Ethics In Healthcare Essays (Examples)

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philosophy of health care medical ethics

Words: 2749 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78598504

Healthcare is one of the most important arenas for applied ethics and social justice. The concept of universal healthcare can be considered from a number of different ethical standpoints including consequential and deontological perspectives (Daniels 1). An ethical consequentialist approach could focus on the net gains to the society from offering universal healthcare coverage to all persons, or the net gains of improved overall quality of life in a more equitable society. Deontological ethics stress the importance of equal access as a fundamental human right.

Because the medical profession as a whole is comprised of individual doctors, each doctor or healthcare worker is required to perform pro bono service at some point during their career in order to promote the value of social justice in medicine. As Daniels points out, there is no way to ensure one hundred percent health equity, given that sociological factors impact health outcomes (1). A…… [Read More]

References

Daniels, Norman. “Justice and Access to Health Care.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Sept 29, 2008. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/justice-healthcareaccess/

Dye-Whealan, M. (n.d.). Advance directives. http://depts.washington.edu/pharm543/documents/schedule/5543%20MDW%20Advance%20Directives.pdf

Nunes, R. & Rego, G. (2016). Euthanasia: A challenge to medical ethics. J Clin Res Bioeth 7:1000282. doi: 10.4172/2155-9627.1000282

Patil, A.B., Dode, P. & Ahirrao, A. (2014). Medical ethics in abortion. Indian Journal of Clinical Practice 25(6). http://medind.nic.in/iaa/t14/i11/iaat14i11p544.pdf

Scheunemann, Leslie P. and White, Douglas B. “The Ethics and Reality of Rationing in Medicine.” Chest, Vol. 140, No. 6, 2011, pp. 1625-1632.

Summers, J. (n.d.). Principles of healthcare ethics. http://samples.jbpub.com/9781449665357/Chapter2.pdf


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Abortion and Health Care Ethics

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29832986

Unfortunately for Kate, a private faith-based healthcare institution in the United States generally has a legal right to refuse access to abortion based on the principle of conscientious objection (Levin, 2016; Fiala & Arthur, 2017). Conscientious objection refers to the health care provider (or in this case, the insurance provider’s) ability to refuse to take action based on religious principles or beliefs. In this case, and in all similar cases, the legal right to refuse treatment should be separated from Kate’s rights as a patient.
Ultimately, Kate’s rights to ethical treatment, medical justice, and autonomy far outweigh the hospital’s right to conscientious objection. The only compromise that can possibly be reached in this case would be for the institution to refer Kate to a nearby institution that could perform the procedure. If, however, no such institution existed then Kate must be able to access the abortion services through her primary…… [Read More]

References

Fiala, C. & Arthur, J.H. (2017). There is no defense for ‘conscientious objection” in reproductive health care. European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 216(2017): 254-258.

Levin, J. (2016). Partnerships between faith-based and medical sectors. Prev Med Rep 2016(4): 344-350.

Rosell, T. (n.d.). Abortion rights and/or wrongs. Center for Practical Bioethics. http://practicalbioethics.org/case-studies-abortion-rights-and-or-wrongs


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Healthcare Ethics - Gardasil Healthcare

Words: 344 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29843597



Assuming all those issues are addressed, mandatory HPV vaccination may be a good idea for all children and the option should be made available to adults and funded, at least in part, by government funds and profit limitations on vaccine sales. EFEENCES

Allen, Terry, J. Merck's Murky Dealings: HPV Vaccine Lobby Backfires; Corpwatch (March 7, 2008). etrieved March 26, 2008, from Corpwatch: Holding Corporations Accountable website, at http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=14401

Pharmaceutical News (March 5, 2008) Safety of Merck's HPV Vaccine Gardasil 'Lost' in Debate. etrieved March 26, 2008, from News-Medical.net…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Allen, Terry, J. Merck's Murky Dealings: HPV Vaccine Lobby Backfires; Corpwatch (March 7, 2008). Retrieved March 26, 2008, from Corpwatch: Holding Corporations Accountable website, at  http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=14401 

Pharmaceutical News (March 5, 2008) Safety of Merck's HPV Vaccine Gardasil 'Lost' in Debate. Retrieved March 26, 2008, from News-Medical.net website, at http://www.news-medical.net/?id=22415.
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Ethics in a Long-Term Healthcare Business Ethics

Words: 1098 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14438008

Ethics in a Long-Term Healthcare Business

Ethics in the health care industry spans a wide spectrum of activities and most of the obligations are cast by law on the professionals and the second by the common practice and morals of the profession. Both are important to the progress of the institution and also the health care industry. Compliance of statutes is of primary importance.

Compliance

There are many rules and statutes that must be complied with by all organizations and one such recent legislation is the hospital information access system. The HIPAA rules apply to all personnel in the system and extend to laboratory technicians, and lawyers and insurers. The culpability comes if the information was disclosed to a third party who did not have an association with the entity -- the clinic and was permitted to access the information. In such cases where the physician discloses information to another…… [Read More]

References

Andre, Claire; Velasquez, Manuel. (2013) "Aged-Based Health Care Rationing" Retrieved 8

June, 2013 from http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v3n3/age.html

Chaikind, Hinda R. (2004) "The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability ACT

(Hipaa): Overview and Analyses" Nova Publishers.
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Health Care Ethics

Words: 1222 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73407970

Ethics in Health Care

The medical industry is filled with professionals who must be competent in many aspects of interaction in order to be successful and allow for patients to heal themselves in a positive manner. Professionalism is noted by a certain ethical attitude that must permeate the environment if the efforts of these people are to be successful. The ethical approach within the medical industry is extremely important due to the nature of the job and the reliance that normal everyday people have on the professionals within this industry to make wise choices based on the best interests of the individual.

The four major ethical principles of autonomy, non-malfeasance, beneficence and justice are ideals that may be rightly or wrongly applied to a patients healing process within the health care industry. The purpose of this essay is to describe the ethical issue of patient non-compliance with treatment using these…… [Read More]

References

Coy, J.A. (1989). Autonomy-based informed consent: ethical implications for patient noncompliance. Physical Therapy, 69(10), 826-833.

Habermann, B., Broome, M., Pryor, E.R., & Ziner, K.W. (2010). Research coordinators experiences with scientific misconduct and research integrity. Nursing research, 59(1), 51.

Sciberras, N. et al. (2013). The Ethical and Practical Challenges of Patient Noncompliance in Orthopedic Surgery. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 2013 May.
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Healthcare Resources Allocating Healthcare Resources Allocation of

Words: 1444 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75434137

Healthcare esources

Allocating Healthcare esources

Allocation of Healthcare esources

It may seem that the resources that a healthcare organization has at its disposal is contained in a very small list, but for proper allocation of total resources every possible thing has to be considered. esources refers not only to the money that a business has on hand, but the people, buildings, land, recruitment of people, retention and finances. An organization is the sum of all of its parts and must operate within the framework of those resources. How those resources are allocated is an important function of the control of the organization also. This essay will discuss the resource acquisition and allocation processes in a healthcare organization with specific emphasis regarding those processes in allocating financial, operating, capital, human, recruitment, and retention resources.

esource Acquisition and Allocation

In one aspect a healthcare organization is no different from any other organization…… [Read More]

References

Kroger, A. (2003). "Ethics in healthcare organizations." Healthcare Management, 27(3),

21-25.

