Grieving Essays (Examples)

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Stages of Grief in Books

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77819425

Grieving in Literary Works

Wolterstorff is able to find joy after his loss in more than one way. Specifically, the author was actually able to transition through the various stages of grieving as outlined by Elisabeth Kubler-oss. Those stages include denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and understanding (Ferrini and Ferrini, 2008). Towards the end of the book, for instance, it is clear that he is able to arrive at an understanding of the entire significance of the death of his son and in that understanding he is able to once more experience joy. That understanding, of course, has a lot to do with his faith as a Christian as much as his ability to transition through the aforementioned five stages. It is pivotal to understand that the evolution of an individual through each of these five stages is not linear, and Wolterstorff's experience certainly details this fact. Still, he is able…… [Read More]

References

Ferrini, R.L., Ferrini, A.F. (2008). Health in the Later Years. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kubler-Ross, E. (1997). On Death and Dying. New York: Scribner. Print.

Matthew. (n.d.) The book of Matthew. www.biblegateway.com / Retrieved from https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+12%3A36&version=KJV
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Clinicians Offering Supportive Interventions a

Words: 3316 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30450397



The first on the recommended list is that the physician must acknowledge the grief that the person is feeling, and also acknowledge the fact that he, himself, may not know what the bereaved person is going through at that particular moment. He can directly express sympathy for the bereaved family, and he can talk freely about the deceased, and mention his name too, when talking about him. He can elicit questions about the exact circumstances in which the death had occurred, and he can ask direct questions about how the bereaved feels, and what he thinks about the death and how it has affected him. The don'ts to be followed by the physician or clinician are that the clinician must never adopt a casual or passive attitude, like for example, saying, 'call me if you want to talk'. He must also learn never to make statements that what happened was…… [Read More]

References

Ambrose, Jeannette. "Traumatic Grief, what we need to know as Trauma Responders" Retrieved from http://www.ctsn-rcst.ca/Traumaticgrief.html. Accessed 15 July, 2006

Christie, Grace. (2000) "Healing Children's Grief, surviving a parent's death from cancer"

Crisis Intervention" Retrieved at  http://www.minddisorders.com/Br-Del/Crisis-intervention.html . Accessed 14 July, 2006

Davidson, Joyce D. (1999) "Living with Grief, at work, at school, at worship"
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Combination of Modern and Postmodern Bereavement Theory Explain and Contrast

Words: 5009 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16035742

Postmodern Bereavement Theory

Bereavement is a universal observable fact as every human being experiences the loss of a loved one at some point in his/her life. However, every individual experiences it in a unique way. It is, without a doubt, an undeniable truth that to be human is to grieve. The passing away of a loved one can be difficult, irresistible and dreadful for any normal individual. When people are faced with such overwhelming situations, a majority of them especially the older adults get into the habit of enduring their loss with time. On the other hand, to forget and live without a loved one is not as easy for some individuals. It becomes difficult for these people to cope up with the grief-stricken situations as they experience a grief of greater concentration or time (Hansson & Stroebe, 2007). There are a number of theorists who have put forwarded their…… [Read More]

References

Bartholomew, K., & Horowitz, L.M. (1991). Attachment styles among young adults: A test o f a four-category model. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61(2), 226-244. Retrieved from http://www.sfu.ca/psyc/faculty/bartholomew/attachmentpub_files/bh1991.pdf

Bonanno, G.A., Keltner, D., Holen, A., & Horowitz, M.J. (1995). When avoiding unpleasant emotions might not be such a bad thing: Verbal-autonomic response dissociation and midlife conjugal bereavement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

69(5), 975-989.

Dent, A. (2005). Supporting the Bereaved: Theory and Practice. Counselling at Work, 22-23. Retrieved May 28, 2012 from http://www.bacpworkplace.org.uk/journal_pdf/acw_autumn05_ann.pdf
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Theory -- Horotwitz & Bartholomew

Words: 4058 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33183152



c. Other theorists (Modern Attachment Theories)

Upon the establishment and strengthening of Bowlby and Ainsworth's Attachment Theory, other theorists have developed new studies which either tested the theory or sought to apply it in different contexts or scenarios. Inevitably, most scenarios and contexts that new theorists and psychology researchers took is the path to explaining grief and bereavement. Others, however, have centered on specific aspects of the theory and sought to expound and/or test it, as Ainsworth did when Bowlby was still in the process of strengthening his attachment theory.

One such study was conducted by Schore and Schore (2008), which explored the emotion regulation aspect of the theory. In their study, the authors realized the potential of attachment theory in developing a "therapeutic intervention" from which coping on the loss of the attachment figure would be a healthier process for the individual. The authors shifted from the issue of…… [Read More]

References

Ainsworth, M. (1984). "Attachment across the life span." Bulletin of New York Academy of Medicine.

Ainsworth, M. And J. Bowlby. (1991). "An ethological approach to personality development." American Psychologist, Vol. 46, No. 4.

Bartholomew, K. And L. Horowitz. (1991). "Attachment styles among young adults: a test of a four-category model." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 61, No. 2.

Bartholomew, K. And P. Shaver. (1998). In Attachment theory and close relationships. J. Simpson and W. Rholes (Eds.). NY: Guilford Press.
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Effects of Massage on Depression in Newly Widowed Elderly Females

Words: 1789 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77031574

Therapeutic Massage on Elderly, Grieving Widows

The prosperity of a country is in accordance with its treatment of the aged," states an ancient Jewish Proverb ("Massage for the Mature Adult," 2001). This is an honorable and true statement. Too often many of our elderly people's needs are not noticed or attended to by family, friends, or medical practitioners. This is especially true for older women whose husbands have died.

Widowhood can have a tremendous impact on the health of older women (Ferraro, 1989; owling, 1987; Gass & Chang, 1989). The death of a spouse or partner has been described as the most disruptive and difficult role transition that an individual confronts throughout the life course (Lopata, 1987). In the United States, over 49% or 8.4 million women over the age of 65 are widows (radsher, 2000). Houdin (1993) states that "although the literature abounds with subjective pieces concerning bereavement, little…… [Read More]

Bibliography for Chapters One and Two

Barry, Kasl, and Prigerson

Tran, 2003

Turvey, 1999 (Parkes, 1998).

Janice Strubbe
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Joan Didion in Several Films

Words: 2007 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46628797

"You can use it if you want to," he said. The horror of Dunne's death is that it fixes the deceased in time. Frustrated and full of self-reproach, Didion is left to look and keep on looking for fresh possibilities in the past: missed clues, wrong turns, alternate endings, places to correct the record, to, as she says, "get it right."

