Forensic Psychology Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

M S Forensics Psychology - Specialization

Words: 460 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32764423



Personal Qualities

I believe I possess a number of personality traits that are relevant to my career goals of becoming a lead forensics psychologist and earning a PhD in clinical psychology. Foremost among these is the fact that I am hard-working in both the intellectual and physical sense of the term. As a result of my solid work ethic, I am goal oriented and extremely driven to succeed in my aforementioned aims. I am also honorable, and have the best of intentions to better the quality of my life for my immediate family, which includes my husband and children.

Why Walden?

This program at Walden is an excellent match for me because it is compatible with the timeline that I would like to accomplish my goals in. Furthermore, I am convinced that this institution can offer me an education that will suitably prepare me for the future career and educational…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Psychology - Intro to Forensics

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87791223



Despite the fact that the field of forensic psychology was formally recognized by the American Psychological Association (APA) as a "subset" in 2001 (Salfati, 2009), aspects of this science have influenced law enforcement long before that. One of the most salient ways it does so is in terms of interviewing people for certain positions -- whether they be formal positions such as an appointment to a law enforcement position or informal ones such as witness and eyewitness testimony.

Various branches of the law have been made cognizant of the fact that individuals who work within law enforcement have a very tenuous, difficult job. There is a significantly greater amount of work -- and psychology -- involved in working as a police officer. Therefore, within the past several years law enforcement officials have included personality tests as part of the testing for police officers (Salfati, 2009). Although these tests are far…… [Read More]

References

Huss, M.T. (2001). "What is forensic psychology? it's not silence of the lambs." Eye on Psi Chi. Retrieved from http://www.psichi.org/pubs/articles/article_58.aspx

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009). "Introduction to forensic psychology." Baltimore: Author. "Foundations of Forensic Psychology" with Dr. C. Gabrielle Salfati.
View Full Essay

Forensic Research The Psychology of

Words: 2415 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30870356

Usually, it is more likely that the ruse is discovered by a forensic psychologist, and/or that there is simply too much evidence pointing to the fact that the criminal knew what he or she was doing when the crime was being committed (Adler, 2004).

The Likelihood of eoffending

Whether a criminal is likely to reoffend is something else that has to be considered by forensic psychologists. They are often asked to give their opinion on this issue when inmates are coming up for early release or when they are eligible for parole. There are other factors and opinions that are taken into account, of course, but having a professional, psychological opinion about whether a criminal has been "cured" of his or her behavior or will be likely to repeat it is very significant (Adler, 2004; Dalby, 1997). It can be difficult to determine what goes on in the mind of…… [Read More]

References

Adler, J.R. (Ed.). (2004). Forensic Psychology: Concepts, debates and practice. Cullompton: Willan.

Dalby, J.T. (1997) Applications of Psychology in the Law Practice: A guide to relevant issues, practices and theories. Chicago: American Bar Association.

Duntley, J.D., & Shackelford, T.K. (2006). Toward an evolutionary forensic psychology. Social Biology, 51, 161-165.
View Full Essay

Forensic and Clinical Roles and Assessment While

Words: 1410 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27727725

Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment

While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct areas of practice. This means that the role of the forensic and clinical practitioner differs in several ways: "who the client of the psychologist is the nature of the relationship between the psychologist and the individual being evaluated, and the psychologist's approach to the material provided by the individual" (Packer, 2008). Moreover, it also means that the professional assesses the individual differently. These differences include: the purpose of the assessment, the goal of the intervention, and psycho-legal vs. psychological assessment. While the differences may seem clear, the reality is that even forensic evaluations can lead to the establishment of the type of relationships that develop in clinical practice, making it difficult for health care professionals and for their clients to differentiate…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2011). Specialty guidelines for forensic psychologists.

Retrieved September 8, 2013 from American Psychology-Law Society website: http://www.ap-ls.org/aboutpsychlaw/SGFP_Final_Approved_2011.pdf
View Full Essay

Code of Ethics in Psychology

Words: 1482 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59202703

Psychology

ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN THE PACTICE OF FOENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

Professional code of ethics regulates the behavior and practicing of individuals from different fields. Psychologists conform to the stated professional code of ethics that guide them in the provision of safe and quality services to their clients. Similarly, psychologists can practice in firms, including the law to aid in forensic examination of the convicted individuals. As such, it may require the application of the law code of ethics and psychological code of ethics, a fact that might present a significant challenge to them. Therefore, the following analysis identifies the standards of ethics psychologist (Dr. Joven) faces when practicing forensic psychology.

Discussion

Dr. Joven has to follow numerous ethical standards guiding his professional practice as a future forensic psychologist. He will have to ensure confidentiality of the information of his clients. Confidentiality entails respecting one's right of privacy to the extent applicable,…… [Read More]

References

APA Ethics Code Commentary and Case Illustrations. (n.d.). http://www.apa.org. Retrieved May 8, 2014, from http://www.apa.org/education/ce/1360279.aspx

Bush, S.S., Connell, M.A., & Denney, R.L. (2006). Ethical practice in forensic psychology: A systematic model for decision-making. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Ethics Rounds -- APA's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: An ethics code for all psychologists? (n.d.). http://www.apa.org. Retrieved May 8, 2014, from http://www.apa.org/monitor/sep06/ethics.aspx

Zapf, P.A., Hart, S.D., & Roesch, R. (2013). Forensic psychology and law. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley
View Full Essay

Forensic Psychological Evaluation

Words: 1732 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77865714

Forensic Psychological Evaluation

Confidential Psychological Evaluation

IDENTIFYING INFORMATION:

Gender: Male Date of Report: 05/07/2012

Date of Birth: 10/01/1981 Age

Marital Status: Single Occupation: Unemployed

Race: Caucasian Education: GED

Referred by: Dr., B. Wynter

REASON FOR REFERRAL:

A Psychiatric Evaluation on May 19, 2006 by Barbara Wynter, License psychologist who is

Clinical administrator of Central Treatment Facility ward 1, 2, 3, was requested to further assist in diagnosis.

LIMITS OF CONFIDENTIALITY:

EVALUATION PROCEDURE:

INSTRUMENT-

DR, B. Wynters

MMPI (Spell out the name Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory)

Is a depressive component of scale 6. The items connote extraordinary emotional sensitivity or vulnerability that is dysphonic in tone. These items have a "poor little me" flavor, portraying the self as meek and innocuous, emotionally fragile, incapable of being a threat to others, and perhaps as being entitle to special concern and consideration for one's tender sensibilities. There is an implicit theme of resentment…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Forensics and Mental Health

Words: 2723 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89090754

Forensic Mental Health Legislation and Policies

The current position on forensic mental health issues when it comes to legislation and policies is a strong one, but there are some difficulties that do not translate well into the probation and parole policies that are currently offered. In other words, there are issues that are not being addressed, and that are allowing individuals with mental health problems who on are probation and parole to slip through the cracks and struggle with their issues on their own (Wang, et al., 2005). Not only are they not getting the help they need in order to live productive lives, they are also more likely to reoffend, violate their probation or parole, become homeless, drink to excess, do drugs, and get involved in other unsavory behavior (Patel & Prince, 2002). The high proportion of indigenous offenders is one of the biggest issues that indicates mental health…… [Read More]

References

Australian Government (2012). Mental health services in Australia. Retrieved from  https://mhsa.aihw.gov.au/home/ 

Demyttenaere, K., Bruffaerts, R., Posada-Villa, J., Gasquet, I., Kovess, V., Lepine, JP., Angermeyer, MC., Bernert, S., et al. (2004). WHO World Mental Health Survey Consortium. Prevalence, severity, and unmet need for treatment of mental disorders in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey. Journal of the American Medical Association, 291(21): 2581 -- 2590.

