French Indian War Essays (Examples)

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War of Independence There Are

Words: 2516 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7292692

...[p. 41] Reasons may be given, why an Act ought to be repeal'd, and yet obedience must be yielded to it till that repeal takes place.

The intent of most colonists, was to create change through the proper channels, as has been described by the Philadelphia congress, as having occurred over the ten years bridging the two previous declarations.

A consummate expert on the War of Independence, writing in the early twentieth century, Van Tyne, stresses that the development of the ideal of democratic representation, was seeded in the ideals of Puritan politics which were spurned by the exposure of ministers to the ideas of John Locke and John Milton, who demonstratively effected the ideas of the American colonists as well as many others all over the colonial world. The idea of a fierce fight against tyranny and unchecked despotism was an essential standard of the day and at some…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bancroft, Hubert H.. American war for Independence: Early Causes. 2002-2003.    http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Great_Republic_By_the_Master_Historians_Vol_II/americanw_bb.html   .

Leach, Douglas Edward. Roots of Conflict: British Armed Forces and Colonial Americans, 1677-1763. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1986.

Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1943.

Morison, S.E., ed. Sources and Documents Illustrating the American Revolution, 1764-1788, and the Formation of the Federal Constitution. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1923.
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Extinction of the Native American Indians

Words: 4659 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25418348

Extinction of the Native American

The area of the world that is now known as the United States of America used to belong to various tribes of people which are now known as Native Americans as opposed to their old name, Indians, which was a misnomer based on the erroneous idea that explorers from Europe did not know that such a large land mass existed and that by crossing the Atlantic Ocean, they had made it to the country of India. hen Europeans first arrived in this country, they were highly outnumbered by populations of Native Americans. The United States of America is a nation that was built on the ideas of life, liberty, pursuit of happiness, and freedom for all persons. Yet, that freedom has been won only through the genocide of hundreds of thousands of people. In the course of a few centuries, the Native American peoples have…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Alexis de Tocqueville. Tocqueville and Beaumont on Race. 1831.

Benjamin Franklin. Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America. The Norton Anthology

of American Literature. 1782.

Bruce Johnson. Encyclopedia of American Indian History. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2008.
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Market Equilibrium War Outbreak What Are the

Words: 3139 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85114443

Market Equilibrium War Outbreak

What are the effects of Market Equilibrium at the outbreak of War on the Economy?

Over the decades, there has been the continuing debate about the underlying effects that war is having on the economy. At the heart of this argument, is the belief that once a war begins it will have a positive impact. This is because it effectively, controls the forces of market equilibrium. Simply put, this is when there is a perfect balance between: supply and demand. As this helping to: ensure price stability. The reason why, is because of: the massive amounts of spending and the allocation of various resources in supporting these efforts. ("Market Equilibrium") Once this takes place, it means that there will be the ideal conditions for the economy to begin to experience above average growth. As there are no economic forces, that can create the kinds of situations…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Consequences of War on the Economy." Maliganani, n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2011.

"Market Equilibrium." Business Dictionary, 2011. Web. 21 Mar. 2011.

Campagna, Anthony. The Economic Consequences of the Vietnam War. New York: Praeger, 1991. Print.

DeGrasse, Robert. Military Expansion, Economic Decline. Armonk: Sharpe, 193. Print.
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War Broke Out in 1756

Words: 7157 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43993603



The Seven Years War saw Britain established as the greatest colonial power, with control over India and North America seemingly secured, while Prussia emerged as the greatest power on the Continent, and the dominant force inside Germany, reducing still further the power of the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Austria. Frederick II of Prussia (the Great) emerges as the most remarkable leader of the war. Prussia was the smallest of the main combatants, and yet Frederick survived year after year of campaigning, and despite coming near to defeat he emerged triumphant (Richard).

Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven-Year's War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history.…… [Read More]

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War for Independence and Colonial

Words: 2278 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52871009

Because the country was essentially thirteen colonies fighting separately, the British had to deal with battles throughout the country, with people who were fighting for their homes and towns. The American forces knew their surroundings better, and they were motivated to fight well to protect their loved ones and neighbors.

The Declaration of Independence, written in July 1776, indicates how resolved most of the population was to independence from Great Britain. Thomas Jefferson, author of the document, wrote that the British government had become "destructive," and people believed they must assert their independence and be free of the country, or their lives would never be free from oppression. He wrote, "That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the ight of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "Revolutionary War Causes." Son of the South. 2009. 20 Feb. 2009.  http://www.sonofthesouth.net/revolutionary-war/cause-revolutionary-war.htm .

Gerlach, Larry R., James a. Dolph, and Michael L. Nicholls, eds. Legacies of the American Revolution. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 1978.

Sweeney, Jerry K., ed. A Handbook of American Military History: From the Revolutionary War to the Present. 2nd ed. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2006

Ward, Harry M. The War for Independence and the Transformation of American Society. London: UCL Press, 1999.
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War American Revolution

Words: 827 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60893062

American evolutionary War

The objective of this study is to write on the causes and major outcomes of the American evolutionary War.

Until the finalization of the Seven Years' War, there were only very few British North America colonists that had objections to their situation in the British Empire and British American Colonists had realized a great many benefits reported from the system of the British imperialists and furthermore paid little in the way of costs for those reported benefits. In fact, the British did not bother the American colonies until the earlier part of the 1760s. However, the 'Seven Years' War" brought about changes with Britain realizing victory over France and their allies at a great cost.

The War

The Seven-Year's War also known as the French and Indian War brought many changes. According to reports "A staggering war debt influenced many British policies over the next decade. Attempts…… [Read More]

References

The American Revolution (2014) Library of Congress. Retrieved from:  http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/amrev/ 

The American Revolution (2014) Library of Congress. Retrieved from:
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Indian Dance an Analysis of the History

Words: 1630 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4611497

Indian Dance

An Analysis of the History and Origins of "Belly Dancing"

Indian Dance is described in the est as "belly dancing," but the name "belly dancing" does not do justice to the style of dance which the title conveys. Indian and Middle Eastern dance actually has more of a history to it than what the est views merely as a kind of erotic show. Described as "danse du ventre" by the French in the Victorian Age, the English translation has come to signify the Indian dance, which in Arabic is known as raqs sharqi or raqs baladi -- the former meaning "Dance of the Near East" and the latter meaning "Folk dance." Essentially, what esterners have identified as "belly dancing" is actually the traditional folk dance of the Middle East and India. This paper will discuss the origins and history of Indian Dance, or "belly dancing," and show how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Belly Dancing." Eijkhout.net. 2000. Web. 12 Oct 2011.

Deagan, Andrea. "In Search of the Origins of Dance." UNCW. Web. 12 Oct 2011.

Jusserand, J.J. English Wayfaring Life in the Middle Ages. Chatham, UK: W&J Mackay & Co. Ltd., 1950. Print.

Wright, Marisa. "Origins of Belly Dance." HubPages. 2009. Web. 12 Oct 2011.
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French Amer Rev Extra

Words: 2391 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65254923

There were several battles therefore that took place between France, Great ritain and American war ships. These battles occurred in European waters as well as in waters in the western hemisphere.

The most challenging ritish action was an order permitting seizure of neutral ships either sending food and supplies to France or trading goods produced in French colonies, above all the West Indies. When ritain obstructed French ships in the French harbors early in the French Revolution, American merchants moved swiftly to take over commerce in the West Indies. These American merchant ships were subject to seizure. The ritish Navy took approximately 300 American ships and forced thousands of captured American sailors to serve on ritish ships. When American tried to negotiate with ritain, France became outraged, which prompted France to start seizing American ships and the attempts to negotiate with France were utterly ineffective. France then started to imagine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bukovansky, Mlada. Legitimacy and Power Politics: The American and French

Revolutions in International Political Culture (Princeton Studies in International

History and Politics). NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Mintz, Steven. "The Critical Period: American in the 1780s: Economic and Foreign
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Motivations of the French and

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7973609

" Fears of French-Catholic influence amongst the settlers combined with the growing dislike of the Indians on the part of the English further inflamed tensions between the two groups.

This is why the title the "French and Indian ar" is the name commonly applied to the "Seven Years ar" when conflict actually began in 1754 because of the great influence of the native alliances in fighting the war, the last hurrah of Native American might. The strength of their allied tribes was used as a political bargaining chip and a military mark of terror by both sides. In particular, although fewer tribes were aligned with their sides, the English colonies exaggerated the Iroquois military predominance over other tribes to defend and establish British control over the region. Yet even many Englishmen privately criticized these same Indians as being disobedient, and unreliable, as well as predominantly known for their skill in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Josephy, Alvin M, Jr. The Patriot Chiefs, New York: Penguin, 1993.

Starkey, Armstrong. European and Native American Warfare 1675-1815, Norman: U. Of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1998.

Alvin M, Josephy, Jr., the Patriot Chiefs, (New York: Penguin, 1993) p.101

Armstrong Starkey, European and Native American Warfare 1675-1815, (Norman: U. Of Oklahoma Press, 1998), p.86.
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History of the Fox Wars

Words: 3913 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40224606



Louvigny returned to Quebec and was considered by Canadians to have ended the first Fox War. He returned to the area in 1717 to continue the policing of the Meskwaki forces, yet made little progress in making contact or forcing the provisions of the previous treaty. In later communication with the government, Meskwaki chiefs expressed their own desire for peace. During the period between 1714 and 1727, the French were able to reopen waterways and move freely throughout the areas previously hindered by the danger of Indian encounters. However, other communications between the French and the American Indians were failing. Among these, the greatest failure was the inability of the French to include the Indian groups in the agricultural settlements they had attempted, including the one at Detroit.