Finally, she realizes that it is okay if she does not "get it right." It is okay to be wrong. It is okay not to be her infallible self. "Life changes fast. Life changes in an instant. You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends." This is where the studies of Erikson and Gould come into play. Didion is not alone. More than likely, most of the people who read her book will be in the same situation with someone close person at one time…… [Read More]

References

Didion, J. 2005. Year of Magical Thinking. New York: Alfred Knopf.

Erickson, E., and Erickson, J. (1998) the life cycle completed. New York: Norton.

Gould, R.L. 1972. The phases of adult life: a study in the development psychology.

Journal of Psychiatry. Vol. 129., no. 5.
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How Children Cope With Friendship and Death After Reading Charlotte's Web

Words: 3091 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96332978

children cope with friendship and death after reading Charlottes' Web?

Academic esearch:

The book, Charlotte's Web is probably the best selling paperback and is really a story about a farm, and how friendships develop between different animals and how they help each other. In this book, the most important development is the friendship that develops between Wilbur and Charlotte. Wilbur is a pig and Charlotte is a spider which turns out to be the leader of all animals. The book developed as a natural consequence to the author having resided on a farm and seen all the animals in action. In this book, Charlotte ends up saving the pig from slaughter and in practice; the author himself had tried to save a pig and not succeeded. The author has written about many such animals, but this became the most popular.

Animals were dear to the author and though the animals…… [Read More]

References

Children and Grief. American Academy of Child. July, 2004. Retrieved from http://www.aacap.org/publications/factsfam/grief.htm Accessed on 8 June, 2005

Hartman, Holly. Charlotte's Web. Retrieved from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/charlotte1.html Accessed on 8 June, 2005

Helping Children Cope with Loss, Death and Grief: Response to a National Tragedy. National Association of School Psychologists. 22 October, 2001. Retrieved from http://www.nasponline.org/NEAT/grief.html Accessed on 8 June, 2005

Information for the Media on Childhood Traumatic Grief. The National Child Traumatic Stress. Retrieved from www.nctsnet.org/nccts/asset.do?id=361 Accessed on 8 June, 2005
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Biological Aspects of Aging

Words: 2241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67278801

Biological Aspects of Aging

I can honestly say that I have been extremely affected by this course in terms of general knowledge related to the death, dying and grieving process. Prior to taking this class, I was largely ignorant of the various processes that all people (who live long enough) go through relating to their interminable procession towards the grave. One of the most salient aspects about this particular course was the ramifications of improvements in science, technology, and medical care that has allowed for an increasingly aging population. With many baby boomers now headed towards their latter stages of life, the relevance of this class, its textbook, and additional course materials has never been greater. In certain ways, I feel as though I am much more cognitively prepared for what is to come in the future. Yet one of the benefits of this class is that it has also…… [Read More]

References

Ferrini, R.L., Ferrini, A.F. (2008). Health in the Later Years. New York: McGraw-Hill.

No author. (2001). "Types of euthanasia." PregnantPause.org. Retrieved from  http://www.pregnantpause.org/euth/types.htm
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Employment Discrimination at Wal-Mart Foundation of the

Words: 5383 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45363162

Employment Discrimination at Wal-Mart

Foundation of the Study

This study examines the legislative and judicial climate that enables corporations like Wal-Mart to engage in practices that violate workers' rights. The popular consensus is that Wal-Mart, the largest retail store in the United States, displays an inordinate disregard for the human dignity and morale of its employees and, despite continual litigation, continues to blatantly violate the legal rights of its employees. Wal-Mart faces charges of violating The Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (2011) by asking management to adjust time sheets so that overtime will not need to be paid, and so that all employees will work under the hourly limit required by the union in order to obtain membership. Employees were insured, without their knowledge, against their death by Wal-Mart. The company was named beneficiary; following death of an employee, the entire benefit amount was retained by the corporation. Not a…… [Read More]

References

Business Day, Companies. (2011) The New York Times. Retrieved  http://www.nytimes.com/ 

2011/03/30/business/30aldi.html?ref=walmartstoresinc

Byrne, T.P. (2009). False profits: Reviving the corporation's public purpose. Discourse, 57 UCLA L. Rev. Disc. 25, UCLA School of Law, UC Berkeley, (Associate, Chadbourne & Parke, LLP). Retrieved http://uclalawreview.org/?p=1056

Clifford, S. (2011, March 29). Where Wal-Mart failed, Aldi succeeds. The New York Times. Retrieved
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Employment Recommendation Letter to Whom

Words: 826 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59999395

I was able to see the patience and love that Jane has extended to my children. She very patiently taught my youngest child all his shapes and colors during his eighteenth month.

Jane's effort in teaching my children was manifested in ways more than one. My middle child showed drastic improvements in her reading level. She even jumped two reading levels in just one year! My eldest daughter, on the other hand, was able to excel in soccer and in school as well. I must say that my children have become the well-adjust persons that they are now through Jane's help.

One of the best things that Jane did for my family, especially for my children was helping them during one of the toughest times of their lives. In 2006, my children lost their mother. Jane's presence got them through this grieving process. She was not just their nanny, nor…… [Read More]

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African-American Suicide Extra Pages African-American

Words: 910 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40372363

If someone returns a questionnaire with identifying personal information, then it will not be used in the study and will be destroyed. The questionnaires will also be constructed so that there will be no questions that could potentially violate the participants privacy in any way. For instance, there will be no questions asked about the particulars of the child's suicide, where the mother works, what particular community she's from and what church she is a member of, etc. Questions such as these could deter the target audience from responding because of fear that their privacy could be jeopardized.

The introductory letter sent with the questionnaire plays an important role in weeding out any ethical issues that may arise. The letter will clearly define the survey and discuss why the prospective participants were chosen. They will know that none of their personal information was used in order to send them the…… [Read More]

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Interviewed Two Parents at My

Words: 1602 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72870891



I asked them what is done for obby at school, and they said that inclusion has been very beneficial for him (Nelson, 2001). With a paraprofessional he has been able to stay in his home school, and importantly, continue to attend the school his friend attends. They said that the school had to work hard to learn about almost all aspects of obby's needs: they didn't know much about Asperger's, or working with a paraprofessional, but they feel that for the most part the school staff understand his unique needs. They have seen huge improvement, and so can see that they should continue to cooperate with the accommodations obby needs.

The one area they expressed lingering frustration with was with obby's earlier education. They said that preschools really didn't know how to deal with children who had special needs (ricker, 2000). They would try to talk him out of being…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bricker, Diane. 2000. "Inclusion: How the scene has changed." Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, April.

Diamond, Karen E. 1999. "Parents who have a child with a disability." Childhood Education, March 22.

DiPipi-Hoy, Caroline, and Jitendra, Asha. 2004. "A Parent-Delivered Intervention to Teach Purchasing Skills to Young Adults with Disabilities." Journal of Special Education 38:3, p. 144, October.

