permitted to…… [Read More]

References

Film and History. Retrieved from  http://www.class.uh.edu/mintz/places/film-11c_sexuality.html  Accessed on 31 May, 2005

Hatsom, Ian. Are we unshockable? Retrieved from  http://www.efc.ca/pages/media/edmonton-journal.18jan97.html  Accessed on 31 May, 2005

Lady Chatterley's Lover by David Herbert Lawrence (1885-1930): Chapter 1. Retrieved from  http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/dhlawrence/bl-dhlaw-lady-1.htm  Accessed on 31 May, 2005

Lady Chatterley's Lover by David Herbert Lawrence (1885-1930): Chapter 7. Retrieved from
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English Literature the Great Gatsby

Words: 1507 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3789537

Great Gatsby

Hamlett

F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" is set against the backdrop of 1920's Long Island. It explores multiple themes about the human condition as experienced through the actions of the story's lead character, Jay Gatsby, and the narrator, Nick Carraway.

I have selected three such themes from the book as the basis for this paper. Each of them revolves around Fitzgerald's core assessment of class differences that existed between the have's and the have not's in the society of excess and indulgence which emerged after America's participation in World War I. The first theme I will examine relates to the promise, pursuit and subsequent failure of the American dream; specifically, the expectation that the acquisition of enough money can buy one's way into all of the right circles and hearts. The second theme is that of the superficiality of the upper classes and how their worth as…… [Read More]

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English Literature Feminism Humanities

Words: 1768 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24846552

Doom in the luest Eye and the Voyage Out Doomed From the eginning:

The Inevitability of Death in the luest Eye and the Voyage Out Commonality is a funny thing. Who would suppose that a young, white twenty-four-year-old, turn of the twenty-first century, English lady might have a great deal in common with a young, adolescent, black American girl? This is exactly the case, however, between Virginia Woolf's main character, Rachel in The Voyage Out, and Toni Morrison's Pecola, in her work, The luest Eye.

Despite their differences in time, location, culture, and circumstance, the characters in the two novels share a common fate based on a common cause. oth characters begin life in unfortunate circumstances that foreshadow the inevitable doom that results from their respective positions in life.

Morrison's The luest Eye, opens with the words, "Here is the house."

It starts out innocently enough -- yet, even before…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gordon, Lyndall. Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life. New York W.W. Norton, 1984.

Hussey, Mark. Virginia Woolf A to Z. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1995.

Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. New York: Plume, 1994.

Woolf, Virginia. The Voyage Out. Oxford: Oxford University, 1992.
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English as a Foreign Language in America

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21192317

Foreign Language Learning

In DeJong's Foundations for Multilingualism in Education, the idea that multilingualism should not be viewed as a specialty but rather treated as a norm is a good one, as Dutta indicates in his experience of growing up using various languages, believing them to be one entity not separate as they are viewed in the West (DeJong, 2011, p. 1). For instance, the UK's tendency to "teach" a separate language in one class but to ignore it in all other occasions does not help to support the actual learning or usage of that language. Yet schools still have a tendency to feel the need to label students and language learners as though they needed to be marked as special or different. It should be the norm for all to learn multiple languages especially at a younger age in order to develop skills and open doors for later careers.…… [Read More]

References

DeJong, E. (2011). Foundations for Multilingualism in Education: from Principle to Practices. Caslon Publishing.

Samway, K and McKeon D. (2007). Myths and Realities: Best Practices for Language

Minority Students. Heinemann.
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English Usage of Language

Words: 1593 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26679930

female of a dog or other animals of the dog family e.g. fox a gray hound *****. However, when used as slang it implies derogatory characteristics of a woman especially a cruel and unpleasant one. In terms of relating it to something or somebody it implies 'making bad or critical comments about someone/something or complaining' inclusive of 'unpleasant situation etc.'.

Thus, its literal meaning is quite different from its common usage. How the literal meaning fell devoid giving birth to a totally new, informal and derogatory meaning is questionable. Although the formal version of the term is still used to imply the gender difference a male dog and a female dog, the informal term still prevails. There lies no apparent connection between the two meanings and it is not easy to comprehend how the two evolved simultaneously for the same word. Attitudes play a major role, the term '*****' is…… [Read More]

References

Naylor, Gloria. "The Meanings of a Word." Language Awareness. Ed. By Paul Eschholz, Alfred Rosa, and Virginia Clark. New York, New York. REL. St. Martin's Press.