Longest, B.B., & Darr, K. (2008). Controlling and allocating resources. In, Managing

health services organizations and systems (pp. 433-470). Baltimore, MD: Health
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Laws on Healthcare

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13171090

Health and Legislative Issues

All Americans have the desire of having a healthcare system which is capable of delivering world-class security together with financial security. The system in place should always be accessible and one that impacts the economy positively. Successful healthcare reforms will lead to a maximization of the choices available for consumers put a restrain to the ever increasing medical care costs and make healthcare accessible to more and more Americans. There are a number of organizations that have consistently urged the president and congress on building on the existing systems which strengths in order to achieve health reform solutions that are workable in a bipartisan manner. However, there are some healthcare legislative issues that come up and have effects on various stakeholders such as legislators, consumers and other healthcare professionals. This paper will look at one of the current health legislative issues, who is affected most by…… [Read More]

References

Mears, B.(2012). Health care's big four issues: What the justices are tackling. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/17/politics/health-care-issues/ 

ANA.(2010). Nursing Beyond Borders: Access to Health Care for Documented and Undocumented Immigrants Living in the U.S. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/Policy-Advocacy/Positions-and-Resolutions/Issue-Briefs/Access-to-care-for-immigrants.pdf 

Goodman, J., (2012). The Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on Job Creators and the Economy. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.independent.org/issues/article.asp?id=3385 

American College of Emergency Physicians, (2013). The Ethics of Health Care Reform: Issues in Emergency - Medicine - An Information Paper. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from http://www.acep.org/Content.aspx?id=80871
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Healthcare Administration

Words: 962 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4768841

Accounting, Cultural Diversity and Healthcare Administration: Law, Ethics and Policy

The difference between the cash basis and accrual basis of accounting

The cash basis of accounting is applied when revenues in an income statement are reported in the period cash from the customers is received, and when all the expenses in an income statement are paid for (Warren, eeve and Duchac, 2014). For example, a payment for a service is recorded in the income statement once the fee from the client is received. Under this basis, the variance that arises from the expenses and revenues is the resultant net profit or loss at that particular period. This method is popular with small businesses that have few debtors and creditors.

The accrual basis of accounting reports revenue on the income statement in the period they are earned. The expenses are also reported once they occur. This method applies the matching principle,…… [Read More]

References

Kazmier, J.L. (2009) Health Care Law. Clifton Park, New York: Cengage Learning, Inc.

Samovar, L.A., Porter, R. E & McDaniel, E.R. (2009). Communication Between Cultures (7th Ed.). South Western: Cengage Learning, Inc.

Warren, C.S., Reeves, M. J & Duchac, J. (2014). Financial Accounting (13th Ed.). South Western: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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Healthcare Leadership & Prejudices Healthcare

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3466094



Conclusion

Prejudice and ethical/leadership issues with healthcare are nothing new but the fight to keep those standards and ethics on an even keel and prevent racism, bigotry and predudice of any sort including based on class, money, political ideology, nationalism, and so forth should be stomped out and eviscerated whenever it can be. People are people and should treated with dignity and respect regardless of their race, gender, beliefs and so forth. Even convicted murderers and rapists should not be treated disdain due to their actions because doing otherwise lowers the ethics and standards of the healthcare community that can and should still apply at all times.

eferences

Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),

143-146.

Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., ay, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences…… [Read More]

References

Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),

143-146.

Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., Ray, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences on ability to afford prescription medications.
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Health Care Information and the

Words: 2722 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55750775

Information technology and computers have also begun to affect, in ways that are both bad and good, family life, community life, education, freedom, human relationships, democracy, and many other issues. By looking into the broadest sense of the word it can be seen that cyber ethics should actually be understood as a branch of applied ethics, and ethics should be something that is believed in by all that provide medical information, whether via the Internet or in some other way, since providing false or fraudulent information could be damaging and potentially deadly for many people.

This particular branch of ethics analyzes and studies information technology and what type of ethical and social impacts it has. Within recent years this new field has led to countless courses, workshops, articles, journals, and many other ways of expression. With the World Wide Web becoming so popular when it comes to health care information,…… [Read More]

Gotterbarn, 1991.

Bynum, T.W. (1999) the Foundation of Computer Ethics. A keynote address at the AICEC99 Conference, Melbourne, Australia, July 1999. Published in the June 2000 issue of Computers and Society.

Bynum, 1999.
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Health Care Right or Privilege Health Care

Words: 1856 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1592459

Health Care ight or Privilege

Health Care ight Privilege

Whether health care is a right or a privilege is one of the most intensely debated social questions of the modern era, but phrasing it in this binary way of one or the other masks a deeper problem that is far more complex. The specific issue at hand is the rationing of scarce medical resources. If there were unlimited resources where everyone could achieve the maximum health all the time, we would not have to ask the question, but this is clearly not the case. Glannon argues this requires a theory of "distributive justice" (2005, p. 144), and outlines the four main theories that have emerged from the modern discussion, which are Utilitarian / consequentialist, Libertarian, Communitarian and Egalitarian.

Utilitarian, consequentialist theory is often invoked toward a solution of who deserves health care when there is not enough for everyone, and…… [Read More]

References

Brownstein, B. (1980). Pareto optimality, external benefits and public goods: a subjectivist approach. The Journal of Libertarian Studies, IV (1), 93-106. Retrieved from mises.org/journals/jls/4_1/4_1_6.pdf

Gensler, H. (1998). Ethics: a contemporary introduction. New York: Routledge.

Glannon, W. (2005). Biomedical ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Hare, R. (1963). Freedom and reason. London: Oxford University Press.
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Healthcare Integrity Is a Major Issue for

Words: 1315 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2662441

Healthcare

Integrity is a major issue for healthcare organizations because there are many avenues for fraud, and for people to demonstrate a lack of ethics. The problem is that the temptation is sometimes too great and despite the fact that there are laws in place to guard against these practices unethical behavior takes place anyway. The government, which supplies a lot of the money which goes for treatments through Medicare and Medicaid, has structured certain laws to make sure that the practices of healthcare organizations are ethical, but billions of dollars in fines are still doled out every year. The big drug companies complain of arcane and hard to decipher legalese, but the fact is that although they realize the issue and the penalty they continue to subvert the law. This paper looks at qui tam statutes and cases, Medicare and Medicaid admissions criteria, installing a corporate integrity program, and…… [Read More]

References

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASLHA). (2010). Summary of self- referral and anti-kickback regulations. Retrieved from  http://www.asha.org/practice/reimbursement/medicare/regulations_sum.htm 

Hanford, J.T. (2001). Regulation of the healthcare professions. Ethics & Medicine, 17(3), 188-190.

Louthian Law Firm. (2012). Healthcare fraud qui tam whistleblower protection lawsuits.

Mattie, A. & Ben-Chitrit, R. (2009) The federal False Claims Act and qui tam actions: What every healthcare manager should know. Journal of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues, 12(2), 49-65.
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Health Care -- a Right

Words: 2910 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4306884

However, they contradict themselves trough supporting one's right to commit physician-assisted suicide, since this would virtually mean that the individual who is no longer willing to live is not provided with health care meant to prevent him or her from dying (Epstein, 1999, p. 1).

Among those opposed to the fact that health care is becoming increasingly better are those who are in their twenties and are obliged to work hard in order to pay for their own medical insurance and for that of the underprivileged (Bonner, 2010).

Contemporary health care is basically provided by groups forced to pay taxes in order for others to benefit out of the process. The fact that health care is a privilege and not a right was made obvious ever since the 1954 foundation of the Department of Health, Education, and elfare. The name contained the term welfare with the intention of highlighting how…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloche, M.G. ed., The Privatization of Health Care Reform: Legal and Regulatory Perspectives (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003)

Epstein, R.A. Mortal Peril: Our Inalienable Right to Health Care? (Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books, 1999)

Heirich, M. Rethinking Health Care: Innovation and Change in America (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998)

Sanders, B. (2009). Retrieved from the Huffington Post Website:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rep-bernie-sanders/health-care-is-a-right-no_b_212770.html
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Health Care Situation Medical Error Due to

Words: 2468 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27484220

Health Care Situation: Medical Error Due to Doctors' Bad Handwriting

Identify a health care news situation that affects a health care organization such as a hospital, clinic or insurance company.

I have identified the following health care news situation as the topic of my paper: "Poor Handwriting of Doctors and its implied risks for the Patient, Hospital and Medical Malpractice Insurance." Poor handwriting of physicians resulting in poor legibility of entries into patients' medical records carries very dramatic risks for all above-mentioned interest bearers. It can result in severe health danger for the patient and - in extreme situations - even cause a patient's death. Doctors' bad penmanship has long been seen a problem within organized medicine and the patient safety movement. Three American Medical Association (AMA) policies dating back to 1992, urge doctors to "improve the legibility of handwritten orders for medications" and review all orders for accuracy and…… [Read More]

References

Berwick, Donald M. & Winickoff, David E. (1996). The truth about doctors' handwriting: a prospective study. BMJ Vol. 313 (21-28 December 1996). 1657-1658. www.bmj.com/content/313/7072/1657.full, accessed 21 August 2011.