Keyes, C. (2002). The mental health continuum: From languishing to flourishing in life. Journal of Health and Social Behaviour, 43(2): 207 -- 222.

Munce, S.E., Stansfeld, S.A., Blackmore, E.R., & Stewart, D.E. (2007). The role of depression and chronic pain conditions in absenteeism: Results from a national epidemiologic survey. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 49(11): 1206 -- 1211.
View Full Essay

Psychology to Me the Most

Words: 339 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47227130

This does not mean that I do not think I would learn a lot from the introductory course. I just believe that there has to be a foundation for knowledge, and that is what the beginning psychology course is generally designed for. By getting a good foundation it would then be easier to learn about any and all of the important issues that will likely be addressed within more advanced courses as the curriculum becomes more difficult.

Based on the experience that you have and what you have done, my question to you would be this: Do you believe that alcohol and substance abuse problems are psychological in and of themselves, or are they merely physical manifestations or reactions to these problems?… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Psychology Definitions Psychosis Loss

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85134043



Know the predominant features of each personality disorder = Such knowledge will help the therapist to identify assistance strategies ahead of time, which can be modified as necessary.

Know about the link between borderline personality disorder and suicide attempts = an awareness of this link will help the therapist to identify warning signs and provide assistance in a timely way.

Know that group therapy is useful for treatment of avoidant personality disorder = Knowing this avoids the intuitive tendency to reinforce the patient's avoidance.

Patients with which disorder are most likely to seek treatment on their own? Depression sufferers are most likely to seek treatment for their condition.

Problems in using the DSM-IV-TR to diagnose personality disorders = the main concern is that some guidelines are very specific. Some personality disorders may overlap or display atypical symptoms.

Chapter 14

Are boys or girls more likely to have a diagnosable psychological…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Forensic Tests Two Forensic Psychological

Words: 490 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37574365

The construction/validation sample of 96 juvenile sexual offenders ranged in age from 9 to 20, with an average age of 14. To administrate the exam, the test is not directly administered to the juvenile: instead the trained professional calculates the boy's relative risk factors, based up his past history, such as a history of violence, of being a victim of abuse himself, caregiver consistency, and history and preoccupation with sexuality. The problem with the test is that it to some degree stereotypes the boy and tries to predict the likelihood of negative behavior based upon negative past and family circumstances. However, it can be useful in family court settings for flagging 'at risk' teens who have already entered the system and may be helped by receiving additional social support to prevent future acts of violence.

orks Cited

Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI). Tacoma, A: Nichols & Molinder Assessments.

http://ibs.colorado.edu/cspv/infohouse/vioeval/vioevalDetails.php?recordnumber=312&vio_name=vioeval

Prentky, Robert.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI). Tacoma, WA: Nichols & Molinder Assessments.

http://ibs.colorado.edu/cspv/infohouse/vioeval/vioevalDetails.php?recordnumber=312&vio_name=vioeval

Prentky, Robert. Sue Righthand, Ph.D. (2003). Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol-II

(J-SOAP-II) Retrieved May 14, 2009 at  http://www.csom.org/pubs/JSOAP.pdf
View Full Essay

Forensic Nursing Goes Far Beyond Traditional Medical

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41015000

Forensic nursing goes far beyond traditional medical care; it is "an innovative expansion of the role nurses will fill in the health care delivery system of the future," (Lynch, 1995, p. 489). This is why the Vice President of the United States Joe Biden has stated, "Forensic Nurses play an integral role in bridging the gap between law and medicine. They should be in each and every emergency room," (cited by the International Association of Forensic Nurses, 2006). Until recently, I was not aware that the profession existed. I learned what I know about forensic science from television, and also from years spent watching autopsies being performed at the morgue near by dad's office. Oddly, I would spend hours watching actual autopsies so when television shows started to depict forensic science in documentary and fiction shows more and more, the field broadened and opened up to me. I soon learned…… [Read More]

References

Hammer, R. & Pagliaro, E.M. (2006). Forensic Nursing: A Handbook for Practice. Jones & Bartlett.

International Association of Forensic Nurses (2006). What is forensic nursing? Retrieved online: http://www.iafn.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=137

Lynch, V.A. (1995). Clinical forensic nursing: a new perspective in the management of crime victims from trauma to trial. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 1995 Sep;7(3):489-507.
View Full Essay

Psychology WA UFPR the Quantitative

Words: 719 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68576973

In the vehicle study, witnesses had to select from various types and colors of vehicles, four of the former and three of the latter. The variables in the study in which listeners heard from 'witness testimony included the participation of both jurors and judges in Arizona, five differently worded findings, as well as two versions of conclusions in which it was stated that the 'suspect' either did or did not commit the crime -- in the opinion of the expert (McQuiston-Surrett and Saks, 2009, p. 441).

However, the data collection was extremely different. In the vehicle witness study, the findings were simply the mathematical results of the percentages of the people who were correct in identifying the requisite vehicle. In the other study, researchers were able to determine how different phrasing and diction swayed the credibility of witness testimony -- with some of the phrasing even mentioning the circumscriptions of…… [Read More]

References

McQuiston-Surrett, D., Saks, M.J. (2009). "The testimony of forensic identification science: what expert witnesses say and what factfinders hear." Law and Human Behavior. 33: 436-453.

Villegas, a.B., Sharps, M.J., Satterthwaite, B., Chisolm, S. (2005). "Eyewitness memory for vehicles." The Forensic Examiner. Retrieved from http://ehis.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=18&sid=e4265201-4916-4a30-9f85-a8889681037f%40sessionmgr14&hid=17
View Full Essay

Psychology - Intro to Forensics

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29273982



Graham was consistent with a general trend exhibited by the court to create a more clear differentiation between appropriate juvenile vs. adult sentencing. For example, in oper v. Simmons (2005) the court declared the death penalty unconstitutional for persons under 18 (Guggenheim 2012: 3). However, the Graham decision was considered more surprising because the Court tends to give more consideration to death penalty cases. There is often great variation between juvenile laws between the states, but rather than defer to a growing trend to emphasize states' rights, the Graham decision emphasized evolving national and international standards of decency. According to Justice Kennedy, regardless of the state in which the juvenile is tried, there must be a general acknowledgement that juveniles have a "lack of maturity and an underdeveloped sense of responsibility...are more vulnerable or susceptible to negative influences and outside pressures, including peer pressure; and their characters are not as…… [Read More]

References

Graham v. Florida. (2010). Cornell Law School. Retrieved:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/08-7412.ZS.html

Guggenheim, M. (2012.).Graham v. Florida and a juvenile's right to age-appropriate sentencing

Harvard CRCL. Retrieved:
View Full Essay

Clinical Psychology Mental Health Is an Essential

Words: 1268 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41604961

Clinical Psychology

Mental health is an essential part of overall health. The Surgeon General's report on mental health in 1999 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999) and the 2001 supplement Mental Health: Culture, ace and Ethnicity (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001) both highlighted mental health as a critical health aspect affecting a broad range of individuals today. Current paper is focused at exploring the concept of clinical psychology and how it is different from social psychology, counseling psychology and forensic psychology.

