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Greek Project 1272 ART204 Formal Research Project

Words: 2160 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52279146

Greek Project 1272

ART204 Formal Research Project Summer Term 2012

Ancient Greek sculpture is one of the most famous historical forms of art. Three main forms of life are represented by this sculpture; war, mythology, and rulers of the land of ancient Greece. The main aim of the paper is to revisit the history of the art of sculpturing in ancient Greece and different steps of its development within different time periods. Some of the main developments in Greek sculpture included depiction of changes in forms, depiction of female and male figures, degrees of present realism, and how sculpturing was used to achieve these effects.

Developments in Greek Sculpturing techniques

There are four main periods in which main developments and changes in the Greek sculpturing took place. The first period is referred to as the geometric period; second period is the archaic period, the third one being the classic and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dillon, Sheila. Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, And Styles. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Dillon, Sheila. The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Giannakopoulou, Liana. The Power of Pygmalion: Ancient Greek Sculpture in Modern Greek Poetry, 1860-1960, Volume 3 of Byzantine and Neohellenic Studies. Peter Lang, 2007.
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Greek After the Death of

Words: 848 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18012603

For example, founding cities on royal possessions gave less profits, as direct and indirect taxation of cities appeared in many cases less profitable than taxation of royal landowners. From the other side, urbanization also led to the weakening centralization.

But in a general scope one the hand with military and economical advantages urbanization also led to cultural Hellenization, which is considered to be its main political achievement. it's important to note that a number of kingdoms in Asia Minor and Middle East adopted Greek law and Greek civil norms. Such changes had a very progressive effect on social life, as it led to the reduction of slavery and guaranteed protection of property rights to citizens in former despotic societies.

Cultural interaction of Greek polises with natives led to the penetration of local customs and cultural traits to the life of Greeks. Greek culture of polises experienced deep interaction with Persian…… [Read More]

References

Boardman, J. Griffin, J. Murray, O. The Oxford Illustrated History of Greece and the Hellenistic World Oxford University Press, 2001

Tarn, W.W. The Greeks in Bactria and India Cambridge University Press, 1997

Greek
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Greek & Persia the Causes

Words: 1469 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51476357

Except for Miletus, which was sacked as an initiator of the revolt, the other cities were treated rather reasonably, going as far as recommendations for the settled Persians to respect local religious traditions (Herodotus VI 42-45).

This does not necessarily need to be seen only as a reasonable conquering policy, but also as a diplomatic and political approach: once Darius asked for the submissions of mainland Greek cities, many of them accepted, based on the previous behavior of the conquerors in Ionic cities. Athens and Sparta obviously remained aside, but this was also because they were also assuming a regional power status and would not find it calculable to surrender without a fight.

Reasonably enough, though, the Persian invasion could also be seen as a direct consequence in the involvement of the Athenians in the revolt of the Ionic cities and in their attempt to preserve a democracy here and…… [Read More]

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Greek Civilization Compare Greek Religion in the

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63638750

Greek Civilization:

Compare Greek religion in the two different periods in history in the eighth century, the time of Homer, and in the fifth century BCE, according to the following:

The different ways they believed their gods intervened.

During the Epic Age, that of Homer, they believed that the God directly intervened in the lives of human beings. Over time, as the rulers of Greece became more powerful, the population began to feel that although the Gods could control lives, they were mostly observers rather than direct participants.

Whether they believed their gods favored or punished specific individuals for moral reasons.

In the 8th century BC, the people believed that the Gods punished behavior, but that the punishments were more targeted at individuals who disrespected the gods rather than those who committed crimes or sins. As exemplified in Antigone, the people feared that if they defied the gods then they…… [Read More]

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Greek and English the Ancient

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56179376

The vengeance of the gods is further underscored by the Chorus who warns that "But if any man comes striding, high and mighty, in all he says and does, no fear of justice, no reverence for the temples of the gods-let a rough doom tear him down, repay his pride, breakneck, ruinous pride!" Oedipus portrays tyranny and the people's greatest blessing becomes their worst curse.

In the last stage, Oedipus is a man who has become humbled with the pain and dejection of knowing the truth of reality as he is forced to admit his tragic destiny by the overwhelming evidence. The writer shows the sudden change in the protagonist's persona when Oedipus condemns himself by saying, "I stand revealed at last -- cursed in my birth, cursed in marriage, cursed in the lives I cut down with these hands!" (1309-1311) Oedipus's complete transformation is demonstrated when he gouged out…… [Read More]

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Greek Artifacts the Civilization of

Words: 1921 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27467730

Also, this carving is quite sentimental in appearance, for it reflects "the solemn pathos of the Greek citizen, much like some of the sculptures found on the pediment of the Parthenon" (Seyffert, 245).

Our last artifact is titled Pair of Armbands with Triton and Tritoness Holding Erotes, made in the Hellenistic period, circa 200 .C.E. These jewelry objects were apparently designed for a woman of high Greek culture, for they are made from solid gold and are fashioned in the shape of two loosely-coiled snakes or serpents. Whomever designed these intricate and beautiful objects realized the special properties of gold, for the woman lucky enough to wear these could easily slip her arms through the loops, due to the malleability of solid gold. The two figures located at the tops of each piece are representations of Triton and Tritoness, most closely associated with the Greek god of the sea Poseidon.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

New Greek and Roman Galleries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Internet. 2007.

Retrieved at  http://www.metmuseum.org/special/greek_roman/images.asp .

Seyffert, Oskar. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Religion, Literature and Art.

New York: Gramercy Books, 1995.
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Greek Sculpture a Timeline of Greek Sculpture

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83902479

Greek Sculpture

A Timeline of Greek Sculpture

Polykleitos, Doryphoros (early fourth century BC)

As Paul Johnson (2003) records, this ancient example of Greek classicalism "epitomizes a canon of male beauty embodied in mathematical proportions" (p. 63). Showing the perfection of contraposto, Doryphoros (or the spear-carrier) is a balanced representation of the body's muscles. Polykleitos, a contemporary of Phidias, had his own school of young artists, which carried on into the third century BC. Polykleitos' works are treated on in his own treatise, called "The Canon," which gave explicit attention to symmetry, clarity, and wholeness. The Spear-carrier is one of the best examples of Polykleitos' teaching -- however, this example is a copy of his original, and is held in Naples -- a fitting representation of the art of Greek sculpting.

Praxiteles, Aphrodite of Knidos (mid-fourth century BC)

Praxiteles actually made two statues for Kos -- so the legend goes. One…… [Read More]

Reference List

Agony -- The Famous Group of Laocoon. (n.d.) Old and Sold. Retrieved from  http://www.oldandsold.com/articles26/rome-19.shtml 

Haaren, J. (2000). Famous Men of Greece. Lebanon, TN: Greenleaf Press.

Johnson, P. (2003). Art: A New History. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

The Farnesse Bull. (n.d.) Old and Sold. Retrieved from  http://www.oldandsold.com/articles26/naples-5.shtml
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Classical Greek Theater

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22673869

omen in Ancient Tragedy and Comedy

Both the drama of Euripides' "Medea" and the comedy of Aristophanes' "Lysistrata" seem unique upon a level of even surface characterization, to even the most casual students of Classical Greek drama and culture. Both in are female-dominated plays that were produced by male-dominated societies and written by men. Both the drama and the comedy features strong women as their central protagonists, whom are depicted under extreme circumstances, in relatively positive lights. And both plays, despite their very different tones, also have an additional, unique feature in that they show 'the enemy' -- or the non-Greek or non-Athenian, in a fairly positive and humane fashion.

The sympathies of the viewer for female's plights are immediately arisen by Aristophanes from the first scene of "Lysistrata," as Cleonice, the friend of Lysistrata, and a common Athenian housewife states, regarding the lateness of the other women that frustrates…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arkins, Brian. "Sexuality in Fifth-Century Athens." Ancient History: Journal of University College Dublin, Ireland, Volume 1: 1994. http://ancienthistory.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.ucd.ie/%7Eclassics/94/Arkins94.html

Aristophanes. "Lysistrata." Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997. http://m3.doubleclick.net/875354/freeze10012004.html

Euripides. "Medea." MIT Classics Archive, 2001. Retrieved on 6 November 1997 at  http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html 

Hemminger, Bill. "Why Study Ancient World Cultures?" Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997.
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Greek on Mediterranean World Sparta

Words: 2198 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88891091

Mediterranean agriculture therefore turned out as extraordinarily market-oriented.

