Healthcare System Essays (Examples)

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Reimbursement Issues in Healthcare

Words: 1420 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47694978

Third-Party Payment Systems:
a) Healthcare System Reimbursement: Evaluate third-party payer models for the impacts they present on healthcare system reimbursement.
Third-party payer models currently have a tremendous impact on the healthcare reimbursement system. The most considerable of these is the diverse forms in which they cause reimbursement to manifest. The vast majority of patients involved in the healthcare system utilize third-party payer models in the form of healthcare insurance. Insurance companies are the predominant means of reimbursing healthcare organizations for the services they provide, the equipment they use, and the staff they employee. In a sense these insurance companies are reimbursed by the premiums they exact from their patients. These two aspects of reimbursement make this concept multidimensional, which is the main effect of third-party payer models on healthcare system reimbursement.
b) Reporting Requirements: Analyze the reporting guidelines of third-party payer payment systems.
There are several challenges and opportunities for…… [Read More]



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Health Care in the Wake on New

Words: 1147 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5433181

Health Care

In the wake on new and very contentious health care reform, many firms have undergone extensive transformations. These transformations have been predicated on both cost control and quality management. In particular quality management has had a profound impact on the underlying business operations of many health care firms. For one, firms are now finding methods in which to enhance the overall patient experience while also mitigating potential loses due to negligent means. The focus on quality management has also made firms more efficient in regards to the overall delivery of service. In particular, my firm has done extensive work with reducing elderly accidents within the facility. This quality management initiative has not only reduced costs associated with accidents, but it also has enhanced the trust and patient experience of all stakeholders within the firm (Kelly, 2011).

Identify the milestone you chose in the history of quality improvement in…… [Read More]


1) Draper, Elaine, Joseph LaDou, and Dan J. Tennenhouse. 2011. "Occupational Health Nursing and the Quest for Professional Authority," New Solutions 21, 47 -- 81

2) Kohn, L.T., Corrigan, J.M., & Donaldson, M.S. (Eds). (2000). To err is human: Building a safer health system. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

3) Kelly, D.L. (2011). Applying quality management in healthcare: A systems approach (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press

4) Lucia, Patricia R.; Otto, Tammy E.; Palmier, Patrick A. (2009). "Chapter 1
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Healthcare the Impacts of Case

Words: 4123 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44424148

"Studies of the relationship between managed care penetration in the health care market and expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service enrollees have demonstrated the existence of these types of spill over effects" (Bundorf et al., 2004).

Managed care organizations generate these types of spillover effects by increasing competition in the health care market, altering the arrangement of the health care delivery system, and altering physician practice patterns. Studies have found that higher levels of managed care infiltration are linked with lower rates of hospital cost inflation and lower physician fees are consistent with competitive effects. "Other studies demonstrate the impact of managed care on delivery system structure including hospital capacity, hospital admission patterns, the size and composition of the physician workforce and the adoption and use of medical equipment and technologies. More recent evidence has linked market-level managed care activity to the process, but not the outcomes of care" (Bundorf et al.,…… [Read More]


Altman, D.E. And L. Levin. (2005). The Sad History of Health Care Cost Containment as

Told by One Client. Health Affairs, 24(1).

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and rising health care costs. part 1: Seeking an explanation.

Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(10), 847-54.
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Health Care Reform Several Years

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13950798

Contracts with doctors often contain a clause which doesn't allow the doctors to discuss

Health care 7 with their patients financial incentives to deny treatment or about treatments not covered by the plan (Glazer, 1996). This has caused many consumers, especially those with chronic illnesses, to form organizations with the American Medical Association and physician specialty groups to promote legislation forbidding "gag rules" (Glazer, 1996). One group, Citizen Action, has 3 million members and "has been lobbying in state legislatures for laws that would require plans to disclose how they pay their doctors; give patients the right to choose specialists outside the plan; and provide appeals for patients who get turned down for expensive treatments" (Glazer, 1996).

The doctor-patient relationship is also affected if a patient must switch to a new doctor under managed care. Having a longterm relationship with a primary doctor is important because he or she is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett Clark, Jane (1996, July). What you should ask your HMO.

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine. pp. 92-93.