Graham, Steve. 2003. "Self-determination for students with disabilities: views of parents and teachers." Exceptional Children, Sept. 22.
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Infanta in Le Cid the

Words: 1092 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14873696

Neither to force nor reason will men yield; Only in semblance can the wound be healed" (II.3.27-30). In other words, she seems aware of the fact that, as warriors, both men may owe allegiance to the King, but their own fierce natures are even more critical to them than this allegiance. They will not allow even the King's counsel to end their feud. The Infanta seems to consider her words, but then suggests that Chimene's feelings for Don Rodrigue will sway her father if the King cannot, but Chimene reiterates her belief that the rift cannot be healed. She also recognizes that if she asks Don Rodrigue to refrain from seeking vengeance from her father, it will compromise his social reputation. The Infanta devises a solution; she will take Don Rodrigue prisoner until the men can heal their rift, so that his failure to seek vengeance against Don Gome will…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Corneille, Pierre. Le Cid, a Study Guide. London England: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Print.
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Multidirectional Learning Is That Learning

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54301247

Although Forest lacks the type of intelligences that allow him to succeed in school such as verbal and mathematical intelligences, he has profound goodness within his heart. This shows his interpersonal or empathetic intelligence. He selflessly helps others throughout his life and seems to intuitively know what to say to people like Jenny, when they feel sad. This also gives him emotional resiliency, as famously expressed in his comment about how 'life is like a box of chocolates.' Forest is kinesthetically gifted, as can be seen in his great speed as a runner. And he is also intrapersonally intelligent -- he understands himself. He knows that he is lacking in intelligence, but that he is a good-hearted person and believes that makes him worthy of love, even Jenny's love (Smith 2008).

Of the three deaths Forest experiences in his life, only one is to be expected: that of a death…… [Read More]

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Currid T 2008 Experience of Stress in Acute

Words: 2197 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9329806

Currid, T. (2008).Experience of stress in acute mental health nurses.Nursing Times, 104 (2), pp.39-40.

The author talks about how the stress in acute mental health nursing needs instant attention and further elaborates that with statistics. As per the results of a recent survey conducted by Nursing Times, 70% of nurses are suffering from work related stress which has affected their physical or mental health problems. From acute mental health units in London, eight individuals belonging to grading levels were interviewed. The results showed that the management didn't pay attention to them and their professional opinions were being ignored. Along with ignorance, they were not allowed to use the skills they had. Thus, here Currid basically uses a real world example in which a nurse is subjected to mental stress. Their tasks included more of filling out the paper work and performing administrative duties. In the entire paper, the identified causes…… [Read More]

References

Currid, T. (2008).Experience of stress in acute mental health nurses. Nursing Times, 104 (2), pp.39-40.

Finn, P. (1981). The effects of shift work on the lives of Employees. Monthly Labor Review, pp.31-35.

Hypertension.(2002). In Natural Medicine Instructions for Patients. Retrieved from http://www.credoreference.com/entry/nmifp/hypertension

Managing Stress. (2009). In Business: The Ultimate Resource. Retrieved from http://www.credoreference.com/entry/ultimatebusiness/managing_stress
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Bdd in Men Various Problems

Words: 2572 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64723294

"

In addition, to media images that bombard men there are also biological factors that influence the development of BDD in men.

According to an article entitled "Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men" the most severe cases of muscle dysmorphia involve a biological predisposition for the disease (Bartlett 2001). The author explains that from a biological standpoint the man suffering with the disease has a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder (Bartlett 2001). For instance someone who washes his hands 10 times per day is normal, however washing your hands one hundred times per day to the point that it hampers with the rest of your life is a symptom of a greater problem (Bartlett 2001). According to the article this example is used to illustrate "there isn't anything pathological about going to the gym regularly or dieting," but there is a problem when "a huge number of boys…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bartlett J. (2001) Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men

American Fitness. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0675/is_1_19/ai_69651755

First Controlled Study of Muscle Dysmorphia Published, 2005. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.driesen.com/muscle_dysmorphia.htm

Grieve F.G., Lorenzen L.A., Thomas a. (2004) Exposure to Muscular Male Models Decreases Men's Body Satisfaction.Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. Volume: 51: 743+.
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Perinatal Loss Support at Time

Words: 5174 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41031712

Armstrong's findings additionally relate that due to previous research and the influence of perinatal loss on postpartum depression on partnered relationships. Armstrong states that differences in continued psychological stress between mothers and fathers after a subsequent birth is another area requiring further evaluation. Specifically stated is that it is necessary to evaluate "...the strength of partnered relationships during future childbearing experiences is important to identify any potential influence of the loss on couple, as well as family, outcomes. Understanding possible gender differences may help neonatal nurses and other healthcare providers to recognize couples at risk for discord." (2007)

Neonatal nurses are those who work closely with infants and parents and in the best position to make identification of depression and to pose questions about the individuals symptoms including:

1) mood;

2) appetite;

3) energy or fatigue levels;

4) ability to concentrate; and 5) as well the neonatal nurse is in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gold, K.J., Dalton, V.K. And Schwenk, T.L. (2007) Hospital Care for Parents After Perinatal Death. Obstetrics and Gynecology Vol. 109. No. 5 May 2007.

Hughes, P., Turton, P., Hopper, E. And Evans, CDH (2002) Assessment of Guidelines for Good Practice in Psychosocial Care of Mothers After Stillbirth: A Cohort Study. The Lancet 2002;360:114-18.

Alexander, K.V. (2001) the One Thing You Can Never Take Away": Perinatal Bereavement Photographs. The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing Vol. 26(3) May/June 2001. 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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Close Scrutiny of Books Journal

Words: 9042 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21005672

2) states:

An eligible employee shall be entitled to a total of seven days of leave because of the death of a parent, spouse, son, daughter, or person for whom the employee serves as designated representative... If the deceased died in the line of duty as a member of the uniformed services. Such leave is intended to permit the employee to prepare for or attend the burial ceremony of the deceased member of the uniformed services and may be paid or unpaid leave.

Conversely, however, the United States Federal government presently has no laws in place to similarly (or otherwise, in comparable and appropriate ways) formally acknowledge and honor the passing of federal government personnel other than military personnel.

According to U.S. Code Title 5, Part III; Subpart E; Chapter 63; Subchapter II (2005), the federal government does in fact authorize, according to three separate sections of Title 5: (1)…… [Read More]

References

Acuff, J. (c2004). The relationship edge in business: Connecting with customers and colleagues when it counts. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Andrus, P. (2005). Grief in the workplace. Martin & Castille. Retrieved February 3, 2005 at http://www.mourning.com/your_grief_workplace.html.