S.I. Hayakawa "Right Word -- A Modern Guide to Synonyms" Harper & Row, Publishers.

Judith Ortiz Cofer, "The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria"
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Communication and Language for Teaching and Learning Math in English in Hong Kong

Words: 1076 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 74992214

English in Teaching and Learning Math in Hong Kong

With the intermingling of cultures, business, and globalization in general, it is difficult to imagine that English would not be spoken or at least understood in some form in any part of the world. If nothing else, Internet communication has opened up myriad opportunities for people to learn about any amount of cultures and languages they wish. In terms of business, as mentioned, the world has also become increasingly globalized. Businesses that can expand globally tend to be stronger financially and have greater longevity than those who cannot. Often, an ability to communicate internationally is at the heart of business success. For this reason, the medium of instruction in schools, and especially non-English speaking countries, have come to the forefront of educational attention. In Hong Kong, social and political changes have given a unique dynamic to whether or not English should…… [Read More]

References

Education Commission (2005, Dec.). Report on Review of Medium of Instruction for Secondary Schools and Secondary School Places Allocation. Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of The People's Republic of China. Retrieved from:  http://www.e-c.edu.hk/tc/reform/resources/MOI&SSPA_report_Eng.pdf 

Poon, A.Y.K., Lau, C.M.Y. And Chu, D.H.W. (2013, March). Impact of the Fine-Tuning Medium-of-Instruction Policy on Learning: Some Preliminary Findings. Literacy Information and Computer Education Journal, Vol. 4, Iss.1. Retrieved from: http://infonomics-society.org/LICEJ/ImpactoftheFineTuningMediumofInstructionPolicyonLearningSomePreliminaryFindings.pdf

Tsui, A.B.M. (2008). Medium of Instruction in Hong Kong: One Country, Two Systems, Whose Language? Medium of Instruction Policies: Which Agenda? Whose Agenda? Edited by James. W. Ollofson and Amy B.M. Tsui. Taylor & Francis e-Library.

Zeng, W. (2007). Medium of Instruction in Secondary Education in Post-Colonial Hong Kong:
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Finite and Nonfinite Verbs and How They Are Used in the English Language

Words: 1563 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73776595

Finite and Non-Finite English Verbs

Verbs do much of the semantic labor in a language -- their use allows us to mean things that cannot be conveyed by mere nouns and adjectives. In our study of syntax, we can identify several important classes of verbs by their behavior and use, and the way in which they interact with negation: finite and non-finite verbs. These verb classes allow us to do a variety of things: distinguish perfect (i.e. finished) and imperfect (not yet complete) actions without the cumbersome use of case markers, use verbs as the core of an independent sentence (finite verbs only), and form the base for clauses that employ auxiliary verbs (nonfinite verb-based clauses). The acquisition of finite and non-finite verbs in English is interesting to many scholars (Theakston, Lieven, & Tomasello, 2003). These forms also respond to negation in distinctive ways compared to other verbs. Below, I…… [Read More]

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Working Class in England First Published in

Words: 1421 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 83756415

orking Class in England

First published in English in 1892, Frederick Engels' The Conditions of the orking-class in England in 1844 was a firsthand account of the everyday conditions of workers in a recently-industrialized England. Engels' book provides an ideal primary source for understanding the effect of the Industrial Revolution on English society, because a Engels is careful to contextualize his discussion of the working-class in 1844 Manchester with a comparison to conditions in rural England, as well as prior to industrialization. Engels begins with the historical and technological developments leading to industrialization, and then moves on to a discussion of the different experiences of industrial workers alongside further information concerning the environment of industrial cities themselves. In all, The Conditions of the orking-class in England offers the student of history a convincing and well-researched examination and critique of a newly industrial England and the social and historical forces that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Engels, Frederick. The Condition of the Working-class in England in 1844. London: Swan

Sonnenschein & Co, 1892.
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Time Periods in English

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18909245

English Literature

The medieval period in English history spans across some 800 years. The Anglo-Saxon period consisted of literature that was retained in memory. The major influence of the literature up until the Norman Conquest was mainly of the religious kind. "Distinguished, highly literate churchmen (Abrams 4) the Ecclesiastical History of England remains our "most important source of knowledge about the Anglo-Saxon period" (4).