Clinical Psychology is the field of psychology in which theory, science and clinical knowledge are combined for the objective of comprehension, prevention and relieve distress and dysfunction based on psychology and for the promotion prejudiced comfort and personal development. The main features of clinical psychology are psychological assessment and psychotherapy. Though clinical psychologist participate in psychological research, teaching, counseling and forensic assessment. Clinical Psychology…… [Read More]

References

Goldstein, A.M. (2007). Forensic psychology: Toward a standard of care. In A.M. Goldstein (Ed.), Forensic psychology: Emerging topics and expanding roles (pp.3-41). New York: Wiley.

Heilbrun, K. (2001). Principles of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Kluwer.

Kane, A.W. (2007a). Basic concepts in psychology and law. In G. Young, A.W. Kane, & K. Nicholson (Eds.), Causality of psychological injury: Presenting evidence in court (pp. 261-292). New York: Springer Science + Business Media.

Mackenzie, B.D.(1977). Behaviorism and the limits of scientific method. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press.
View Full Essay

Opportunities to Venture in Psychology

Words: 1002 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10188453

Careers in Psychology

Each person possesses his or her own field of preference in psychology specialization after the basic course. The desire emanates from personal experience, passion in life, desired goals to fulfill, and the rewards accompanying each specialization. All the specialization areas in psychology remain in high demand in the society. Concisely, all that matters is the innovativeness of the person in the profession, the skills, and the approach methods in use when in the practicum field. The result after the inputs determines how successful one becomes. The societal needs are at a rampant change, therefore as one chooses a certain profession to venture in, critical analysis in of utmost importance. After detailed evaluation of the various ventures that provide the best satisfaction to a psychologist, the three topmost specializations are forensic, biopsychology and social psychologists.

Social psychologists work in environments with close relation to hospitals, clinics, mental hospitals,…… [Read More]

References

Accredited Forensic Psychology Schools and Degrees Online. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.psychologyschoolguide.net/forensic-psychology/ 

Biopsychology | The Psych Files. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.thepsychfiles.com/category/topics/biological-psychology/ 

Kuther, T.L., & Morgan, R.D. (2013). Careers in psychology: Opportunities in a changing world. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Perception | The Psych Files. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.thepsychfiles.com/category/topics/perception/
View Full Essay

Organizational Behavior Psychology Applied Comprehension

Words: 4268 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87584890

With this approach, consultation psychology focuses on the issues of the group as a whole and therefore typically uses group discussions, interviews and observations as opposed to singling out specific individuals. The result is that, by using consultation psychology in the field of industrial and organizational psychology, the focus is on the group and the roles the individuals who make up the group play. With this focus, industrial and organizational psychology is better able to meet its goals of increasing organizational productivity, well-being and success.

Case Example

In the case sample cited in the introduction of this paper, the issue was how consultation psychology could be utilized as a method for providing industrial and organizational psychological services to a mental health related organization. From the overview provided in the previous section, it can be seen that utilizing consultation psychology, as opposed to clinical psychology, will be the best method of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bass, Bernard M. (1960): Leadership, Psychology and Organizational Behavior. New York: Harper and Brothers.

Bass, Bernard M., and Pieter JD Drenth. (1987): Advances in Organizational Psychology: An International Review. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.

Brehm, S.S., Kassin, S. And Fein, S. (2005): Social Psychology. Boston: Charles Hartford.

Cameron, Kim S., and Robert E. Quinn. (2006): Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture Based on the Competing Values Framework. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
View Full Essay

Post-Modern to Contemporary Psychology

Words: 3161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16183152



Diversity and Psychology

There were two major developments that influenced the field of psychology and the professions' views regarding multicultural competence, emphasized in 2003. The American Psychological Associations' 2002 Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and the Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice and Organizational Change for Psychologists published in 2003 both stressed the importance of moving from a mono-cultural school of thought to a multicultural perspective and that these 'new rules' acknowledge an appreciation of differences as well as an "understanding of the inherent ambiguity and complexity in psychological practice (Pack-rown & Williams, 2003; Manesse, Saito, & Rodolfa, 2004). Knapp and VandeCreek (2003) said of these new guidelines that they articulate a need for greater sensitivity regarding linguistic and cultural minorities. The development of the new Code of Ethics and the APA's positioning were purported to be in response to a long awaited recognition of the need for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychological Association (2003). Guidelines on multicultural education, training, research, practice, and organizational change for psychologist. American Psychologist, 58(5), 377-402.

Barbour, I. (2000). When science meets religion: Enemies, strangers, partners? San

Francisco: Harper.

Blumenthal, A. (2001). A Wundt primer: The operating characteristics of consciousness.
View Full Essay

Personalizing Punishment-Based on Brain Psychology

Words: 1884 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2325030

Psychopathology Criminal Behavior Part

What might be some of the implications for the forensic field of the differences between the "low-fear hypothesis" and the "high-impulsive" subtypes of psychopathy? In other words, how might the differences in the models help inform us about best practices for such activities as police work on the streets, interrogation methods, trial and sentencing practices, providing treatment, or evaluating recidivism risks?

In retrospect, theorists view Lykken's conceptual framework as a first step toward distinguishing between primary and secondary psychopathy (Baskins-Sommers, 2010). As theory building continues in this decade, the typology is supported by the notion of trait-like sensitivities and trait-like cognitive capacities that suggest the following implications for criminal justice procedures. Primary psychopathy is characterized by disinhibition, which is an inability to abort a dominant response, integrate socialization, or adopt alternative objectives. An individual who is considered to have primary psychopathy will fail to consider emotional…… [Read More]

References

Baskin-Sommers, A.R., Wallace, J.F., MacCoon, D.G., Curtin, J.J., and Newman, J.P. (2010, October 1). Clarifying the Factors that Undermine Behavioral Inhibition System Functioning in Psychopathy. Personal Disorders, 1(4), 203 -- 217. doi: 10.1037/a0018950. PMCID: PMC2992384. NIHMSID: NIHMS211679. Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992384/#!po=74.5614 

Baskin-Sommers, A.R., Curtin, J.J. And Newman, J.P. (2013, May). Emotion-modulated startle in psychopathy: clarifying familiar effects. Journal of Abnormal Pychology, 122(2), 458-468. 10.1037/a0030958. Epub 2013 Jan 28. Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23356218 