Banusiewics, J.D. (2004). Customs of military funerals reflect history, tradition.

United States Department of Defense. Retrieved January 31, 2005, at http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Jun2004/n06102004_200406106.html.
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Counseling the Broken Hearted -

Words: 3946 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57065322

" In the process, one learns to see oneself as strong and resilient, courageous, and empowered. Whether the individual can get up and go on and have a happy life after the loss depends on how the person views self

Is he or she a victim or a survivor? A strong person making spiritual progress or weak and debilitated? Whiting & Bradley (2007) argue that there must be an outcome for every loss. Whether the outcome is "reconciliation" or "vulnerability" or "victimization" depends on successful and positive identity reconstruction.

It used to be believed that the grieving individual had to achieve detachment from the person who had died. This was Freud's theory, that "grieving people need to break free from the deceased, let go of the past and reassert their individualism by charting a new course for life.

A healthy grief experience, according to Freud [was] one in which the…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, R.A. (2006). Immunity and grief. Townsend Letter: The Examiner of Alternative Medicine, 276, 128.

Briggs, C.A. And Pehrsson, D. (2008). Use of bibliotherapy in the treatment of grief and loss: A guide to current counseling practices. Adultspan Journal, 7 (1), 32-43.

Bush, H.K. (2007). Grief work: After a child dies. The Christian Century, 124 (25), 36-40.

Care of the elderly - bereavement: An essential guide (2006). The Practitioner (June 29), 22-29.
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Genetic Counseling Dealing With Its

Words: 2480 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92171465

"Accurate descriptions of sex chromosome differences are critical, the decisions potentially regrettable, and the long-term outcomes devastating if a termination is based on the misinformation," that the patient later discovers to be misinformation for instance, "that any of these conditions is comparable to Down's Syndrome" (Biesecker r 2001:2) Conversely, it is also important not to minimize the odds of a potentially fatal genetic condition like Tay Sachs disease.

Providers are obliged to obtain useful up-to-date information and to ensure parents have adequate opportunity to consider their decision with the help of an experienced healthcare provider, preferably in medical genetics, and if necessary, a counselor who is attuned to the cultural assumptions and needs of the couple's population group, and religious beliefs. Certain populations might have a different view and understanding of the real difficulty of raising a child suffering from a heritable disorder, or even the concept of heritability of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baker, Schuette & Uhlmann. (Eds.) (1998). A guide to genetic counseling.

Beery, Theresa a & Kerry a. Schooner. (Nov 2004). "Family History: The First Genetic

Screen." Nurse Practioner. Retrieved 23 Jun 2007 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3958/is_200411/ai_n9469874/pg_5

Biesecker, Barbara. (24 Feb 2001). "Prenatal diagnoses of sex chromosome conditions:
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Greiving Case Study Grief Is a Powerful

Words: 1922 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5583404

Greiving Case Study

Grief is a powerful, and somewhat self-regulating condition which we face having experiences a traumatic event. The wonders of our human ody respond with pre-programmed efficiency in order to help us adjust to the reality of the new situation. In the face of a traumatic occurrence, when our emotional or mental reaction may e to shut down, or run and hide, the grieving response gives a person the needed oundaries in which they can continue to function. However, some time after the events have past into the distance, the need exists for the person to process through the grief. Only y processing the grief can the person reenter a healthy relationship with the daily responsiilities of life, and healthy relationships with others in their life.

Charley's current situation in life is a function of poor decisions in his adult life. However, these decisions are also a response…… [Read More]

bibliography

Lindemann, Erich. (1994) "Symptomatology and Management of Acute Grief." In Essential Papers on Object Loss. New York: New York UP, 1994.

Major Depressive Episode. (2004) Bravenet clinical Capsule. Accessed 18 Feb 2004. Available from: http://www.behavenet.com/capsules/disorders/mjrdepep.htm

Alcorn Jr., M. (2001, Spet. 22) Ideological Death and Grief in the Classroom: Mourning as a Prerequisite to Learning. Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society/

Manveet, K. (2002, June 4) Children and grief New Straits Times;
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DSM-5 Depression

Words: 1623 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18485765

First, the assignment of an arbitrary time period where bereavement is "normal" and after that particular time frame it becomes dysfunctional has no empirical basis. Secondly, the exclusion criteria in the DSM -- IV -- T most likely resulted in individuals who would have benefited from treatment not receiving treatment for their depressive symptoms until this particular time period expired. That is inexcusable. Finally, the research indicates that there may be some minor differences between bereavement and major depression; however, the two are not often clinically distinguishable aside from noting that in one case there was a loss of a loved one and yet individuals who are experiencing severe symptoms in bereavement are at risk for more serious issues. By eliminating the exclusion criteria clinicians are given much-needed room to treat their patients in individualized basis as opposed to a standardized cookie-cutter protocol.

eferences

American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders

(3rd Ed.). Washington DC: Author.

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders

(4th Ed. -- Text Revision). Washington DC: Author.
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Learning Theory and Grief

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18936593

Operant Conditioning and Grief

Because grief is an emotional process, many people are reluctant to believe that grief can, in many ways, be explained through operant or classical conditioning principles. However, the biochemical underpinnings of many type of love relationships serve as reward systems that can actually condition a person to feel love, which can result in grief when the object of affection is no longer available. In both sexual relationships and parent-child relationships, the body releases chemicals at certain times during the relationship- sexual intercourse, nursing, holding an infant, and hugging are all related to the body's release of hormones. Classical or operant conditioning principles suggest, then, that the presence of the loved one will, eventually be sufficient to stimulate the release of those hormones. If the loved one resides with the person who has done the learning or spends sufficient time with them, then it seems clear that…… [Read More]

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Deaf Community and Its Need

Words: 3490 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23751505

Equally destructive is the attitude that communicating with the Deaf person may involve more time and effort than one wishes to expend" (Zieziula, 1998, p. 193).

Moreover, and perhaps one of the most important challenges related to this issue, a large percentage of deaf individuals do not trust the hearing society. "Historically, the dominant hearing culture has relegated deaf people to social categories such as "handicapped" and "outsider." The history of oppression and exclusion of the deaf community -- although with important variations depending on the countries -- and the ignorance and rejection of the natural and preferred means of communication of many of them is a well-known and many times denounced phenomenon," (Munoz-Baell & uiz, 1999, p. 1).

Finally, there is a real deficiency of information in Deaf culture regarding hospice and its related services. Finding appropriate facilities can be a time-consuming and frustrating process.