The Anglo-Saxons were primarily known for their contribution to poetry. Their alliterative form was, of course, how poetry survived. Sine they wrote nothing down until they were "Christianized," Abrams suggest that that Christian ideals influenced how things were recorded and it would also explain why some non-Christian literature did not survive. Beowulf is what Abrams refers to as the "greatest" German epic, even though it appears to many pre-Christian ideas. (4) Another example of the Anglo-Saxon writing movement would be Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Chaucer brilliantly weaves…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrams, M.H., ed. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986.

Encyclopedia Britannica. Chicago: William Benton Publisher. 1959.

Wright, Meg. Early English Writers. New York: Marshall Cavendish Corporation. 1989.
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Athabaskan-English Interethnic Communication the Author

Words: 1804 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15896513

By acquiring knowledge about racism and how it operates in everyday life of people, whether they are white Americans or not, students, through their educators and experiences, become more aware and hopefully, tolerant, of the differences in values, attitudes, and behavior of people coming from different races and cultures.

Social class and the hidden curriculum of work" by Jean Anyon provides a descriptive study of four categories of schools determined through the socio-demographic characteristics of its students. As part of an ethnographic research, Anyon's observations of four types of schools -- working class schools, middle-class schools, affluent professional school, and executive elite school -- illustrate how, as students' social class level goes down from the socio-economic ladder, the kind of learning and education that the students receive correspondingly decreases as well.

Anyon's method is indeed reflective of this reality in America's educational institutions, and descriptions from her observations show that…… [Read More]

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War Isolation and English Is

Words: 1327 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24634852

In 1066, illiam the Conqueror and his army of Normans established themselves as the dominant power in Britain, and the form of French they brought with them quickly became the language of the powerful classes in British society, while the lower classes still spoke English (English Club, 3). For the second time in just over five-hundred years, a major conquest of the Isle of Britain was conducted by an invading tribe with a foreign tongue. This time, however, the existing language and people were not replaced, but instead the Latin influence of the Norman tongue began to seep into English, creating the first elements of a "bastard" tongue (Anglik.net, 6). ords such as "beef" and "cow" illustrate how the class difference that existed at first between speaker of the Norman and Anglo-Saxon languages eventually resulted in a language with a greater diversity of words than any other -- cow has…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglik.net. "A Brief History of the English Language." Accessed 1 February 2009.  http://www.anglik.net/englishlanguagehistory.htm 

Baugh, Albert C. And Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language. New York: Prentice Hall, 2001.

English Club.com. "History of the English Language." Accessed 31 January 2009.  http://www.englishclub.com/english-language-history.htm 

Marsh, George P. The Origin and History of the English Language. New York: Scribner, 1896.
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Learning to Read and Write in English

Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21447154

Learning to read and write in English has been one of my most treasured accomplishments in the recent past. To begin with, learning to read and write in English is in my opinion the very first step towards becoming a fluent speaker of one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. In that regard therefore, I am convinced that fluency in English is a plus as I pursue my career of choice. Given that English is one of the most common languages, corporations and most organizations would ordinarily hire individuals who can relate well with their customers and clients. Being able to read, write, and speak English will therefore give me a distinct advantage in my future job seeking endeavors. It is also important to note that fully aware that the world is increasingly becoming interconnected; the relevance of learning an additional language cannot be overstated. It is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldwin, James. Sonny's Blues. Stuttgart: Klett Sprachen, 2009. Print.

Brinton, Margaret. 100 Little Reading Comprehension Lessons. New York: Lorenz Educational Press, 2004. Print.