Slavery turned out to be a further key component of the Mediterranean world economy. Aristotle was among the Philosophers who came up with the justifications for requisite of slavery to a proper society, for exclusive of slaves it would have been challenging for aristocrats to learn what was required to maintain culture or have the time to nurture political virtue. Slaves were obtained as a consequence of wars, bizarrely common in the Mediterranean world. Athenians relied on slaves for household jobs as well as workers in their enormous silver mines, which accelerated the development of Athens's empire as well as money-making operations, even though working environment were awful. Slavery also assisted elaboration on why Greece was never particularly engrossed in technological modernism appropriate to either agriculture or manufacturing. The Greeks established significant advances in building ship as well as routing, which proved…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Baeck L (1994) the Mediterranean tradition in economic thought. Routledge, New York [Routledge history of economic thought series, vol 5, 1994]. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from:  https://www.google.com/search?q=Bibliography+on+Political+and+social++impact+of+Greek+on+the+Mediterranean+world&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-U.S.:official&client=firefox-a .

John Boardman (1999). The Greeks Overseas: Their Early Colonies and Trade, 4th edition, Thames and Hudson. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from: http://suite101.com/article/greek-colonization-and-its-impact-on-the-mediterranean-world

Perrotta C (2003) the legacy of the past: ancient economic thought on wealth and development. Eur J. Hist Econ Thought 10(2):177 -- 219. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from:
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Drama's Origin and Its Appeal

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1017319

Origin and Appeal of Drama

A generally accepted theory is that drama's origins lie in prehistoric human beings and their rituals which contained music, dance, masks, costumes, a specific performance area, and a division between audience and performance. Later, in Egypt about 4,000 C texts were written on tomb walls with plot, characters, and stage directions for enacting the body's resurrection. etween 3,000 and 2,000 C other plays developed which were performed at the coronation of the pharaoh (coronation plays), celebrated pharaoh's 30th year on the throne (jubilee plays), and which were part of religious festivals (passion plays).

Western drama as we know it today started about 600 C in the ancient city-state of Athens when a Greek poet named Thespis got the idea for an innovation to music. At that time a Greek chorus, with a leader, sang songs about legendary heroes. Thespis, who was probably the leader of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Drama: Definition" and Much More From Answers.com:

 http://www.answers.com/topic/drama?hl=theatrical& ; hl=plays 'Ancient Drama":

http://www.geocities.com/broadway/balcony/7634/ancient_drama.htm?200517

'Theatre History Thru Renaissance"
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Historical View of the Greek Heroic Ideal

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87791054

Greco-oman Tradition

How does the ideal of heroic citizenship change from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through the emergence of Greek tragic drama to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism?

Mythopoeic thought holds that the occurrences of events are the result of an act of will on the part of gods and spirits. A thread of anthropomorphism runs through this mythopoeic thinking as impersonal laws of nature and the deductive generalizations of logic are not a part of the mythopoeic framework: instead, every event is an aspect of some personal being. A mythopoeic orientation is one of the most primitive lenses used by humans to explain and attribute meaning to phenomena. Sensemaking in naive cultures typically involves attribution of human motivation to the inanimate and to otherwise inexplicable events. Indeed, the term mythopoeic means myth-making, from the Greek muthos or myth and poiein which means to make. From the anthropomorphic position…… [Read More]

References

Bowra, C.M. (1957). The Greek Experience. New York: Praeger. In Steven Kreis, History Guide (2006).

Dunkle, R. (1986). The classical origins of western culture. Brooklyn, NY: Brooklyn College, The City University of New York.

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Egyptian Civilizations Classical Greek or

Words: 1011 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90859767

As Amun, he also wears a flat-topped crown, which was his signature. The figure is carrying and ankh in one hand and a scimitar in the other which is laid across his chest.

The gold represents the sun in ancient Egyptian culture, and so it is the only fitting

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period began in 323 BC, after the death of one of ancient Greece's great heroes, Alexander the Great. Alexander had conquered vast expanses of the ancient world, which opened up great cultural influences on the people of Greece (National Museum of Athens 2010). During this era, the people speak a multitude of different languages, and there are cultural influences from around the ancient world parading through the streets, which might I add, have all been recently paved. The city itself looks strikingly similar to more modern day cities. The culture is ripe with artistic expression and acceptance.…… [Read More]

References

American Institute of Pyramidology. "Part One: The Ancient Mystery Unraveled." The Great Pyramid. 2010. Retrieved 19 Feb 2010 from  http://greatpyramid.org/aip/gr-pyr1.htm 

Inter-City Oz. "About Ancient Egypt." Tour Egypt. 2010. Retrieved 19 Feb 2010 from  http://touregypt.net/egyptantiquities/ 

Metropolotan Museum of Art. "Statuette of Amun." Works of Art: Egyptian Art. 2010. Retrieved 19 Feb 2010 from  http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/collection_database/egyptian_art/statuette_of_amun/objectview.aspx?page=2&sort=5&sortdir=asc&keyword=&fp=1&dd1=10&dd2=31&vw=1&collID=31&OID=100001249&vT=1 

Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Statue of Eros Sleeping." Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. 2010. Retrieved 19 Fed 2010 from  http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/04/eusb/ho_43.11.4.htm
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Structure of Ancient and Modern Dramas to

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36161336

structure of ancient and modern dramas to highlight their differences and similarities. The paper also shows how drama evolved over the centuries with references to Greek, Elizabethan and Modern plays.

MODEN AND ANCIENT DAMA: A COMPAISON

Drama has an inherent ability to adapt itself to the thinking and wishes of the society in which it takes birth. Therefore modern drama with all its intensity, relevance and eloquence is certainly more popular among modern audiences than its ancient counterpart. Still we cannot deny the importance of ancient dramatic concepts, models and devices in the development and evolution of modern drama. While ancient plays are mostly remembered for their grandeur and myths, close analysis reveals that there is more to them than meets the eye. All ancient Greek tragedies contain some similar elements, which set them apart from tragedies of later eras. While they basically concentrated on highlighting the significance of myths,…… [Read More]

References

Aristotle The POETICS Book XIII: 350 BCE Translated by S.H. Butcher Online version:

 http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.html 

Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, 1949 Penguin USA, 1 edition, October 6, 1998

Arthur Miller, "Tragedy and the Common Man," from The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller (Viking Press, 1978)
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Homer Etc Examples of Greek

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98789101

Gradually the Greek hero recognizes (peripeteia) that his visitors are the hated Greeks who once abandoned him, in disguise. Philoctetes denounces the foul plot and demands back his bow, realizing once again he is alone in the world. (anagnorisis)

In Euripides, "Hippolytus," pity and fear (pathos) is evoked by Phaedra's unbridled passion for her stepson Hippolytus. The recognition element of the drama (peripeteia) comes when both Phaedra and Hippolytus see that their mutually incompatible desires both for others (in the case of Phaedra) and also to be removed from others (as expressed in the character of the young, title son of Theseus) are inescapable. This recognition is shortly followed by the terrible peripeteia of Theseus that his wife has lied to him and he has cast off his son as nothing, for nothing. The final tragic anagnorisis comes with Athena's visit. Athena exposes Theseus' folly of his love for his…… [Read More]

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Female Role Depicted in Greek

Words: 1630 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27914475

In asking him to stay with her and their family, she was practically betraying her country. Demeter cares for the earth in a way that no other gods did. She was actively involved with mortal affairs. However, she also cared for own, her daughter. She does what she feels what she must do in an act of revenge. These women demonstrate the complexity of the female in any era. Even in ancient texts, we see the female figure associated with the typical womanly things such as motherhood and fertility but she is also given characteristics that are strong, powerful, and dangerous. What these myths tell us about the role of the female is that it is constantly changing. The female is complex and while she will always associated with fertility, she should never be relegated to an inferior role. While we often see mythology as wild with fantastical elements, we…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bullfinch, Thomas. Bulfinch's Mythology. New York: Random House Publishing. 1979.