The program: breaking down…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Berke, J. (2009). Deaf Awareness Week. Retrieved April 10, 2010, from the About.com Website: http://deafness.about.com/cs/events/a/deafawareness.htm

Deaf Community Health Workers Provide Education and Support to Deaf Patients, Facilitating

Access to Linguistically and Culturally Appropriate Care, Improving Patient Health

Knowledge and Adherence to Recommended Care. (2005.) Retrieved April 10, 2010, from the AHRQ Health Care Website: http://www.innovations.ahrq.gov/popup.aspx?id=2757&type=1&name=print
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Emotional Intelligence Humans Are Living

Words: 1728 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97628165

62).

Being dismissed coldly by a partner can be a bit like having a partner die, haram writes on page 62. And when you go through the grief of losing a sweetheart who has been with you for years, "being present in the emotion is the best way forward" even though it "just doesn't feel" right at the time.

Conclusion

Emotional intelligence can be implemented into any situation, especially a situation where death is involved. and, as this paper pointed out through the literature, emotional intelligence helps the sufferer understand why it is necessary to "cry…scream or get angry" when the shock of sudden loss hits. In the end, the emotionally intelligent person will be thankful that he or she did not ignore the emotions. hether or not omens appear in dreams, when the loved one is near death, the steps that are taken to deal effectively with the situation…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berta, Peter. (2007). Omens. Encyclopedia of Death and Dying. Retrieved March 1, 2011, from http://www.deathreference.com/nu-pu/omens.html.

Goleman, Daniel. (1998). Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Random House

Digital, Inc.

McBride, Patricia, and Maitland, Susan. (2001). The EI Advantage: Putting Emotional
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Eldest Child by Maeve Brennan

Words: 366 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23667155

It seemed as if Mrs. Bagot was expecting her husband to grieve in the same way she was grieving but people grieve in different ways, in their own unique ways. On the other hand, it showed a husband who seemed to think of himself more than he thinks of his wife. Mr. Bagot thought that her wife was acting the way she does because she was pleading for attention. Although it was clear that he was also grieving for the loss of his son, his primary thought was of moving forward and all he wanted was for his wife to come back to how she was before, failing to realize that experiences and circumstances change people. In the end, he didn't understand his wife.

What I liked about this story is how it illustrates the dynamics between a husband and a wife, how communication plays a crucial role and how…… [Read More]

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Constant Gardener Written by John

Words: 1399 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38223825

Justin's investigation was in pursuit of the truth behind his wife's death, a truth that is closely guarded by the people in power, people who control the situation.

Justin's started the investigation under a guise while he traveled to different countries to uncover the mystery. His investigation led him to both surprising and startling discoveries. Though he was Tessa's husband, he detached himself from her causes. Though Tessa was born rich and beautiful, which makes the reader fall in love with her easily just like the other characters did, she had a strong conscience and was genuinely passionate about helping Africa and its people. Justin's investigation led him to discover things about Tessa that surprised him. It was an opportunity for him to understand her passions and her causes. He also found out startling things about what Tessa and Bluhm were working on and what they had discovered. Justin found…… [Read More]

References

Angell, Marcia. "The Body Hunters." The New York Review of Books. Volume 52 Number 15 (6 October 2005). 27 March 2009 http://www.nybooks.com/articles/18301.

Brewer, Janet. "The Constant Gardener: Film Industry Forces a Look at Big Pharma's." BMJ Medical Publication of the Year. (21 December 2005). 27 March 2009 http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/331/7514/462#124341.

Le Carre, James. The Constant Gardener. New York: Scribner, 2001.
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Abolition an Argument to Abolish

Words: 3203 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40355368

They may know what they have done and freely confess to it, but a true understanding of what they have done is not really present.

It is somewhat like the difference between knowing that jumping off the roof and hitting the ground will hurt, and actually making the jump and understanding what it feels like to hit the ground that hard from 10 or 15 feet up. The concept of what it really means to take another human being's life is not there; nor is the concept of being executed by the state for the taking of that life.

Third, the person must have an IQ that is significantly below average. There are quite a few people out there who do not have an 'average' intelligence score, (around 100 to 110, as previously mentioned), but that does not make them mentally retarded to the point that their reasoning and abilities…… [Read More]

Bibliography

AAMR. Position Statement on Mental Retardation and the Death Penalty. 6 March 2002. AAMR. http://www.aamr.org/Policies/position_statements.shtml.

American Civil Liberties Union. Mental Retardation and the Death Penalty. 26 June, 2002. ACLU Publications. http://www.aclu.org/DeathPenalty/DeathPenalty.cfm?ID=9314&c=63.

Death Penalty, the. 2002. Human Rights Watch. http://www.hrw.org/campaigns/deathpenalty/mr.htm.

Derbyshire, John. She was just someone. (2000, August 10). National Review Online. Retrieved from http://www.nationalreview.com/nr_comment/nr_comment081000b.shtml
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Freud and His Complete Theory of Grief Bereavement

Words: 3008 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50942874

Grief

Freud's theory of Grief and bereavement

Grade Course

Id, Ego and the Superego or the conscious and the unconscious mind are some of the terms which are well-known by almost every individual. These words not only point out to the field of Psychology but also to the man who coined them and proposed a new realm of theories behind each of it; Sigmund Freud. He is famous for being the father of psychoanalysis and the techniques of hypnosis, dream interpretation and free association which he has used to successfully treat his patients. Psychology is devoid without Freud. This is not only because of the theories which he proposed but also because of his followers and those who extended his basic concept with a new touch. Freud in all his theories talks about the past to be affecting the present. In other words, the unconscious mind which is the hidden…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Butler, J. (1997). The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Freud, S. (1914). On narcissism: An introduction. Standard Edition. 14:73 -- 102.

Freud, S. (1917). Mourning and melancholia. Standard Edition 14:243 -- 258

Freud, S. (1923). The ego and the id. Standard Edition 19:12 -- 66.
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Coping With Death

Words: 758 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96230199

Death and Dying

There is no right or wrong way to react to someone's death or to someone who is dying. Grief is as individual as anything can be. Some cry uncontrollably and even have to be sedated. Others become silent and uncommunicative. A person's culture will invariably impact the way they grieve because it will socially dictate behaviors that are appropriate or inappropriate to a given set of conditions. There are some communities which, instead of grieving, choose to think only of the good times that they spent with the deceased. The Irish tradition of the wake exemplifies this model of grief. Other cultures, such as the Jewish people, will take days to mourn their loved one and devote a week to the process. In the United States there are many cultures all living in one place and each has its own practices about dealing with grief and the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"Perspectives on Death: Cultural and Historical."
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Healing and Loss in Nelson S I Ll Give You the Sun

Words: 4832 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40637261

New Identity through Healing in Nelson's I'll Give You the Sun: A Feminist Critique

I'll Give You the Sun is a Michael L. Printz Award-winning young adult novel by Jandy Nelson that examines the complexities of coming of age, dealing with grief and loss, burgeoning sexuality, and healing. It gives a dual-gender perspective -- that of fraternal twins Noah and Jude, and from a feminist critique it offers an example of how the oppressions of patriarchal society are overturned by the subversion of the male status quo and the valorization of the oppressed (in this case, the valorization of the homosexual Noah and the female Jude). Throughout the narrative, the growing pains, experience of loss, and the concomitant healing process is given breadth through application of the feminist critique, which provides the framework for how Jude overcomes her initial negative sexual experience at a young age to grow into a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chopin, Kate. The Awakening. Chicago: Herbert Stone, 1899. Print.