Cusipag, Maria, et al. Critical Thinking through Reading and Writing. Philippines: De La Salle University Press, 2007. Print.
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Black Vernacular English

Words: 1808 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74008057

African-American Vernacular English can be described as an assortment of American English that is mostly used by urban-working class and mostly bi-dialectical middle-class black Americans. The language is also commonly known as Black Vernacular English or Black English. In some cases, particularly outside the academic community, it is referred to as Ebonics given its distinctive features and similarities with other non-standard English varieties. The similarities with other varieties are evident when compared to various standard and non-standard English languages that are commonly used in the United States and the Caribbean. In the past few years, African-American Vernacular English has been the subject of various public debates and attracted considerable attention among sociolinguists. This paper examines the development of this language, its distinctive features, cultural context, and socio-economic implications of the use of African-American Vernacular English.

oots of African-American Vernacular English

The history and origin of African-American Vernacular English and other…… [Read More]

References

Fisher, D. & Lapp, D. (2013, May). Learning to Talk Like the Test: Guiding Speakers of African

American Vernacular English. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 56(8), 634-648.

Harris, Y.R. & Schroeder, V.M. (2013, January 24). Language Deficits or Differences: What We

Know about African-American Vernacular English in the 21st Century. International Education Studies, 6(4), 194-204.
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Lesson Plan for Gustav Klimt Art Class

Words: 6407 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67881416

Gustav Klimt Lesson Plan

Central Focus

"Describe the central focus and purpose for the content you will teach in the learning segment".

Students will learn the art of Gustav Klimt, which will assist in creating the work of art that will resemble Klimt's style. Moreover, students will be introduced to the Gustav Klimt's artwork focusing on his love for cats. (Weidinger, 2007).Students will also learn their artistic style and utilize their patterns and shapes to fill up their works. Moreover, students will continue to build and develop the basic skill sets utilizing art tools such as paint, glue, scissors, and oil pastels. Students will also learn how to utilize the line variation, stylized form, symbol, color, and media variety with the ability to create their "Tree of Life". Moreover, the lesson plan will assist students to learn about cool and warm colors incorporating them into the artistic styles of Gustav…… [Read More]

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British and American English Comparative

Words: 6793 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Multiple Chapters Paper #: 52117769

5). Surprisingly, however, in a corpus of 50,000 spoken words compiled from "group discussions between representatives of the EU government and national agencies of higher education" (pp. 6-7), Breiteneder (2009) did not find a large incidence of 3rd person singular - O. In only about 21% of the cases where 3rd personal singular was used was the -s left off. Perhaps, reasons Breiteneder, this is because all the speakers in the study had received formal schooling in a SE, but if so, then why was the -s used in some cases and not in others? Breiteneder posits that in some instances the interlocutors may have been purposely leaving off the -s for social reasons (2009, p. 262).

Certain verbs and expletive phrases seem to divide along dialectal lines with regard to use of modal past. Jacobsson (1975) writes that the sentences I suggested he took it with him, and I…… [Read More]

References

Bell, Daniel a. Beyond Liberal Democracy: Political Thinking for an East Asian Context. Princeton University Press. 2006

Brandon, L., Baszile, D., & Berry, T.. Linguistic moments: language, teaching and teacher education in the U.S. Educational Foundations (Winter-Spring), 47-66. 2009

Breiteneder, a.. English as a lingua franca in Europe: An empirical perspective. World Englishes, 28, 256-269. 2009

Davidsen-Nielsen, Niels.. Tense and Mood in English: A Comparison with Danish. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 1990
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Revolutionary Comparison The English America

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 14770744

Unlike the English Revolution, the American Revolution was also bloody, not relatively peaceful, and created a new government, rather than sustained and substantially reformed an old one. But it was more desired and waged 'by the people,' rather than by the ruling classes, unlike the British. In this sense, the American Revolution was seen as a greater victory for the Enlightenment. Just as the Bloodless Revolution did make the English system more balanced in terms of monarchial authority and allowed the predominantly Protestant will of the English people to be respected, the American Revolution even more radically upheld notions of national self-definition, individual rights, and the right for a people to exercise self- determination over their futures. The philosopher John Locke believed that a sovereign abdicated his or her right of rule when he or she acted in a tyrannical fashion and deprived citizens of fundamental rights to life, liberty,…… [Read More]

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Beautiful English Rose Is an

Words: 1110 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17814138

"

he was lucky too that a dedicated and gifted teacher came his way who recognized his skills and effort fully interceded on his behalf.