Though the city groups of Indians and white men did not last, the area remained secure enough for the French and Americans…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Edmunds, R. David, and Joseph L. Peyser. The Fox Wars: The Mesquakie Challenge to New France. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

Hagen, William Thomas. The Sac and Fox Indians. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1958.

Jones, George O, and Norman S. McVean. History of Wood County, Wisconsin. Publication details unknown, 1923, accessed 22 October 2006; available at http://www.scls.lib.wi.us/mcm/wood_county/.

Kay, Jeanne. "The Fur Trade and Native American Population Growth." Ethnohistory 31, no. 4 (1984): 265-287.
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Agonquin Indian Tribes of Michigan

Words: 7164 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10710962

Finally it also represented an important means of conducting the foreign policy from the point-of-view of the French occupation. In this sense, "the North America fur trade of the 17th and 18th centuries had usually been viewed, until recently, as merely another commercial enterprise governed by the premise "buy cheap, sell dear" in order to rip the maximum of profit. Of late the Canadian end of the trade has come to be regarded as having been more a means to a noncommercial end than a pursuit conducted solely for economic gain. As European penetration and dominance of the continent progressed, the trade, which had begun as an adjunct of the Atlantic shore fishery, became a commercial pursuit in its own right. After 1600 (...) it became a means to finance and further the tragic drive to convert the Indian nations to Christianity."

Aside from the Algonquin tribes, the Huron tribes…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Eccles, W.J. "The fur trade and eighteenth- century imperialism." William and Mary Quarterly.

3rd Ser., Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 341-362.

Jenkins, P. A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave, 1997.

Michigan Pioneer and Historical Collections vol. XXXIV.
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American Experience With War

Words: 2615 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85444445

American Experience With War

Which historian - David M. Kennedy, or John Shy - best represents the American experience with war?

While reading Kennedy's - and Shy's - essay discussions, it's necessary to put their writings in the context of time. Kennedy penned his essay in 1975, and Shy wrote his in 1971. In terms of world events subsequent to both essays - in particular the advent of terrorism on a colossal and destructive scale, (9/11/01) - veritable light years of military and political change has emerged.

But notwithstanding the tumultuous global changes since the 1970s, the assigned essays are timeless in their intelligent analysis, very important in terms of their forthright accuracy of U.S. history and war, and hence, provide valuable reading for any and all students of the times. However, the essay by Kennedy, in this writer's opinion, best reflects the big picture view of America, its peoples,…… [Read More]

References

Coser, Lewis A. Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings. Toronto: The

MacMillan Company, 1969.

Kennedy, David M. "War and the American Character." The Nation (1976),

Shy, John. A People Numerous and Armed: Reflections on the Military Struggle for American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.
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Military Topic Exclude Civil War I Chose

Words: 1559 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71316556

military topic; exclude civil war. (I chose Special Forces) • All Research Papers 8 1/2 x

white paper, margins 1" x 1." • The Research Papers a minimum 4 pages typed information exceed 6 pages

There is much controversy concerning the U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF) and the missions that they perform on a daily basis because the mass-media tends to distort people's understanding about the military organization. Some might be inclined to consider that the Special Forces take most of the good men in the army and put them in a community that typically performs actions that most military groups would be capable of doing. Moreover, many believe that these people basically take advantage of the government's determination to keep the Special Forces in operation. However, most people fail to understand the training that these people go through on a daily basis, the fact that they have the ability…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Hamilton, John, "Special Forces," (ABDO, 10.01.2007)

North, Robert, "American Heroes: In Special Operations," (B&H Publishing Group, 01.11.2010)

Olson, Eric T., "U.S. Special Operations: Context and Capabilities in Irregular Warfare," Retrieved November 16, 2012, from the National Defense University Website: http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/jfq-56/8.pdf

Pushies, Fred J., "United States Army Special Forces," (Zenith Imprint, 01.10.2001)
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Revolutionary French Peasants Thinking

Words: 2251 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73111961

French Revolution

The final crisis of the French Monarchy occurred in 1789, with the official beginning of the French Revolution. Although this was the year in which the first official battle of this martial encounter was fought, it is vital to realize that the monarchy had been floundering for some time prior. There were numerous factors that contributed to the disfavor the monarchy found itself in at the end of the 18th century. Some of the more eminent of these political, financial, and environmental causes helped to weaken the French Monarchy's hold over its subjects, as judged by the standards of the present 1. Concurrently, there were military woes that accompanied these factors and which contributed to the mounting unpopularity of this government. However, an analysis of these factors reveals that the most prominent cause of the French Revolution pertained to the zeitgeist of the time in with Enlightenment ideals…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Acemoglu, Daaron, Cantoni, Davide, Johnson, Simon, Robinson, James. "The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution." NBER Working Paper Series. Retrieved 4/3/2016. http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/jrobinson/files/jr_consequeces_frenchrev.pdf

Davies, Norman. The History of Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press,1990.

Langer, William. The Encyclopedia of World History. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1972.
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History of the Native American Indians Is

Words: 4219 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67047316

history of the native American Indians is a long and colorful one. The first Indians arrived on the North American continent subsequent to the end of the Ice Age approximately 15,000 years ago. These early Indians arrived from Siberia as they passed through Alaska and gradually settled throughout what is now the United States. These early arriving Indians were hunter-gatherers and, as a result, they traveled freely across the vast North American continent and by 8,000 years ago had spread as far east as the eastern seaboard.

As indicated, the early Indians were hunter-gatherers and many of the tribes remained such until the early 1900's but a select few tribes began farming. The Indian tribes electing such life style were centered in present day Mexico City and by the time that this area began to be explored and settled by Europeans the farming life-style of these Indian tribes had been…… [Read More]

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Military War

Words: 1837 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74569156

growth and development of the United States military from its origination to its present status in the 21st century. It will specifically examine the fostering of both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. Moreover, these two branches -- which will serve as case studies for the overall development tendencies of the military in general -- will get deconstructed in the context of the martial encounters that were most seminal for them: The evolutionary War and the War of 1812, and World War I and World War II, respectively.

this paper will delineate the history of the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force to indicate how military sophistication has paralleled the developments in technology and applications knowledge of America itself.

B.U.S. Naval History

The American evolutionary War

The War of 1812 and the establishment of the U.S. Naval Academy

C.U.S. Air Force History

1947 Third branch of the…… [Read More]

References

Deeben, J.P. (2012). Stoking the fires: The impressments of Seaman Charles Davis by the U.S. Navy. Prologue Magazine. Retrieved from  http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2012/summer/1812-impressment.html  This is an excellent source which helps to contextualize the sentiment that contributed to the War of 1812, It not only covers the events of that time period at a macro level, but also includes a number of salient personal details as well. This source emphasizes the importance of the Navy in this war.

Dzurec, D. (2013). Prisoners of war and American self-image during the American Revolution. War in History. 20(4), 430-451. This source provides an explanation for much of the anti-British sentiment during the Revolutionary War. It principle does so by discussing the experience of those captured by the British in this encounter.

National Archives. (2010). Teaching with documents." www.archives.gov. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/369th-infantry / This source provisions a decent overview of World War I. It does so largely through a consideration of the involvement of African-American troops. These troops were necessary to implement in combat situations for the simple fact that the U.S. did not have enough men without their addition. It illustrates some of the wider social implications of this war and its effect both within and outside of the military.

United States Naval Academy (2015). A brief history of USNA. www.usna.edu Retrieved from http://www.usna.edu/USNAHistory / This source provides a fairly detailed history of the development of the United States Naval Academy. As such, it provides an overview of the history of the navy as well. By emphasizing the level of development that the academy underwent since its inception, this source indicates the sort of improvement that characterizes the military in general through the years.
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War Imagine Living in 18th Century America

Words: 1414 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41151585

War

Imagine living in 18th Century America. What would a person encounter during that time period? Would the diverse social and political backgrounds impact a person positively or negatively during this era? Can a person prepare for what may occur with the upcoming Seven Years War? How would the outcomes of this war affect America in general? One will study these issues in depth from the perspective of an individual existing in the past.

During the 18th Century, I experienced a number of things that are worth mentioning. I went to the south at one time and noticed that slavery is an issue. Many of these individuals are poor, and a select few became land owners despite becoming exposed to various diseases. When I saw this I was devastated and wanted to help each person but I could not. However, these people after fifty years of service were promised their…… [Read More]

References

Bailyn, Bernard. To Begin the World Anew: The Genius and Ambiguities Of the American

Founders (Knopf, 2002), 185p.

HistoryKing. (2011). The social classes in 18th century colonial america. Retrieved May 25, 2011, from History King: http://www.historyking.com/American-History/The-Social-Classes-In-18th-Century-Colonial-America.html.

University of Southern Mississippi. (2011). Seven years war. Retrieved May 25, 2011, from University of Southern Mississippi: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:wvJvJ2QbbaIJ:ocean.otr.usm.edu/~w416373/HIS%2520360/HIS%2520360%2520Lsn%25204%2520Seven%2520Years%2520War.ppt+seven+years+war+outcomes&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESj8az8UYbRUpHVHP_TzWTpeTtDvq1m5BPG-RFmHHgEmQzzbC.
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Bacon Rebellion Has Been Considered

Words: 2870 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41842170



During the 18th century there was a fierce competition between the British and the French colonial empires which ultimately led to The Seven Years War. The final result of the conflict favored the English who, nonetheless, were forced to make appeal to the force of the American colonies in order to defeat the French. Following such an action, the opponents of the British rule over the American territories would later on recall and use in supporting the cause of independence the aid the Americans provided the British in tackling the French threat.