Crawford, Suzanne Mills. "Liars, Lovers, And Thieves: Being Adolescent Readers And Writers In Young Adult Literature And Life." Dissertation Abstracts International 74.7 (2014): MLA International Bibliography. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

Jeffries, Jeannine L. "The Image Of The Artist: A Content Analysis Of Authenticity,

Ethnicity, And Quality In Young Adult Novels." Dissertation Abstracts International 74.5 (2013): MLA International Bibliography. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.
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The Character of the Woman in Home Burial

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19206594

Home Burial" And The oman

In Robert Frost's "Home Burial," the woman in the poem is grieved -- both haunted by the death of her child and by the lack of compassion that she senses in her husband's callousness. At least, she perceives it to be callousness. As the poem plays out, it appears more and more that the man is simply short-tempered and lacking in emotional intelligence: he has none of the sensitivity that a grieving woman might prefer from a man. However, it might also be that her anger towards him stems from some unknown grudge -- some ill-will that she bears him and that it is projected outward only when she is frustrated by his attempts to intellectualize her grief. In Frost's "Home Burial," insights about the woman's character are given through the poem's dialogue and description -- snippets that begin first with the narrator, then the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Frost, Robert. "Home Burial." Web. 2 Oct 2016.

Jarrell, Randall. "Robert Frost's 'Home Burial.'" Modern American Poetry. Web. 2

Oct 2016.
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Dream Vision and Other Poems

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9280332

Chaucer basically offers an idea of the acceptance of the temporal quality of the world and how that relates to life and love. This can also be seen as a lack of consolation; however, in this lack of consolation he is admitting that there is no consolation and that that fact alone should act as a consolation. The man is destined to grieve for his wife as this is how the temporal world works. There is no consolation for the grieving.

There is not one of the two characters whom find any kind of consolation, though it is clear that the Dreamer is quite taken with the dream. e aren't able to say what happens next -- after he wakes up; however, it is somewhat accepted that the Dreamer and the Black Knight are a bit closer to making peace with their situations. Neither of them have been on a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chaucer, Geoffrey. & Lynch, Kathryn L. Dream Visions and Other Poems. W.W. Norton & Company, 2006.

Fichte, Jorg O. Chaucer's 'Art Poetical: A Study in Chaucerian Poetics. John Benjamin's

Publishing Company, 1980.

Phillips, Helen. "Structure and Consolation in the Book of the Duchess." The Chaucer
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Owns Your Email Who Has

Words: 946 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60907294

Essentially, by taking such a strong stance against breaking their own regulations, even in cases of death, Yahoo! was upholding utilitarian principles in order to benefit the community as a whole. Thus, the company was focused on upholding a commitment to privacy for all of its members. It was unfortunate that Justin Ellsworth lost his life in the line of battle, but that could not jeopardize the promise Yahoo! made to its millions of users. If the company was to just give up one user password, it could have the potential to do so again, thus risking the privacy rights of others. Moreover, there are also deontological considerations against the internet company giving up private account information, even after death. In this sense, the company had an obligation to Justin Ellsworth to uphold its promise of protecting his personal information. The marine had himself agreed to the terms and conditions…… [Read More]

References

Leach, Susan Llewlyn. (2005). Who gets to see the e-mail of the deceased? The Christian Science Monitor. Web.

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=0&did=830357671&SrchMode=1&sid=20&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1236294601&clientId=29440
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Compare and Contrast Dr Larry Crabb's Book Effective Biblical Counseling

Words: 2215 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11541346

Bible Counseling

Goal of Christian Counseling

Dr. Larry Crabb sees human problems through two lenses: the first category involves problems that result from "…natural or physical causes" (things the individual has little or no control over). Examples of those kinds of problems include learning disabilities, a chemical imbalance within the person, and other issues that result from "perceptual dysfunctions." Crabb's goal is to fill the basic needs of a person, and under Christian counseling he feels the basic need is for "personal worth," which can be satisfied through two important inputs. One is a kind of "longing for significance" -- that is, the person longs for a purpose, for importance, for a meaningful job that has a positive impact. The other is to have security through being accepted (p. 2).

Part ONE: Goal of Rogerian Theory of Counseling (Client-centered therapy)

The client-centered approach by Rogers is designed to allow the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Andrews, Linda Wasmer. (2010). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Encyclopedia of Depression.

Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Press.

Cherry, Kendra. (2010). Client-Centered Therapy. About.com Psychology. Retrieved February

18, 2013, from http://psychology.about.com.
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Depression Not Just a Bad Mood Mdd

Words: 3261 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90318784

Depression: Not just a Bad Mood

MDD: Not Just Another Bad Mood

The term "Prozac Nation" says a lot. This catch-phrase had begun to describe the current state in the U.S. when cases of clinical depression began blooming and treatment turned to medication as a first response. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over fourteen million of the adult U.S. population suffers from Major Depressive Disorder. Major Depressive Disorder, or MDD, is the leading cause of disability in people ages 15-44. The average age of onset is 32 (U.S. Department of, 2011.) It is often also found co-occurring with other mental disorders, such as anxiety and substance abuse. Perhaps it is worth taking a closer look at a case example in order to better understand this often debilitating disorder in our times.

Taylor is a 24-year-old single, Jewish female presenting with symptoms of depression. She reports that for…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Burns, D.D. (1989). The feeling good handbook. New York, NY: Plume.

Cornes, C.L., & Frank, E. (1994). Interpersonal psychotherapy for depression. The Clinical

Psychologist, 47(3), 9-10.