Glazer, Sarah (1996, April 12). Managed Care. CQ Researcher, 6,

Koop, C. Everett (1996, Fall). Manage with care. Time. pp. 69.
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Healthcare Issues With the Provision

Words: 1180 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96629310

In their move from a completely government-paid and -- operated healthcare system to a fees-based approach, the Chinese have greatly improved the efficiency, availability, and efficacy of their healthcare system (Wan & Wan 2010). This suggests that a combination of perspectives, rather than the market or single-payer perspectives that form so many healthcare systems, is most effective.

There are also, of course, healthcare systems that have developed in the same period as those mentioned above, but with far more negative results. The South African healthcare system, though effective in combating certain specific conditions, has many of the same failings as the United States' system, only on to a far more apparent degree. A lack of organization and responsiveness, exacerbated by an attempt to exert highly politicized and highly centralized control over healthcare provision, has plagued South African efforts to combat AIDS and many other problems the country -- and the…… [Read More]


Offredy, M. (2008). "The health of a nation: perspectives from Cuba's national health system." Quality in primary care 16(4), pp. 269-77

Sewankambo, N. & Katamba, A. (2009). "Health systems in Africa: learning from South Africa." The lancet 374(9694), pp. 957-9.

Squires, A. (2009). "U.S. Healthcare reform: A comparative book review." Nursing ethics 16(5), pp. 673-5.

Wan, Y. & Wan, Y. (2010). "Achievement of equity and universal access in China's health service: A commentary on the historical reform perspective from the UK National Health Service." Global public health 5(1), pp. 15-27.
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Health Care Industry the State

Words: 1114 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99313436

Even though the overall life expectancy in the U.S. has increased to the age of 78, the relative ranking has fallen in relation to the rest of the world, with the U.S. now 38th out of 195 countries, behind most of Western Europe.

These rankings may reflect the combination of a shortage of public health education, lack of daily exercise, poor nutrition, and the uninsured not seeking medical help.

The results seem inevitable: the vast amount of money being spent on health care in the U.S. is plainly not buying better health care for the population. In a privatized insurance system where individual resources determine availability to obtain health care, then access to care will be prejudiced by income difference.

Positive Outcomes with Earlier Detection

There is some positive news. Cancer survival rates are considerably higher in the U.S. than the UK, presumably a result of a health care system…… [Read More]


Donohue, Tom. "U.S. Health Care -- Strengths and Weaknesses." 12 Feb 2008 . Chamber Post. 2 May 2009 .

"Health Insurance Cost." 2008. The National Coalition on Health Care. 2009 2 May .

Journal Compilation. "Is healthcare in the United States too big to fail?" Clinical Practice (2008): 62, 12, 1827 -- 1830.

Uretsky, Samuel D. "Healthcare in the United States ." 10 Jan 2005 . MedHunters. 2009 2 May .
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Healthcare Health Care Research Health

Words: 1017 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86002963

Canada is even further behind in its access to high tech equipment, including machines used for MRI's and CAT scans. This shortage of equipment affects wait time for diagnostic tests, which in some provinces can run well over three months (Beaudan, 2002).

According to Michael Decter, chair of the national board of Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian health care system is dazed but he still believes that modernized public healthcare is the answer. "e do well on life expectancy and immunization of children compared to the U.S.," he says, noting that the United States spends 40% more on healthcare than Canada does (Beaudan, 2002).

Americans who go to Canada for cheap flu shots often come away impressed at how Canada offers free and first class medical care to everyone. But hospital administrators will tell a different story about having to cut staff for lack of funds or about…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beaudan, Eric. "Canadian model of healthcare ails." Christian Science Monitor. 28 Aug. 2002: 1.

David, Guy. "The Convergence between for-Profit and Nonprofit Hospitals in the United

States." (2005). The Wharton School of Business University of Pennsylvania. 13 April 2009
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Healthcare Disparities in the U S

Words: 2117 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20695588

S. healthcare structure do not include the unobserved disparities. This may sound very rudimentary, even silly to point out, but in by understanding that the numbers are actually worse than they appear, and that the rising costs of healthcare services re associated with both what we see and can't see, it is easier to understand how costs rise so quickly.

It is also a sobering fact that what we cannot observe is still out there, existing beyond the scope of the government and social programs designed to help people overcome obstacles to access to healthcare and health insurance. The ethnic group that is most unobserved within the bounds of many of the studies and statistics related to the disparities in the U.S. healthcare industry is non-Mexican Latinos (Bustamante, et. al., 2009). This group represents a major portion of the U.S. population that currently lacks access to healthcare. In understanding this…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bodenheimer, T., Chen, E., and Bennett, H.D. (2009). "Reorganizing Care:

Confronting The Growing Burden Of Chronic Disease: Can The U.S. Health Care Workforce Do The Job?" Health Affairs. Vol. 28, No. 1. Pp. 164-174.