Bruner, Anne & Kasdan, Morton.L. Handwriting Errors: Harmful, Wasteful and Preventable.

1-4. www.kyma.org/uploads/file/.../Harmful_wasteful_and_preventable.pdfSimilar, accessed 22 August 2011.

Gallant, Al. (22 November 2009). For a secure electronic health record implementation, user authentication is key. 1-2). searchhealthit.techtarget.com/.../User-authentication-is-critical-for-pl.., accessed 24 August 2011.
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Healthcare Lobbyists Drugmakers Hospitals and

Words: 1614 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91197596

Each of these was included in the initial Senate bill, but was struck from the final Senate version. Despite the victories, the group isn't ready to pledge support for health reform bills. The AMA will not endorse any legislation unless Congress gets rid of the mandated payment cuts of more than $200 billion over 10 years in the government's Medicare program for the elderly. The cuts are part of Congressional action that was passed in 1997 in order to cut costs in the Medicare program, but have never gone into effect. There are also several hospitals, insurers, pharmaceutical manufacturers and advocacy groups that are withholding final support. Most of these groups have pledged support to health care reform in principle while working privately through lobbyists to protect their industries (Eaton and Pell, 2010).

Healthcare lobbyists range from very large companies and corporations to very small groups who are all looking…… [Read More]

References

BREAKING: Health care lobby invests in reform summit. (2010). Retrieved March 1, 2010, from Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington Web site:

http://www.citizensforethics.org/node/44211

Eaton, Joe and Pell, M.B. (2010). Lobbyists Swarm Capitol to Influence Health Reform.

Retrieved March 1, 2010, from the Center for Public Integrity Web site:
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Health Care Law Privacy and

Words: 5626 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3283668

S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011). Furthermore, subpart C explains the privileges and the protections of confidentiality that is attached to the patient's record along with much exception (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011).

The penalty for anyone who breaks confidentiality is imperative. In "November, 23, 2009" was increased to $11,000 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011). This goes for anyone in the medical field or has access to this information. A person has to follow HIPAA precisely or face a huge fine. If one thought of this ahead of time, whether or not they own a business, then no issues would arise legally. However, sometimes this does occur, especially for those who want to harm another person, yet in the medical field the goal is not to do this to any individual, regardless, otherwise he or she could face losing their license in…… [Read More]

References

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Civil Rights. (2011). Your health information privacy rights. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services Civil Rights:

 http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/consumer_rights.pdf.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2011). Health information privacy. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
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Healthcare Issues With the Provision

Words: 1180 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96629310

In their move from a completely government-paid and -- operated healthcare system to a fees-based approach, the Chinese have greatly improved the efficiency, availability, and efficacy of their healthcare system (Wan & Wan 2010). This suggests that a combination of perspectives, rather than the market or single-payer perspectives that form so many healthcare systems, is most effective.

There are also, of course, healthcare systems that have developed in the same period as those mentioned above, but with far more negative results. The South African healthcare system, though effective in combating certain specific conditions, has many of the same failings as the United States' system, only on to a far more apparent degree. A lack of organization and responsiveness, exacerbated by an attempt to exert highly politicized and highly centralized control over healthcare provision, has plagued South African efforts to combat AIDS and many other problems the country -- and the…… [Read More]

References

Offredy, M. (2008). "The health of a nation: perspectives from Cuba's national health system." Quality in primary care 16(4), pp. 269-77

Sewankambo, N. & Katamba, A. (2009). "Health systems in Africa: learning from South Africa." The lancet 374(9694), pp. 957-9.

Squires, A. (2009). "U.S. Healthcare reform: A comparative book review." Nursing ethics 16(5), pp. 673-5.

Wan, Y. & Wan, Y. (2010). "Achievement of equity and universal access in China's health service: A commentary on the historical reform perspective from the UK National Health Service." Global public health 5(1), pp. 15-27.
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Healthcare - The Truth About

Words: 3685 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27551651



The experiences of seniors within the healthcare delivery system will alter how all Americans view healthcare. The healthcare delivery systems and overall organizational structure in the United States has been slow to adjust but that rest of the world is currently in flux that will migrate into our system. Technological advances in communication have made telehealth and telemedicine vialbel solutions to our outdated healthcare industry orgainzational structre. While these types of advances are only in their infancy, "...there seemed to be broad acceptance that telehealth and telemedicine had provided positive benefits to the worlds healthcare delivery system." (Telehealth Applications) Our technoloically challenged seniors have actually discovered the trend within the healthcare system and telehealth and telemedicine seems to be an advance that will find worldwide support so we as a nation will be reqquired to jump on the bandwagon.

In conclusion, this article review focused on new Healthcare Delivery Systems…… [Read More]

References

Farnsworth, Chris. "The Truth About Fraud" Washington Monthly 01 May 1997.

Joshua-Amadi, Mabel. "Recommendations: A Study in Motivation: Recruitment and Retention in the NHS" Nursing Management. February (2003).

Soloye, Daniel J. "Privacy and Power: Computer Databases and Metaphors for Information Privacy" Stanford Law Review July (2001).

Telehealth Applications. (2004) "Current Telehealth Applications" Retrieved October 26, 2004, at http://www.startegis.com/epic/internet/inict-tic.nsf/PrintableE/it07545e.html
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Healthcare Reform Throughout All of

Words: 1860 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52497443

" (Arnold & Reeves, 2009). ith medical services price at the present time, illness or some kind of complicated to medical services may take people deprived of health insurance years to reimburse for bills that are medical. Furthermore, I believe that individuals who lost their jobs also are uninsured for the reason that their employer gave health insurance is no longer paying for them. I understand that based on the statistic; there are "way too many around 1 million workers that have lost their health reporting in the first three months of 2009. I think that helping people buy health insurance coverage with low-cost with offering the health plans options for the uninsured is the healthcare reform that is really needed now. In this way, individuals that are without health insurance will be able to afford paying their medical insurance to uphold their well-being.

In conclusion, with the increasing rapidly…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnold, P.J., & Reeves, T.C. (2009). International Trade and Health Policy: Implications of the GATS for U.S. Healthcare Reform. Journal of Business Ethics, 63(4), 34.

Belcon, M.C., Ahmed, N.U., Younis, M.Z., & Bongyu, M. (40-74.). ANALYSIS of NATIONAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS: SEARCHING for a MODEL for DEVELOPING COUNTRIES - TRINIDAD and TOBAGO as a TEST CASE. Public Administration and Management, 14(2), 10-14.

Bolduc, C.R. (2008). The impact of healthcare reform on HMO administrators. Hospital & Health Services Administration, 17(9), 23-45.

Reiboldt, M. (2010). The Industry Responds to the Passing of Healthcare Reform. The Journal of Medical Practice Management, 18(6), 327-328.
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Healthcare Government Regulations the Role of Government

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46728609

Healthcare Government egulations

The role of government regulatory agencies and government regulations in general is particularly important in health care. The reasons for this are many, but the most important of those reasons is that health care delivery is a special case with regard to consumer use, as to some degree all individuals have the right to safe and ethical treatment and treatment that above all else does no harm. Government regulatory agencies and government regulations therefore become a sort of watch dog for healthcare, attempting to make sure that treatment to all patients is safe, ethical and equitable. Government regulatory agencies are especially keen on identifying universal barriers to health care by establishing public insurance, rules and regulations as well as funding and also attempting to eradicate some of the health care disparities that exist today. To do so they have created and regulate many pieces of legislation that…… [Read More]

Resources

By the Numbers. (2011). Modern Healthcare, 41(27), 9.

Prial, D. (2007, July 18). A painful prescription. Record, The (Hackensack, NJ).

Rothstein, M.A. (2011). Currents in Contemporary Bioethics. Journal Of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 39(1), 91-95. doi:10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00553.x

Webster, P. (2011). Value of e-prescribing questioned. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 183(14), 1575.
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Health Care Access Ethical Dilemma Access to

Words: 672 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45149030

Health Care Access Ethical Dilemma

Access to health care services is not equitable in the United States. The 15% of Americans without health insurance coverage find it extremely difficult to access health care services (Trotochaud, 2006). This is an injustice that should be addressed. Patients going to rural health care facilities face myriad challenges that are occasioned by stigmatization. Stigmatization of illnesses that patients grapple with occasions ethical conflicts. In the process, patients' right to privacy and confidentiality are often violated. There are practical guidelines that can be used to minimize ethical conflicts. It is imperative that confidentiality and trust be made paramount under circumstances where healthcare professionals deal with patients with stigmatizing illnesses.