Hesiod. Theogony. Perseus Digital Online Library. Information Retrieved August 7, 2009.

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Homer Will the Real Greek Homer Please

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5787006

Homer

Will the Real Greek Homer Please Stand Up?

Homer is the name by which the legendary Greek poet of great fame is known. He is credited with the Greek epics The Iliad and They Odyssey, as well as with the authorship of the mini-epic Batrachomyomachia, the corpus of the Homeric Hymns, and also the Margites. (Docu) Nothing about Homer's actual biographical information is known, (though he is commonly assumed to have been blind) and there are many theories that speculate Homer himself may have been completely mythological, or that he may have been more than one person. It is assumed, however, that Homer's works originated from the Greek settlements on the west coast of Asia Minor in the 9th century BC (Helenism), and several Ionian cities claim to be the birthplace of Homer. (Docu) Although Homer's works great works The Iliad and The Odyssey have shaped a great deal…… [Read More]

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Classical Drama

Words: 1531 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89972241

Love Got to Do With it: A Critical Analysis of Hippolytus and Lysistrata.

If one reads Hippolytus and Lysistrata, one may immediately conclude that love has 'nothing' to do with anything. Many Greek plays discuss the subject of love in obtuse ways. Love is often the driving force of Greek tragedies, thought to inspire, incite and even enrage in many cases. While love is an important concept and theme, it is not always presented in a positive light in many plays. This is certainly the case in Hippolytus and Lysistrata, which at best suggest that love is unnecessary or tragic.

Hippolytus written by Euripides does so remarkably well, suggesting that love is something that can not only be manipulated by the Gods, but also something that is less tangible in some cases than passion and lust.

Lysistrata, written by Aristophanes, puts sex and power on a pedestal above love suggesting…… [Read More]

References:

Seldes, G. (1930). "Aristophanes' Lysistrata: A new version." New York: Farrar &

Rinehart.

Sutherland, D. (1960). "Hippolytus in Drama and Myth: The Hippolytus of Euripides."

Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.
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Heroic Ideal Greece Rome an Analysis of

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49939858

Heroic Ideal Greece, ome

An Analysis of the Heroic Ideal from Ancient Greece to oman Empire

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece begins with Homer's Iliad, which balances the heroic figures of Achilles and Hector, two opposing warriors and men of honor, amidst a war on which not even the gods are in agreement. Hector and Achilles mirror one another in nobility and strength and both represent an ideal heroic archetype of citizenry -- men who do battle to honor both their countries and their names. To illustrate, however, the way the ideal of heroic citizenship changes from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism, it is necessary to leap ahead several centuries and survey the several different bodies of work.

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece somewhat continually dwells on the same themes with regard to heroic citizenship, whether in Homer or in the Golden Age…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aristophanes. (1973). Lysistrata/The Acharnians/The Clouds. Trans. Alan Sommerstein. NY: Penguin Classics, 1973.

Homer. (2008). The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. UK: Oxford University Press.
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Maladies Failed Saviors Sophocles' Oedipus

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94997440

Mr. Kapasi and the Dases are all Indian, but in the interpreter's eyes, Mr. And Mrs. Das are foreigners because they dress and speak like Americans. Mina Das sees Kapasi not as a romantic partner, as he desires her to see him as, but as a kind of romantic confessor, who will wash her clean of her sins, much as the citizens of Thebes see their king.

Eventually, when Oedipus' unintentional sin of marrying the queen of Thebes and killing the former king is revealed to the city, the citizens realize that Oedipus is not the great man they hoped he would become, and their illusions are shattered. Oedipus' own illusions about himself as a wise and saving figure of the city are shattered, as he must obey the banishment he laid down for the person who brought the plague upon the city. Mrs. Das must also come to terms…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lahiri, Jhumpa. "The Interpreter of Maladies." From the Interpreter of Maladies. New York: Mariner Books, 1999.

Sophocles. "Oedipus the King." Internet Classics Archive e-text. [3 Dec 2006] http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/mirror/classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/oedipus.html
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Society as if it Were

Words: 4861 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78890187

New scholarship suggests that Byzantine Empire was as successful as was ome in shaping modern Europe (Angelov, 2001).

Islamic Golden Age

The Islamic Golden Age (also called the Caliphate of Islam or the Islamic enaissance) was a center of government and political, cultural and religious traditions that arose in the early 6th century AD from the teachings of the Prophet Mohammed and reached its height between the 8th to 13th centuries (Kraemer, 1992). The Golden Age was centered around the Saudi Arabian peninsula. Its first capital was Media; at its greatest extent, the Caliphate controlled all of the present day Middle East, northern Africa and parts of Spain, and extending to the Indus Valley. It was thus one of the few empires that rules over three continents (Kennedy, 2001).

After the end of the classical empires of the Middle East (such as Egypt and Assyria) the region was politically and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

thinkquest.org. (1999). Retrieved March 27, 2010, from SPQR Online: http://library.thinkquest.org/26602/government.htm

Islam and Islamic History in Arabia and the Middle East. (2001). Retrieved March 28, 2010, from islamcity.com:  http://www.islamicity.com/mosque/ihame/Sec12.htm 

The European Voyages of Exploration. (2001). Retrieved April 5, 2010, from the Applied History Research Group:  http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/eurvoya/index.html 

Mummies and Mummification. (2003). Retrieved March 30, 2010, from Digital Egypt:  http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/mummy/ok.html
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Rhythm Dynamics Melody Harmony and

Words: 5737 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15065513

Beethoven uses choral voices in his 9th Symphony to produce a sound that no man-made instrument could produce. Beethoven is attempting to achieve the highest and most joyful sound in the final movement of the symphony and so therefore uses human voices to compel the listener to the rapturous heights that he wants them to witness.

or what might look at the importance of tone and key. n the 20th century, composers like Schoenberg wrote atonal music that made music sound fractured and splintered and, in a word, off. This effect allowed Schoenberg to artistically represent a world around him that seemed to be going off its head -- with war, loss of conviction, and devaluation. There seemed to be no real key to happiness, and so the earlier keys that were used by Bach are rejected here by Schoenberg.

6) Using the illustrations found throughout chapter five, name the…… [Read More]

It is likely that the people of Japan continue to perform and listen to their own folk tunes even today because their culture is more tied to their past than ours. America's history is relatively brief, and its inhabitants come from all over the world. America has been likened to a melting pot of cultures; therefore it is not surprising to find that it has no real connection to a folk music tradition.

Japan on the other hand has existed for many centuries and its people are rooted in their heritage. Their culture is part of their lives and defines who they are and how they live: their folk music is an expression of their past, which they continually look back upon and reflect upon. They have also been more isolated from the West: it is only relatively recently that Japanese society has begun to reflect the social conditions of the Western world. It has made the attempt to become industrialized and be a viable element in the world's economy. It manufactures a great deal of the West's goods. But still it knows its heritage, and Japanese people know that while they seemingly work for the West, they are not of the West. Their folk music tells them this.

American culture tends to look only toward the future: it rotates its Top 40 continuously and calls music "classic" that came out thirty years ago. It does not know its ancestry and were it told to it, it would likely balk at the revelation. Americans do not like to consider the culture from which they came: they are not supposed to think of culture. They are like the people in Orwell's 1984 -- controlled, manipulated, and coddled. History is re-written by those in power, and those in power do not want the citizens thinking for themselves. To do so might cause dissonance.
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The Island of Cyprus

Words: 3143 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12033344

Tourism takes a substantial place in the economy of Cyprus. Tourism has such an impact on Cyprus culture and daily life that the industry contributed 10.7% or US $5,445.0 mn of the GDP in 2006, allowing for job creation approximated at 113,000 jobs. (Micula and Micula) Thanks to consistent tourism, Cyprus has become the 40th most popular place to visit, inspiring almost 3 million tourists to come each year. Since 1975, Cyprus has been orld Tourism Organization full member and offers scenic views, high quality food, and ancient archaeological sites for any would-be traveler. (Micula and Micula) However, one thing makes Cyprus different from other destinations. That is the divide between Northern Cyprus and Southern Cyprus. This essay will detail how the difference in the north and south side contribute to tourism on the island and how it influences the busy tourism season and which activities promote more tourist engagement.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bowman, Jim. Narratives of Cyprus: Modern Travel Writing and Cultural Encounters Since Lawrence Durrell. I.B.Tauris, 2014.