Braveman, P.A., Cubbin, C., Egerter, S., Williams, D.R., and Pamuk, E. (2010).

"Socioeconomic Disparities in Health in the United States: What the Patterns Tell Us." American Journal of Public Health. Vol. 100, No. 1. Pp. 186-196.
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Healthcare Information Systems Databases and

Words: 959 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59218565

Here second question that is raised for the author is that till now and for the future, many healthcare architectures have been designed that increase the availability of the patient records, not only on the national but on an international scale as well. The author in the study has only focused on the national or local availability of the patient records.

Content of the article is strong and there are a number of important facts given in the article in relation to the importance of healthcare indexing systems. The healthcare indexing systems being used in U.S., UK and Australia have been mentioned as an example. The two models of the indexing architecture given by the author in the beginning have been linked by the author with the examples. The loopholes that can be noticed in these cases are the absence of any privacy and security concerns that may be an…… [Read More]


Liu, V., Caelli, W., Smith, J., May, L., Lee, H.M., Ng, H.Z., Foo, H.J., and Li, W. (2010). A Secure Architecture for Australia's Index-Based E-health Environment. Proc. 4th Australasian Workshop on Health Informatics and Knowledge Management (HIKM 2010), Brisbane, Australia, p. 7-16.
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Health Care Options for Pregnant Women

Words: 1588 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16562288

Healthcare for Pregnant Women Comparison: U.S., Switzerland and Canada

A Comparison of Healthcare Options Pregnant Women in United States, Canada and Switzerland

The healthcare systems in Western societies do not assume that a woman requires health information; however, collectively, it has become well recognized that good information is necessary to a pregnant woman, and that understanding the stages of pregnancy, labor, and delivery is important to good perinatal care (Crook, 1995). This paper provides a comparison of the healthcare options available to pregnant women according to their income and insurance resources in the United States, Canada and Switzerland. A comparison of the respective healthcare systems for these nations will be provided in the summary, and a critique of the United States healthcare system will be provided in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion

Healthcare Options -- United States. The U.S. spends a larger percentage of its GDP on healthcare than does…… [Read More]


Barnes, D. (January 10, 2002). Group Fights 'Enormous' Problem of Teen Pregnancy. The Washington Times, 8.

Benoit, C., Carroll, D. & Millar, A. (2002). But Is It Good for Non-Urban Women's Health?

Regionalizing Maternity Care Services in British Columbia. The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 39(4), 373.

Collins, C. & Williams, D.R. (1995). U.S. Socioeconomic and Racial Differences in Health:
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Health Care Privatization Unlike a

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8549070

Surgeons in Canada report that, for heart patients, the danger of dying on the waiting list now exceeds the danger of dying on the operating table. Emergency rooms there are so overcrowded that patients awaiting treatment frequently line the corridors. Not only is there a long wait for care, but care is frequently denied to patients who prognosis is poor. In ritain kidney dialysis is generally denied patients over the age of 55. At least 1,500 ritons die each year because of lack of dialysis.

Countries with national health care systems also lag far behind the U.S. In the availability of modern medical technology. In Canada, high-technology medicine is virtually unavailable. In addition to being biased against new medical technologies, national health care systems generally discriminate against nontraditional practitioners, such as naturopaths and chiropractors.

It is true that Canada spends only about nine percent of its GDP on health care,…… [Read More]


Financing National Health Insurance." (2003, February 4). Available:  (Accessed 9 Feb. 2005).

Health Care Policy Issues. Sept. 2004. Available:  (Accessed 9 Feb. 2005).
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Health Care Reform Federal Deficit the American

Words: 4331 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22551835

Health Care Reform Federal Deficit

The American Health Care Crisis and the Federal Deficit

The United States spends more than any other country on medical care. In 2006, U.S. health care spending was $2.1 trillion, or 16% of our gross domestic product. At the same time, more than 45 million Americans lack health insurance and our health outcomes (life expectancy, infant mortality, and mortality amenable to health care) are mediocre compared with other rich democracies. We spend too much for what we get.