The British considered the Americans as being the closest political ally and colonial region. Moreover, the historical context determined such an approach. This special treatment protected the American colonies from any external and foreign threat; in return, the British sought to maintain a preferential trade connection with the American colonies who were, without a doubt, one of the…… [Read More]

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Iroquois Confederacy Following a Peace

Words: 774 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75421622



During the years of the French Indian Wars, Benjamin Franklin saw the Colonies as needing to be united under one government, particularly for the purposes of defense. His Albany Plan of 1754 was directly influenced by the makeup of the Iroquois Confederacy. It was a commonly held view by American Patriots at the time that the functioning of the Confederacy most closely resembled that of ancient ome, and offered a unique living insight into the Colonists' own deep past. The Albany Plan was Franklin's first plan for uniting the colonies under one peaceful government. The Plan was not ratified, but several ideas therein moved forward into the Articles of Confederation and laid the platform for Franklin's position in drafting the Constitution. The Albany Plan is the blueprint for modern American government: the proposal included a President (appointed by the British monarchy) who would lead with the support of a Grand…… [Read More]

References author not specified. "Perceptions of America's Native Democracies"

.doc file provided by client

Cook, Brian. Iroquois Confederacy and the Influence Thesis. 12-11, 2000. http://www.ces.sau48.org/iroqconf.htm (accessed 5-13, 2011).

Portland State University. Covenant Chain. 10 1, 2001.  http://www.iroquoisdemocracy.pdx.edu/html/covenantchain.htm  (accessed 5-13, 2011).

Six Nations Indian Museum. The Six Nations: Oldest Surviving Participatory Democracy on Earth. n/a.  http://www.ratical.org/many_worlds/6Nations/index.html  (accessed 5-13, 20111).
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Georges Roger Clark Was the

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27253891

During his campaign, he successfully won the support of the French settlers living in the area. He is famous for masking his true number to his enemy. Clark had his flags continually marched back and forth behind a ridge to make the ritish believe he had a force of over six hundred men. He defeated the ritish despite all the odds against him and extended American borders to as far North East as the Great Lakes.

His defeat of the ritish at Vincennes, Clark was honored by the newly created United States of America. He was granted the title public surveyor in Virginia. Although he did a great deed which still affects us even to this day, he was not fully recognized by the United States as one would think he would have deserved for his deeds.

ibliography

Clark, George Rogers. "Memoir of Campaigns against the ritish North of the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clark, George Rogers. "Memoir of Campaigns against the British North of the River Ohio." 1791. Indian Historical Bureau. http://www.statelib.lib.in.us/www/Ihb/resources/grcmemone.html

Hamilton, Harry. "Clark Recapture Vincennes, February 22 to March 5, 1791." Indian Historical Bureau. http://www.statelib.lib.in.us/www/Ihb/resources/hamilton2_22_1779.html

Indiana Historical Bureau. "George Rogers Clark Biography." 2007. http://www.statelib.lib.in.us/www/Ihb/resources/grcbio.html
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European Colonization of the Atlantic

Words: 2004 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80367891

ut though Indian resistance was strong Native Americans didn't have effective military organization and Europeans used the tactics of total warfare. Knowing enemy's superiority Indians unleashed guerilla wars but they didn't have any chance to win as they were not united. That was the main reason of Native Americans' failure. Colonists played various Indian tribes against one another as Colin G. Calloway wrote and this Roman strategy succeeded. Very few Native Americans realized this threat but they could do nothing: they all were sentenced to death in the battle against own brothers or colonists. It is worth mentioning that warfare influenced both European and Indian military tactics: "Europeans showed Indians that survival depended on securing and using guns; Indians taught Europeans that success in American warfare demanded adapting to the American environment." ut every smart person knows that war is always evil whatever it is waged for. Military pressure was…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Colin G. Calloway, New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998

Colin G. Calloway, New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press,1998), 10.

Colin G. Calloway, New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), 15.

Colin G. Calloway, New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press,1998), 33.
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Revolutionary America Describe Shay's Rebellion

Words: 2441 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19771269

The ritish came to impose serious taxes as a result of the French Indian war. These in turn were unacceptable to a people which considered itself not to be responsible for the causes of the war. The confrontation had been in fact another matter of European dispute that had to be solved outside the continent in the colonies.

Third, there is a disagreement in the way in which the war was perceived at the local level. The American colonies viewed this struggle as a need for independence from a regime that continued to impose an undemocratic control over its institutions and the lives of the people. On the other hand, the ritish saw it as a rebellion that must be immediately squashed. In its view, it was a war for the maintenance of a certain order, while the Americans viewed it as one of disruption of this order. While the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brainard, R. (2005) "Shays' Rebellion." 18th century history. 11 June 2008. http://www.history1700s.com/articles/article1120.shtml

British Battles. (N.d.) the War of the Revolution 1775 to 1783. Accessed 11 June 2008  http://www.britishbattles.com/american-revolution.htm 

Calliope. (2008) "Shays' Rebellion." A Historical Synopsis. 11 June 2008.  http://www.calliope.org/shays/shays2.html 

Jenkins, P. (1997) a history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.
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Evolution of Modern U S Society

Words: 1212 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36583240

In an era where the issue of human and civil rights was considered an element that could not be addressed by law, the drafting of the U.S. constitution came as a result of a great democratic endeavor which tried to point out several aspects. On the one hand, it proved the fact that the people are the supreme judges of the way in which the country is developing through the fact that Thus, the most important line for the American democracy is part of the Declaration of Independence which underlines the fact "that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness" (the Declaration of Independence, n.d.). This aspect certifies the idea that according to the American documents, people have the right to be free in all their respects.

The Constitution comes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams, John. "Novanglus, Febuary 6, 1775." From Revolution to Reconstruction. 2003. 5 May 2008 http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/P.ja2/writtings/novan1.htm

American Foreign Relations. Revolution: Impact on the Economy. 2007. 5 May 2008 http://www.americanforeignrelations.com/Re-Ro/Revolution-Impact-on-the-Economy.html

Jenkins, P. (1997). A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Republicanism. 2006. 5 May 2008.  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/republicanism/
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Smallpox Plague IN1779 in You

Words: 361 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51731140

In 1779 the Creeks and Cherokees in 1779 suffered tremendous population losses and were unable to resist the new U.S. federal government's political and military advances upon their land (Richter 2001). The Indians lost economic power as well, as the Crees and Assiniboines saw their control over the northern fur trade ebb away to the Hudson's Bay Company. Through New Spain, the Great Plains, Hudson's Bay, and the Pacific Coast between 1779 and 1782, the pox cut a swathe through the nation, but had a particularly devastating impact upon Native Americans (Richter 2001). The Native Americans lost their political and economic clout, their land, as well as their lives, and, in the very long-term, they also lost their culture to the epidemic brought by whites.

orks Cited

Richter, Donald. Review of Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82. By Elizabeth Fenn. New York, N.Y., Hill & ang Publishers, 2001.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Richter, Donald. Review of Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82. By Elizabeth Fenn. New York, N.Y., Hill & Wang Publishers, 2001. Common Place.

2.3. 2001. February 17, 2009. http://www.common-place.org/vol-02/no-03/reviews/richter.shtml
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The Power of George Washington

Words: 1556 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81985080

George ashington: The First American Hero

Today, George ashington is an American icon, a symbol of patriotism, strength, and humility. His honesty has become the source of legend, to the point that it is easy to forget that he was a real human being with significant political and military accomplishments. Perhaps what is equally surprising about ashington as the durability of his image is the fact that he was just as beloved in his own era. Death sometimes erases some of the more unflattering aspects of a historical figure's legacy from the collective memory but ashington was always revered, even in life. In fact, many of his contemporaries wished to make him a king after he helped secure American independence, an honor which he refused. Instead, he went on to become the nation's first Chief Executive.

George ashington first came to political prominence in colonial America due to his military…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kladky, William P. "Continental Army." Mount Vernon. Web. 24 Feb 2017.

Knott, Stephen. "George Washington: Life Before the Presidency." Miller Center of Public

Affairs, University of Virginia. Web. 24 Feb 2017.

Remini, Robert. A Short History of the United States. HarperCollins, 2009.
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Major Events That Resulted in the American Revolution

Words: 1714 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38176960

American Revolution

One of the most important events in the history of the United States is the American Revolution, which is regarded as more important in the country development that ideas, trends, and actions. The significance of the American Revolution in the nation's history and development is highlighted in the fact that it was one of the seminal instances of the Enlightenment. During this period, the political philosophy of the Enlightenment was established and utilized in creating an entirely new country that has developed to become the world's super power. However, the American Revolution was fueled by a series of several major events and incidents brought by various factors including rebellion by the American colonies and Declaration of Independence.

Overview of the American Revolution

As previously mentioned, the American Revolution is one of the most important and remarkable events in the country's history given its role in the birth of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Revolution History. A & E Television Networks, LLC. accessed November 30, 2015.

http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/american-revolution-history

Hubley, Benrard. The History of the American Revolution, Including the Most Important Events

and Resolutions of the Honorable Continental Congress During that Period and also the Most Interesting Letters and Orders of His Excellency General George Washington, Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces. New York, NY: The New York Public Library Reference Department, 1805.
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British Legislation Between 1764 and

Words: 1799 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46157749

These Acts, along with the Quebec Act, which extended the southern boundary of Canada into territories claimed by Massachusetts, Connecticut and Virginia, proved to be the last straw and hurtled the country into the Revolutionary ar ("Intolerable Acts").