If not for Jack MacFarland, ose may never have gone onto Loyola or become the kind of person that he became today.

In contrast, ichard odriquez's memoir "the achievement of desire" derogates education and amplifies the true value of the 'ordinary' person that is often overlooked...

The two articles have one thing in common: both indicate that there is more thantn one kind of knowledge and that we do ill by abrogating people's capacities and skills to a Western construct of 'knowledge'.

The conventional school system, at least in the Western world, perceives 'knowledge' to be comprised of certain skills in certain subjects at a certain level that they rate to be applicable This they have pronounced to be the 'norm' and so anything that…… [Read More]

Rose, M. "I Just Wanna Be Average"

 http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~mmartin/rose.pdf 

Rodriquez, R. The achievement of desire http://myweb.cwpost.liu.edu/lbai/Data/English%201F -- Materials/Open%20Questions/the%20Achievement%20of%20Desire.pdf
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Worst Composition Class Policies the

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15250035



For that matter, the editorial process in this class changed my perspective about when a piece of writing is ready for submission in the first place. I realized that previously, I considered an essay substantially complete as soon as I had satisfied the required length. The editorial process in this class taught me that this is actually just the starting point for the editing process. From now on, instead of doing only an automated spell check and a quick read immediately after finishing my first draft, I intend to complete my first drafts with enough time left over to wait at least 12-24 hours before re-reading my work with a critical eye.

The Grading System:

My only complaint about the grading system is that it did not include a letter grade component but only a numerical grade. On one hand, everybody is aware of the approximate letter grade that corresponds…… [Read More]

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African-American Vernacular English There Are a Couple

Words: 2606 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87171559

African-American Vernacular English

There are a couple of theories as to the origin of African-American Vernacular Englsh (AAVE). Some linguists believe that the language derives from est African languages. This dialect theory is based on the knowledge that most African-Americans who were brought to the United States from Africa had to learn how to speak English by ear. The may have picked up some of the English words incorrectly and incorporated the incorrect words in their language. Another theory is called the Creole Hypothesis. This theory bases its origin on the thought that slaves developed the language themselves. The slaves, who came from many different countries in Africa formulated AAVE so that they may talk amongst themselves. They developed with is called a pidgin by combining words from their own language with new words from America. They used grammar and speech patterns that were known to them from their own…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jackson, Jenny Ebonics and Gullah, One and the Same? (http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~petersj4/jenny.htm)

Labov, William Academic Ignorance and Black Intelligence (Labov (http://www.arches.uga.edu/~bryan/AAVE/).

Rickford, John. "Creole Origins of AAVE  http://www.stanford.edu/~rickford/papers/CreoleOriginsOfAAVE.html 

Where Did It Come at (http://www.arches.uga.edu/~bryan/AAVE/).
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Race and Class in U S

Words: 1572 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56422366

In other case the motive was rooted first in ideological assumption -- and that assumption was that ASP superiority was a given.

The issue of race and class finally came to a head as America continued its expansion westward. But the issue was political as well: hat right did the Federal Government have over State Government to say whether slavery should be abolished? ho was really in power in America -- the States and local government -- or federal national government? The Civil ar, of course, answered the question brutally and bloodily in 1865. But racism and classism did not end. In fact, the problems of race and class would continue even after the war for as long as American policy was determined by ASP elitism. That policy has not changed to this day.

In conclusion, issues of race and class were ingrained into the American fabric from the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Horsman, Reginald. Race and Manifest Destiny: the Origins of American Racial Anglo-

Saxonism. Harvard University Press, 1981. Print.
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Tammie Martin English Marriage What

Words: 597 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82432677

According to this research, these trends are due to changes in the association of husbands' and wives' education rather than by changes in the relative supply of more- and less-educated partners.

In addition to income and education, individuals select marriage partners along racial lines (Fu, 2001). In fact, although racial homogamy has declined over time, it remains as the strongest pattern in assortative mating according to Fu. Further, many individuals remain particularly resistance to marriage between whites and blacks than they do between whites and other minorities. Fu (2001) also reveals that African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans who are in interracial marriages tend to have a higher socioeconomic status than others from these groups. Fu theorizes that this higher socioeconomic status helps to equalize their status with majority group partners.