Blonigen, D.M., Hicks, B.M., Krueger, R.F., Patrick, C.J. & Iacono, W.G. (2005, May). Psychopathic personality traits: heritability and genetic overlap with internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Psychological Medicine, 35(5): 637 -- 648. doi: 10.1017/S0033291704004180. PMCID: PMC2242349. NIHMSID: NIHMS38985. Retreived  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2242349/#__ffn_sectitle 

Franklin, K. (2010, May 30). Psychopathy guru blocks critical article. Will case affect credibility of PCL-R test in court? In the News: Forensic psychology, criminology, and psychology-law. Retrieved  http://forensicpsychologist.blogspot.com/2010/05/psychopath-guru-blocks-critical-article.html
View Full Essay

Legal Aspects of Professional Psychology

Words: 1541 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50460802

Legal Aspects of Professional Psychology

All psychologists are required to follow the ethical guidelines found in the 2002 Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct of the American Psychological Association (APA), commonly known as the Ethics Code. Other important ethical guidelines are found in the 2007 Competing Development Achievement Levels (DALs) of the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology (NCSPP) and the Assessment of Competing Benchmarks Work Group of the APA. These ethics codes cover compliance, privacy and confidentiality, assessment, therapy, research and publications, and there are also special guidelines for dealing with children, minorities, culturally diverse populations, forensic psychology and gay and lesbian clients. Both the Ethics Code and state laws require psychologists to maintain the confidentiality of clients and their records, apart from legal requirements to report verified or suspected child abuse or clients who are a danger to others. Psychologists can only provide…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Arnaut, G.L.Y. And D.A. Hill (2010), "Ethical and Legal Issues," in J.C. Thomas and M. Hersen (eds). Handbook of Clinical Psychology Competencies. Springer, pp. 73-94.

Corey, G. et al. (2011). Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions, 8th Edition. Cengage Learning.

Wulach, James S. And David L. Shapiro (2005), "Ethical and Legal Considerations in Child Custody Evaluations," in Gunsberg and Hymowitz (Eds.), A Handbook of Divorce and Custody Forensic Development and Clinical Perspectives. New Jersey: The Analytic Press pp. 45-56.
View Full Essay

Clinical Psychology the Field of Clinical Psychology

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19328472

Clinical Psychology

The field of clinical psychology emerged as a viable method through which the theoretical foundations of cognitive studies could be effectively applied within the clinical setting to prevent and treat psychological syndromes. Derived from the first clinical psychology work conducted by Lightner Witmer in the late 19th century, and expanding throughout the 20th century as diagnostic tools were refined and classification systems for mental disorders were standardized, modern clinical psychology has been adapted to fulfill a niche within a whole host of divergent fields, including criminal justice, the social sciences and gender relations. Clinical psychologists premise their work on the use of empirical analysis to accurately investigate matters of cognitive processing, psychological assessment and mental illness, with the administration of personality tests, neurological scans and clinical interviews the most frequently utilized diagnostic resources. As clinical psychology expanded the base of knowledge pertaining to the human brain's highly refined…… [Read More]

References

Blackburn, R. (1993). The psychology of criminal conduct: Theory, research and practice. John Wiley & Sons.

Donohue, J., & Levitt, S. (2001). The impact of race on policing and arrests. Journal of Law and Economics, 44, 367-394. Retrieved from  http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittDonohueTheImpactOfRace2001.pdf 

Fite, P.J., Wynn, P., & Pardini, D.A. (2009). Explaining discrepancies in arrest rates between

Black and White male juveniles. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 77(5), 916. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2981137/ >.
View Full Essay

Why Only Christian Psychologists Can Practice True Psychology

Words: 19429 Length: 71 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78576075

Soul: Why Only Christian Psychologists Can Practice "True Psychology"

Today, there are more than one hundred thousand licensed psychologists practicing in the United States. These mental health professionals are in a unique position to provide individuals, groups, and American society with valuable counseling services for a wide range of mental health issues and mental disorders. This study uses a triangulated research approach to demonstrate that true psychology can be done only by Christians since only Christians have the resources that are needed to understand and transform the soul in healing ways. The first leg of the research approach consists of a review of the relevant literature, the second leg consists of a custom survey of 25 practicing American psychologists, and the final leg of the triangulated research approach consists of an exegetical analysis of relevant biblical verses concerning the human soul and its relevance for mental health professionals. Finally, a…… [Read More]

References

American people and society. (2015). CIA world factbook. Retrieved from https://www.cia. gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html.

Bassett, R.L. (2013, Winter). An empirical consideration of grace and legalism within Christian experience. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 32(1), 43-49.

Black's law dictionary. (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Bobgan, M. & Bobgan, D. (1987). PsychoHeresy: The psychological seduction of Christianity.
View Full Essay

Ethics Psychology Has a Professional

Words: 1811 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97371740

This means that the decision I make in this scenario must be guided by sincere questions concerning the validity of my practice and the importance of alternate ambitions such as my desire to make a foray into the screenwriting profession. It is thus that I have decided the costs are simply too high to maintain the current relationship which I have with my patient.

Therefore, the only appropriate measure is for me to immediately cease my counseling relationship with the patient. In order to ensure that the patient does not lose his access to the treatment which he requires, he will be referred to one of my respected colleagues. It is believed that the necessary cost of breaking from this established doctor/patient relationship will be outweighed by the benefits of removing myself from a situation in which objectivity has been lost.

Upon separating form the patient thusly, I would make…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Fisher, C.B. (2008). Decoding the Ethics Code. Sage Publications.

Holcomb, W.R. (2006). Thinking Correctly About Ethics: A Review of Ethical Practice in Forensic Psychology. Psychology Critiques, 51(48), 1554-1556.

Jordan, A.E. & Meara, N.M. (1990). Ethics and the Professional Practice of Psychologists: The Role of Virtues and Principles. Professional Psychology Resource Press, 21(2), 107-114.

Koocher, G.P. & Keith-Spiegel, P. (1998). Ethics in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
View Full Essay

Looking at Psychology of Violence

Words: 3967 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96457880

violence and aggression. First, different aspects of violence, such as diversity and culture, gender and psychosocial aspects are discussed. And, the ethical and legal dimensions of mandatory reporting of child and elder abuse are looked into. The emerging technologies in the field of psychology are also discussed in relation to the topic of violence and other forms of deviant behavior. Lastly, correlations of the causality and violence prevention interventions are given.

MFT: Psychology of Violence

The history of the world is mired with incidences of violence. Violence traces its origins back to prehistory, and there is barely a community, society or individual that has never experienced or witnessed some form of violence. A single incidence of violence can be powerful and unbearable whether it is terrorism, war, suicide, homicide or even systemic injustices (structural violence -- whereby there are access barriers to health care, social justice, or some other type…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, C., & Bushman, B. (2002). Human Aggression. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 27-51.