Conclusion

Although it is still debatable whether the American independence from the British was inevitable, there is hardly any doubt that the required the series of legislation enacted by the British Parliament between 1764 and1774, outlined in this essay, served to greatly antagonize the American colonists. Almost all measures taken to tax the American colonies and tighten British administrative control met with resentment and, ultimately, open hostility. These measures proved to be a major reason for the Revolutionary ar, and eventual independence of America.

orks Cited

America During the Age of Revolution, 1764-1775." The Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/continental/timeline.html

British Actions After the French Indian ar." Multied.com. November 26, 2008. http://www.multied.com/Revolt/sugart.html

Cogliano, Francis…… [Read More]

Works Cited

America During the Age of Revolution, 1764-1775." The Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/continental/timeline.html

British Actions After the French Indian War." Multied.com. November 26, 2008. http://www.multied.com/Revolt/sugart.html

Cogliano, Francis D. "Was the American Revolution Inevitable?" April, 2001. November 26, 2008. BBC Web site.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/empire_seapower/american_revolution_01.shtml 

Intolerable Acts." Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2008. November 26, 2008. http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761579222
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Revolutions Compare Similarities Differences Revolutions America France

Words: 865 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84238100

evolutions

Compare similarities differences revolutions America, France, Latin America. Identify common themes present revolution. What fighting ? Who influenced revolutions? What outcome revolution? What effect revolutions world?.

evolutions in America, France, and Latin America:

Causes, ideology, and consequences

Perhaps the most notable difference between the 18th century revolution in America vs. The 18th century revolution in France was one of class: America was not, primarily, a class-driven revolution. The Founding Fathers and supporters of the American evolution came from the elites of American society. George Washington was an important British general during the French-Indian Wars and Benjamin Franklin was a prominent figure in American colonial politics before talk of revolution became common currency. The colonists' frustration at what they perceived as the British Crown's unreasonable taxation policy and their growing economic power that was not honored with political power within the Empire was at the heart of the American evolution.…… [Read More]

References

Kelly, Martin. (2012). Causes of the American Revolution. About.com. Retrieved:

http://americanhistory.about.com/od/revolutionarywar/a/amer_revolution.htm

Minster, Christopher. (2012). Causes of Latin American revolutions. About.com. Retrieved:

http://latinamericanhistory.about.com/od/19thcenturylatinamerica/a/09independencewhy.htm
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Tea Party the American Tea Party the

Words: 3344 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48526296

Tea Party

The American tea party

The Tea Party is a populist movement that promotes several conservative values which include the following;

Limitations on the authority of the U.S. federal government

eduction of government spending and the national debt

eduction of personal and corporate taxes

This is a party that has been known over the historical moments to pull frustrated and concerned Americans together to protest against excessive government spending coupled with increased debt burden. This conservative group has it that the government's growing involvement in business and indulgence in individual freedom is a deviation from conservative values.

Since its inception to date, the mission of the Tea Party Coalition has been to organize and launch in a rapid response fashion special nationwide projects that will help to advance the goal of a return to a constitutionally limited government that does not go overboard, through whichever arm to disenfranchise the…… [Read More]

References

David W. Koeller, (1999). The Boston Tea Party 1773. Retrieved July 28, 2011 from http://www.thenagain.info/webchron/usa/teaparty.html

Eye Witness to History, (2002). The Boston Tea Party, 1773. Retrieved July 28, 2011 from  http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/teaparty.htm 

James L. Roark et.al. Eds. The American Promise: A History of the United States. Fourth Ed.

Vol I. Bedford/St. Martin's: New York.
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England's Financial System and Its

Words: 4145 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16290222

Instead, Britain could use its vast navy and naval blockades to enforce the provisions of the Sugar Act. Therefore, while the Sugar Act actually lowered the amount of the duties, it resulted in far stricter enforcement of the laws. The result of the Sugar Act was immediate economic hardship in the colonies:

um distilling slumped badly and colonial exports overall dropped sharply. The slowing economy was further impacted by currency contraction as people, uncertain of the future, tried to retain their funds; efforts were made to settle debts with paper money rather than gold or silver.

The Sugar Act caused alarm in the American colonies, partly because of the expected economic disadvantages, but also because of a number of other reasons, one of the most important being the severe implementation by the navy." Although the colonists grumbled about the Sugar Act and threatened to boycott British merchants, the Sugar Act…… [Read More]

Referenced

Adams, Charles. 2006. The Rocky road of American taxation. Auburn, AL: Ludwig von Mises

Institute. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.mises.org/story/2110,accessed 10 August 2006.

Avery, Steve. 2005. The American Revolution: Sugar Act of 1764.. Florence, OR: Online

Highways. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1211.html, accessed 10 August 2006.
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Loyalist Arguments -- a Persuasive

Words: 1019 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53602824

(Early America, "hy the Loyalists Lost," 2005) Support for the American colonial control of local matters and taxation does not necessarily signify that we Loyalists advocate a division between the imperial powers and our own -- and does not mean we believe our tenuous support for greater local control means that the Revolutionaries are justified in seeking severance from the British power. Rather, it is an effective effort at a compromise.

Only when a king becomes a tyrant are the governed peoples not remiss in seeking revolt. In this case, although evident tensions exist between the colonies and King George III, this does not mean that the King's taxation to repair the costs the colonies have incurred upon the mother country are unjust in the sense that the taxes were imposed simply to enrich the king's own pockets -- such self-aggrandizing enrichment is the definition of tyranny, not simply disputing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Why the Loyalists Lost." The Early America Review. Winter 2000. http://earlyamerica.com/review/winter2000/loyalists.html[6Mar 2005].

Ward & Trent, et al. The Cambridge History of English and American Literature. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1907-21; New York: Bartleby.com, 2000 (www.bartleby.com/cambridge/).[6 Mar 2005].
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Conflict Great Britain and Colonies

Words: 676 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42847371

revolution was economic in origin, or depended largely on politics and other areas of American life. The American evolution came about for a variety of reasons. Many people believe the biggest reason was "taxation without representation," which became a well-known phrase of the fight. However, there were many reasons for the evolution, and not all of them were economic.

Trade and the importance of economic trade with England were certainly factors in the American evolution. Americans faced sanctions and taxes for their trade items, and they wanted to be able to trade freely with the world without the English getting in the way. However, these taxes and sanctions were only one reason Americans wanted freedom, and they were not the most important reasons. Politics and political freedom were very important to Americans, and England began to take away these freedoms and the people rebelled.

The colonies had been loosely governed…… [Read More]

References

Fisher, Sydney George. The Struggle for American Independence. Vol. 1. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1971.

Wahlke, John C., ed. The Causes of the American Revolution. Revised ed. Boston D.C. Heath and Company, 1967.
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Founding Documents the Declaration of

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62205323

The way it worked is the Executive branch had the ability to enforce various laws and control of the military. However, in order to receive any kind of funding for its activities it had to work with the Legislative branch. This is when Congress had the power to review these actions and determine if they wanted to continue providing the President with funding for a host of different activities. If there was a conflict one had the power to check the other through different actions they could take (i.e. Congress refusing to fund a particular program that is favored by the President). At the same time, Congress had the authority to pass various laws that would determine how the country was governed. While, the President has the power to check that of Congress by vetoing it and sending it back to them for further review. The courts have the authority…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Declaration of Independence. (1776).

Williams, J. (2004). The U.S. Constitution. Minneapolis, MN: Campus Print Books.
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American Indian Movement the Poorest People in

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81369738

American Indian Movement

The poorest people in America are the American Indians and it is also a fact that Indian reservations have unique laws that has made it a nation by itself within the United States. The modern movements focus on the American Indian reservations being empowered by self-determination. This is important for the economic, social and cultural improvement of the American Indians. It was with the Nixon administration that the welfare of the tribes became the focus of the government. The subsequent administrations encouraged the Indians to adapt to a policy of political and economic self-determination. Today many reservations have become economic hubs with tax and regulation havens for investment. Thus as of now the Mescalero and White Mountain Apaches "have become premier private managers of multiple-use forest resource economies." (Legters; Lyden, 1994)

However it must be stated that only during the eagan administration that there were major reports…… [Read More]

References

Bolt, Christine. (1990) "American Indian Policy and American Reform: Case Studies of the Campaign to Assimilate the American Indians" Routledge. Pages: 250, 298

http://books.google.co.in/books?id=75UVAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA298&dq=american+indian+movement&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nj2IT92qCsWJrAeW-anrCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwADge#v=onepage&q=american%20indian%20movement&f=false

Fritz, Henry E. (1963) "The Movement for Indian Assimilation, 1860-1890." University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. Page Number: 15, 34, 56,138

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3054897
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Identification American Indian Movement Activist

Words: 349 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25824397

Carlisle Indian School: founded 1879; Indian boarding school; Pennsylvania; forced assimilation of native children; abuse of children

11. Cheyenne Tribe: Plains Indians; a Sioux name for the tribe; currently comprises two tribes; ties with Arapaho; hunters; ghost dance

12. ed Cloud: leader of Ogala Lakota; fierce warrior opposed U.S.; ed Cloud's War 1866-1868; Wyoming, Montana; became leader on reservation

13. Comanche Tribe: Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Kansas, Oklahoma; Plains Indians; hunter-gatherers; about 14,000 remain; speak Uto-Aztecan language related to Shoshone

14. Joseph Brant: Thayendanegea; Mohawk; American evolution fought with British to help Indians; became Mason; active political leader for Six Nations

15. Trail of Tears: massive relocation of Native Americans; affected Choctaw, Cherokee and other southern Indians; move to Oklahoma Indian Territory; 1830s; related to Indian emoval Act; represented treaty violations

16. Pontiac's War: 1763; Great Lakes region; Pontiac was Odawa leader; war against British after Seven Years War; British…… [Read More]

References

"Red Cloud." PBS. Retrieved Mar 26, 2009 from  http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/i_r/redcloud.htm 

Saunders, R. (2007). "Chief Pontiac's War -- 1763." Retrieved Mar 26, 2009 from http://colonial-america.suite101.com/article.cfm/chief_pontiacs_war_1763
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Social Impact of Cold War & Terrorism

Words: 1772 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30854973

Social Impact of Cold War & Terrorism

The Cold War is often associated with the idea of making great and physical divides between the good and the bad of the world. It was a symbolic representation that extended for about 30 years on the expectation that the greatest powers of the world could, under the right circumstances, impose a sort of benign order on the planet by isolating the evil empires and showcasing how the non-evil ones could administer their own ideas of peace, justice and liberty .