In summary, forced marriages may be dead, at least in the modern Western world, but individual preferences are alive and well. Ironically,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Assortative Marriage and Inequality." Economist's View.  http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2007/05/assortative_mar.html 

d'Addio. Anna Christina. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility across Generations? A Review of the Evidence for OECD Countries." OECD

Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers no. 52. 2007.

Fu, Vincent Kang. "Racial Intermarriage Pairings." Demography. 38(2) 2001: 147-159
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Personal Social Class My Parent's Class Position

Words: 1894 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50777628

Personal Social Class

My Parent's Class Position

My parents grew up in poverty in Latin America. Their story is not an unfamiliar one in America. My parents were able to obtain a middle school education, which at that time in Latin America, was a good educational accomplishment. Like most children living in impoverished, lower class families, my parents both had to contribute to the household income. Opportunities for earning extra money were scarce, but my parents were creative and determined; they took what jobs they could find and set themselves up to establish work where there had previously been none. My mother would say that sometimes people just didn't know what work they needed someone else to do -- but if you do some work, and the people like it, they see that it is nice not to have to do the work for themselves. When my grandparents immigrated to…… [Read More]

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Crime in America - The Racial and Class Implications

Words: 4614 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31983701

Race, Class & Crime

The confluence of race, class and crime is a hot topic nowadays. This is especially true when discussing events or topics of various types. Very or fairly specific examples of this would include the recent shooting of Mike Brown in Ferguson, MO and the subsequent non-indictment of the officer who shot him despite the fact that Brown was not armed and the ongoing discussion about how paying a "wage" should be a moral imperative of all employers and how people in poverty are much more apt to commit crimes. Throw in the fact that people that exist in racial minorities are much more likely to be in poverty, it seems to make sense to some that minorities are also more commonly incarcerated and committing crimes in general. However, this is not entirely true as white people commit plenty of crimes themselves. However, blacks and Hispanics are…… [Read More]

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Sherman Alexi Class Is a

Words: 360 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52340338

We believe in class and talk about it and place ourselves within the so-called class structure. Once we accept that we are members of a certain class, it becomes deeply embedded in our consciousness and is difficult to change because it becomes part of who we think we are. We learn to behave in a way that coincides with the class we think we are.

It may be just as difficult to move downward as upward. I know a woman who moved to a small farm town where the people all spoke a rural dialect. Because she spoke Standard English, the townspeople didn't trust her. They thought she was showing off and trying to lord it over them. Perhaps they never would have accepted her, except she married a man from the town. They trusted him, so they accepted her. Although she said she tried, she was unable to speak…… [Read More]

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Race and Social Class in

Words: 1772 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93329578

In fact, the Toy is considered to be one of the most racist films of all time due to these issues (Sastry).

Blazing Saddles and the Toy approach comedy from distinct perspectives, and although they may have common elements, the differences in their approach to humor, comedy, and race allow the audience to understand why Blazing Saddles is successful in its commentary on society and why the Toy fails miserably at changing people's perspectives about society in a positive way. Brooks's approach to race and social status helps to redefine how blacks were viewed in cinema, and also helps to demonstrate that previous cinematic depictions have been skewed due the control exercised by Hollywood executives. On the other hand, Donner's approach to race and social status ends up being degrading, racist, and further reinforces negative stereotypes of race and social status. It is through these various depictions and approaches that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blazing Saddles. Directed by Mel Brooks. United States: Warner Bros., 1974. DVD.

Dirks, Tim. "Comedy Films." AMC Filmsite. Web. 13 April 2013.

Rice, Kathryn. "Race Consciousness and Class Invisibility in American Comedy." Dissident

Voice: A radical newsletter in the struggle for peace and social justice. 4 Sept 2010. Web. 12 April 2013.
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Race and Class the Social

Words: 784 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26833162



Secondly, this different approach also led the American society to experience a distinct social evolution. The fact that the ritish colonists were less reluctant to encourage social mobility offered the new settlers the change to become an important member of the society despite his eventual modest origin. Consequently, the highest level of the social scale was that of the colonial aristocrats, represented by wealthy planters and merchants, the middle class was represented by the land owning farmers, while the hired help made up the lower class. Indeed, there were racial frictions as well, which forced African-Americans to be considered the least important in the society. Nonetheless, despite this hierarchy, the geographical conditions enabled every man to go in search of wealth and thus improve his social conditions.