A typical example of confidentiality, overlapping relationships and lack of willingness to seek care can be attested to in a situation where a woman working at a local store finds out that her partner is HIV-positive…… [Read More]

References

Trotochaud, K. (2006). Ethical Issues and Access to Healthcare. Journal of Infusion Nursing,

29(3), 165-170.

Tummala, A. & Roberts, L.W., (2009). Ethics Conflicts in Rural Communities: Stigma and Illness. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England.
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Healthcare Access the Health of Any Single

Words: 564 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51186709

Healthcare Access

The health of any single person is the most important and most limiting factor about that person's ability to complete physical tasks and live a useful and purposeful life. Healthcare is a term that is widely used but never discussed in how it can best be accessed. The purpose of this essay is to identify and describe a useful plan that helps solve the dilemma of people acquiring a proper and useful source of healthcare. The ethical component of the situation will also be introduced to help demonstrate how practical this plan can be.

To many, healthcare is often associated with doctors, nurses, hospitals, drugs and surgery. It seems that more people are sick or are diseased with some sort of affliction than ever before. Tanner (2008) made the point that "a closer look shows that nearly all health care systems worldwide are wrestling with problems of rising…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, J. (2008). Does Preventive Care Save Money? The New England Journal Of Medicine, 14 Feb 2008. Retrieved from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp0708558

Lowes, C. (2011). Reviewing Medical Ethics. Philosophy International Journal Of Health, 12 June 2012.

Tanner, M. (2008). The Grass is Not Always Greener: A Look at National Health Care Systems Around the World. CATO Institute, 18 Mar 2008. Retrieved from http://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/grass-is-not-always-greener-look- national-health-care-systems-around-world
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Health Care Legislative Bill

Words: 1387 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5151645

Healthcare Legislative Bill

The expanded and improved Medicare for all Acts

The Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Act was introduced to the House of Representatives in 2009 and seeks to lobby for the implementation of a common single-payer health care system throughout the United States o0f America. The bill if enacted would require that all medical care costs be paid for automatically by the government instead of private insurances for the same. The move will significantly alter the role of private insurance companies as merely offering supplemental coverage especially when the kind of medical care sought is not all that essential (McCormick, 2009).

With the Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Bill, the country's national system will be paid for through taxes and the monies that will replace the regular insurance premiums. Proponents of the bill argue that by eliminating the need for private insurance companies in the national…… [Read More]

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, (2010), Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations

The American Journal of Medical Practices, (2011), The Impact of single-payer Medicare

Program, New York
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Healthcare Administration Functions of Healthcare

Words: 559 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72488342

Administrative boards routinely reevaluate general institutional compliance with federal and state legislative statutes and also with stated hospital policies. Ethics guidelines regarding procedures, treating minors, and admission to clinical research trials are only some of the legislative guidelines necessary when making healthcare decisions. Chains of command, appropriate disciplinary and appeals procedures, and health and safety guidelines for patients and employees are some examples of legislative functions a board may perform. Additionally, conduct between employees will also be governed, including sexual harassment policy, chains of command regarding institutional decisions, and human resource policies such as bonuses, performance reviews, and seniority.

Judicial

The judicial roles of the administration involve evaluating specific individual's compliance with legislative policies, and the legality or wisdom of institutional policies in general. For example, an appeal might be made about the justice of certain guidelines, like the maximum amount of hours nurses may work, the institution's policies regarding…… [Read More]

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Healthcare -- Legal Issues Religion

Words: 2158 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11354839

While it may not be just to hold an organization liable, absolutely, for every instance of employee negligence, there is a rationale for imposing such liability in many cases. For example, many types of industries entail potential danger to others that are inherent to the industry.

Individual workers are not likely to be capable of compensating victims of their negligence, but the employer benefits and profits financially by engaging in the particular industry. Therefore, the employer should not necessarily escape liability for compensating all harm caused by their activities, regardless of fault in particular instances.

10.A nurse is responsible for making an inquiry if there is uncertainty about the accuracy of a physician's medication order in a patient's record. Explain the process a nurse should use to evaluate whether or not to make an inquiry into the accuracy of the physician's medication order.

Like other highly trained professionals, experienced nurses…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, N., Buckner, M.D. (1989) Medical Ethics: A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professionals. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Caplan, a.L., Engelhardt, H.T., McCartney, J.J. Eds. (1981) Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley

Starr, P. (1984) the Social Transformation of American Medicine.

New York: Basic Books
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Health Care -- Strategic Planning and Marketing

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62159050

Health Care -- Strategic Planning and Marketing

Strategic planning and marketing often wed customer-oriented issues with broader issues of public health, morality and survival in a highly competitive market. Consequently, a key issue set forth by the American Hospital Association and an issue of strategic planning/marketing are often two sides of the same coin. This work addresses the customer-oriented issues of Diversity and Emergency Planning that are mirrored in two key issues advanced by the AHA. These two issues are articulated in the first part of this work and answered in the second part of this work.

Customer-Oriented Strategic Plan

Diversity

American society is increasingly ethnically diverse due to immigration, relocation, birth rates and other factors. Consequently, a 250-bed community hospital must hone its sensitivity to resulting changes in community health needs. n addition, there is a high level of competition among hospitals that requires sensitive, targeted marketing to attract…… [Read More]

Issues or Opportunities

Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities

As the American Hospital Association states, "Addressing disparities is no longer just about morality, ethics and social justice: It is essential for performance excellence and improved community health" (American Hospital Association, 2012). A multi-faceted approach to discerning, accommodating and marketing for diversity would certainly include the thoughtful collection and examination of diversity data to define target ethnic markets and specific steps tailored to those markets, as described in Noonan's and Savolaine's article. Studying obstetrical discharge data for ethnicity and outright asking physicians for specific information about the ethnicity of their patients is a sensible approach to determining the community's ethnic composition. In addition, the hospital zip code's CNI data for "five factors long known to contribute to health need - income, culture/language, education, housing status, and insurance coverage" (Anonymous, 2011) should be defined and collected. After that data is collected, it should be studied to define the community's major ethnic target groups. After determining the target groups, the hospital's services should be marketed directly
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Healthcare Crisis US Health Care

Words: 1617 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87102656

Universal healthcare is the only saving formula for this nation, which is doomed in a health care crisis of unprecedented proportions. There is a urgent need to transform healthcare from its present state of commercialism towards the humanitarian approach which guarantees 'healthcare for all' independent of their social or financial circumstances. A shared and collective responsibility of healthcare management is the only viable formula for America. It is high time we learn from Canada, UK and other European nations and restructure the current broken state of our healthcare. The successful passing of the USNHC act (H.R. 676) is the only way for America to wake up from its healthcare nightmare. Will the powerful insurance industry hold its ground yet again and resist this awakening leaving all the citizens doomed? This is an important question for all the citizens of our country.

ibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values lamed for U.S.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values Blamed for U.S. Healthcare Crisis',

Accessed May 11, 2009, Available at, http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081204160558.htm

2) Laura K. Altom, BS, MSIII and Larry R. Churchill, PhD, Ann Geddes Stahlman

'Pay, Pride, and Public Purpose: Why America's Doctors Should Support
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Health Care Reform Several Years

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13950798

Contracts with doctors often contain a clause which doesn't allow the doctors to discuss

Health care 7 with their patients financial incentives to deny treatment or about treatments not covered by the plan (Glazer, 1996). This has caused many consumers, especially those with chronic illnesses, to form organizations with the American Medical Association and physician specialty groups to promote legislation forbidding "gag rules" (Glazer, 1996). One group, Citizen Action, has 3 million members and "has been lobbying in state legislatures for laws that would require plans to disclose how they pay their doctors; give patients the right to choose specialists outside the plan; and provide appeals for patients who get turned down for expensive treatments" (Glazer, 1996).

The doctor-patient relationship is also affected if a patient must switch to a new doctor under managed care. Having a longterm relationship with a primary doctor is important because he or she is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett Clark, Jane (1996, July). What you should ask your HMO.