In reality, what was happening was much different. The Cold War was about engagement, not separation (Tirman, 2006). No matter that the Berlin Wall was its most powerful symbols of division, the world as a whole was learning that military might was not all that it was made out to be (U.S. History, n.d.). Together and separately, the biggest countries across the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Diamond, L. (n.d.). Winning the new cold war on terrorism. Hoover Institute. Stanford University. Retrievable from http://www.stanford.edu/~ldiamond/papers/coldWarOnTerrorism.pdf.

Levine, D. And Levine, R. (2006). Deterrence in the Cold War and the War on Terror. National Science Foundation Grant publication. Retrievable from   http://www.dklevine.com/papers/inimical.pdf  .

Tirman, J. (2006). The War on Terror and the Cold War: They're not the same. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Audit of Conventional Wisdom. Retrievable from   http://web.mit.edu/cis/acw.html  .

US History (n.d). Berlin Wall. Viewable at   http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1867.html  .
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Anthropology Blackfeet Nation Indians

Words: 1327 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96956563

THE BLACKFEET NATION INDIANS



This is a five page paper dealing with the Blackfeet Nation Indians. It will explore the tribe's history and early lifestyles. It will also cover the health and education of the tribe now. Problems facing the tribe and methods used in preserving their culture will also be addressed. There are seven references used.
Introduction
The Blackfeet Indians are a Native American tribe that live in Northern Montana. They have a history rich in traditions and rituals. There is some controversy on how they became known as Blackfeet, but many believe it is because of the black moccasins they wore. It's not sure how these moccasins became black, but two suggestions are the Indians painted them or they were darkened by prairie fire (www.blackfeetnation.com).
The Beginnings
The original home of the Blackfeet is believed to have been in the eastern woodlands "north of the Great Lakes (www.blackfeetnation.com)."…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

(Origins and Early History of the Blackfeet (accessed 10-01-2002) http://
www.blackfeetnation.com)

Ritter, John. "Blackfeet plan USA's only offshore bank." USA Today. (2000): 03 April.

Nijhuis, Michelle. "Tribal immersion schools rescue language and culture." The Christian
Science Monitor. (2002): 11 June.
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Comprehension and Miscomprehension Between French

Words: 971 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44023737

"Their superstitions are infinite, their feast, their medicines, their fishing, their hunting, their wars -- in short almost their whole life turns upon this pivot; dreams, above all have here great credit" (Foner 16). There are a number of value judgments within this quotation; almost all of them are negative. The religious beliefs and practices of the Micmac have been reduced to "superstitions" by the priest. hat is revealing is that almost all of the practices of these people -- including their means of providing food and health care and engaging in social conflict, are likened to "dreams." Yet all of these facets of the Micmac that de Brebeuf names are simply different points of culture that exist between the Europeans and the Native Americans. Because they are different, the priest himself does not believe in them and dismisses them as having a basis in fantasy.

It is interesting to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Foner, Eric. Voices of Freedom. New York: Bantam. 1991. Print.
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Sun Chief Autobiography of a Hopi Indian

Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65045556

Sun Chief: Autobiography of a Hopi Indian is a book written by Don C. Talayesva, a Hopi who learned the ways of white people. Talayesva and Simmons write to educate the reader about the Hopi culture. The book is told from only one man's point-of-view and yet Talayesva writes in a way that introduces all readers to the unique ways of life shared by all the Hopi people. Although the narrative is told from a man's point-of-view, the reader understands what it means to be both a man and a woman in the Hopi society. In addition to discussing matters of gender, the author also delves into issues related to sexuality. hat makes Sun Chief: Autobiography of a Hopi Indian remarkable is the way that the book discusses Hopi culture in relation to the white oppressor. Talayesva writes for a white audience, and is deliberately provocative so that white people…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Talayesva, Don C. And Simmons, Leo William. Sun Chief: Autobiography of a Hopi Indian. Yale University Press: 1963.
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World War II Also Marked

Words: 2272 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99236996

The demonstration in Tiananmen Square showed that there were alrge semgnets of the population that wanted change, but Deng's response was to crush the movement with violence and to assert the supremacy ofm centalzied rule once more..

These actions show some of the difficulties of independence and of developing a new political structure when many adhere to older political structures and ideas. One response is to try to wipe out the old with violence, but regimes tend to become reactionary about their own ideas as well and to crush any opposition, real of perceived.

9. Arab unity has not materialized for a number of historical reasons related to the different ways in which the countries of the region have developed so that the leaders of some of the states are wary of other leaders, because of differences in economic structures in the various countries, and because of different reactions to…… [Read More]

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What Were the Causes of the Civil War in Somalia

Words: 3477 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64181976

Somalia Civil war

SOMALIA- CAUSES OF THE CIVIL WA

Columbia Encyclopedia describes the geographical position of Somalia in these words:

Somalia is directly south of the Arabian Peninsula across the Gulf of Aden. It comprises almost the entire African coast of the Gulf of Aden and a longer stretch on the Indian Ocean. It is bounded on the NW by Djibouti, on the W. By Ethiopia, on the SW by Kenya, and on the S. And E. By the Indian Ocean. Mogadishu is the capital. There are 18 regions. (The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition, 2000)

Somalia has been ruled by various imperial empires. Some of its earlier rulers were the nations of Oman, Turks and Zanzibar. Most of these nations lost control in Somalia. Britain, France and Italy came to this part of the world in the 19th century. Each country has had a say during its rule. It was…… [Read More]

References

The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition, Columbia University Press, Page 43895, 2000

I.M. Lewis: A Modern History of Somalia: Nation and State in the Horn of Africa, I.M. Lewis, Westview Press, 1988

Simons, Anna: Networks of Dissolution: Somalia Undone, Westview Press, 1995

Learning from Somalia: The Lessons of Armed Humanitarian Intervention, Walter M. Clarke, Jeffrey M. Herbst, Westview Press, 1997
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How Did Nursing Change Social Roles of Northern Women During the Civil War

Words: 7299 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96446723

Nursing & omen's Roles Pre-and-Post Civil ar

The student focusing on 19th century history in the United States in most cases studies the Civil ar and the causes that led to the war. But there are a number of very important aspects to 19th century American history that relate to women's roles, including nursing and volunteering to help the war wounded and others in need of care. This paper delves into the role nurses played in the Civil ar (both Caucasian and Black nurses), the way in which the Civil ar changed the woman's work roles, the role women (both Black and Caucasian) played before, during, and after the war, and the terrible injustices thrust on women of color in a number of instances throughout the 19th century.

The oman's role in America prior to the Civil ar

"A woman's work is never done," is an old maxim but it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brockett, Linus Pierpont, and Vaughan, Mary C. (1867). Woman's Work in the Civil War: A

Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience. Chicago, IL: Zeigler, McCurdy & Co.

Child, Lydia. (1837). The Family Nurse [or] Companion of the American Frugal Housewife.

Bedford, MA: Applewood Books (originally published by Charles Hendee in Boston).
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Changes in WWII

Words: 1752 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67033905

WW2 Momentum Shift 1942-1944

WWII

One of the events that rocked the world and consequently shaped the world was the WWII that commenced effectively in 1939 and ended in 1945. It is however worth noting that some of the conflicts that eventually ended up in the culmination of the WWII started much earlier. The WWII parse involved majority of the nations, including the powerful nations at that time taking sides and aligning themselves and their military and diplomatic allegiance to either the Allies or the Axis, each side forming their combined forces. The commanding forces in the Allies were France, Great Britain, Soviet Union, United States and to some little extent China (odye-Smith J., 2014). One the other side of the divide the Axis were Italy, Germany and Japan. This war was largely seen as a continuation of the WWI bearing the 20 years of unresolved disputes that emanated from…… [Read More]

References

Rodye-Smith J., (2014). World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/648813/World-War-II

Rogole J.A., (2002). The Strategic Bombing Campaign against Germany during World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.google.co.ke/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=10&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CGoQFjAJ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fetd.lsu.edu%2Fdocs%2Favailable%2Fetd-0413102-132317%2Funrestricted%2FRigole_thesis.pdf&ei=rnTVU7T2HOHj4QTl6YCwCA&usg=AFQjCNGr0G5t3esuMHkyG6efcmsHwe2lVg&sig2=f4uVuDX2XSnYn89JcB0wYA&bvm=bv.71778758,d.bGE

Yale Law School, (2008). The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Chapter 7 - The Attacks. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from  http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/mp07.asp
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Causes and Outcomes of War

Words: 1976 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54142514

Furthermore, while it established Canada as an independent
nation, it also established America. As a war over its previous colonizer,
America can be said to have won a second war of independence. This is
further reflected in considering President Madison's war message to
Congress. Madison appeals to the "honor" of his country, as if Britain has
violated it and it is America's responsibility to retain it (Madison,
1812). Although the war was fought primarily for economic reasons, the
"honor" Madison is referring to was regained during the war as Great
Britain was unable to dominate the United States. In fact, the United
States did more than a good job of fighting the British. Thus, it appears
that the war was fought somewhat over honor, and the United States
maintained their honor in the war. This means that the United States
established itself, and its pride, in the war, and this…… [Read More]

References

Feldmeth, Greg D. (31 March 1998). U.S. History Resources. Retrieved 3
March 2007 from
http://home.earthlink.net/~gfeldmeth/USHistory.html.