Duxbury, J., & Wright, K. (2011, March 7). Should nurses restrain violent and aggressive patients? Retrieved from Nursing Times: http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice/specialisms/mental-health/-should-nurses-restrain-violent-and-aggressive-patients/5026793.article

EIGE. (2015). What is gender-based violence. Retrieved from European Institute for Gender Equality: http://eige.europa.eu/gender-based-violence/what-is-gender-based-violence

Felson, R., Deane, G., & Armstrong, D. (2008). Do theories of crime or violence explain race differences in delinquency. Social Science Research, 624-641.
View Full Essay

Margin of Error the Forensic

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67455240

Instead, a representative sample is used. The larger the sample the better, obviously, because the larger the sample the less wiggle room there is going to be between the sample looked at and the entire body.

Perhaps another explanation for the margin of error in this study is noted in the abstract of the document, whereby it is acknowledged that they questionnaire looked at forensic psychologists that were retained or secured by the court as well as situations where one of the child custody parties in question retained the forensic psychologist. It is not immediately clear whether that figured into the margin of error because that would certainly affect the motives and even the outcome of the study in general but whether/how much of an impact was had was not immediately made clear.

Conclusion

In short, the margin of error in this study accounts for the fact that only a…… [Read More]

References

Arch, M., Jarne, a., Pero, M., & Guardia, J. (2011). CHILD CUSTODY ASSESSMENT:

A FIELD SURVEY of SPANISH FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGISTS' PRACTICES. European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context, 3(2), 107-128.
View Full Essay

Alternative Approach to Computerized Tomography in Forensic

Words: 1983 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82013039

altenative appoach to Computeized Tomogaphy in foensic pathology.

Thomsen, A.H., Juik, A.G., Uhenholt, A.G., Vesteby, A. (2009).

Jounal: Foensic Science Intenational.

Publication Infomation: 2008, 183, 87-90.

Publishe Infomation:

The main pupose of this aticle is to see whethe o not CT scans ae necessay as a means of augmenting autopsies. The eseach question is: do the benefits of CT scans match the effot equied to implement this technology? Thee is no hypothesis fo this aticle; the authos wee cetainly non-patisan in thei appoach and assumptions. The sample was 20 dead bodies (including 15 males) with CT scans pefomed by the Depatment of Radiology at Aahus Univesity Hospital. I eviewed this aticle to ascetain the elevance of CT scans to foensic pathology.

Abstact: This aticle denotes the boons and the detiments associated with using CT scans as compaed to, and augmenting the usage of conventional autopsies fo foensic pathology. Oiginal eseach…… [Read More]

references to certain applications dating back to the 1980s. In this respect the article was extremely comprehensive in its scope, although perhaps it may have been better suited focusing on more contemporary applications. Still, for the variety of knowledge it covered and the degree of insight it shed, it is certainly an excellent starting point for research into this field, and helps to synthesize the various points of relevance of the other articles explicated within this assignment.

Bruised witness: Bernard Spilsbury and the performance of early twentieth-century English forensic pathology

Author(s): Burney, I., Pemberton, N.

Journal: Medical History

Publication Information: 2011, 55, 41-60.
View Full Essay

Clinical Measures in Forensic Settings

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2942889

The authors of the article determined that by directing children into a specific line of questioning regraind a certain action "gives the child material that might appear in subsequent play or narrative" (Gilstrap and Cici, 2001).

The true relationship between both of these issues is that ultimately, Hewitt also engaged in leading children through the use of imagery, by asking them to draw how they would feel if something sexual did happen to them. Finally, the last problem identified with using clinical techniques in a forensic setting is related to relying on aspects of behavior as being congruous with abuse. Without properly attributing for the base rate of sexual abuse in the world or the population in which the children are, the propensity for gaining false positives is very real -- and problematic.

Thus, there are many different important concepts a forensic psychologist could take away form this particular article.…… [Read More]

References

Gilstrap, L.L., Ceci, S.J. (2001). "Difficulties inherent in integrating clinical wisdom with empirical research in forensic interview." PsycCRITIQUES. 46 (2). Retrieved from http://ehis.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/detail?vid=6&sid=e8439b61-401f-4d44-b03d-9552b26c9259%40sessionmgr115&hid=107&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=pvh&an=cnt-46-2-159

Litwack, T.R. (2001). "Actuarial vs. clinical assessments of dangerousness." Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(2), 409-443. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/detail?sid=87617533-0386-4c21-a27f-bfc6df2dbdb5%40sessionmgr104&vid=1&hid=122&bdata=JnNjb3BlPXNpdGU%3d#db=pdh&an=2001-17852-005
View Full Essay

Insanity Evaluations Represent the Most Challenging Forensic

Words: 1904 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93289250

Insanity evaluations represent the most challenging forensic assessments in the criminal domain" (ogers, 2008, p.126). This is due to the fact that insanity evaluations require the psychologist to assess whether a defendant had a mental illness at the time that an offense was committed, and, whether that mental illness was related to the commission of the crime in a way that would make the defendant "insane" under applicable state laws. First, whether or not the defendant is presenting as mentally ill at the time of the assessment is often not relevant to the assessment; most defendants, processed and in the jail system, have access to medications and treatment that they may have lacked at the time of the crime. Therefore, it is important to realize that a defendant's competency to stand trial is a different issue than whether a defendant is not guilty by reason of insanity. If a defendant…… [Read More]

References

Bonnie, R.J. (1992). The competence of criminal defendants: A theoretical reformulation.

Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 10(3), 291-316.

Frontline. (2013). Instanity defense FAQs. Retrieved September 30, 2013 from PBS website:

 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/crime/trial/faqs.html
View Full Essay

Forensic Assessment in The Role of the

Words: 861 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16584089

Forensic Assessment

In "The role of the Violence isk Appraisal Guide and Historical, Clinical, isk- 20 in U.S. courts: A case law survey," Vitacco et al. discuss the use of the psychological forensic assessment in predicting future dangerousness. The authors are very critical of the use of psychological assessments for these purposes because of their belief, which is affirmed by investigation into case law, that psychologists often get their predictions wrong. In other words, psychologists are not necessarily able to predict future dangerousness, which can make an assessment of future dangerousness little more than guesswork.

One of the cases mentioned by Vitacco et al. was the seminal case of Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983). The defendant, Thomas Barefoot, was convicted of murdering a police officer. He was charged with a capital offense and the jury had to determine whether or not Barefoot was eligible for the death penalty.…… [Read More]

References

Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983).

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). Introduction in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). The nature and evolution of forensic mental health assessment in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). Relevant sources of authority for developing best-practice standards in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.
View Full Essay

Forensic Dynamics in the Interviewing Process

Words: 1224 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29996921

Alter the Forensic Dynamics during an Interviewing Process

In this paper, we reveal how professional's attitudes, views, and knowledge do not necessarily match forensic research findings. Witness issues will then be discussed concerning research community. The study identifies some of the key factors that can alter or improve forensic dynamics during the interviewing process. This study focuses primarily on forensic dynamics relating to the interviewing young children and the associated challenges.