Cuijpers, P, van Straten, A, Hollon, S.D., & Andersson, G. (2010). The contribution of active medication to combined treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression: a meta-analysis. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 121(6), Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?hid=13&sid=568ccfe5-0fe6-4429-92a3- cb159b2e4044%40sessionmgr115&vid=5&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3
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Stages Grief Losing a Son or Daughter

Words: 699 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72565495

Stages Grief

Losing a son or daughter challenges personal faith in God and can bring a person to the brink of despair. In Lament for a Son, Nicholas Wolterstorff accomplishes the difficult goal of communicating his grief over the loss of his son. The author achieves his goal by grounding his sorrow in Biblical truth and also by allowing himself to proceed between the various stages of death within the Kubler-oss model. The stages of grief include the initial phase of denial and self-isolation, even shame. Anger is a pervasive problem in the face of grief, and Wolterstorff admits his confrontation with anger at God and the seeming unfairness over the death of his son. Accompanying anger is often the stage of bargaining, in which the individual speaks to God without a full acceptance or understanding of His ways. Wolterstorff's challenge, which he seeks to communicate with his readers, is…… [Read More]

References

Axelrod, J. (2006). The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief. Psych Central. Retrieved on March 6, 2015, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/the-5-stages-of-loss-and-grief/000617

Bible: NIV

Wolterstorff, N. (1987). Lament for a Son. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans.

Worden, J.W. (2008). Grief Counseling and Grief Therapy. 4th edition. Springer.
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Paul Dealt With the Various Issues of

Words: 1974 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49978627

Paul dealt with the various issues of the Thessalonian church in both a practical and theoretical manner. He chose to deal with grief and loss by enabling discussion and explanation of the Second Coming and the concept of resurrection. He provided comfort and guidance to his members, a social aspect of associations and clubs often witnessed within their cities. In addition, he preached a ministry of pleasing God to prepare for the day when Christ returns.

Greek city life often involved clubs and associations. This meant most Greeks participated in social clubs and activities. Paul operated within a club or association context. He knew this was a practical way to appeal to the Thessalonians as clubs and associations allowed members to participate, created a sense of community, and even covered funeral expenses. Paul also knew the omans would not view the synagogue as a threat if it were seen as…… [Read More]

References

Authors, V. (2008). Holy Bible (NIV).

Grant, M. (1986). A guide to the ancient world. [Bronx, N.Y.]: H.W. Wilson.

Polhill, J. (1999). Paul and his letters. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman.

1. Paul worked for money instead of simply relying on contributions and donations. (True or False)
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Death Have an Effect on

Words: 1281 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68552895



Losing a pet is difficult for anyone, but children may take longer to grieve and get over the loss than adults do. A small amount of depression, acting out, or gloominess can be expected, and should go away. Longer periods or abnormal activity following loss should be addressed by the parent, a counselor or minister, or a grief counselor. Warning signs of severe or prolonged grief will vary depending on the child's age, relationship with the pet, emotional maturity, circumstances involved with the death, and so on.

Others find that children are far more resilient that adults in coping with death. Because they have a limited ability to understand chronology, unless faced with something quite traumatic, they are usually able to process grief, accept the issue, and sometimes with a little help or explanation, simply move through the issue with very little scaring. Children are exposed to many more issues…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alat, K. (2002). "Traumatic Events and Children: How Early Childhood Educators

Can Help." Childhood Education. 79 (1): 2.

Bjorklund, D. 2006-08-10 "Spot Died Last Week: Children's Picture Books About

the Death of a Pet" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American
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Location of the City of

Words: 2266 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42429749



Harris, rown and Moore (2000) explain that in the instance depicted in Joshua 8:9, where Joshua again sent out his army, Joshua's attitude has changed. He has realized that he needed to take the threat of the enemy seriously; that to win he had to plan in accordance to and had to adhere to God's directives "on the west side of Ai" (Joshua 8:9 (NKJV) (lue Letter ible 2010).

Joshua's neglect of prayer, according to Rick Grieve (2009) in the book, On the Way, proved to be the beginning of his downfall, noted in Joshua 7. "In this second battle plan, Joshua did not hear from God…. At Jericho[,] Israel won because their leader listened to the directives of the Lord and followed through. Absolute obedience brought absolute victory. Yet before the skirmish against Ai no such meeting occurred" (Grieve, p. 86). With Joshua's prayerlessness, he basically told God, that…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Ai." 2010. Encyclopedia Britannica. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/10356/Ai

Blue Letter Bible. "Book of Joshua 7 - (KJV - King James Version)."

http://www.blueletterbible.org/Bible.cfm?b=Jos&c=7&t=KJV

Blue Letter Bible. "Book of Joshua 8 - (KJV - King James Version)."
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Bereavement the Role of Acute

Words: 3707 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27571803



In the case of the former of these groups, there is a demand for proper training and experience in helping family members face the practical realities imposed by the death of a loved one. Further, research demonstrates that many acute care settings are lacking in the capacity to manage these particular issues, failing particularly to make some of the most basic steps needs to help the bereaved face this difficult period. According to Murphy et al. (1997), a survey of area hospice facilities revealed that such settings were problematically deficient in the areas of preparation for bereavement. Accordingly, Murphy et al. report that "the facilities completed surveys about on-site services routinely offered by licensed hospice agencies. 55% of the homes sent sympathy cards after the patients death. 99% of the facilities did not provide materials to the family or primary caregiver on the grieving process or bereavement after the death.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Benoliel, J.Q. (1999). Loss and Bereavement Perspectives, Theories, Challenges. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 30(4), 263-272.

Birtwistle, J.; Payne, S.; Smith, P. & Kendrick, T. (2002). The role of the district nurse in bereavement support. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 38(5), 467-478.

Bunting-Perry, L.K. (2006). Palliative Care in Parkinson's Disease: Neuroscience Nursing Implications: Bereavement Care. Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 38(2), 106-113.

Hanson, L.C.; Danis, M. & Garrett, J. (1997). What is wrong with end-of-life care? Opinions of bereaved family members. Journal of American Geriatric Society, 45(11), 1339-1344.
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Frost's Home Burial Tragedy Will

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54066916

Judith Oster notes that the poem is of such a nature that it represents the real trauma that occurs after a tragic loss. She writes, "Home is only suffocating when the marriage is unhappy" (Oster 300) and that its subject matter is too dramatic and tragic too realistically ties to failure in human love to have poetic form as its principal subject" (300). Richard Poirier claims that this poem is one of Frost's "greatest dramatizations" of the theme of home, in which the husband and wife share the same "pressure" (Richard Poirier 123). Richard Thorton states that Frost's description of this home represents how "unending work distorts grief into callousness" (Thornton 257). The role of the husband is "ambiguous" (123) while he does his best to "comprehend the wife's difficulties, he is only partially able to do so" (124). "The very title of the poem means something about the couple…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Frost, Robert. "Home Burial." Robert Frost's Poems. New York: Pocket Books, 1916.

Oster, Judith. Toward Robert Frost: The Reader and the Poet. Athens: University of Georgia Press. 1994.

Parini, Jay. Robert Frost: A Life. New York: Macmillan. 2000.