Harney, Major W. (1989). The Causes of the War of 1812. Retrieved 4 March
2007 from
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1989/HWW.htm.
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World War I Known at

Words: 3255 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87605902



Conscription

From the beginning of the war, there had been some variation in the Canadian attitude toward the conflict. Canada never questioned the legitimacy of the war and did not question the need for Canadian participation. There were differences of opinion, though, concerning how extensive the Canadian contribution should be. These variations affected the response to calls for enlistment and divided the country as the towns were more willing than the countryside, the prairies more willing than the Atlantic seaboard, and "it was observed that the proportion of enlistments achieved by any social group appeared to vary almost inversely to the length of its connection with Canada. On the one hand, the ritish-born -- the new arrivals with a large proportion of unattached males of military age -- gave the highest percentage of their numbers to the armed services, and, on the other hand, the French Canadians unquestionably gave the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ameringer, Charles D. Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indie.

Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1992.

Bothwell, Robert. History of Canada since 1867. Washington, D.C.: Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, 1996.

Boudreau, Joseph a. "Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert "Canada and Worlod War I," the History of Canada (2007),   http://www.linksnorth.com/canada-history/canadaandworldwar1.html  .
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History of Wars

Words: 1017 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20653256

History Of ars

The years of the late 16th century witnessed the colonial conquests of the Americas by the British powers. In "A People's Army" Anderson shows that the King of England was interested in an expansionist policy during this time. The British forces already present in America had laid the ground ready for any war. In defiance of authority, the local people also organized themselves in readiness to face the incoming British forces as well as the French forces that had been hired. Their major aim was to fight and defend their land with all it could take

The author shows that the people who had been in America for far too long as natives had managed to convince many more of their colleagues to stage a fight to defend their heritage. In response to the desire to stay strong, they organized themselves into groups. After this, they undertook…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Fred, Anderson. A People's Army -- (Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War 1984)

Fred, Anderson. A People's Army -- (Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War 1984): p.30

Fred, Anderson. A People's Army -- (Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War 1984): p.52

Fred, Anderson. A People's Army -- (Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War 1984)
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Native American Nations and European

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22735319

The politics were simple. The Government and the settlers had all the power, ultimately the Natives did not, and so, the settlers and the government subjugated the Natives and forced them into treaties that only served the European settlers. Another writer notes, "In 1983 ichard White argued in the oots of Dependency that Euro-Indian relations in various parts of North America had in common the 'attempt... By whites to bring Indian resources, land, and labor into the market.'"

Of course, they brought them into that "market" on their own terms most often, rather than that of the Natives.

Joseph Brant - Mohawk leader - British Army officer - Studied at "Moor's Indian Charity School - Translator for Department of Indian Affairs - esponsible for restoring lands to the Mohawk people.

Wampum belt - Fashioned from seashells - Used as money or for trade - Given during times of peace making…… [Read More]

References

Editors, First World. Voyager's World, (2009), (http://www.tfo.org/television/emissions/rendezvousvoyageur/en/world/context/firstnations.html) 9 Feb. 2009.

Hatfield, April Lee. "Colonial Southeastern Indian History." Journal of Southern History 73, no. 3 (2007): 567+.

Konkle, Maureen. Writing Indian Nations: Native Intellectuals and the Politics of Historiography, 1827-1863. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

Editors, First World. Voyager's World, (2009), (http://www.tfo.org/television/emissions/rendezvousvoyageur/en/world/context/firstnations.html) 9 Feb. 2009.
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Discovery of the New World

Words: 2822 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36579816

As a result, the majority of European business companies that handled the large number of fur trades were English. The largest of such firms was the Hudson's ay Company established in 1670 (elden, 82). This institution was the center of North American fur trading for more than two hundred years. It was founded by two French fur traders English merchant. The English government granted the company sole trading rights within the Hudson ay region. The development of the fur trade resulted in a greater integration between traders and merchants, and created an entire social system based upon this concept.

The French dominance of the marketplace meant that other European players wanted to gain momentum within the industry. ritish Merchants founded the North West Company in Montreal in order to compete with the stranglehold of Canadian fur trading (Innis, 154). y the late 1700's, fur became a much harder commodity to…… [Read More]

Burley, D., J. Scott Hamilton, and Knut R. Fladmark (1996) Prophecy of the Swan: The Upper Peace River Fur Trade of 1794-1823. University of British Columbia Press, Vancouver.

Innis, Harold (1956) the Fur Trade in Canada. University of Ontario Press, Totonto.

Rich, E.E. (1966) Montreal and the Fur Trade. McGill University Press, Montreal.
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Natisve Americans Native Americans and European Nations

Words: 1499 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 733467

Natisve Americans

Native Americans and European nations during the seventeenth century lived peacefully in such a manner that it was impossible to believe that this peace coexistence would be disrupted after the end of French and Indian ar in 1763. The ar of League of Augsburg and the ar of Spanish Succession were fought in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century respectively in order to gain power, wealth and lands in the eastern part of North America.

Native Americans in North America after 1763

Native Americans and European nations during the seventeenth century lived peacefully in such a manner that it was impossible to believe that this peace coexistence would be disrupted after the end of French and Indian ar in 1763. The ar of League of Augsburg and the ar of Spanish Succession were fought in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century respectively in order to gain power, wealth…… [Read More]

Work Cited

James A. Henretta, Rebecca Edwards, Robert O. Self. America: A Concise History (textbook) 2012. pgs. 100-104 and 116-125, 138-142
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Social Significance of 1763 in America an

Words: 1083 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88961375

Social Significance of 1763 in America

An Inevitable First American Revolution

In 1763, France and Spain ceded much of eastern North America to the British as part of the peace deal that took place in Paris on February 10 (Galloway 8). This brought to an end the Seven Years ar, otherwise known as the French and Indian ar. The amount of land that Britain won with its victory was massive, extending east from the Mississippi River, north to the Hudson Bay, and south to Florida. Concessions were also made in an effort to appease France and Spain. The British monarchy returned Havana, Cuba to Spain, a critical way point for ships entering and leaving the Gulf of Mexico and ports south. France retained the northern most sections of Canada around Hudson Bay and several Caribbean Islands, including the sugar-producing economic dynamo Guadalupe.

On the surface, it seemed that all three…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Galloway, Colin G. The Scratch of a Pen: 1763 and the Transformation of North America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Print.
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Conflict Between Native Americans and

Words: 2457 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2696378

In general, both sides fought using impromptu raids and very vicious and undercutting tactics. However, this was the traditional fighting method used by Native Americans during this particular era and could be understood in terms of their cultural perspective.

The fifth criteria of just warfare is that "war must be the only possible means of righting the wrong done." This particular standard is another very flexible standard for warfare. oth sides of any conflict must justify their actions as "last resort" even if other opportunities were open for negotiation. However, in this historical context it could be argued that war was inevitable. This is because population tension within the eastern border mandated that a push by the colonials west of the Ohio River was inevitable. As a result, land that was traditionally Native American would ultimately get taken away from their ownership by the colonists. This it is an unavoidable…… [Read More]

Bibliography

A. Britt, Great Indian Chiefs (1938, repr. 1969)

M.F. Schmitt and D.A. Brown, Fighting Indians of the West (1948, repr. 1966)

R.H. Lowie, Indians of the Plains (1954, repr. 1963)

A.M. Josephy, the Patriot Chiefs (1961)
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Conflict and Amity of the

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 573765



The Algonquian also had harmonious relationships with the French fur trappers who came to this country and Canada to make their livings. In fact, the French bonded with the Algonquians so much that they fought with the Algonquians against their enemies, the Iroquois, during the seventeenth century. The editors of a historical Web site continue, "The Algonquian were among the first North American natives to strike alliances with the French, who adopted Algonquian means of travel and terms like 'canoe' and 'toboggan'" (Editors). This indicates the Algonquian people were eager to strike a balance with the new settlers entering the country, but they were not willing to give up their lands or way of life, something the settlers often demanded as their colonies continued to grow.

Another aspect of the relationship between the Algonquians and the settlers is the issue of disease. Many Algonquian tribes (and others) suffered huge losses…… [Read More]

References

Bragdon, Kathleen J. The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Editors. "The Algonquians." USHistory.com. 2009. 26 Feb. 2009.  http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h560.html .

Hatfield, April Lee. "Spanish Colonization Literature, Powhatan Geographies and English Perceptions of Tsenacommacah/Virginia." Journal of Southern History 69.2 (2003): 245+.

Jalalzai, Zubeda. "Race and the Puritan Body Politic." MELUS 29.3-4 (2004): 259+.
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Race Both Ward Churchill and

Words: 1171 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71976082

The French colonial government actively sought means to control land and land use in Algeria, notes Sartre. Control over land and natural resources equals ownership of the means of production. Economic oppression also creates class conflict: the subjugated peoples become a clear and identifiable underclass. Even within the underclass, class conflict prevents political cohesion. The French and the Americans would have been far less successful in their colonial campaigns had the Algerians and the Native Americans been able to organize en masse in rebellion. Poverty pits neighbor against neighbor in the competition for limited resources.

Furthermore, race and social class become linked together and offered up as false proof that the oppressed groups are inherently inferior. Economic oppression also serves another key goal that helps perpetuate colonial rule: ignorance. Stripping the underclass of access to capital or to the means of production, the ruling class ensures lack of access to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Churchill, Ward. A Little Matter of Genocide. City Lights Books, 1997.