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine. pp. 92-93.

Glazer, Sarah (1996, April 12). Managed Care. CQ Researcher, 6,

Koop, C. Everett (1996, Fall). Manage with care. Time. pp. 69.
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Healthcare Finance

Words: 1675 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96594035

Healthcare Finance

The relationship between the doctor and a possible patient is established when the physician asks the person for the first time as how he could be of possible help. This direct and simple enquiry is the beginning of the trust of the patient that has to be put in the physician for any treatment to proceed. The patient is in need of help at that time, and has to trust the professional for getting the help and the patients want to do it. They need a person to take care of them during their period of suffering from illness. This relationship between the patient and the physician in the financial sphere also involves the same amount of reliance, confidence and trust, as otherwise, not treatment can be undertaken. This makes it essential that the physicians clearly mention to the patients when there is any conflict of interest in…… [Read More]

References

"Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization: Deriving Best Practice Models for the U.S. Health Care Safety Net: A Cross-State Meta Analysis of Finance, Organization and Outcomes" Retrieved from http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:h3F83ojarhYJ:depts.washington.edu/eprc/areas/proposalnarrative%2520web.pdf+Changes+in+Health+Care+Financing+and+Organization+& hl=en Accessed on 7 June, 2005

'Health Administration Press" (March/April 2003) Journal of Health Care Management.

Volume 48, Number 2. Retrieved from http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:p36ZB3H0T4AJ:www.ache.org/pubs/jhm482.cfm+healthcare+finance+relationship+centered& hl=en Accessed on 7 June, 2005

"The Core Program: Trust and the Patient -- Professional Relationship" (September, 2000) The
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Health Care How Would You

Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29469983

Futile medical care is the ongoing provision of medical treatment or care to a patient who does not show any hope of recovery. It is either that his condition is not curable and therefore the treatment that he is receiving is of no benefit. The common examples of these are that a surgeon is performing a surgery on a patient with terminal cancer. Patients who have terminal cancer have gotten the cancer spread all throughout their body. It is only until time that their organs will go into failure and they will pass away. Another example is of keeping brain dead people on life support for other reasons. As it would be expected, this is quite a sensitive area and it would involve arguments with the patient's relatives and friends.

It is understandable that the loved ones do want to do anything they can to keep the patient in front…… [Read More]

References

Appel, J. (2009). What's So Wrong with "Death Panels"?. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jacob-m-appel/whats-so-wrong-with-death_b_366804.html  [Accessed: 26 Jul 2013].

Doyle, D. (2010). WebmedCentral.com:: Baby K. A Landmark Case In Futile Medical Care. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.webmedcentral.com/article_view/969  [Accessed: 26 Jul 2013].

Gardent, P. And Reeves, S. (2009). Ethics Conflicts in Rural Communities: Allocation of Scarce Resources. [e-book] Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England.  http://geiselmed.dartmouth.edu/cfm/resources/ethics/chapter-09.pdf  [Accessed: 26th July, 2013].

Pomerance, J., Morrison, A., Williams, R. And Schifrin, B. (1989). Anencephalic infants: life expectancy and organ donation.. Journal of perinatology, 9 (1), pp. 33-37.
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Healthcare Case Study

Words: 1972 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85745335

Healthcare Study

Defined as the philosophical study of right and wrong action, Ethics is a predominant subject of concern in nursing (Michael Dahnke, 2006). Being presented with various situations, the ethical and cultural problems are a serious concern faced by the nursing and healthcare staff which needs to be catered to day in and out. There is no time tested methodology that can be applied here, since the every patient is different, with a different background history, therefore the ethical and cultural implications of each decision would also vary.

Importance of Ethical Theory to Nursing

Defining what is right and wrong is a very subjective approach and even that can change from scenario to scenario. Therefore it is important to have some form of umbrella under which the functioning of nurses takes place. It is under this rationale that the importance of ethical theory emerges in front of us.

In…… [Read More]

Works Cited

DuAnne Foster Edwards, R.M. (1999, Feburary). The Synergy Model: Linking Patient Needs to Nurse Competencies. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from American Association of Critical Care Nurses: http://www.aacn.org:88/wd/certifications/content/synpract2.pcms?pid=1&menu=

Green, D.B. (2001, July). Medical Ethics. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from Priory.com:  http://priory.com/ethics.htm 

Michael Dahnke, H.D. (2006). Defining Ethics and Applying the Theories. In P.M. Vicki D. Lachman, Applied Ethics in Nursing (p. 3). New York: Springer.

Samar Noureddine RN, M. (2001). Development of the ethical dimension in nursing theory. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 2-7.
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Health Care Ethics the Ethical

Words: 662 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30215427

Many of the chapters relate to medical research as well as medical procedures, with the informed consent issue in particular affecting both human beings involved in medical research and those facing a medical crisis and wanting to now what their treatment will entail.

Throughout, the authors present ways of thinking about these ethical issues and also encourage medical personnel to consider these matters and to have a means for making decisions in mind at all times and to follow certain procedures in analyzing a situation and making a determination as to what behavior is acceptable and what is not. Some of the issues discussed are more controversial than others, with abortion being perhaps the most controversial and so the most in need of an ethical structure to decide between competing interests. The death and dying issue is another with two clear positions polarizing the argument and with a range of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Garrett, Thomas M., Harold W. Baillie, and Rosellen M. Garrett.

Health Care Ethics: Principles and Problems. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 2001.
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Health Care -- Ethical Issues in Evaluation

Words: 1683 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68472650

Health Care -- Ethical Issues in Evaluation Research

Ben is a professor and Alyssa is his graduate student in health sciences. Ben is the program chair for a conference with publications that are "refereed" or reviewed by an expert board of editors before publication. The conference has a policy that accepted papers must be presented by their authors but Ben does not mention this policy to Alyssa. He suggests that Alyssa submit a paper to the conference and that he will present it because the conference is being held abroad and he cannot support her trip to the conference. Alyssa writes the paper entirely with her own research while funded by an external fellowship, and submits it with herself as the sole author. She gives several drafts to Ben, who does not comment on any of them. Alyssa's paper is accepted by the conference, she is then advised of their…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Evaluation Association. (1994, revisions through 2004). American Evaluation Association guiding principles for evaluators. Retrieved on December 15, 2012 from www.eval.org Web site: http://www.eval.org/Publications/GuidingPrinciples.asp

Kass, N.E. (2001, November). An ethics framework for public health. Retrieved on December 15, 2012 from search.proquest.com Web site: http://search.proquest.com/docview/215114044/13B0743D48B182F5BD9/1?accountid=28844

Public Health Leadership Society. (2002). Principles of the ethical practice of public health, version 2.2. Retrieved on December 15, 2012 from www.apha.org Web site: http://www.apha.org/NR/rdonlyres/1CED3CEA-287E-4185-9CBD-BD405FC60856/0/ethicsbrochure.pdf

Thomas, J. (2004). Skills for the ethical practice of public health. Retrieved on December 15, 2012 from phls.org Web site:  http://phls.org/CMSuploads/Skills-for-the-Ethical-Practice-of-Public-Health-68547.pdf
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Healthcare Administration

Words: 835 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77118325

Healthcare Administration: Healthcare Law, Cultural Diversity, And Principles of Accounting

Cities, Suburbs, And ural Areas

ural areas are geographic areas located away from suburbs and cities, often characterized by a small population and abundant natural resources. Currently, in the U.S., rural residents make up 16% of the entire population - as compared to 17% in 1910. This implies that poor job opportunities and lack of skills that are evident in these areas have pushed people into towns and cities. Suburban areas are residential areas often situated on the outskirts of major cities. Although they have more residents, they have fewer resources as compared to rural areas. The current population in the suburbs has increased to 51%, something that has never been witnessed before. Cities in the U.S. are the largest areas of settlement and are often congested due to high population. The National Center for Education statistics reported that 33%…… [Read More]

References

Kazmier, J.L. (2008). Introduction to Health Care Law. Clifton Park, New York: Cengage Learning

Samovar, L.A., Porter, R. A & McDaniel, E.R. (2009). Communication between Cultures. (12th Ed.). Independence, KY: Cengage Learning

Warren, C.S., Reeve J. M & Duchac, J.E. (2013). Financial Accounting. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning
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Health Care Marketing Approach for

Words: 1922 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42855396

edu). While this example just discusses one manner in which a given policy can empower a healthcare marketing strategy, social marketing is currently so engrained in our culture that its powers are truly widespread. Social marketing allows products and brands to have more flexible and sensitive pricing as their prices can be changed at any minutes and consumers alerted, given the instantaneous nature of social marketing. The same goes for service as well -- any changes or enhancements that are made to services can be alerted to the public immediately. Likewise, social marketing is a two-way process: it allows consumers to chat their thoughts, ideas and concerns to marketers, giving them immediate and constant feedback. Social marketing can impact large groups of people at once, as readily seen by campaigns used by the AHA or the FDA (Kotler et al., 2008).