Constandinides, Costas, and Yiannis Papadakis. Cypriot Cinemas: Memory, Conflict, and Identity in the Margins of Europe. Bloomsbury Academic, 2015.

Dubin, Marc, and Damien Morris. Cyprus. Rough Guides, 2002.

Frykman, Jonas, et al. A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe. Wiley-Blackwell, 2016.
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Shakespeare's Success as a Playwright

Words: 2400 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 12081360



hile Shakespeare attracted his fair share of criticism during his day, it is also clear that many of his contemporaries as well as the general public viewed Shakespeare's work in a positive light. For example, Callaghan (2004) points out that, "hile we do not know how much Shakespeare was paid for the plays he furnished his company, it is clear that the greatest part of the handsome fortune Shakespeare had started to amass as early as the 1590s came from his share in the profits of his company rather than from his plays" (405). This relative affluence apparently helped to provide a sort of comfort zone for Shakespeare that allowed him to write when and what he wanted and for whatever audience he desired in ways that contributed to his ultimate success as a playwright as well as the enduring qualities of his works. For instance, Callaghan adds that, "For…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Peter. Shakespeare's Life and Art. London: James Nisbet, 1939.

Blakeley, John. (2009). "Shakespearean Relocations: The Final Scene of John Madden's

Shakespeare in Love." Shakespeare Bulletin 27(2): 249-250.

Blayney, Peter W.M. The First Folio of Shakespeare. Washington, DC: Folger Shakespeare
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Oedipus Tyrannos in English the

Words: 1461 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53936726

Thus, Oedipus' reference to his cursed birth at what is very nearly the end of the play refers back to the very opening lines of the Argument by repeating the image of the prophesied birth, but this time the characters are seeing that image with the same clarity as the audience.

The cursed nature of Oedipus' marriage is highlighted by Jocasta's death, because after learning the truth about her and Oedipus' relationship, she goes "straight to her marriage-bed" and hangs herself there after lamenting "o'er the marriage-bed / here, fate-abhorred, a double brood she bare" (Sophocles 103). The repeated references to the marriage-bed included in the account of Jocasta's death fits within the plays larger focus on the conflation of familial roles, because the bed itself marks a physical location of this conflation; this bed is likely where Oedipus was conceived in the first place, and it marks the spot…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davis, Robert, and J.M. Walton. "Found in Translation: Greek Drama in English." Theatre

Survey 49.2 (2008): 299-301.

Sophocles. Oedipus the King. London: MacMillan & Company, 1885.
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Paul's Early Life Birth Upbringing and Early

Words: 1854 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94746152

Paul's Early Life (birth, Upbringing, And Early Education)

Paul's early life can be dated back from 1-33 A.D. His upbringing comprised of being born in Tarsus of Cilicia, where he was raised under another name, Saul. He was raised in a Jewish, strict household. Because Paul was Jewish, he received abbinic training in Jerusalem from abbi Gamaliel. As he received his training, he also learned the traditions of the Pharisees. Later on in this period, Paul worked with the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem as well as adopting the Sanhedrin policies. The Sanhedrin were in opposition of the church and so was Paul. Including Jewish culture, Paul received immersion into Hellenistic culture of the era, which meant he went to the gymnasium, attended Greek dramas at the Amphitheatre, and was knowledge on the various schools of Greek Philosophy. Gamaliel taught Paul the Scriptures including the traditional lessons of the Pharisees. This meant…… [Read More]

References

GCU Media,. (2014). Paul Timeline. Retrieved 16 December 2014, from  http://lc.gcumedia.com/bib380/documents/paul-timeline-map-v1.1.pdf 

Greg, P. (2014). Paul through Mediterranean eyes: cultural studies in 1 Corinthians. International Bulletin of Missionary Research, 38(3), 163-164.

Parable,. (2014). Life Application Study Bible. Retrieved 15 December 2014, from http://cdn-parable.com/content/preview/9780310434481.pdf

Polhill, J. (1999). Paul and his letters. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman.
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Hero in Popular Culture- One

Words: 2872 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47675589

Camera angles that focus on wretched faces, of young boys in red coated uniforms begging for mercy, and of the arrogance of the British officer corps, not just towards Americans, but towards their own enlisted men, are shown with filming skill. As might be expected for this type of film, John Williams' score was masterful and very much in line with the generation of epics from the 1950s and 1960s -- painting a realistic picture of the film without dialog. Similarly, the audience is set up between the idyllic farm and hard work of a widower in the opening scene to the juxtaposition and hoped for return to normalcy in the final moments -- however, knowing that things will never be as they were (See: http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=336714&contentTypeId=130&category=trailer). The scene, however, that most stays with the audience is not one of the grander battles, but a one-on-one battle between Benjamin and Tavington,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Bittarello, M.B. (2008). "Re-Crafting the Past: The Complex Relationship

Between Myth and Ritual." Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies. 10(2): 214.

TRAILERS and PREVIEWS

Brown, Todd. (2007). "Footage from Taras Bulba." Twitch. Cited in:
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Person and the Work of

Words: 3588 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90469447

It is this selfsame Holy Spirit that will serve to convict within the unbeliever and to work within that individual until that person comes to the point of opening the inner door for the Christ and then urging the same individual forth into fulfilling the 'Great Commission' of spreading Christ to the world. In the fulfillment of this commitment inclusive of "baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit" the three faces of God's person are revealed and authenticated. Just as when Jesus entered the waters to be baptized and entered into communion with God the Father and God the Son was baptized of the God the Holy Spirit in the Gospel of John is clearly characterized in the evidence provided by John of the words Jesus spoke.

This one book of the ible explains clearly to believers and followers of Christ that the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Wintz, Jack (2003) the Work of Pentecost Continues. Friar Jack's E-spirations. American Catholic 26 June 2003. Online available at  http://www.americancatholic.org/e-News/FriarJack/fj062603.asp 

Piper, John (1981) That Which is Born of the Spirit is Spirit. The Role of the Holy Spirit in Conversion. 22 Feb 1981 Resource Library - desiring God. Online available at  http://www.desiringgod.org/ResourceLibrary/Sermons/ByDate/1981/284_That_Which_Is_Born_of_the_Spirit_Is_Spirit/ 

Step-by-Step with the Bible (Nd) Online available at  http://www.mbay.net/~jmejia/chapt32.htm .

Pentecost Sunday Gospel St. John 14: 23-31 (nd) Laselle.org Online available at  http://www.lasalle.org/English/Resources/Publications/PDF/WritingsJBDLS/Med43.pdf .
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Arthur Penn's Classic 1967 Film

Words: 315 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23959025



Through the characters of Bonnie and Clyde, the filmmakers present and critique the social values of 1930s merica. Issues related to anti-trust legislation and monopolies were important at this time, especially as they related to the stock market crash and the Great Depression. It is against this bleak economic and social backdrop that Bonnie and Clyde commit their crimes. The anti-establishment worldview of the title characters also corresponds with 1930s ideologies. Communism and socialism were becoming viable alternatives to capitalism. lthough robbing banks is not the hallmark of communism, Bonnie and Clyde do share the ethical viewpoint that would cause them to view banks as faceless, impersonal institutions. Finally, the film Bonnie and Clyde pays homage to the burgeoning business of organized crime that flourished during the early 20th century in…… [Read More]

Arthur Penn's classic 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde relays the true story of a gangster couple whose foray into bank heists turns sour and deadly. Although the title characters are clearly criminals who deviate from normative behavior in many ways, Bonnie and Clyde are heroes. The couple is depicted in a way that helps the audience sympathize with them, and therefore root for them throughout the film even as their plans go awry. Bonnie and Clyde share traits in common with the heroes in classical Greek drama.

