Health Promotion Essays (Examples)

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Health Program Bronx Racial Disparities in the

Words: 1214 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91586564

Health Program Bronx

Racial Disparities in the Healthcare System

America's healthcare system is one of the most visible indicators of the broad array of social, economic and racial inequalities that still impact American life. For racial minorities such as African-Americans and Latinos, health outcomes are disproportionately worse than they are for white patients. This denotes a core inequality that goes to the root of our society. Outreach, education and advocacy programs such as the one described here in relation to minority populations living in the Bronx helps to provide a valuable case demonstration of this public health issue.

Collaborating Organizations:

The pressing racial issues that are evidenced in our imbalanced healthcare system serve as the impetus for the agenda and actions taken up by the REACH Bronx organization. This action-group is actually described as a coalition of groups and demonstrates the considerable push from a wide variance of parties to…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Calman, N. (2005). Making Health Equality a Reality: The Bronx Takes Action. Health Affairs, 24(2).

Institute for Family Health (2011). Bronx Health REACH -- Making Health Equity a www.institute2000.org/bhr/.

National Cancer Institute (2009). How to Evaluate Health Information on the Internet: Questions and Answers. Cancer.gov.

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2011). Health Literacy Online: A Guide to Writing and Designing Easy-to-Use Health Web Sites. www.health.gov/
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Health Education Plan Red Hook

Words: 1073 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11834798

Most of the people in that area are still trying to rebuild from that, and they have put their health on the back burner for the time being. They are not as interested in tending to potential problems and going to doctors appointments when their homes and community are damaged or destroyed. In the coming months and years things will normalize and people will return to pre-hurricane activities, but for now the post-hurricane cleanup is something with which health care providers and health educators will simply have to deal. The other factor that is a barrier to learning is the geographic isolation of ed Hook, because it is tucked away from the hustle and bustle of the main part of the city. That can leave the people somewhat forgotten when it comes to their needs.

One of the most important issues has to do with the health education outcomes (McKenzie,…… [Read More]

References

Brockwell, S., Kilminster, F. & Starr, A. (2009). Red Hook Community Health Assessment.

Hunter College Department of Urban Affairs and Planning, Issued 22 May, 2009.

Retrieved from http://www.brooklyncb6.org/_attachments/2009-05-

22%20RHI%20Red%20Hook%20Houses%20Health%20Assessment.pdf
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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Healthcare Promotion Prevention and the

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80129421

Nurses, who have first hand knowledge and understanding of how to live healthy and how to take proper care of themselves, are far better equipped to teach others about these concepts. Certain populations can benefit greatly from prevention, especially those who are prone to specific types of diseases or conditions.

One of the most common behaviors that leads to many chronic and often very damaging health conditions is smoking. Smoking can cause a multitude of diseases and conditions from emphysema to heart disease to lung cancer (Chapman, 2007). The list goes on and on. But smoking is 100% preventable and nurses need to understand not only how to treat these smoking-related diseases but how to more importantly discourage and prevent people from smoking in the first place. Many nurses agree that this behavior leads to many of the worst case scenarios for people with pre-existing chronic conditions. It is therefore…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Simon. (2007). Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking

History. Blackwell Publishing, New York, NY. Pp. 55-56.

Chung, Daniel C. (2008). "Stool DNA Testing and Colon Cancer Prevention: Another Step

Forward." Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 7. pp. 509-510.
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Health Care Roles in Communication Is a

Words: 2187 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48105866

Health Care oles in Communication

Communication is a fundamental piece of health care education and has been shown to improve health outcomes, patient compliance, and patient satisfaction. Quality health care emphasizes knowledge and utilization of communication skills. Health care professionals often express anxiety and lack of confidence and are deficient in a creating a situations that are conducive to open and candid communication with patients (Kameg et. al., 2009).

Effective communication involves gathering information, establishing a relationship or connection with a patient, and supporting the person through words and other non-verbal forms of interactions. Effective communication involves not only the interactions between the staff and the patient but also the interactions between staff and the interactions between the staff in front of the patient. Many times the high demand for services in a health care facility cause the staff to overlook the importance of good communication skills and enables situations…… [Read More]

References

Beer, J.E. (2003). Nonverbal Communication: Communicating across cultures. Cultures at work. Retrieved May 29, 2011 from  http://www.culture-at-work.com/nonverbal.html 

Coiera, E. (2006, May). Communication systems in healthcarre. Clinical Biochemist Reviews. nursing.Vol. 27, Issue 2, 89-98. Retrieved May 28, 2011 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1579411/ 

Gamble, T.K. & Gamble, M. (2006). Communication works. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill.

Health Communication. (2010). Health communication. Healthy people 2010: Objectives for improving reproductive health. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Retrieved May 29, 2011 from http://www.hhs.gov/opa/pubs/hp2010/hp2010rh_sec2_healthcomm.pdf
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Health Seeking Behaviors of Appalachian

Words: 2162 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84721921

15).