Sartre, Jean-Paul. Colonialism and Neo-Colonialism. Translated by Azzedine Haddour, Steve Brewer. Routledge, 2001.
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Colonialist and Native Interesting Relationships

Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51833378

French and the Native American: A Mutually Beneficial elationship

When considering the history of the United States and its inception, the most common conception is of Native American tribes being tortured, murdered, and generally emaciated from their contact with the Europeans. And certainly, this was generally the case. However, in the often sad history of contact between the new entrants into the Americas and the native tribes, there are also a few sparks of light, where the native tribes and Europeans in fact benefited from their interactions with each other. Although these benefits were often not without their complications, the relationships between the French and the native tribes with whom they came into contact were generally of a far less violent and murderous nature than most other Indian-European interactions. Indeed, the mutual benefits of these relationships began based upon the fur trade and later progressed to intermarriage and intercultural relationships.…… [Read More]

References

Templeton, K.A. (n.d.). Trail of Tears: The Native American "Problem" in the New World. Retrieved from: https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~katster/Hist16p.htm

University of Ottawa (n.d.). European Colonization and the Native Peoples. Site for Language Management in Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.slmc.uottawa.ca/european_colonization

White, S. (2013). Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana. University of Pennsylvania Press
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Origins of Scalping Revealed the

Words: 3018 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36862254



The history of Indian and European scalping)

Another factor that should be considered in the discussion of the origins of European scalping traditions is the evidence in etymology. There is evidence of the prior knowledge and use of scalping in the original usage and understanding of the word ' scalping'.

The noun "scalp" (from a Scandinavian root) existed in English long before the seventeenth century. It had two meanings of different ages. The older meaning was "the top or crown of the head; the skull or cranium," and the more recent one was the skin covering that upper part of the head, "usually covered with hair." ut in 1601, Holland's edition of Pliny added a third meaning from a literary acquaintance with the "Anthropophagi" (Scythians) near the North Pole, who wore their enemies' "scalpes haire and al, instead of mandellions or stomachers before their breasts."

Axtell 29)

Researchers have also…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ancient Evidence Similar to Indian Scalping Found in China's Hinterland. May 19, 2005.  http://www.china.org.cn/e-kaogu/2001/36.htm 

Axtell, James. The European and the Indian: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America. Vol. 12. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982.

Binder, a. Early development of arrest as a concept and process ERCES Journal. May 19, 2005. http://www.erces.com/journal/articles/actuel/v04_02.htm#_ftnref107

Brooke, Christopher. The Saxon & Norman Kings. London: B.T. Batsford, 1963.
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African and Native Americans When Discussing the

Words: 1926 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4056412

African and Native Americans

When discussing the experience of minorities in early America, it is tempting to fall into one of two extremes, either by imagining that the treatment of minorities by European colonizers was equal across the board, or else was so different that one cannot find congruities between experiences. Like most things in history, however, the truth is far more complex, because although the same religious, political, and economic ideologies motivated Europeans' treatment of Native Americans and Africans, the effects were mixed. In some instances Native Americans were treated to the same kind of brutality and disregard as those Africans caught up in the trans-Atlantic slave trade, but more frequently, European colonizers attempted to treat Native Americans as something closer to equals in an attempt to manipulate them into favorable actions, such trade alliances or military support. Furthermore, the experiences of Native Americans and Africans in America prior…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clark, Andrew F. "The Atlantic Slave Trade Revisited." Journal of Third World Studies 22

(2005): 273-284.

Maass, John R. "The Frontier War for American Independence/The French and Indian War."

The Journal of Military History 69 (2005): 228-230.
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Last of the Mohicians James Fennimore Cooper's

Words: 1162 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69549632

Last of the Mohicians

James Fennimore Cooper's The Last of The Mohicans was published in 1826, part of a pentology, but the best known work for contemporary readers. The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain were at odds for dominance of the North American Colonies. During this war, the French made treaties and allied themselves with many Native American tribes to up the balance between the far more numerous British and colonialists. It was written in a popular genre of the time in which historical accuracy came second and numerous inaccuracies in terms of Native culture were simply overlooked, or became part of White popular culture (Peck). Ironically, there is a famous American author who took great pains to deride the material, Mark Twain. Twain found the novel lacking in variety with excessive verbiage, and even suggested that before praising…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Boles, J., ed. A Companion to the American South. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. Print.

Cooper, J.F. The Last of the Mohicans. New York: MacMillan, 1921. Print.

Franklin, W. The New World of James Fenimore Cooper. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982. Print.

Meacham, J. American Lion. New York: Random House, 2008. Print.
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Reasons for the American Revolution and the Arguments Made by the Colonists After 1763

Words: 833 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69877722

American Revolution after 1763

There are several factors leading to the American Revolution. During the 18th century, the ritish colonists in North America established themselves as a new nation. Increasingly, they had begun to see themselves as American rather than ritish. This new consciousness contributed to increasing resentment of any ritish attempts at control and influence in America. ritish action deemed unfair by American colonies, such as taxes on tea and sugar, contributed significantly to this problem.

Exacerbated American Grievances after 1763

The Stamp Act is one of the greatest ritish thorns in the American side when 1766 arrived (enjamin Franklin Testifies Against the Stamp Act, p. 3). The problem was that this tax had to be paid by order of a Parliament where the colonials were not specifically represented. Franklin in fact threatens the ritish with a loss of respect and "affection" from the colonials if this Act were…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"History 205 - Documents for Chapters 5&6.

Garraty, John A. & McCaughey, Robert A. The American Nation: A history of the United States. New York: Harper & Row, 1987.

1775-76:

1776: Adam Smith opposes Mercantilism (1776), p. 1
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US Colonial History

Words: 1352 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76335538

Colonial America: Questions

Puritans

Unlike previous European settlers who came to the New World primarily to make a profit, the Puritans arrived with a commitment to create a new society and genuinely 'settle' on the land. They had no plans to return to England, given that they had been cast out of the Old World because of their religious beliefs. Unlike the settlers at Jamestown, they came prepared to work hard, and did not hope to simply make a quick profit and return to England rich, having done little labor. They believed in the value of hard work as part of their religious philosophy. They believed God had quite literally 'chosen' them to know the truth, which sustained them during times of suffering. During the first years, however, like previous colonists, they did struggle to stay alive. The winter was harsh, and they were forced to adapt their crops and…… [Read More]

References

"5b. Indentured servants." The Southern Colonies. U.S. History. 2012. [1 Feb 2013]

 http://www.ushistory.org/us/5b.asp 

Pearson, Ellen Holmes. "The New World: A Stage for Cultural Interaction." Teaching History.

[1 Feb 2013.]
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Shaping of the Colonies in 1763 There

Words: 1107 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23047760

Shaping of the Colonies in 1763

There have been few eras in human history possessed with more of the expectant optimism, and the grim pragmatism, than the century following first contact with the new world of North America. With an expansive landmass, the size of which more than doubled that known to citizens of any European country at the time, brimming with natural resources and lying open for exploration and settlement, many thinkers of the age shared Benjamin Franklin's fateful estimation, made in his tract America as a Land of Opportunity, which claimed "so vast is the Territory of North-America, that it will require many Ages to settle it fully." Penned and published in 1751, Franklin's treatise on the seemingly infinite riches to be reaped by the American colonies failed to fully anticipate man's overwhelming compulsion to compete for the control of land. While America's preeminent philosopher was prescient in…… [Read More]

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Race Social and Political Contexts

Words: 1431 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 796053

Whites generally were associated with roles including plantation overseers and supervisors or small proprietors; free non-whites generally suffered from circumscribed social and political abilities prior to the revolution (Knight, 2005). While their wealth and education may place them about smaller merchants and proprietors in the white class, they were still not held to the highest castes or ranks. Slaves were often distinguished as property and subject to coercion and much control (Knight, 2005).

The presence of a slave society resulted in an extremely turbulent and volatile environment where tensions among whites and members of other races were constantly raised (Knight, 2005). Lacking among all races and groups was solidarity among classes with respect to humanity and civil rights or political rights (Knight, 2005). In each of these instances race served as the impetus for revolts and revolution. With lack of solidarity and a general in acceptance of legal and social…… [Read More]

References

Dominguez, Virginia R. White by Definition, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick:

Knight, F.W. "Haitian Revolution." Today in Black History. (2005). Available:

http://www.swagga.com/haitian.htm

Oliver-Velez. "Color, Caste and class in the Americas." AfriGeneas World Research
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Vine Deloria Jr 's Custer Died for Your

Words: 1042 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22369609

Vine Deloria Jr.'s Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto

An Analysis of Vine Deloria, Jr.'s Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto

One of the more profound developments of the current Native American movement has been an effort on the part of Indians themselves to record their own history in order to help them gain control of their future. When Deloria promulgated his "Indian Manifesto" in 1969 with the title of Custer Died for Your Sins, it became apparent that he was at the forefront of this movement and the issues he identifies continue to be at the forefront of Native American concerns today. This paper will provide an overview of Deloria's book, followed by a discussion of six of the main points made by the author. A summary of the research will be provided in the conclusion.

Review and Discussion

According to his editors, Vine Deloria,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Deloria, Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto, New York: Macmillan, 1969.

p. 6.

p. 11.

p. 150.
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How Did English Settlement Affect the Land of North America

Words: 1310 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69411078

ritish agricultural revolution and English settlement patterns in their colonies in New England. It is the authors contention that the world view of the English influenced their agricultural practices and the way that these practices changed the ecology of the land in New England. While largely a failure as a commercial enterprise in New England, it did however have commonalities with the Middle and Southern colonies, a relentless drive West and a decimation of Native American cultures and populations. Needless to say, there were huge differences between this English world view and English agricultural policies and the Native American world view, agricultural practices and approach to the environment.