For example, both Bonnie and Clyde suffer from a great deal of hubris and this tragic flaw causes them to fail at key moments. A hero is not necessarily an unambiguously benevolent character but rather, a multidimensional one. In fact, Bonnie and Clyde do not intend to use violence. Their tragic flaws led them astray from their true goals, the way Oedipus and other classic heroes also fail. Bonnie and Clyde are also depicted as heroes in the way their relationship deepens, because the audience wants them to succeed not just as individuals but as a couple.

Through the characters of Bonnie and Clyde, the filmmakers present and critique the social values of 1930s America. Issues related to anti-trust legislation and monopolies were important at this time, especially as they related to the stock market crash and the Great Depression. It is against this bleak economic and social backdrop that Bonnie and Clyde commit their crimes. The anti-establishment worldview of the title characters also corresponds with 1930s ideologies. Communism and socialism were becoming viable alternatives to capitalism. Although robbing banks is not the hallmark of communism, Bonnie and Clyde do share the ethical viewpoint that would cause them to view banks as faceless, impersonal institutions. Finally, the film Bonnie and Clyde pays homage to the burgeoning business of organized crime that flourished during the early 20th century in America.
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Parental Violence Toward Children

Words: 2152 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38688584

killing of a child in real life has no symbolic meaning, no power other than that of an expression of evil and is, therefore, one of the worst acts a human, let alone a parent, can commit. In literature, however, the killing of children is symbolic of a diseased mind or of a diseased culture. Euripides' Medea kills her children, but she is a symbol of Mother Earth, of the Gods, and of nature all of which can exert, with no warning and no necessity of explanation, a death upon any or all of us. That which we are given can be taken away. The killing of a child in literature is, in some contexts, a symbolic reminder of the seeming arbitrariness of nature. While some critics interpret Medea as being a proactive population reducer, she can be rightly understood as a sick woman who, like the animals that eat…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Mark, David and Dubowitz, Howard. "Fathers and Child Neglect." AMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. May 17, 2000 v283 i19 p2505. Online. Internet. CD-ROM Database: Infotrac.

Mark and Dubowitz provide a keen insight into the role of fathers as the primary source of child abuse through neglect. The authors observe that the majority of single-parent homes are run by women because the father/husband has abandoned his duties. As abandonment is a key factor in analysis of Medea's motivations for murdering her children, this article provides modern examples of Jason's behaviors.

Crimmins, Susan; Langley, Sandra; Brownstein, Henry; Spunt, Barry. "Convicted women who have killed children: A Self-Psychology Perspective." Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Feb, 1997. v12. n1. p49(21). Online. Internet. CD-ROM Database: Infotrac.

The authors of this study found a prevalence of damaged psyches and significant mental problems in women convicted of killing their children. The extent that these self-damage indicators interfered with the women's ability to parent children is discussed. Links between these self-damage experiences and the homicide and explored.
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Close Is Too Close What Is Wrong

Words: 2098 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23157076

Close is Too Close: What is Wrong with Incest?

This paper outlines incest as a social taboo with reference to the Jewish, Native American, and Malagasy cultures and identifies what is wrong with the practice of incest. It has 7 sources.

Definition of Incest

Incest or the sexual relations between persons to whom marriage is prohibited by custom or law because of close kingship [Kottak 2002] is a social phenomenon that differ from culture to culture and by definition too they differentiate from one group to the next. The reason being that customs, traditions and cultures all vary due to the accepted norms as well as religion found in these groups and hence the prohibition or the allowance for people to marry siblings differs greatly. Inter-marriage to close relatives in the American culture for instance is considered taboo while in the Jewish it is considered compulsory. What triggers such social…… [Read More]

References

Sander L. Gilman Sibling incest, madness, and the "Jews." Social Research Summer, 1998.

J. Shepher, Incest: A Biosocial View, New York: Academic, 1983.

Kottak, Conrad P. Cultural Anthropology, 9/e University of Michigan, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2002.

Williams, Walter L. The Spirit and the Flesh, Sexual Diversity in the American Indian Culture. Boston: Beacon Press, 1986.
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Compare and Contrast Athens and Sparta

Words: 353 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4021842

Greek Studies

Athens and Sparta

Athens and Sparta existed during the same time in history, and did share some core social and cultural values, but for the most part, they were quite different. Perhaps the biggest difference between the two cultures was Sparta's almost exclusive reliance on a military culture. Afraid of slave uprisings (because one had already occurred), they began military training for their young boys at the tender age of seven, and instilled the belief that the ultimate act of bravery for a warrior was to fight and die in defense of their city.

Sparta dominated the land by warfare and with agriculture, while Athens was a better-blended society. They had a large sea force, and were a commercial and trade center for the area. They had more interests and influence in the ancient world, and because their society was more advanced, they began to develop a more…… [Read More]

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Death of a Salesman as a Tragedy as Defined by Aristotle

Words: 2818 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76605001

drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Brief overview of the play

Miller's work

Story

Characters

Obstacles

Argument for tragedy

Aristotle's definition

Pro argument for tragedy

Con argument against tragedy

Own conclusions

What the critics say

Death of a Salesman as Tragedy

This paper analyzes the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller. Specifically, it discusses the definition of tragedy by Aristotle, and research if it is correct to label the play as a tragedy.

Death of a Salesman is indeed a tragedy of epic proportions. The drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Arthur Miller wrote Death of a Salesman in 1948,…… [Read More]

References

Adamczewski, Zygmunt. The Tragic Protest. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1963.

Amsden, Robert. "Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy." Ripon College. 2002. 29 Aug. 2005.

<  http://www.ripon.edu/Faculty/Amsdenr/THE231/GreekTheatreFolder/AristotlePage.html#3 

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
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Homer's Life and Epics and Their Effect and Contribution to Western Civilization

Words: 2309 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16156867

Homer was a legendary Greek poet who is traditionally credited as the author of the major Greek epics the "Iliad and the Odyssey," as well as the comic mini-epic "Batracholmyomachia" (The Frog-Mouse ar), the corpus of Homeric Hymns, and various other lost or fragmentary workd such as "Margites" (Homer pp). Some ancient authors credited him with the entire Epic Cycle, which included other poems about the Trojan ar as well as the Theban poems concerning Oedipus and his sons (Homer pp). According to legend, Homer was blind, and aside from several Ionian cities claiming to be his birthplace, there is nothing else known about him (Homer pp). Aristotle and Pindar believed that Homer was born in Smyrna, on the coast of modern-day Turkey, and enjoyed years of fame on the Aegean island of Chios (Tolson pp). Although the great scholar-librarians of Alexandria scrutinized the epics for historical and geographic errors,…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Tolson, Jay. "Was Homer a solo act or a bevy of bards?"

U.S. News & World Report; 7/24/2000; Tolson, Jay

Boorstin, Daniel J. "The reign of the spoken word; Homer spun epics that survived while marble temples fell to ruin." U.S. News & World Report; 8/31/1992; pp.

Due, Casey. "Homer and the Papyri: Center of Hellenic Studies."
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Achilles the Hero Without Doubt

Words: 1625 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12765227

He is described as being of gigantic size and of tremendous emotion. Always Achilles is described with the most exaggerated terms, shining like the sun or falling in the most absolute wretchedness. In a moment of sublimity oddly precognizant of gothic writers like E.A. Poe, Achilles refuses to bury his beloved Patrocles' body because "since I'm journeying under the earth after you, I'll postpone your burial...Till that time, you'll lie like this with me..." (book 18, 330-338) Achilles is perfect and heroic in the extremity of his nature. A more archetypal approach would say that he was heroic because, more than any other character, he represented the purity of war. Archtypically, he represents a purity of action and emotion than can drive men to battle, the pure warrior who is at once filled with the strength of emotion and will and yet resigned to perfect destiny, faithful towards the gods,…… [Read More]

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Kazantzakis Freedom or Death Captain Michalis the

Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 14217339

Kazantzakis Freedom or Death

Captain Michalis, the hero of Freedom or Death, was based on Kazantzakis' father Michalis, a traditional Cretan community leader and warrior in the independence struggles who fought in the 1888-89 rebellion. He also introduces the Captain's best friend Nuri Bey and his wife Emine, who he also loves, but in the end he rejects them both in the cause of Cretan independence. The Pasha and the Metropolitan also symbolize the ancient clash of religions, cultures and civilizations that is fought out in this novel -- Greek vs. Turk, Christian vs. Muslim -- which also resonates with the contemporary word and the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. These ethnic, tribal and nationalistic hatreds are so great and so enduring that they crowd out all romance, friendship or personal feelings, as all the characters join in the bloodbath. Only Nuri Bey commits suicide rather than go to war…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Kazantzakis, Nikos. Freedom or Death. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1983.
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Captive Greece

Words: 451 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20755957

Greeks in Western Civilization. There are five references used for this paper.