Social networking can also be a means of social…… [Read More]

References

Berkowitz, E. (2011). Essentials of Health Care Marketing. Sudbury: Jones and Bartlett.

Brown, M. (1992). Healthcare Marketing Management. Gaithersburg: Apsen Publishers.

Hma, e. (n.d.). Stakeholders. Retrieved from Hma.eu:  http://www.hma.eu/fileadmin/dateien/HMA_joint/02-_HMA_Topics/02-HMA_Strategy_Paper/Index/Section_III_01_Stakeholders.pdf 

Kotler, P., Shalowitz, J., & Stevens, R. (2011). Strategic Marketing for Health Care Organizations: Building a Customer. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Health Care Zwetsloot G Pot

Words: 789 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48740669

The article states, "The enormous human and economic costs associated with occupational stress suggest that initiatives designed to prevent and/or reduce employee stress should be high on the agenda of workplace health promotion (HP) programs" (Noblet, LaMontagne, 2006, p. 346).

Along with the article's assertion that reducing employee stress should be beneficial to both the individual and the company, the article also documents the many problems that can occur due to stress in the workplace. The article espouses, "For employees, chronic exposure to stressful situations such as work overload, poor supervisory support and low input into decision-making have been cross-sectionally and prospectively linked to a range of debilitating health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, emotional exhaustion, immune deficiency disorders and cardiovascular disease" (Noblet, p. 347). Many of these illnesses are debilitating and can be long-term which adds to the company's cost due to employee absence(s) directly affecting the company's bottom line.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aldana, S.G., Merrill, R.M., Price, K., Hardy, a. And Hager, R. (2005) Financial impact of a comprehensive multisite workplace health promotion program, Preventive Medicine, 40, 131-137.

Downey, a.M., Sharp, D.J., (2007) Why do managers allocate resources to workplace health promotion programmes in countries with national health coverage?, Health Promotion International, Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 102-111

Musich, S.A., Adams, L. And Edington, D.W. (2000) Effectiveness of health promotion programs in moderating medical costs in the U.S.A., Health Promotion International, 15, 5-15

Ozminkowski, R., Ling, D., Goetzel, R., Bruno, J., Rutter, K., Isaac, F. et al. (2002) Long-term impact of Johnson & Johnson's health & wellness program on health care utilization and expenditures. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 44, 21-29.
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Healthcare -- Legal Issues Medical

Words: 2029 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70244625

1993). Within medical settings in particular, physicians and supervisors are often too over-burdened with their myriad formal responsibilities to take note of minor irregularities in protocols and procedures. Because coworkers are often in the best possible situation to notice inadequacies, it is important for all levels of employees to be equally involved in the overall CQI process.

Optimal implementation of an effective CQI process also requires a culture of openness to suggestion and confidentiality with respect to reporting more serious issues such as those that result from negligence or willful misconduct on the part of co-workers.

11. The textbook states that "an organization's most vital component in costly resource is its staff." With this being the case, the human resource function plays a very important role. Should the human resource function be part of the senior management team?

In terms of policy implementation and organizational philosophy, the human resources function…… [Read More]

References

Horine, P.D., Pohiala, E.D., Luecke, R.W. (1993) Healthcare Financial Managers and CQI: Implementing Continuous Quality Improvement; Healthcare Financial Management.

Humphry, D. (1991) Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying. Secaucus: Carol Publishing

Russell-Walling, E. (2005) Fifty Management Ideas You Really Need to Know. London: Quercus
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Healthcare Administration

Words: 800 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8346187

Healthcare Administration

The family is the earliest source of an individual's moral beliefs and principles (Dunn & Woodard, 2003). Essentially, children are not born with a set of moral principles -- they acquire a sense of what is wrong/right by observing how others react to their behavior. As a child, for instance, I was forbidden, right from my formative years, from taking something that belonged to someone else without their consent. The rule became instinctive, such that I considered the forbidden behavior wrong, and had to look out to see if I was being observed before engaging in the same. On a similar note, children learn by example - by observing the behavior of their parents or adults close to them, and are predisposed to take on their beliefs and principles (Dunn & Woodard, 2003). As they grow and interact with a larger section of the community, the society -…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2002). A Reference for Professionals: Developing Adolescents. American Psychological Association. Retrieved 10 September 2014 from  http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/develop.pdf 

Bailey, C. (2012). The Cost-Reduction Imperative. Becker's Hospital. Retrieved 10 September 2014 from  http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/the-cost-reduction-imperative.html 

Dunn, C.W. & Woodard, J.D. (2003). The Conservative Tradition in America. Lanham, MA: Rowman & Littlefield.
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Health Care Law Relating to

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44996916

Informed consent signifies one of the protections in studies on mental illness. Consent is a procedure that permits for the free choice by a knowledgeable and competent person to or not to partake in investigative procedures. Capacity for consent is not a stationary experience. It can transform with the circumstance of the person. The theory of informed consent was established on two distinctive legal philosophies. Every patient has the right to figure out what will or will not be completed on them and in regards to a fiduciary character of the patient physician affiliation it has to be articulated with the main purpose of endorsing individual self-rule while endorsing balanced decision formulation.

Evaluation

This article was very easy to read and attempted to break the subject matter down into everyday language in order to maintain clarity. It gave a very good overview of psychiatric drug testing on children and how…… [Read More]

References

Malhotra, Savita and B.N., Subodh. (2009). Informed consent & ethical issues in paediatric psychopharmacology. Indian Journal of Medical Research, 129(1), p.19-32.
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Healthcare Ethics -- Stem Cells

Words: 577 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50662077

While freedom of religion absolutely guarantees the right to refrain from choosing to submit to stem cell-based treatment, the same freedoms and the concept of separation of church and state absolutely preclude religious beliefs about when life "begins" (or about anything else) from dictating laws that affect other people who may not share those particular beliefs (Dershowitz, 2002).

Beneficence and Non-malfeasance

Certainly, both the concept of beneficence and non-malfeasance absolutely prohibit the use of fetal stem cells from any fetus that is sufficiently developed to be considered a "person" as well as from any fetus that is sufficiently developed to sense pain. Medical authorities may debate where the exact point is where "personhood" first becomes an issue, but in principle, that characterization must be a function of objective criteria and never subjective beliefs of laypeople, especially based in religion (Dershowitz, 2002).

Both beneficence and the duty to avoid malfeasance prohibit…… [Read More]

References

Dershowitz, a. (2002). Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York:

Little Brown & Co.

Levine, C. (2008). Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Bioethical Issues. Dubuque, Iowa:

McGraw Hill.
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Healthcare Leadership in the Clinical

Words: 1121 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92116087

..above all - its situation." (Ibid)

II. Leadership Strategy for Transition or Change

Watkins proposes 'Five Fundamental Propositions' in his work and the first is which that the "root causes of transition failure always lie in a pernicious interaction between the situation, with its opportunities and pitfalls, and the individuals with his or her strengths and vulnerabilities." Or otherwise stated no superheroes exist and the leadership is not a complete failure but the combination of the two determine the direction of the organization. The second proposition is that "there are systematic methods that leaders can employ to both lessen the likelihood of failure and reach the breakeven point faster." (2003) There are however proven and reliable methods that leaders must use to ensure success or at least minimize possibilities leading to failure. Third Watkins proposes that "overriding goal in a transition is to build momentum by creating virtuous cycles that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Watkins, Michael (2003) The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at all Levels. Harvard Business School Publishing 2003. Team Lib ISBNB: 1591391105.