While agriculture was largely a failure as a commercial enterprise in New England, the idea in the English settlers mind to keep pushing West to find arable land was alive and well and continued throughout the colonial period. Surprisingly enough, this English…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Canterbery, E. Ray. The Making of Economics: The foundation. Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific

Publishing Company, 2003.

Cochrane, William W. Development of American Agriculture: A Historical Analysis . Rochester, MN:

Univ Of Minnesota Press, 1993.
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Assigned Readings

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35584738

Thomas Paine was an earlier conqueror of the special association that was formed between America and France. His part in this association was initiated with his responsibility of the post of American Congress Secretary of Foreign Affairs where he continually used dialogue to make relations between the two better. He retained this post throughout the American evolution. Paine, however, is better noted for his works written throughout the American and French evolutions Eras. In his writings, Paine offered spirited protection of accepted autonomy, human rights, and the republican government. Both Common Sense (1776) ights of Man (1791-1792) stick out as the most broadly read political areas from the era. Paine's distinctive global thought also can serve as the building blocks for liberal cosmopolitanism in worldwide relations. His unrelenting faith in aspects of democratization, free trade, and respect for human rights being the factors that cut back worldwide conflict stands among…… [Read More]

References

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine and the Religion of Nature." Johns Hopkins University Press . 1993.

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine: Apostle of Freedom." Four Walls Eight Windows. 1994.

Keane, John. "Tom Paine: A Political Life." Little, Brown. 1995.
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Important Events in World History

Words: 709 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17735865

world's nations and citizens was the Cold ar. Indeed, slave trade was important, and the formation of American colonies in the 17th century has had an enormous impact on the history of the planet. Also the Seven Years' ar and imperialism had enormous implications and impacts. But the years of the Cold ar stand out as more pivotal in terms of the history of the world. This paper will explain why the Cold ar was most important.

Slave Trade: The International Slavery Museum (ISM) explains that European slave traders "forcibly uprooted millions of people" from est African and est Central Africa between the years 1500 to 1900. In particular, the 16th century was a century in which millions of African peoples were forcibly shipped in cruelly over-crowded slave ships to the Americas. These individuals from Africa were "…farmers, merchants, priests, soldiers, goldsmiths and musicians" (ISM). hile crossing the oceans from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Fred. Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North

America, 1754-1766. New York: Knopf Publishing, 2007.

International Slavery Museum. "The trade triangle." Retrieved December 8, 2013, from  http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk . 2008.
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Otis How Does James Otis's

Words: 354 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31011771

He saw the colonists as civilized and living in a law-abiding and property-owning society in the way that Native Americans did not. Thus, even if Otis proclaimed the right of self-determination of the colonists in a way that was based upon natural rights and the natural integrity of all persons, regardless of the will of the British sovereign King George, the inherent rights of human beings to life, liberty, and property did not extend to the property claims of Native Americans upon the land who resided outside of the European legal system. Otis saw Indians through the lenses of past American conflicts, such as the French and Indian war, rather than as noble savages or potential sources of trade or missionary 'targets' like some of the initial European explorers.… [Read More]

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Formation of the Various States

Words: 2467 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 805203

New states lying north of said parallel would be admitted as non-slave while those lying south would be slave.

The importance of the Missouri Compromise cannot be over-stated. It impacted the boundaries of several other states other than Missouri and led to some of the most hotly contested political debates in United States history.

Interestingly, the boundary established through the Missouri Compromise, that is, the 36?30' parallel, had actually been in use as a boundary line since early colonial days and the Missouri Compromise served to continue its use. The boundary between original thirteen colony members, Virginia and North Carolina, is the 36?30' parallel and the boundary between two of the earlier states admitted to the Union, Kentucky and Tennessee is also the 36?30' parallel.

Map depicting 36?30' parallel

The admission of Texas as a statehood was affected by the Missouri Compromise. Unlike any other state, Texas enjoyed status as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dixon, Archibald. The True History of the Missouri Compromise and its Repeal. BiblioBazaar, 2009.

Eastern Michigan University. Bleeding Kansas. http://edit.emich.edu/index.php?title=Bleeding_Kansas (accessed December 4, 2010).

Marshall, Peter C. Envisioning America: English Plan for the Colonization of North America, 1580-1640. Bedford / St. Martin's, 1995.

Mcgreevy, Patrick. Stairway to Empire: Lockport, the Erie Canal, and the Shaping of America. State University of New York Press, 2009.
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Three Important Figures From an Era in U S History Between European Settlement and Reconstruction

Words: 1568 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86442214

America was finding its footing, Americans were finding their identity. The spark of revolution trickled down the vine where three men decided to take arms. One took arms by defending the country against the British and securing the role of president of a new country. A second took pen and wrote to inspire the reluctant to declare independence from an unfair Britain. A third took brush and art to establish a painted history of the American revolution along with the first museums to showcase them in.Three notable figures, George Washington, Charles Willson Peale, and Thomas Paine became some of the most influential men of their time.

George Washington was born on February 22, 1732 or February 11, 1731 and died December 14, 1799. He was alive during the time of the American evolution and played a pivotal role in America's victory over Great Britain.He became the first President of the…… [Read More]

References

Burns, J.M., & Dunn, S. (2004). George Washington. New York: Times Books.

This source discusses the life anf career of George Washington.

Greene, J.P., & Bailyn, B. (1967). The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. American Historical Review, 11(3), 588-90. doi:10.2307/1849163

This is a journal source that discusses the reasons behind the American Revolution.
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Scratch of a Pen by

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36071888

The author portrays the Pontiac War, for example, as an Indian war of independence against British rule. The level of bloodshed and the number of displaced or destroyed Indian populations grew not only in relation with Indian-British violent relation but also due to East-West migration. As soon as French presence disappeared, white colonists started moving aggressively in Indian territory creating even more instability in the region for Britain. Weakened by wars fought inside and outside the American continent, Britain lost even more of its military power in its conflicts with the Indians, offering a context for North American independence. The author builds upon this and also presents the relations between other colonists of the North American Plains. Spanish, French or British soldiers reaction to the 1763 events are also important elements in the 1783 American Independence War, as the year has not only reshaped state borders but it also created…… [Read More]

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How Revolutionary Was the American Revolution

Words: 3820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79397572

revolutionary the American evolution was in reality. This is one issue that has been debated on by many experts in the past and in the present too. The contents of this paper serve to justify this though-provoking issue.

American evolution-how revolutionary was it?

When we try to comprehend why the American evolution was fought, we come to know that the residents of the American colonies did so to retain their hard-earned economic, political and social order when the British had stated to neglect them. However, before we began to understand what The American evolution was all about, it is necessary for us to look at conditions of the colonies preceding the war. The economy of Colonial America were divided into three separate parts: New England, where the economy was commerce; the South, where cash crops were the major source of earning; and the middle colonies, a combination of both. [Account…… [Read More]

References

Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (Harvard University Press, 1967).

Kurtz and Hutson (eds), Essays on the American Revolution (University of North Carolina Press, 1973).

Account of a Declaration 1, available at:  http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/account/ , accessed on: February 11, 2004

American Journey, available at:
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Sea Power to the Achievement

Words: 1698 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92102628

Things got no better for d'Estaing and the French navy in 1779 when they were defeated near Savannah, Georgia, by the British. But what such skeptics fail to realize is that even though the British triumphed in these early attempts of France's Navy to provide some form of power at sea, the final victory was, of course, France's and the colonialists', largely because of the effort end expenditure that such battles took on the British. The Colonial war was fought over a period of six years, during which time the British were fighting a war on multiple fronts against multiple opponents. The aggregate of British victories, then, became so pyrrhic that British forces were eventually defeated.

Despite the fact that the French fleet suffered some early losses, it was able to gain the final victory largely because of its prowess on the waterways and the aid it was able to…… [Read More]

References

Brecher, F.W. (2003). Securing American Independence: John Jay and the French Alliance. Westport: Praeger Publishers.

Chartrand, R. Francis, R. (1991). The French Army in the American War of Independence. Long Island City: Osprey.

Corwin, E.S. (1962) French Policy and the American Alliance of 1778. North Haven: Archon Books.

Dull, J.R. (1985). A Diplomatic History of the American Revolution. New Haven: Yale U. Press.
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James Fenimore Cooper the Last

Words: 1887 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95397823

Fenimore is responsible for having provided the public with an adventurous history of the old American landscape.

In spite of the fact that James Fenimore Cooper has been born in New Jersey, his father decided to move the whole family to an area around Otsego Lake, near New York, a place where he owned some land. This presented James with the chance of coming across a vast forested territory where Indian tribes roamed free.

James's father had attempted to give the boy a good education, but he had not been enthusiastic his boys academic achieving, as the latter was dismissed from Yale and later resigned from the navy. The reason for his resignation had been that he wanted to spend more time with his wife, Miss Susan De Lancey. Consequent to several divergences he and his wife had over his writing style vs. his capabilities, with the latter mocking him,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Dennis Ian, "The Worthlessness of Duncan Heyward: A Waverley Hero in America," Studies in the Novel 29.1 (1997).

2. Fenimore Cooper James, the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 (Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957)

3. Lamberton Becker May, "Introduction How This Book Came to Be Written," the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 (Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957) 5.

4. Pitcher Edward W., "The Beaver and His Cousin in Cooper's the Last of the Mohicans," ANQ8.2 (1995): 11.