It is felt that 'Captive Greece made ome captive'. It is important to examine what is meant by this belief in terms of literature, art and philosophy.

Two Captive Countries

When ome conquered the Levant at the end of the Hellenistic era, and "ruled the civilized world, conquered Greece took captive her rude conqueror (Gutzman, 2004)." The poet Horace noted that "the omans conquered Greece only themselves to be enslaved by the superior culture of their captives (Morris, 2002)."

During the era of the "poets Homer and Hesiod, the ancient Greeks associated their polytheistic, anthropomorphic deities with their cities, states, and regions (Matthews, 2000)." The Greeks often symbolized cities on coins with a god or goddess on one side, and their representation on the other. An example of this was the representation of Athens with Athena and her…… [Read More]

References

Gutzman, Kevin R.C. 01 January, 2004. "The Metropolis of Ancient Egypt. (Alexandria:

City of the Western Mind). Modern Age.

Hegel, G.W.F. 01 January, 1992. "Philosophy of History: Rome From the Second Punic

War to the Emperors. History of the World.
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Athens and Sparta Were the Two Opponents

Words: 1617 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88823958

Athens and Sparta were the two opponents of ancient Greece that clattered most and bestowed us with the majority of customs and traditions. Despite the fact that the two poleis were close together geographically, both differed greatly in their values and ways of living1.

Athens and Sparta: History

The enriching, intellectual and artistic heritage of ancient Athens to the world is immense and immeasurable. The indications to the Greek legacy that flourish in the civilization of Western Europe are attributed to Athenian civilization. Athens was made the strongest Greek city-state after the Persian Wars. Though it was a good deal smaller and less dominant than Sparta at the beginning of the wars, Athens was more energetic, efficient and effectual in the warfare against Persian Empire. Miltiades, Themistocles, and Cimon were the Athenian heroes who were mainly responsible for making the city strong. Athens reached the pinnacle of its cultural and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. "Athens and Sparta: Different Yet the Same." Social Studies for Kids. [database online]; available from  http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/worldhistory/athenssparta.htm ; Internet; accessed 22 July 2012.

2. The Columbia Encyclopedia 6th ed., s.v."Athens, City, Greece" [database online]; available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117004302 ; Internet; accessed 22 July 2012.

3. The Columbia Encyclopedia 6th ed., s.v."Sparta" [database online]; available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117046808 ; Internet; accessed 22 July 2012.

4. Solanki, P. 2012. "Sparta Vs. Athens." Buzzle. [database online]; available from  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/sparta-vs.-athens.html ; Internet; accessed 22 July 2012.
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Myth it Has Been Stated That There

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63305000

Myth

It has been stated that there are only seven real story lines, upon which all literature is based. Whether or not this is true, modern literature often echoes myths or legends of long ago. Sometimes, the recycling of a tale is blatant, and other times it is subtle. William Shakespeare regularly made use of Greek myths, and folklore. In the play, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," Shakespeare's premise is that Theseus, the Duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, a warrior he has captured, are to be married. Shakespeare has successfully created a plotline based, if only loosely, on the greek myths of Theseus and Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons.

The myth of Theseus is one of the most popular of the Greek myths. There are many different stories that involve Theseus, but perhaps the most famous is the story of how Theseus killed the Minotaur. The greeks understood the myth in…… [Read More]

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Homer the Eternal Cycle of

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26315712

Achilles, in effort to match his personal loss on a national level, strives to kill Hector, again fueling the economy of revenge, but this time in a far more 'high stakes' manner. Now, the loss of a man will result in the loss of Troy's greatest warrior. But even though Achilles emerges victorious from this struggle, his is an empty victory. He knows that his own death will follow shortly after the death of Hector. He does not care; revenge means everything to him in the heat of the moment, just like sacrificing the Greek advantage was worth upholding his honor at the beginning of the poem.

Although Achilles' sudden loyalty to his friend may seem honorable to some degree, perhaps more honorable than Menelaus' obsession with Helen, it also shows how the dynamic of loss leading to more and greater losses has spiraled out of control. The one real…… [Read More]

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Philip II and the Growth

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 47374289

Overall, Philip's main goal was to create a united Macedonia and thus instill in his people the desire to bring about the collapse of the Persian Empire which in his eyes would bring about much-needed economic changes in Macedonian society, all for the good of its citizens and its king.

One of Philip's most important triumphs as king of Macedonia prior to the rise of Alexander the Great was the creation of the League of Corinth which came about after the battle of Chaeronea in oeotia in 338 .C.E. Although the defeated Greek states were allowed to keep their internal freedoms, they were compelled by Philip to join his alliance with himself as its undisputed leader. The creation of this league was a decisive turning point in the history of ancient Greece, for never again would Greek states be allowed to make their own foreign policies without considering the wishes…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ginouves, Rene. Macedonia: From Philip II to the Roman Conquest. NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994.

Parker, Geoffrey. The Grand Strategy of Philip II. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press,

Philip II of Macedon Biography." History of Macedonia. 2003. Internet. Retrieved November 10, 2008 at http://www.historyofmacedonia.org/AncientMacedoniaPhilipofMacedon.html.
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Alexander the Great Books on

Words: 1442 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 88216034

Hamilton notes the biographies of Alexander often reflected the backgrounds of authors who wrote about him. For example, Sir William Tarn, a Scottish gentleman of the ritish imperial era, characterized Alexander as a chivalrous Greek gentleman with a missionary zeal to spread Greek civilization. In contrast, Fritz Schachermeyr, a German historian who had experienced the rise and fall of the Nazi Germany, described Alexander as a ruthless and cruel ruler, indulged "in deceit and treachery to gain his ends, as a 'Titanic' figure aiming at the conquest of the world."

oth Tarn and Schachermeyr are among the great modern historians of Alexander but even they could not escape personal biases.

The irony of Hamilton's book is that, although he is at pains in his discussion of the difficulty of writing about Alexander and is critical of biased historians, the book starts with a straightforward admission of a bias. Rejecting the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Freeman, Philip. Alexander the Great. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2009.

Hamilton, J.R. Alexander the Great. Pittsburg: The University of Pittsburg Press, 1974.

Philip Freeman, Alexander the Great (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2009), p. xxii.

Ibid, p. 323.
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Alexander the Great There Is

Words: 7146 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79048295

Instead, while under false arrest and retreating from the Macedonians, Darius was killed by one of his subjects.

ecause the battle at Gaugamela marked the turning point in the battle between the Macedonians and the Achaemenids, it is clear that if Darius was to have been able to defeat Alexander and his troops, he would have needed to do so before the battle at Gaugamela. Therefore, it is important to look at the opportunities that Darius had to attack Alexander and his troops prior to that battle. Looking at those opportunities, it becomes clear that Darius' best chance to defeat Alexander's army would have been to attack Alexander before he had the chance to gain the support of the Greek city-states. To do that in the most successful manner, Darius would have needed to attack the armies of Parmenion and Attalus. This would have permitted Darius to defeat Alexander before…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Darius III," The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. 2005. New York: Columbia University Press. Online. Available from Bartleby.com  http://www.bartleby.com/65/da/Darius3.html , Accessed June 5, 2006.

The Columbia Encyclopedia is an encyclopedia published by Columbia University and is among the most complete encyclopedias ever produced.