Expert knowledge and attitudes

It has been proven that professionals and social researchers (biased) towards information confirming their initial beliefs by refuting established opinions. Once established, beliefs and impressions challenged to contrary proof. Thus, belief systems and generalization can create a confirmation prejudice that may result in faulty understanding and wrong presentation, adversely affecting important decisions. egarding child victimization situations, such prejudice may result in dramatic repercussions presenting a serious risk to a person's legal rights or presenting a…… [Read More]

Reference

Bull, R., Valentine, T., & Williamson, T. (2009). Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: Current developments and future directions. Chichester, UK: Wiley and Sons, Inc.
View Full Essay

Four Goals of Psychology

Words: 791 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99982551

Goals of Psychology

Psychologists in various areas of specialty put emphasis on different behavioral aspects though often with similar goals, that of getting acquainted to the human behavior. The paper will look at these four goals of psychology as well as an example of a study created that would help elaborate on each of these four goals of psychology. These four goals of psychology are to describe behavior, to explain behavior, to predict behavior and to control behavior.

Describe behavior

This involves the naming and classification of a behavior that is displayed by an individual or a group of people. A description is normally based on careful, systematic procedure carried out which is a contrast to the haphazard description that may be put forth without backing of well researched data. Description is important as it clarifies the phenomenon under study and it is only after a description of the phenomena…… [Read More]

References

Pastorino, E., & Doyle-Portillo, S. (2013). What is psychology ? essentials. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
View Full Essay

Clinical Psychology Interview

Words: 2790 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16662797

sit-down with an experience psychologist recently and a very enlightening and expansive conversation ensued. The psychologist in question did request that her name and her practice be excluded from being named within this report, but there is a bevy of great information that was gleaned during the interview and will be shared in this report. She said she wanted to be very candid and felt she should not do so if her name (or the name of her practice) are in play. At the request of the professor, topics to be mentioned in this summary include how long the psychologist has been working in the field, what orientation the psychologist was trained for and the time splits that the psychologist allocates her time to, the assessment tools she uses and the associated training engaged in to be able to use those tools, the ethical dilemmas that the psychologist has encountered…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Historical Psychology

Words: 763 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53164341

Psychological Testing

The science of Psychology has evolved over time and certain studies have been instrumental in that evolution. Two of the more famous studies that have revolutionized the field were the orschach inkblot study of 1942, and the study in 1962 by Calhoun on the effects of overcrowding. These two scientific studies changed the field of psychology and our understanding of human behavior.

The orschach inkblot test is one of the most famous studies in the history of Psychology. As stated in the published study, "the experiment consists in the interpretation of accidental forms, that is, of non-specific forms." (orschach, 1951, p. 15) Inkblots are created by dripping ink on a piece of paper and then folding the paper. The researchers maintain that it is important that the resulting inkblot fulfill certain requirements, but most importantly the inkblot must be symmetrical. The inkblots are then shown to the subject…… [Read More]

References

Calhoun, J.B. (1962). "Population Density and Social Pathology." Scientific American. 206, 139-48.

"Letting the Rat out of the Bag, The Cultural Influence of John B. Calhoun's Rodent Experiments." (2009) London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved from http://www2.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/researchHighlights/Environment/rats

.aspx

Rorschach, Hermann. (1951). Psychodiagnostics: A Diagnostic Test Based on Perception, 2nd Ed.. Retrieved from http://www.archive.org/stream/psychodiagnostic011205mbp#page/n7/mode/2up
View Full Essay

Ethics in the Practice of Psychology Ethical

Words: 959 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43296154

Ethics in the Practice of Psychology

Ethical Decision-Making

Identify the problem.

The therapist must decide how to respond to several potential ethics issues that the client has brought to the client-therapist relationship. The therapist is considering options for responding that will preserve the integrity of the client-therapist relationship and that will avoid communicating any disregard for the ethnic traditions that are most likely influencing the client's actions.

Identify the potential issues involved.

While it is probable that the psychologist has reviewed the ethical guidelines that govern her work, the client has stepped outside of those bounds in several ways. Most notably, the client has not complied with the processes and constraints associated with fee payment, and the client has introduced complexity into the client-therapist relationship by making arrangements for the provision of therapy services to another family member without first discussing the matter with the therapist. In addition, the client…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G., Corey, M., & Callanan, P. (2011). Issues and ethics in the helping profession (7th ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks / Cole.

Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. (1992, December 1).

American Psychological Association. Author. Retrieved http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/code-1992.aspx [Type text]
View Full Essay

Ethical and Professional Conflicts in Correctional Psychology

Words: 1828 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94324679

Correctional Psychology

Duties of a Correctional Psychologist

An increasing rate of violation of crimes characterizes the current global environment. Different forms of violence and aggression, including drug trafficking and abuse, robbery, and rape cases among other forms of violence necessitates the need for analyzing the roles of a correctional psychologist. he special roles played by the correctional psychologists such as providing environments that improve the safety of the staff and inmates, psychological services, inmate management, and conducting an evaluation of the inmate/prison population and its influence on inmates' health necessitated the study into the topic. In addition, the fact that the correctional psychology has numerous ethical dilemmas and conflicts makes it wanting to study the topic.

he working environment, professional and personal experiences made me interested in studying the duties and challenges facing correctional psychologist. he fact that correctional psychologists work in a simulative and challenging environment attracts my interests…… [Read More]

The study provides a variety of opportunities for future research. For example, it provides an avenue for conducting research on the organizational factors that influence decision-making of the correctional psychologists. Organizational factors such as structure have been predicted to affect the practicing of correctional psychologists. Therefore, this study will provide the basis for studies into the issue. In addition, the study provides opportunities for future research on the contributing factors to the transformation of the correctional psychologists and their roles. Other ways in which this study will provide opportunities for future research include studies that aim at criticizing legitimacy of studies conducted on the topic.

References

Corriea, K.M. (2009). A Handbook for Correctional Psychologists: Guidance for the Prison Practitioner. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher, LTD
View Full Essay

Criminal Justice Forensics Undercover Is a

Words: 11198 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97252031

However, as criminals become more aware of undercover tactics, the covert officer is required to provide more and more proof that he is indeed a criminal- which leads to the officer committing acts that compromise his or her integrity for the sake of maintaining cover. y understanding the often conflicting nature of these goals, deception and integrity, we can see how an undercover officer can become confused, lost, and susceptible to temptation (i.e. criminal behavior).

y examining both aspects- environmental factors and personality factors- we take into account both sides of a complex relationship. These two groups of factors, when combined together, shed some light on the exact nature of criminal tendencies amongst police officers.

Definition of Terms

Covert: another term for undercover, meaning the use of deception for the purpose of gathering information or intelligence.

Non-covert: police officers that, even in plain clothes, maintain their own true identity instead…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Choo, A., and Mellors, M. (1995) Undercover Police Operations and What the Suspect Said (Or Didn't Say). Web Journal of Current Legal Issues, Blackstone Press, University of Leicester. Web site: http://wenjcli.ncl.ac.uk/articles2/choo2.html

Girodo, M. (1985) Health and Legal Issues in Undercover Narcotics Investigations: Misrepresented Evidence. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 3(3),299-308.