Pack, Robert. Belief and Uncertainty in the Poetry of Robert Frost. Dartmouth: UPNE. 2004.
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Recurs Through a Few Works

Words: 1047 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26208727

As William Henry Davies would have averred, "… we have no time to stand and stare…" Frost describes, at length, how a young boy might have enjoyed himself swinging along the boughs. Certainly, one boy might have not been able to have bent several boughs. Frost does realize the cause of the bending of the boughs. It is the weight of the ice that collects on the boughs that causes them to bend. But a man can wish, can't he?

In "Mending Walls," Frost celebrates the notion of solitude. He twice mentions, "fences make good neighbors;" this is despite what one hears very often in modern parlance that, one should build bridges, not fences." The poem is interplay between two individuals or two opposing concepts. One is about the protection of one's privacy and the celebration of solitude. The opposing view supports the notion of community living and the need…… [Read More]

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Clytemnestra's Role in the Oresteia

Words: 2434 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76201218

In the second part, the role of Clytemnestra changes somewhat, but she is still depicted as a weak woman. The weakness of her position in society is further illustrated by the fact that her son, Orestes, confesses freely to his mother's murder, and also that he never shows any remorse. It is clear that to Orestes, his father, not his mother, is of importance to him, that he finally claims as his sole parent. Any persuasive capabilities of Clytemnestra are overcome by Orestes in the Choephoroe, as she is unable to successfully defend herself when he tries to kill her. In another related play Electra and her brother Orestes hatch a plan to kill their mother and step father. Clytemnestra is said to treat Electra really badly, almost like a beggar or someone living in poverty because she is still grieving at the death of her father. Electra deceives Clytemnestra…… [Read More]

Bibliography

McClure, L. (1999). Spoken like a woman. Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama.

Encyclopedia Beta. (2007). Clytemnestra Greek wife of Agamemnon. Retrieved April 9, 2007 at http://ancienthistoryabout.com.

Thalmann, W. (1985). Speech and Silence in the Oresteia. Phoenix, Vol. 39(3).

Zeitlin, F. (1965). The Motif of the Corrupted Sacrifice in Aeschylus' Oresteia.
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Female Character in Robert Frost's Poem Home

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73707266

female character in Robert Frost's poem, "Home Burial."

Frost's poem "Home Burial" tells the story of two people torn apart by the loss of their first-born child, a son. Amy, the woman in the story, is nameless until we read at least half the poem. We know she is a woman, because Frost refers to her as "she," and talks about the way she is dressed. "She turned and sank upon her skirts at that, And her face changed from terrified to dull." Already we know that she is troubled about something, and her husband is concerned.

Amy is still grieving over her son that seems to have recently died. She also is very angry with her husband, but she has not told him why. She seems a little afraid of him, but he seems to bend to her wishes. He says, "My words are nearly always an offence. I…… [Read More]

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Ability of an Organization to

Words: 10330 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26969335

Customer centricity then can also have a significant impact on the perspective an organization has of its market and the opportunities inherent within it and other, tangential and territory market areas as well. This aspect of blue ocean strategies being driven by customer's perspectives, preferences, unmet needs and wants further underscores its inherent value and also its usefulness from a strategy perspective. The ability to find uncontested markets, which is a key aspect of blue ocean strategies, is predicated on how customer-centric an organization is as well (Kim, Mauborgne, 2004). The concept of a blue ocean strategy is one of finding an untested market space and exploiting it not through massive amounts of esearch & Development (&D) spending, but through the development of innovative approaches to anticipating and responding to current and future customer needs. As a result, blue oceans or uncontested markets are often found by more customer-centric organizations,…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, S., Baggett, L., & Widener, S.. (2009). The Impact of Service Operations Failures on Customer Satisfaction: Evidence on How Failures and Their Source Affect What Matters to Customers. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, 11(1), 52-69.

Josh Bernoff, Charlene Li. (2008). Harnessing the Power of the Oh-So-Social Web. MIT Sloan Management Review, 49(3), 36-42.

Braff, a., & DeVine, J.. (2009). Maintaining the customer experience. The McKinsey Quarterly,(1), 58.

Bala Chakravarthy, & Peter Lorange. (2007). Continuous renewal, and how Best Buy did it. Strategy & Leadership, 35(6), 4-11. Retrieved March 31, 2010, from ABI/INFORM Complete. (Document ID: 1369380701).
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Close Reading of Sylvia's Lovers

Words: 1501 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60408243



Sylvia's Lovers is a rich and gratifying historical novel, which does not put on a pedestal imprudent behavior. In the novel, not only does Gaskell describe the significant historical events but also exposes the impacts that these historical events can have on the lives of lower class members of the society. The violence of war disrupts people's social lives, making them go for desperate choices, which change the bearings their lives take. This brings about a lot of misery among the people, especially those from the lower social class. The novel exemplifies the effects of the war on people integrating the social class (middle class and the poor). This is evident through out the novel including the marriage between Philip and Sylvia, and Charleys forceful recruitment into the navy.

orks Cited

Bowen, John. "The Historical Novel." A Companion to the Victorian Novel. Eds. Brantlinger Patrick, and illiam Thesing. Oxford: John…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bowen, John. "The Historical Novel." A Companion to the Victorian Novel. Eds. Brantlinger Patrick, and William Thesing. Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2007. 244-259. Internet resource.

Gaskell, Elizabeth. Sylvia's Lovers. Boston: MobileReference.com, 2010. Internet resource.

Shaw, MarionMatus. "Sylvia's Lovers and Other Historical Fiction." The Cambridge Companion to Elizabeth Gaskell. Ed. Jill Matus L. Cambridge [etc.: Cambridge University Press, 2007. 75-89. Internet resource.
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Communication in the Health Care Environment Effective

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99831588

Communication in the Health Care Environment:

Effective communication between patients, physicians, family members, and nurses is one of the most important elements in the delivery of care. Actually, the lack of effective communication in the health care sector contributes to poor delivery of care services since it enhances the likelihood of mistakes due to lack of clarity. Therefore, in order for the health care system to accomplish its goal of improved patient outcomes, there must be effective communication. Every stakeholder involved in the health care industry or system acts as an agent of communication either verbally or through non-verbal signals. This is primarily because the delivery of care involves the transmission of millions of messages among several stakeholders on a daily basis. In the modern health care system, the delivery procedures involve several crossing points and patient handoffs among the many health care practitioners.

As part of interpersonal communication, collaborative…… [Read More]

References:

"Communication Skills." (n.d.). Employability Skills. Retrieved from University of Bradford

website: http://www.careers.brad.ac.uk/employability/skills/communications.php

Ellingson, L.L. (2002). Communication, Collaboration, and Teamwork among Health Care

Professionals. Communication Research Trends, 21(3), 1-44. Retrieved from http://cscc.scu.edu/trends/v21/v21_3.pdf