The Spanish and Portuguese colonial empires, although they offered a different social structure for their colonies, they left little mobility between classes. The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lewis, Laura. "Spanish ideology and the practice of inequality in the New World." Racism and anti-racism in world perspective. Ed. Benjamin Bowser. London: Sage Publications, 2002.

Loury, Glenn C., Tariq Modood, and Steven Michael Teles. Ethnicity, social mobility, and public policy:comparing the U.S. And UK. London: Cambridge UP, 2005, 22-25.
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Welcome Sixth Week Class This Week Discussions

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elcome sixth week class. This week, discussions. The discussion asks read articles "ho Am I?" "Gender Gap Cyberspace." After reading articles, asked compare contrast articles. Then, asked insights gained evaluation improve draft.

Comparison: "ho Am I?" And "Gender Gap in Cyberspace"

According to socio-linguist Deborah Tannen's essay "Gender Gap in Cyberspace," using the computer is a fundamentally gendered experience. Although both women and men use computers in today's society, they do so in different ways that reflect the fundamental orientations of the genders. Men are interested in getting the most powerful computer, winning at computer games and exhibiting their technical mastery by fixing 'bugs.' omen use mediums such as emails to build relationships. The Internet does offer the ability for the genders to bridge communication chasms. But the anonymity of the Internet is also more supportive of the male desire to engage in aggressive, verbally-directed combat, since common social niceties…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Martin, Demetri. "Who am I?" The New Yorker. 28 February 2011.

 http://www.newyorker.com/humor/2011/02/28/110228sh_shouts_martin 

Tannen, Deborah. "Gender Gap in Cyberspace." 16 May 1994. Newsweek. [12 Dec 2012]

 http://college.cengage.com/english/amore/demo/ch4_r1.html
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Film Required for the Class With a

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film required for the class with a non-Required film of your choice.

One can find a lot of parallels between John Singleton's 1991 film "oyz n the Hood" and Allen and Albert Hughes' film "Menace II Society," taking into account that they both address the idea of young men dealing with violence in underprivileged African-American neighborhoods in the U.S. Even with the fact that both films are filled with stereotypes, they manage to put across the message the producers were interested in sending. They basically emphasize the harsh environment that a person has to deal with in order to be able to achieve success in his or her enterprise.

The fact that both movies are largely appreciated for the way they represent the 'Hood' means that they each have a large fan-base and that reviews are likely to differ on account of how each reviewer perceives each film. "oyz n…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Dir. Allen Hughes & Albert Hughes. Menace II Society. New Line Cinema, 1993.

Dir. John Singleton. Boyz n the Hood. Columbia Pictures, 1991.
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Working Class Surname What Was Life Like

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Working Class

Surname

What was life like in the 19th century for the working class?

The conditions of towns were often very dreadful in the early 19th century. However, there came an improvement. The gaslight saw its first London light in 1807 at Pall Mall. Coming to the 1820s, many towns started introducing gas lighting in streetlights. In the early 19th century, most of the towns were untidy and dirty, overcrowded, and unsanitary. Men started forming groups that they referred to as pavement commissioners or improvement commissioners in the 19th century. They had the power and mandate to light, clean, and even pave the streets. During the same time, England had made divisions, which they named parishes. The power that the commissioners had could only be applied in some areas. In the parishes nearby, houses were built as the towns grew. It was very unfortunate that the commissioners had no…… [Read More]

References

Halsall Paul (a). Modern History Sourcebook: Harriet Robinson: Lowell Mill Girls. Fordham University. 1997. Web.  http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/robinson-lowell.asp 

Halsall Paul (b). Modern History Sourcebook: Women Miners in the English Coal Pits. Fordham University. 1998. Web.  http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1842womenminers.asp 

Laura Del Col (a). Chadwick's Report on Sanitary Conditions. The Victorian Web. 2002. Web.

 http://www.victorianweb.org/history/chadwick2.html