Darius III," Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2006. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. Online.

Available from Encyclopaedia Britannica Premium Service
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Hector vs Achilles the Noblest

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29420096

War is a fact of life, a terrible fact of life, but when it is willed by the gods it cannot be ignored.

Achilles does have some positive moral characteristics: although he spends much of the Iliad retreating from the fighting, he is clearly not a coward, in contrast to the Trojan Paris. He wants to fight, but his honor is too bruised. Furthermore, Achilles harbors a deep and abiding affection for his friend Patroclus, and the Greeks idealized this type of male friendship often more than husband-wife relationships. When Hector kills Patroclus in battle, because he believes him to be Achilles, Achilles is thrown into a frenzy of grief. He puts aside the slight done to him by Agamemnon, and vows to kill Hector.

Still, unlike Hector, who is repeatedly shown rallying the Trojans to fight in more glorious ways through his wise leadership, Achilles' bravery is often emotional,…… [Read More]

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El Cid

Words: 2309 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83770183

El Cid was a courageous and brave knight, who was born in Burgos in circa 1040, and was, during his lifetime, a great and popular hero. He was given the title of 'seid' or 'cid', which meant 'Lord' or 'Chief', by the Moors, and also that of 'Campeador' or 'Champion' by his own admiring countrymen. Unfortunately, tradition and legend have competed with one another through time, to such an extent that today, the real problem is that one must indeed regard him as a sort of a 'dual personality', wherein doubts have been cast over whether he really existed, or whether he was just a figment of the imagination. However, there is no doubt at all that this person actually existed in real life, and that he was a true hero of his times. One must distinguish this person from the historical Cid and the legendary Cid. (New Advent, El…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, Richard. Spanking and Occentricity, some psychological consequences of the Greek ideal in the Construction of Westernness. Retrieved From

 http://www.apaclassics.org/AnnualMeeting/06mtg/abstracts/armstrong.pdf 

Accessed 24 September, 2005

El Cid in Literature, Film and other Media. Retrieved From
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Histories by Herodotus

Words: 1178 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98763112

Histories of Herodotus

In his Histories, which chronicles the historical aspects of ancient Greece, Egypt and other regions of Asia Minor, Herodotus focuses in the beginning on the myths associated with these cultures and civilizations from his own distant past which at the time had acquired some relevance based on what was viewed as historical truth. Some of these myths, which now through archeological evidence may have some basis in fact, include the abduction of Io by the Phoenicians, the retaliation of the Greeks by kidnapping Europa, the abduction of Helen from Sparta by Paris and the consequences which resulted in the Trojan War.

Following this, Herodotus examines the activities and consequences of more recent historical myths associated with the cultures of the Lydians, the Egyptians, the Scythians and the Persians, all of which are interspersed with so-called dialogue spoken by the leading figures of these cultures. However, Herodotus' ability…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Rawlinson, George, Trans. Herodotus: Histories. UK: QPD, 1997.
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Philips II the Macedonian King Focuses on

Words: 1322 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85699847

Philips II the Macedonian King focuses on how Philip II expanded the Macedonian empire. This paper also gives a brief background of Philip II before he inherited the thrown. This paper highlights how the Macedonian leader entered Athens and conquered it through his tactics and strategy. The paper also gives a brief account of all the battles fought by Philip II's army and how he played a great role in the evolution of his battalion.

Philips II, The Macedonian King

Philip II, the most significant compatriot and general of his era formed the establishment of the most powerful military, which conquered most of the regions of the Mediterranean, Southern Europe and the Middle East. His great tactics, strenuous strategies, rearrangement of his army and utilization of the heavy phalanx formation transformed him into the master of Greece.

One of the greatest empires of the world ever formed, The Macedonian Empire…… [Read More]

Works Cited

N. Hammond. A History of Greece. Cambridge Ancient History. Vols. I-VI. 1991.

Simon H. The Greek World, 479-323 BC. Third Edition. Paperback Publisher. 2002.
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Formation of Ancient Societies the

Words: 2084 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91389503

Both Spartan men and women exercised together in the nude, and both were "encouraged to improve their intellectual skills" ("omen in Ancient Greece"). Being a woman in Sparta certainly ensured a greater sense of gender equality -- but that does not necessarily mean Sparta was the preferred residence of women in Greece. After all, Sparta did without a lot of the creature comforts that other city-states like Athens took for granted as essential to civilization. There is a reason the phrase "Spartan living" has come to be synonymous with the bare necessities.

As for variance in the social structure of the various states, democracy prevailed in Athens for a time (but so did tyranny and corruption as well). Thebes also had its monarchy and later on its heroic warrior citizens. Sparta had two kings who ruled simultaneously. But its social structure was also more slave-based than anywhere else. In fact,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Rome. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnston, Sarah. Religions of the Ancient World. Harvard University Press, 2004.

Kyziridis, Theocharis. "Notes on the History of Schizophrenia." German Journal of Psychiatry, vol 8, 42-48, 2005.

Sikora, Jack. Religions of India. Lincoln, NE: Writer's Club Press, 2002.
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Polybius Historian and Politician

Words: 3811 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 82435874

Polybius: Historian and Politician

Louis XIV

The histories written by Polybius are considered to be essential from historiographic perspective as it gives detailed and comprehensive picture and understanding of the Hellenistic world. His work on the rise and fall of the Roman Empire are considered to be one of the most important and significant works in the field of classical history.[footnoteRef:1] The aim of this research is to investigate and study the historical settings in which Polybius had penned down his most famous work, the Histories in the lights of broad and diverse academic resources. The analysis would be beneficial in understanding the political and social constraints responsible for influencing his work and furthermore, the opinion of his contemporaries and the reception got from critics when Polybius work was completed. [1: ulloch, A.W., Gruen, E.S., Long, A.A. And Stewart, A. (eds.) (1993) Images and Ideologies: Self-Definition in the Hellenistic World,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bulloch, A.W., Gruen, E.S., Long, A.A. And Stewart, A. (eds.) (1993) Images and Ideologies: Self-Definition in the Hellenistic World, Berkeley-Los AngelesLondon

Clarke, K. (1999a) Between Geography and History: Hellenistic Reconstructions of the Roman World, Oxford

Clarke, K. (1999b) 'Unusual perspectives in historiography', in C.S. Kraus, ed., The Limits of Historiography: Genre and Narrative in Ancient Historical Texts (Leiden-Boston-Cologne) 249 -- 79

Collatz, C.F., Helms, H. And Schafer, M. (2000) Polybios-Lexikon, Band I, Lieferung I (?-), 2nd edn, Berlin
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Is Peace Possible

Words: 1394 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43940170

Peace Possible in the Modern World?

Is peace possible in the world as we know it today? One side of the human brain, if idealistic, might reply: "Certainly peace is possible, even perpetual peace, but it is possible only if visionary, bold and intelligent leadership emerges in key international places." The other side of the brain could well answer like this: "Are you kidding? There are too many terrorists, and too many greedy, power-crazed nationalist leaders pushing and shoving and developing weapons to ever expect a peaceful world." And meanwhile, what did some of the great thinkers and philosophers have to say about the prospects of peace?

THUCYDIDES: Thucydides, in writing about the Peloponnesian War, makes it clear that human nature tends to dictate how history plays itself out, and he does not blame the Gods or other forces for this war. Thucydides, who is a young man, and an…… [Read More]

Reference

Brown, Chris, Nardin, Terry, and Rengger, Nicholas. International Relations in Political

Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War. Cambridge, UK:

Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Thucydides, "History of the Peloponnesian War," in International Relations in Political Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War, ed. Chris Brown, Terry Nardin, Nicholas Rengger (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 38.
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Hebraism and Hellenism the Old Debate Between

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81105471

Hebraism and Hellenism

The old debate between the values of so-called 'Hebraism' and 'Hellenism' is manifest in our culture today. Hebraism, according to the Victorian scholar Matthew Arnold is defined as putting 'right doing' over 'right knowing.' Hellenism, in the spirit of the ancient Greeks, emphasizes the need to understand the world: "to see things as they really are" (Drake 2001). This can be seen in our modern debate over teaching evolution in schools. People who take a literal view of the Bible are less concerned about scientific truth and are more worried about the implications of teaching a theory of the origin of life that denies God's moral influence upon human existence. The Hellenistic mindset stresses the need to teach a scientifically-accepted theory to educate the young and advance human progress and insight.