Furthermore, and despite its popularity as a tourist destination because of its natural beauty, the Appalachians are not a sterile environment by any means and the people who live there have higher risks for certain types of conditions than their counterparts elsewhere. According to Bauer and Growick (2003), "Americans who live in Appalachia experience unique and different ways of life than most Americans. Appalachian culture runs from the bottom half of the State of New York through the mountains of West Virginia and Southeast Ohio to the flatlands of Alabama. This area of the country offers different perspectives and challenges to life. Because of the geographical vastness and uniqueness of the Appalachian culture, many people with disabilities who live in Appalachia are unable to access rehabilitative services and agencies" (emphasis added) (p. 18).

Likewise, many rural residents throughout Appalachia may have septic tanks and will lack access to other…… [Read More]

References

Anguiano, R.P., & Harrison, S.M. (2002). Teaching cultural diversity to college students majoring in helping professions: The use of an eco-strengths perspective. College Student Journal, 36(1), 152.

Barrett, E., Hackler, R., Highfill, K.A., Huang, P., Jiang, X., Monti, M.M., & Peipins, Lucy. (2002). A Norwalk-like virus outbreak on the Appalachian Trail. Journal of Environmental Health, 64(9), 18.

Bauer, W., & Growick, B.M. (2003). Rehabilitation counseling in Appalachian America. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 69(3), 18.

Brown, J.W., & May, B.A. (2005, April). Rural Appalachian women's formal patterns of care. Southern Online Journal of Nursing Research, (2)6, 1-21.
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Healthcare Inequalities Are Healthcare Inequalities UK Defining

Words: 1638 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54460625

Healthcare Inequalities

Are healthcare inequalities UK

Defining Health Inequality

The term healthcare disparity or healthcare differences have been defined in a number of ways. Healthcare inequality can be defined as the difference of the health levels of any tow comparable demographic groups within a certain country or a region even when proper healthcare facilities are available. The inclusive incidences include higher rates of mortality as well as morbidity within the people who belong to lower occupational classes and are poorer. These rates are higher as compared to the mortality rates in the people who belong to better occupational classes being richer and more privileged. Second important aspect that has been highlighted in the definitions of healthcare inequality includes increased rates of occurrence of mental healthcare-based issues in people from poor classes.

A number of countries have been highlighted with healthcare inequalities including Canada and UK. Since 1980, the documentation of…… [Read More]

References

Asthana, S, and Dr. Halliday, J 2006, What works in tackling health inequalities?: pathways, policies and practice through the life course, Studies in poverty, inequality, and social exclusion, The Policy Press.

Barron K. 2009, Health inequalities: written evidence; Volume 422 of HC SeriesPaper (Great Britain. Parliament. (Session 2007-08). House of Commons)) Written evidence, The Stationery Office.

Davies P. 2007, The NHS in the UK 2007/08, 9th edn, The NHS Confederation.

Dowler E. 2007, Challenging health inequalities: from Acheson to choosing health, Health and Society Series, The Policy Press.
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Health Policy the Issue of

Words: 2923 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23543804

"

The relationship between healthcare and economics is a particular issue in poorer countries. The report explains that the economic impact in poor countries is seen in the form of grants and loans that the orld Bank grants. The report explains that credit worthy countries that are extremely poor can qualify for long-term interest free credit. These credits are given under the International Development Assistance program. Although some countries qualify for these interest free credit, they often resort to borrowing funds because IDA funds are limited and based on a first come first serve basis.

Countries that have both IDA and loans for the purpose of healthcare for citizens are under what is referred to as an IDA blend. It is referred to in this manner because the terms under which the funds are borrowed is a mixture of the ID and those of the International Bank for Reconstruction and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bambra, C., Debbie Fox, Alex Scott-Samuel. (2003) Towards a New Politics of Health. Retrieved on December 11, 2009 from: http: / / eres.welch.jhmi.edu / eres / docs/4464 / bambra_2003_1.pdf

Banerji D. (2006) Serious Crisis in the Practice of International Health by the World Health Organization: The Commission on Social Determinants of Health. International Journal of Health Services, Volume 36 (4), 637 -- 650,

Muntaner, C., Salazar, R.M.G.,Benach, J., Armada F. Venezuela's Barrio Adentro. (2006) An Alternative to Neoliberalism in Health Care. International Journal of Health Services, Volume 36 (4). 803 -- 811,

Navarro, V. (2007) What is a National Health Policy. International Journal of Health Services, 37 (1) 1 -- 14
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Healthcare the Impacts of Case

Words: 4123 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44424148

"Studies of the relationship between managed care penetration in the health care market and expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service enrollees have demonstrated the existence of these types of spill over effects" (Bundorf et al., 2004).

Managed care organizations generate these types of spillover effects by increasing competition in the health care market, altering the arrangement of the health care delivery system, and altering physician practice patterns. Studies have found that higher levels of managed care infiltration are linked with lower rates of hospital cost inflation and lower physician fees are consistent with competitive effects. "Other studies demonstrate the impact of managed care on delivery system structure including hospital capacity, hospital admission patterns, the size and composition of the physician workforce and the adoption and use of medical equipment and technologies. More recent evidence has linked market-level managed care activity to the process, but not the outcomes of care" (Bundorf et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Altman, D.E. And L. Levin. (2005). The Sad History of Health Care Cost Containment as

Told by One Client. Health Affairs, 24(1).