Healthcare Leadership and Strategy in the Clinical Audit Unit for Healthcare
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Health Care More Area Is Dealt by

Words: 3267 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38705732

Health Care

More area is dealt by Human esource Management than people originally thought of. Some may explain it as the exchanges between boss and worker in the time period between which a worker is employed, until they are eliminated. It is true human resources management starts even before this, with the strategies that are formed by the institution, and the laws that govern workplace institutions. Human esource Management is the procedure of working with people so that they and their organizations attain full potential even when change accelerates the necessity to get new talents, take up new tasks, and develop new relationships, as per an article by L. Dobb abd P. Dick of 1993. (Blessinger, Human esource Management)

Human esource Management is projected as that part of management, which deals with plans, decisions, issues, ethics, process, routines, work, performance and system associated with the management of people as workers…… [Read More]

References

Blessinger, Kelly. Human Resource Management. Available from http://www.libsci.sc.edu/bob/class/clis724/SpecialLibrariesHandbook/hr_management.html. Accessed 2 February 2003]

De Silva, Sriyan. Human Resource Management As A Strategy: The Changing Focus of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management. Available at http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/actemp/papers/1998/asiawksh.htm[Accessed 2 February 2003]

De Silva, Sriyan. Human Resource Management in Achieving Management Objectives: The Changing Focus of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management. Paper presented at the ILO Workshop on Employers Organizations in Asia-Pacific in the Twenty-First Century Turin, Italy, 5-13 May 1997. Bureau for Employers' Activities International Labor Office Geneva April, 1997 Available at http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/actemp/papers/1998/srsirhrm.htm#C5-3. Accessed 2 February 2003]

Guide to Managing Human Resources: Chapter 14: Team Building" Available from http://hrweb.berkeley.edu/guide/teams.htm[Accessed 2 February 2003]
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Healthcare Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration

Words: 1307 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30685069

Healthcare Legal

Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration

Please answer the question below:

Give and support two arguments for and two arguments against Euthanasia. (Note: Pages 430 to 433 in Pozgar's textbook will provide some background on the issue).

In modern medical practice the meaning of euthanasia is an action that assists dying in someone who has requested it and countries such as Belgium, where it is a legal practice, require that the person must be older than 18 years, be in unbearable physical or psychological pain that is medically permanent and without hope of recovery, the request must be made by his or her own self-will, and the person must have thought about it and made the request several times (Gulsah, Gursel, & Nazan, 2007). These requirements by themselves imply the kinds of arguments that can be made for the practice.

The obvious argument for euthanasia is to alleviate…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bostrom, B. (2007). Gonzales v. Carhart. Issues in Law & Medicine, 89-93.

Freeman, E. (2004). Corporate Liability for Illegal Downloading of Copyrighted Music. Information Systems Security, 6-10.

Gulsah, K., Gursel, O., & Nazan, A. (2007). Intensive Care Unit Nurses Opinions about Euthanasia. Nursing Ethics, 637-650.

Novack, B. (1973). Informed Consent and the Patient's Right to No: Cobbs v. Grant. Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review.
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Healthcare Discussion Response Embryonic Stem

Words: 398 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39943588



Discussion Response: Abortion don't think abortion should be ethical dilemma for 'Americans,' but only for the American women contemplating an abortion. No woman (or at least, hardly any woman) considers having an abortion lightly. It is a personal, not a political decision. No government can make a decision that a woman must go through the pain, stress, and emotional and physical trauma of an unwanted pregnancy. But no father can, either. Could a father compel a woman he impregnated to risk her life, but not his, in a pregnancy (because all pregnancies carry some risk)? Could he force a woman to have an abortion she did not want, because he did not want to have a child? After birth, the parents have equal rights over the life of their child. But before birth, in a world where visibly unwed mothers are still prohibited in some areas from going to the…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Alcoholics and Liver Transplantation

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30714685

They also reject the argument that public support for transplantation will endure something bad if it becomes known that donated organs are being used for alcoholics.

There is an extensive reluctance to consider people with alcoholic cirrhosis for liver transplantation. The authors of this article do a good job of presenting both sides of the argument about whether alcoholics should be eligible for liver transplants. They present both a moral argument and a medical argument and compare and contrast both sides before drawing their conclusion. They illustrate the screening and selection process for liver transplant contenders in a concise manner. At the end the authors dissect the objection to the moral argument and the medical argument of not allowing alcoholics to receive liver transplants. They reply to both of these objections with the reasons as to why alcoholics should be allowed to receive transplants. In the end they conclude that…… [Read More]

References

Cohen C & Benjamin M. (1991). Alcoholics and liver transplantation. The Ethics and Social

Impact Committee of the Transplant and Health Policy Center. Journal of American

Medical Association. 265, pp. 1299-1301
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Healthcare Law Ethics & Policy Ethics and Health Care

Words: 405 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79379901

ABC Hospital Incident Report

Follow Up Requested: Yes? Nox

INCIDENT DESCRIPTION

What happened? Time: 5 PM Date: 8 Feb 2015 Location: Treatment Room

ABC Hospital has been always known for upholding the highest of ethical and moral standards since my time being employed as a nurse in this organization. The code itself is based on the Hippocratic Oath which directs and aligns the clinical practices of this organization with directed set of principles based on the ancient teachings of Hippocrates, the first Western Healer. The code suggests that patients are to receive our best efforts as healers, leaving no reasonable excuse for failure. Patients are treated as real people with real problems and the need to ensure their protection and safety is no doubt a primary concern.

The code of conduct here at ABC appears to have been violated with the recent problems with MS. Patient X and here misdiagnosis…… [Read More]

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Gbmc Healthcare Hospital The Main Issue Relates

Words: 835 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60308834

GBMC Healthcare Hospital. The main issue relates to privacy and confidentiality issues considered essential components of fostering trust between healthcare consumers and providers. The issue arose the GBMC hospital did not strictly follow the rules of privacy and confidentiality. Because of its lack of complete control on the privacy issues, many pieces of private information of patients were stolen and compromised.

Although GBMC hospital has been committed for 75 years to ensuring patient healthcare information is used to fulfill appropriate needs as provided by consent or law, but with the advent of the electronic health record and the transfer of an individual's health information through electronic media, including the Internet, the need for privacy and confidentiality protection takes on new meanings and challenges for the GBMC.

As medical science and technology continue to mature, and new data is being created that, when accessed, could be used to discriminate against an…… [Read More]

References

Courtney S. Campbell, The Crumbling Foundations of Medical Ethics, Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, Volume 19, Issue 2, April 1998, Pages 143-152

Roberto, M. And Flynn, E.P., Issues in Medical Ethics, Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, Volume 1, Issue 2, 1997, Pages 188-189
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Clinical Integration Healthcare

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71289994

Healthcare: Clinical Integration

Item Page

What is clinical integration

History of clinical integration

Goals of clinical integration

Importance of clinical integration

Health reform

New payment models

IT advancement

Barriers to clinical integration

Legal barriers

Lack of practitioner alignment

Lack of interoperability

How to achieve success in clinical integration

Incentive alignment

Knowledge alignment

Behavioral alignment

The future of health care systems

Physician acquisitions vs. clinical integration

HIEs -- solution to clinical integration?

Policy makers are beginning to appreciate the fact that only systemic change can effectively change, for the better, the manner of health care delivery in the U.S.; and that anything less would only alter the system's edges - with little or no substantial effect on cost-control, innovation-promotion, effectiveness of reward incentive schemes, coordination and coverage (AHA, 2010). Clinical integration has been found to be crucial to the change needed for the achievement of the aforementioned goals (AHA, 2010). Despite…… [Read More]

References

AHA. Clinical Integration -- the Key to Real Reform. Trend Watch. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Athena Health. (2014). History of the Clinical Integration Model. Athena Health. Retrieved from https://www.athenahealth.com/knowledge-hub/clinical-integration/clinical-integration-model.php

eHealth Initiative. (2012). The Rise of the Private Health Information Exchange and Changing Role of Public Exchanges. eHealth Initiative. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Fridsma, D. (2013). Interoperability Vs Health Information Exchange: Setting the Record Straight. Health IT Buzz. Retrieved from  http://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/meaningful-use/interoperability-health-information-exchange-setting-record-straight/
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Healthcare for Latinos and African Americans New Challenges

Words: 3430 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23577326

Diversity of Aging Population -- Innovative Healthcare

Over the past several decades there has been an avalanche of research and scholarly narratives focusing on the aging of millions of Americans -- among them the "baby boomers" that were born between 1946 and 1964 -- including their numbers and their health vis-a-vis the impact on the sometimes struggling healthcare system. But there has been a dearth of research on how American healthcare services will respond -- and is currently responding -- to an increasingly diverse older population when it comes to racial, cultural and ethnic identities. This paper points to the numerous issues and challenges that not only face an increasingly diverse older American population when it comes to healthcare, but also the challenges that the healthcare system itself faces as these Americans move into the twilight of their lives.

hat should be the Vision and Mission of Healthcare Professionals in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Administration on Aging. (2010). A Statistical Profile of Black Older Americans Aged 65+.

