Greek Artifacts the Civilization of Term Paper

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Also, this carving is quite sentimental in appearance, for it reflects "the solemn pathos of the Greek citizen, much like some of the sculptures found on the pediment of the Parthenon" (Seyffert, 245).

Our last artifact is titled Pair of Armbands with Triton and Tritoness Holding Erotes, made in the Hellenistic period, circa 200 B.C.E. These jewelry objects were apparently designed for a woman of high Greek culture, for they are made from solid gold and are fashioned in the shape of two loosely-coiled snakes or serpents. Whomever designed these intricate and beautiful objects realized the special properties of gold, for the woman lucky enough to wear these could easily slip her arms through the loops, due to the malleability of solid gold. The two figures located at the tops of each piece are representations of Triton and Tritoness, most closely associated with the Greek god of the sea Poseidon.

As Seyffert points out, Poseidon who "ruled over the sea and all its gods and all its creatures," had a son named Triton which may be related to an object known by the same name with three upright prongs attached to a long handle, often used for fishing by ancient Greeks. Also, as Homer mentions in one of this lesser-known poems called the "Helice," Poseidon, "on leaving his palace, is clad in a golden robe and wields in his hand a golden whip, while he stands in a chariot drawn by swift-footed steeds wit hooves of gold... "(506). Obviously, the creator of these exquisite pieces of jewelry fashioned them in gold in honor of Poseidon and his son Triton. Also, Tritoness may indicate that the female figure is the wife of Triton, due to both figures holding infants in their arms.

Thus, these artifacts illustrate the cultural and social heritage of ancient Greece as one of the most important Western civilizations of all time. They also prove that the ancient Greeks were superb artisans who always attempted to reveal the intricacies of Greek culture through their work, whether in the form of a simple vase for holding wine or the highly-detailed beauty of a pair of armbands meant to adorn the smooth arms of a Grecian lady.

Bibliography

New Greek and Roman Galleries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Internet. 2007.

Retrieved at http://www.metmuseum.org/special/greek_roman/images.asp.

Seyffert, Oskar. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Religion, Literature and Art.

New York: Gramercy Books, 1995.

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

New Greek and Roman Galleries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Internet. 2007.

Retrieved at http://www.metmuseum.org/special/greek_roman/images.asp.

Seyffert, Oskar. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Religion, Literature and Art.

New York: Gramercy Books, 1995.

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