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and rising health care costs. part 1: Seeking an explanation.

Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(10), 847-54.
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Health Care Reform Several Years

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13950798

Contracts with doctors often contain a clause which doesn't allow the doctors to discuss

Health care 7 with their patients financial incentives to deny treatment or about treatments not covered by the plan (Glazer, 1996). This has caused many consumers, especially those with chronic illnesses, to form organizations with the American Medical Association and physician specialty groups to promote legislation forbidding "gag rules" (Glazer, 1996). One group, Citizen Action, has 3 million members and "has been lobbying in state legislatures for laws that would require plans to disclose how they pay their doctors; give patients the right to choose specialists outside the plan; and provide appeals for patients who get turned down for expensive treatments" (Glazer, 1996).

The doctor-patient relationship is also affected if a patient must switch to a new doctor under managed care. Having a longterm relationship with a primary doctor is important because he or she is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett Clark, Jane (1996, July). What you should ask your HMO.

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine. pp. 92-93.

Glazer, Sarah (1996, April 12). Managed Care. CQ Researcher, 6,

Koop, C. Everett (1996, Fall). Manage with care. Time. pp. 69.
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Health Maintenance Issues Concerns

Words: 1305 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42746766

Health Maintenance Issues

Mrs. Gray is an 86-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes. She has lived with the disease for three years. Mrs. Gray is single and lives in the area in a naturally occurring retirement community. Mrs. Gray, though 86, appears much younger than her stated age, which can be largely attributed to her active physical nature. Mrs. Gray boasts an exceedingly active social life, meeting her friends for lunch several times a week, and she strives to keep herself in good physical condition by going to the gym an average of four times a week. Mrs. Gray is further involved in the community through significant work in her church and as a member of the Senior Friends Program, which allows volunteers to interact with shut-ins by visiting with them and bringing them dinner once a week. Mrs. Gray's last A1C was 6.1%.

Health Maintenance…… [Read More]

References

Esfahani, A., Josse, A., and Panahi, S. (2008). Nutritional considerations for older adults with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly, 27.3-4. pp. 363-80. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Fravel, M., McDanel, D., and Ross, M. (2011). Special considerations for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 68.6. pp. 500-9. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Haffner, S., Lehto, S, and Ronnemaa, T. (2008). Mortality from coronary heart disease in subjects with type w diabetes and in nondiabetic subjects with and without prior myocardial infarction. New England Journal of Medicine, 349:1. pp. 229-234. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Halter, J. (2009). Geriatric patients. In: Therapy for Diabetes Millitus and related disorders, 3 ed. Alexandria, VA: American Diabetes Association. pp. 234-240. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.
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Health Canadian Health Care the

Words: 1345 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14236067



In 2004, a Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care was announced, primarily intended to improve access to medical services, decrease wait times, and update medical equipment and ensure accurate reporting and enhance public health promotion and prevention programs. Shortly thereafter, the Canadian Supreme Court affirmed the nation's health care philosophy and the immediate need to implement further improvements envisioned by the ambitious 2004 plan in striking down a Quebec law that had prohibited private medical insurance for covered services:

The evidence in this case shows that delays in the public health care system are widespread and that in some serious cases, patients die as a result of waiting lists for public health care...In sum, the prohibition on obtaining private health insurance is not constitutional where the public system fails to deliver reasonable services."

According to legal experts, the decision could "open the door to a wave of lawsuits challenging the…… [Read More]

References

Canadian Medical Association Journal.

1939 September; 41(3):

Chaoulli v. Quebec: Judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada Accessed, September 2, 2007, at http://scc.lexum.umontreal.ca/en/index.html

Kraus, C. (2005) Canada's Supreme Court Chips Away at National Health Care.
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Health Care Communication

Words: 1391 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23803465

Health Care Communication

As the nation's health care resources become more and more strained, health care professionals are being asked to do more with less. They are being pressured to find cheaper ways to improve the quality of health care they deliver. Given the current circumstances, this sounds difficult and even unreasonable, but it may not be entirely impossible.

One simple way for medical professionals to improve the quality of health care they provide is by improving their health care communication skills. Health care communication is "The art and technique of informing, influencing, and motivating individual, institutional, and public audiences about important health issues. The scope of health communication includes disease prevention, health promotion, health care policy, and the business of health care as well as enhancement of the quality of life and health of individuals within the community." (U.S.D.S.H.S., 2000, p.11-20).

In health care, as in all aspects of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Healthy People 2010: Volume I, Focus Area 11: Health Communication (second edition) Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Zachariae, R. et. al. (2003). The relative importance of physician communication, participatory decision making, and patient understanding in diabetes self-management. British Journal of Cancer, 88(5), 658-65.

Heisler, M. et. al. (2002). The relative importance of physician communication, participatory decision making, and patient understanding in diabetes self-management. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 17(4), 243-52.

Safran, D.G. et. al. (1998). Linking primary care performance to outcomes of care. Journal of Family Practice, 47(3), 213-20.