Girodo, M. (1991) Drug Corruption in Undercover Agents: Measuring the Risk. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 9, 361-370.

Girodo, M. (1997) Undercover Agent Assessment Centers: Crafting Vice and Virtue for Impostors. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 12(5), 237-260.
View Full Essay

Evolutionary Psychology - Gender Differentiation

Words: 2781 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35138307



Since males of all sexually reproducing species are naturally drawn to signs of fertility in females (Zuk 2002), they naturally express more interest in females when they ovulate, or come into heat in the vernacular applied to non-human animals. In many other species that do not rely as much on a monogamous pair bond for the survival of the fetus (Barash & Lipton 2001), females exhibit very clear external signals corresponding to their ovulation. This system is very well suited to species where a single male (or several) mate with many females, such as among lions and many mammals; in fact, it probably reduces any potential for conflict among harem females for male attention.

Human females replaced the outward signals of ovulation and fertility by evolving a suppression of any outward manifestation, precisely, to ensure that males provided for, guarded, and protected them continually rather than only that portion of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ackerman, Diane. (1995) a Natural History of Love. New York: Vintage

Angier, Natalie. Birds Do it. Bees Do it. People Seek the Keys to it; the New York Times (Apr. 10/07)

Barash, David, P. And Lipton, Judith E. (2001) the Myth of Monogamy. New York: Henry Holt.

Branden, Nathaniel (1999) the Psychology of Romantic Love. New York: Bantam.
View Full Essay

Competency Psychology Post Two Specific

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94927743

Thus, a juvenile-specific evaluation is mandated and the evaluation must be performed by someone with juvenile-specific experience (which was not necessarily the case for the initial evaluation of K.G. In Indiana, based upon the facts presented). Virginia law also provides strict guidelines regarding how the evaluation must be performed.

After the evaluation, the court makes a decision as to whether the juvenile is competent to stand trial. The juvenile's attorney, pursuant to Virginia § 16.1-357 B. can also request a hearing regarding the issue of competency. "If a hearing is held, the party alleging that the juvenile is incompetent shall bear the burden of proving by a preponderance of the evidence the juvenile's incompetency. The juvenile shall have the right to notice of the hearing and the right to personally participate in and introduce evidence at the hearing" (LIS -- Code of Virginia). If the juvenile is found competent based…… [Read More]

References

LIS -- Code of Virginia. Retrieved:

http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+16.1-356

Sirkin, J. (2005). Juvenile competence to stand trial: Alleged juvenile delinquents in Indiana are not subject to the adult competency statute. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 33(2), 267-268. Retrieved:

http://www.jaapl.org/cgi/content/full/33/2/267
View Full Essay

Awareness About Psychology Behind Domestic Violence Has

Words: 1072 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3339499

Awareness about psychology behind domestic violence has been greatly enhanced in recent years, as have legal protections for victims. However, the courts' major decisions on domestic violence cases have been somewhat equivocal. For example, in the case of Castle ock v Gonzales, the abused woman filed a complaint against the police department, arguing that it violated her right to Due Process when "acting pursuant to official policy or custom" the police "failed to respond to her repeated reports over several hours that her estranged husband had taken their three children in violation of her restraining order against him. Ultimately, the husband murdered the children" (Castle ock v Gonzales, 2012, Cornell). In the case, the woman had a restraining order against her husband, prohibiting him from coming near her or her children. However, ultimately the court did not find favor with the defendant since a restraining order is not a property…… [Read More]

References

Castle Rock v Gonzales. (2012). Cornell University Law School. Retrieved:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/04-278.ZS.html

Hiatt, Heidi. (2011). Landmark domestic violence legislation: Tracey Thurman vs. Torrington,

CT. Time's Up. Retrieved:  http://timesupblog.blogspot.com/2011/10/landmark-domestic-violence-legislation.html
View Full Essay

Clinical Decisions in This Chapter

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71668409

The MMPI-2 has been used successfully to detect feigning in neurological and psychiatric control groups (Klein, 2007). As a result, the MMPI-2 is the most frequently used test in forensic psychological testing. There is, however, still substantial "debate which of the four subscales is most useful for identifying malingering" (Klein, 2007). However, one of the MMPI-2's lingering problems is that it is a test where people can incorporate coaching, so that it is somewhat vulnerable to coaching.

The issue of coaching is critical in the forensics environment. This is because the goal of forensic psychology is to use neuropsychological assessment methods to help in some type of legal proceedings. These proceedings can be civil or criminal proceedings. In both civil and criminal environments, the need for accurate diagnosis can be critical to outcomes for the person being tested and for people being impacted by their testing. Moreover, it can be…… [Read More]

References

Klein, H. (2007). Assessment of malingered neuropsychological deficits. New York: Oxford
View Full Essay

Knapp and Vandecreek 2001 Is a Qualitative

Words: 603 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5092226

Knapp and VandeCreek (2001) is a qualitative article with somewhat of a literature review. There are no formal reports, tables, graphs, or content related to a case study or research study. There is valuable information regarding the context within which the article will consider the ethical issues in personality assessment within the field of forensic psychology. They offer valid examples and spend time clarifying definitions and jargon related to the issue. This is not a quantitative article; it is a qualitative one. Knapp and VandeCreek provide context for the research questions and conclusions in addition to offering examples and counterexamples. The article discusses why ethics should be forensic psychology overall. "Ethical Issues in Personality Assessment in Forensic Psychology" is part exposition, part qualitative research, and part literature/contextual review.

This particular piece of writing is about the evolving role of the forensic psychologist as the expert. The article seeks to identify…… [Read More]

References:

Kalmbach, K.C., & Lyons, P.M. (2006). Ethical issues in conducting forensic evaluations. Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice, 2(3), 261-288.

Knapp, S., & VandeCreek, L. (2001). Ethical issues in personality assessment in forensic psychology. Journal of personality assessment, 77(2), 242-254.
View Full Essay

Eyewitness and Recalling Shook Hands I Shook

Words: 2111 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62015673

Eyewitness and ecalling

Shook hands

I shook hands with Bugs Bunny... Describe and evaluate the role of schemas and stereotypes on recalling past events. What implications does this have for the accuracy of eyewitness accounts of events?

I shook hands with Bugs Bunny... Describe and evaluate the role of schemas and stereotypes on recalling past events. What implications does this have for the accuracy of eyewitness accounts of events?

Literature on Schemas

Literature on Schemas and Stereotypes and their role in Eyewitness

I shook hands with Bugs Bunny... Describe and evaluate the role of schemas and stereotypes on recalling past events. What implications does this have for the accuracy of eyewitness accounts of events?

Introduction

To investigate and prosecute crime the criminal justice system heavily depends on eyewitness identification (Wells & Olson, 2003). An eyewitness goes through different psychological procedures prior to the courtroom testimony. It is evident that before…… [Read More]

References

Brewer, W.F., & Treyens, J.C.(1981). Role of schemata in memory for places. Cognitive Psychology, 12(2), 207-230

Charman, S., & Wells, G.(2008). Can eyewitnesses correct for external influences on their lineup identifications? The actual/counterfactual assessment paradigm. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 14(1), 5-20.