A different view of the Hebraism vs. Hellenistic mindset can be seen as early as the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Designer arcade." March 2, 2011.

 http://www.designarcade.in/showcase/listing_products.php?id=1545 

Drake, Alfred J. "Hebraism and Hellenism." The Victorian Web. Updated December 2001.

March 2, 2011.  http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/arnold/writings/4.html
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Ancient Societies and Their Philosophies

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 10485778

This was true for example in the northern countries of Europe where Protestantism had firmly embedded itself an thrown off Church teaching. ars were the result as the Holy Roman Empire attempted to put down the Protestant Rebellions -- but the Peace of estphalia in 1648 finally and politically gave the Protestant countries in the north of Europe the right to exercise their new religions. Humanism, indeed, was spreading as a result of the Renaissance and many societies were willing to adopt it.

orks Cited

Bennett, Judith. Queens, hores and Maidens: omen in Chaucer's England.

University of London. 5 March 2002. Royal Halloway, Hayes Robinson Lecture Series No. 6. eb. 23 March 2011.

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Greece. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003.

Jusserand, J.J. English ayfaring Life in the Middle Ages. Chatham, UK: &J Mackay & Co. Ltd., 1950.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett, Judith. Queens, Whores and Maidens: Women in Chaucer's England.

University of London. 5 March 2002. Royal Halloway, Hayes Robinson Lecture Series No. 6. Web. 23 March 2011.

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Greece. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003.
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Perceived Superiority of Modern Western Civilization Is

Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28741881

perceived superiority of modern Western civilization is unfounded. There is little evidence to suggest that our cultures are any more advanced than the ancient cultures of the Fertile Crescent, Greece, or Rome. The argument for a linear progression or an evolution of civilization can be countered by evidence to the contrary in areas as diverse as science, politics, philosophy, art, and architecture. Although definite improvements have been made in women's rights, forced labor, and governmental systems, for instance, the accomplishments of ancient cultures rival our own. They may not have possessed microchips or jet engines in ancient Athens, but they did create the structures upon which we base our society today. We are still reaping the rewards that ancient civilizations sowed millennia ago. In fact, Mesopotamia, Sumeria, Babylon, Egypt, Assyria, Israel, Greece, and Rome comprise the beginnings of Western civilization.

Ancient civilizations possessed a remarkable understanding of nature and the…… [Read More]

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Owns Past Who Define Past Means Today

Words: 316 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71261789

owns" past? Who define past means today? This assignment

The controversy regarding the Parthenon Marbles began when Elgin, an English ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, removed a number of marble details of figures that originally decorated the famed Greek Parthenon in the final centuries of the last millennium. Elgin did so at his own personal expense; beforehand he had asked the British government if it desired for him to appropriate or even render facsimiles of art found at the monument and it declined. Originally Elgin was supposed to merely produce facsimiles of these works. However, he then found out that portions of the Parthenon were actually being destroyed and converted into material for building, at which point he decided to simply remove the marbles that he had originally intended on replicating. Since the Parthenon was on the grounds of the Ottoman Empire, Elgin required permission from the empire to both…… [Read More]

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Myths What Are the Five

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56062775



Compare and contrast two other Olympic deities with the story of Zeus. Discuss and elaborate in your answer how these gods interact with Zeus and why the stories about their origins are important to our understanding of Greek mythology

Zeus overtook and destroyed his father, the Titan Cronos -- but was nearly destroyed by the birth of his own daughter, Athena. Zeus, fearing that her mother Metis would become wiser than himself, ate his lover while she was pregnant, and Athena was born from Zeus' skull, fully formed. Zeus proved his ability to 'give birth,' thus showing his greatness as a god, and Athena gained her unique status, having been entirely mentally generated by a male, although female in appearance. Unlike the other deities of Olympus, she seldom had conflicts with Zeus, as Zeus seemed to respect her wisdom.

Zeus also had another special relationship with Hermes, another of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ganz, Timothy. (2009). Early Greek Myth. Excerpted at About.com March 20, 2009 at  http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/grecoromanmyth1/a/hesiodagesofman.htm
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Western Civ Athens and Sparta

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81078631

Moreover, the empire was politically as well as geographically fragmented. Macedonian rule was tolerated only as long as Alexander remained alive.

3. The reasons civilizations developed with particular robustness in the Near East can be narrowed down to geography and the migratory patterns of early humans. Known as the Fertile Crescent, the Eastern Mediterranean offered arable land complete with a plethora of indigenous flora and fauna for domestication and cultivation. Moreover, animal domestication flourished in the Near East. Agriculture and animal husbandry necessitated the rise of early cities, whereas in less fertile regions hunting and gathering remained more productive means to procure food. Early humans, traveling from the African subcontinent, naturally found the Fertile Crescent a suitable place for developing permanent settlements. As disparate groups settled throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, geography also permitted the ready trade of goods, people, and ideas. The sea and a location close to East Asia…… [Read More]

References

Ancient History Timeline." Thinkquest. Retrieved Feb 11, 2007 at http://library.thinkquest.org/10805/timeline.html

Hooker, R. (1996). "Sparta." Retrieved Feb 11, 2007 at  http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/GREECE/SPARTA.htm 

Hooker, R. (1996). "Athens." Retrieved Feb 11, 2007 at  http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/GREECE/ATHENS.htm 

Kings Rulers Emperors Dictators Tyrants and Military Leaders" About.com  http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/rulersleaderskings/Kings_Rulers_Emperors_Dictators_Tyrants_and_Military_Leaders.htm
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Cycladic Female Figure Many Ancient

Words: 1050 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 4893072

).

The Cycladic Female Figurine- Most of the Cycladic sculptures are similar in tone to many of the Stone Age pieces found in the Aegean, Near East and Western Europe. They represent nude women with their arms folded across their abdomens. They have been found in many sizes ranging from a few inches to almost life-size, in graves, settlements, and even in places suggesting idolatry or religious activities. However, some modern scholars think that the term figurines or idols is not really correct. Idols imply a religious function that has not been confirmed and figurines do not fit with some of the larger figures. However, because of the distribution of these pieces of art, we can tell they were popular among the people of Crete and Mainland Greece as well; and their distribution suggests they were produced not just for the wealthy, but had a broader appeal (Doumas, 1969).

The…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Female Figure. (2008). Learner.org. Retrieved from:  http://www.learner.org/courses  / globalart/work/139/index.html

Doumas, C. (1969). Early Cycladic Art. New York: Praeger Publishers.

Gimbutas, M. (1991). The Language of the Goddess. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Higgins, R. (1967). Minoan and Mycenaean Art. New York: Thames and Hudson.
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Carthage Empire the Origin of the Carthaginian

Words: 1224 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 23588394

Carthage Empire

The origin of the Carthaginian Empire can be traced back to 814 C, North Africa where Carthage was situated towards the east of Lake Tunis where we can locate Tunisia today. Carthage was basically founded by Phoenician settlers which came from Tyre city which is now known as Sur in Lebanon. Queen Dido was credited with being the founder of this city and since the establishment of this empire; there are numerous myths that can be traced back to the association with Romans and Greeks, essentially their literature (owman).

Success of the Carthage Empire

The Carthage city was famous for trade and that proved to be the means of their survival and helped the Carthaginians gain massive amounts of power and spreading the trade routes and networking all along the Mediterranean. In the early 6th century C, Hanno, a famous Carthaginian explorer went on his trip sailing till…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bagnall, Nigel. The Punic Wars: Rome, Carthage, and the struggle for the mediterranean. Hutchinson Publishers, 2005.

Bowman, David. The Carthaginian Empire. Bluewood Publishing Limited, 2010.

Durham, David Anthony. Pride of the Carthage. Anchor Publishers, 2006.

Goldsworthy, Adrian. The Punic Wars. Cassell Publishers, 2001.