Retrieved April 2, 2014, from  http://www.aoa.gov .

Bookman, A. (2008). Innovative models of aging in place: Transforming our communities for an aging population. Community, Work & Family, 11(4), 419-438.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). The State of Aging and Health in America
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Mission Viejo Healthcare

Words: 3473 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97092115

Healthcare Administration Mission Viejo Executive Summary

Over the last several years, the healthcare delivery environment has been continually evolving. This is because consumers are demanding efficient ways for receiving a variety of services. That is focused on reducing costs and enhancing quality. The result is that the entire system is continually changing to keep up with them. In the case of Golden Age Hospital (GAH), they are reaching a crossroads with rising number of seniors locally and nationally. This is in response to the rising demographic and many local facilities feeling overwhelmed. The new location can be utilized as an integrated business model that will achieve these larger objectives. In the long-term, this will make them more competitive and able to respond to changes in the way industry is operating. Those who are able to do this will see their employee turnover rates decrease and they can enhance the care…… [Read More]

References

Community Profile. (2014). City of Aliso Viejo. Retrieved from: http://www.cityofalisoviejo.com/wp-content/uploads/ApdxC_Community_Profile.pdf

Mission Viejo, California. (2015). U.S. Census. Retrieved from: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0648256.html

Rising Demand for Long-Term Care. (2014). CBO. Retrieved from: http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44363

Cuellara, A. (2006). Strategic integration of hospitals and physicians. Journal of Health Economics, 25 (1), 1-28.
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Health Care in the United States Has

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51512155

health care in the United States has been the source of heated debate for a number of years. Although the publicity surrounding the issue has been considerable and made to look like it is a recent problem facing the nation, the problem, in reality, has been on the horizon for nearly a century. During President Woodrow Wilson's administration, efforts were unsuccessfully made to pass national legislation regarding the delivery of health care in the United States and the issue has appeared periodically on the national agenda ever since (Lepore, 2009). Finally, on March 23, 2010, among massive controversy, the Affordable Care Act, through the massive efforts of the Obama administration, became law.

Despite the passing of the Affordable Care Act, health care in the United States remains dismal for a large percentage of American citizens. Although there were a number of significant provisions in the Act that took effect nearly…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, R.M. (2001). Improving Access to Care in America. Los Angeles: University of California.

Boehm, G. (2005). Debunking Medical Malpractice Myths: Unraveling the False Premises behind Tort Reform. Yale Journal of Health Policy Law & Ethics, 357-369.

Lepore, J. (2009, December 7). Preexisting Condition. The New Yorker .

Shi, L. (2003). Delivering Health Care in America: A Systems Approach (3rd Edition). Burlington, VT: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
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Healthcare Rationing

Words: 1065 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35531353

Ethical Analysis of Healthcare Rationing

The topic of health care rationing has been the subject of debate in the U.S. The last few years as government expenditures on health care have far exceeded budgeted levels. Central to the concern is the ethical issue over whether it is better if fewer Americans profit with a greater amount of health resource allocation or if the majority benefit to a lesser degree for an equity in health care benefits. In the essay, "We've Got To Ration Health Care," (author unknown) the position is taken that America would fare better to follow the course of health care action seen in other western countries, where it is considered better to ration medical procedures to the extent that a system provides "the highest possible level of basic health care that can be delivered to all the people." With the growing concern over health care rationing, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cook, D & M. Giacomini. 1999. "The Sound of Silence: Rationing Resources for Critically Ill

Patients." Critical Care. 3: R1-R3.

Devettere, RJ. 1993, Feb. "Clinical Ethics and Happiness." Journal of Medical Philosophy.

Devettere, RJ. 2000. Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
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Health Care in Canada An

Words: 1761 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35968610

These needs are only beginning to be addressed in Canada and while there do not appear to be many well-established initiatives there is a growing recognition of the need for such if Canada's healthcare sector is to gain and retain the necessary workers to deliver optimal healthcare in Canada.

ibliography

Polls & Research (2006) Health Care, Environment Top Issues in Canada. 1 Nov 2006. AngusReid Global Monitor. Online available at: http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/13653

ack, Chris (2008) Current and Emerging Trends: Occupational Health and Safety in the C Healthcare Sector. 19 Sept 2008. Prepared for the OHSAH Stakeholder Meeting. Online available at: http://www.ohsah.bc.ca/media/240-OHS-Current-and-Emerging-Trends-full.pdf

Canadian Institute for Health Information, Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2006 (Ottawa: CIHI, 2007).

Canadian Nursing Advisory Committee, Full-time Equivalents and Financial Costs Associated with Absenteeism, Overtime, and Involuntary Part-time Employment in the Nursing Profession, February 15, 2002.

Canadian Health Services Research Foundation, What's Ailing our Nurses? A…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Polls & Research (2006) Health Care, Environment Top Issues in Canada. 1 Nov 2006. AngusReid Global Monitor. Online available at: http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/13653

Back, Chris (2008) Current and Emerging Trends: Occupational Health and Safety in the BC Healthcare Sector. 19 Sept 2008. Prepared for the OHSAH Stakeholder Meeting. Online available at: http://www.ohsah.bc.ca/media/240-OHS-Current-and-Emerging-Trends-full.pdf

Canadian Institute for Health Information, Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2006 (Ottawa: CIHI, 2007).

Canadian Nursing Advisory Committee, Full-time Equivalents and Financial Costs Associated with Absenteeism, Overtime, and Involuntary Part-time Employment in the Nursing Profession, February 15, 2002.
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Health Care Managers Challenges for

Words: 1922 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27164957



eferences

Aaron, H.J. 1994. Thinking About Medical Costs. Health Affairs, 13, 5 (winter): 8-13 in Hong, G-S and Kim, S.Y. (2000). Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditure Patterns and Financial Burden across the Life Cycle Stages. Journal of Consumer Affairs. 34. 2.

Acs, G. And John S. 1995. Trends in Out-of-Pocket Spending on Health Care, 1980-1992. Monthly Labor eview, 35-45 in Hong, G-S and Kim, S.Y. (2000). Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditure Patterns and Financial Burden across the Life Cycle Stages. Journal of Consumer Affairs. 34. 2.

Cote, J. And Latham, C. (2003). Exchanges between Healthcare Providers and Insurers: A Case Study. Journal of Managerial Issues. 15, 2.

Health, United States. (2003). Chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. HHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Health Statistics in Lesnik, J. (2006). Community Health Centers: Health Care as it Could Be. Journal of Law and Health. 19, 1..…… [Read More]

References

Aaron, H.J. 1994. Thinking About Medical Costs. Health Affairs, 13, 5 (winter): 8-13 in Hong, G-S and Kim, S.Y. (2000). Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditure Patterns and Financial Burden across the Life Cycle Stages. Journal of Consumer Affairs. 34. 2.

Acs, G. And John S. 1995. Trends in Out-of-Pocket Spending on Health Care, 1980-1992. Monthly Labor Review, 35-45 in Hong, G-S and Kim, S.Y. (2000). Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditure Patterns and Financial Burden across the Life Cycle Stages. Journal of Consumer Affairs. 34. 2.

Cote, J. And Latham, C. (2003). Exchanges between Healthcare Providers and Insurers: A Case Study. Journal of Managerial Issues. 15, 2.

Health, United States. (2003). Chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. HHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Health Statistics in Lesnik, J. (2006). Community Health Centers: Health Care as it Could Be. Journal of Law and Health. 19, 1..