Christianson, S., & Hubinette, B.(1993). Hand up A study of witnesses' emotional reactions and memories associated with bank robberies. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 7(5), 365-379

Duffy, E.L.(1948). Motivational theory of emotion. Psychological Review, 55, 324-328.
View Full Essay

Worlds of Criminal Justice and

Words: 1422 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79090795

"(Bonnie et al.)

For many the ability of a client to participate in pleading insanity is controversial. Many contend that this ability shows that the person is rational and should be punished accordingly. While others argue that, the ability of a person to know that they are insane does not make them sane. In either case, the insanity plea remains as a controversial subject.

Within the realm of psychology, the issue of insanity has always been a topic of interest. Psychologists have long asserted that there are various mental conditions that render individuals insane. These conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and even certain forms of depression. Psychologists contend that these conditions can make an individual unable to rationalize.

A book entitled Court-Ordered Insanity: Interpretive Practice and Involuntary Commitment explains that many cases involve the hospitalization or commitment of the client. In these cases, the book explains that the client mental…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000459756

Bonnie, R.J., Poythress, N.G., Hoge, S.K., Monahan, J., & Eisenberg, M. (1996). Decision-Making in Criminal Defense: An Empirical Study of Insanity Pleas and the Impact of Doubted Client Competence. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 87(1), 48-62.. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000317272

Ellias, R. (1995). Should Courts Instruct Juries as to the Consequences to a Defendant of a "Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity" Verdict?. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 85(4), 1062-1083. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77002953

Fass, M.E. (1999). A Forensic Psychology Exercise: Role Playing and the Insanity Defense. Teaching of Psychology, 26(3), 201-203. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=34684718
View Full Essay

Historically Track the Concept of the Measurement

Words: 1432 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64541187

individual is someone who has a distinct personality of his/her own that differentiates him from a group or class of people. This individual has a distinguishing intelligence level, achievement abilities and aptitude. As far as intelligence is concerned, it can be defined as the "ability to reason about personality and personality-relevant information and to use that information to guide one's actions and more generally, one's life" (as qtd. In Mayer, Panter & Caruso, 2012, p. 124). In other words, intelligence is a basic psychological capability in an individual that allows him/her to give explanation, plan and prepare and get to the bottom of troubles. Intelligence is something that is not acquired by reading books or being academically bright. In the similar fashion, achievement is the way a task is performed in a successful manner (Travers. 1970, p. 447). However, aptitude is a natural ability/tendency to carry out a task.

In…… [Read More]

References

Fagan, T., & Wise, P.S. (1995). School psychology: Past, present and future. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill.

Huss, M.T. (2009). Forensic psychology: research, practice, and applications. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publications.

Kaplan, R.M., & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2013).Psychological testing: principles, applications, & issues. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Mayer, J.D., Panter, A.T., & Caruso, D.R. (2012). Does Personal Intelligence Exist? Evidence From a New Ability-Based Measure. Journal of Personality Assessment, 94(2), 124-140.
View Full Essay

Correctional Subspecialty Roles and Responsibilities

Words: 556 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47820174



The forensic psychologist has a responsibility of ensuring that individuals are fully informed of their legal rights in regards to the anticipated forensic service and the reasons for evaluation and the nature of the procedures to be used as well as the intentions concerning the use of any product of these services. The forensic psychologist is required to obtain the informed consent of the party or their legal representative prior to proceeding with any evaluations or procedures.

Sometimes the party does not have the capacity to give informed consent and this means that the forensic psychologist must obtain the consent of the individual's legal representative before proceeding with evaluations or procedures. Confidentiality issues are of critical importance for the forensic psychologist to address with their client and where confidentiality is limited; the forensic psychologist is required to maintain confidentiality on any issue that is not directly related to the legal…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists (1991) Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists. Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 6. 1991. Retrieved from: http://www.ap-ls.org/links/currentforensicguidelines.pdf

Bartol (2004) Forensic Psychology: Introduction and Overview. Retrieved from: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/5136_Bartol_Chapter_1_Final_Pdf.pdf

Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists (1991) Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists. Division 41. American Psychological Association. 9 Mar 1991. Retrieved from: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/psychology/info_forensicguidelines.pdf
View Full Essay

Empirically-Based Evidence Plays a Crucial

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46624247



Thus, the relationship between investigative psychology and forensic psychology is fairly lucid. Investigative psychology largely provides the means of identifying suspects and eventually indicting them. The mechanics of investigative psychology are multi-fold. For instance, in the case of the so-called "D.C. Sniper" in 2002, investigators were able to gain forensic evidence regarding ballistics and fingerprints. The former enabled them to identify the type of weapon that was repeatedly used during the attacks; the latter was used to procure a suspect in this particular case (Federal, 2007).

However, the true value of this sort of methodology becomes manifest in court during subsequent trials. In the previously mentioned sniper case, two suspects were convicted largely due to the evidence gathered against them. It is important to note that this sort of evidence is empirically based and confirms to scientific methodology. Without such convincing evidence, of course, there could have been a greater…… [Read More]

References

Knox, D., Limbacher, J., & McMahan, K. (1993). "Thomas Dillon, hunter of humans." Akron Beacon Journal.

Retrieved from  http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/767482/posts 

Federal Bureau of Investigations: Headline Archives: A Byte Out of History: "The Beltway Snipers, Part 1." Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2007/october/snipers_102207
View Full Essay

Psychopaths Discussion on Without a Conscience by

Words: 2672 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56614103

Psychopaths

Discussion on "ithout a Conscience" by Robert D. Hare

The Psychopathic Characteristics

Scientific Reasons of Psychopathy

Psychopathic Behavior and Forensic Psychology

Violence and Psychopaths

Most people would be terrified as well as perhaps intrigued by the word psychopath and visualize images of cold blooded and remorseless murderers or offenders that are depicted in TV serials or films. However Dr. Robert D. Hare, arguably the most well-known researcher of psychopath, describes such people as those who essentially suffer from personality disorder but are very aware of the results of their actions and have the sense between the wrong and the right (Hare, 2011). Such people are often hardly distinguishable in common life and seem to just like anyone else in society until their cruel side shows up.

Hare discusses these aspects of dual consciousness and cruelty and violence of psychopaths knowing very well the consequences of their actions in his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ablow, Keith R. Psychopath. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003. Print.

Brytting, Tomas, Richard Minogue, and Veronica Morino. The Anatomy Of Fraud And Corruption. Farnham: Ashgate Pub., 2011. Print.

Cohn, Moran D. et al. 'Incentive Processing In Persistent Disruptive Behavior And Psychopathic Traits: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study In Adolescents'. Biological Psychiatry (2014): n. pag. Web.

Cooke, David J. 'Psychopathic Disturbance In The Scottish Prison Population: The Cross-Cultural Generalisability Of The Hare Psychopathy Checklist'. Psychology, Crime & Law 2.2 (1995): 101-118. Web.