Nothing is new about these sobering realities. The Nixon administration first declared a health care cost crisis in 1969. Four decades later, the United States still has not adopted systemwide cost controls because the politics of health care make it extraordinarily difficult to control costs. I explain below why this is so (Marmor, et al., 2009).

The starting point for understanding the politics of cost control is…… [Read More]


1. Eakin, Douglas and Michael Ramlet. (2010) "Health Care Reform is Likely to Widen Budget Deficits -- Not Reduce Them." Health Affairs, 29, no.6:1136-1141. Eakin and Ramlet examine the underpinnings of the Congressional Budget Office's projection that enacting the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will decrease deficits, and conclude that it is built on a shaky foundation of omitted costs, premiums shifted from other entitlements, and politically dubious spending cuts and revenue increases. A more comprehensive and realistic projection suggests that the new reform law will raise the deficit by more than $500 billion during the first ten years and by nearly $1.5 trillion in the following decade. This is an excellent article with regards to my article, written by two policy commentators at the forefront of their field. This article shows expertise in medical economics and offers compelling, clear arguments for the increase in the federal deficit due to the massive spending on entitlements as a result of passing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. They project deficits, opposing the Congressional Budget Office, through their insightful analysis.

2. Marmor, Theodore, Jonathan Oberlander, and Joseph White. (2009) "The Obama Administration's Options for Health Care Cost Control: Hope vs. Reality." Ann Intern Med. 150:485-489. Controlling the costs of medical care has long been an elusive goal in U.S. health policy. This article examines the options for health care cost control under the Obama administration. The authors argue that the administration's approach to health reform offers some potential for cost control but also embraces many strategies that are not likely to be successful. Lessons the United States can learn from other countries' experiences in constraining medical care spending are then explored. This article offers evidence for the lack of cost containment in the Obama administrations' plans for health reform. It gives a good analysis of the international scene in health care as well.

3. Collins, Sara, Michelle M. Doty, Karen Davis, Cathy Schoen, Alyssa L. Holmgren, and Alice Ho. (2004) "The Affordability Crisis in Health Care." Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey. Published in 2004, The Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, conducted from September 2003 -- January 2004, presents new and timely information on where the American public stands on solutions to reform the health care system. The survey finds widespread support for federal efforts to extend health insurance to more people, as well as a widely held belief that the financing of health care should continue to be a shared responsibility among individuals, employers, and the government. The survey also uncovered potential reasons for such strong support for health care reform. Among the insured and the uninsured alike, there is concern that health care security in the United States is eroding. People are experiencing reductions in insurance coverage that are threatening their financial security.

4. Etheridge, Lynn (1984) "An Aging Society and the Federal Deficit." The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly. Health and Society, 521-543. This article serves as early warning sign of the deficit battles to come. It argues that the conflict between the growing needs of an aging society and a federal budget which cannot afford its current commitments has become one of the nation's most difficult government policy dilemmas. Assistance for the elderly through Social Security, Medicare, and other programs-is already the federal government's largest fiscal responsibility. In 1985 these programs will require nearly half of all domestic program spending an estimated $256 billion. The future costs of these commitments will rise rapidly well into the next century, accounting-with national defense and interest costs-for virtually all of the spending increases in the projected $200 to $300 billion deficits. Etheridge asserts that the decisions about the nation's assistance to the elderly -- and about reaffirmation, reform, and/or retrenchment of these commitments-will thus be central to the coming budget debates.
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Health Care Reform in the United States

Words: 1100 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32231164

Health Care eform:

In March 2010, after protracted public and political debate, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was enacted into law by President Barack Obama. This legislation was one of the many health care reforms initiatives that have sought to rectify major features of the health care system in the United States such as service delivery, care coordination, and financing. Since its enactment, PPACA is considered as a milestone along the historical continuum of health care reform in America. Generally, health care reform in the United States is an issue that has continued to evolve based on the ever-growing health care needs of the population. However, this issue has been characterized with several challenges that are mainly influenced by the public's response to reform efforts.

Principal Features of U.S. Health Care System:

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which is commonly known as the Affordable…… [Read More]


Bodenheimer, T., & Grumbach, K. (2012). Understanding health policy: a clinical approach (6th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Medical.

"Key Features of the Affordable Care Act by Year." (n.d.). Features of the Health Law.

Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website:

Leflar, R.B. (2013, July 12). Reform of the United States Health Care System: An Overview.
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Health Care Reform Recommendations to

Words: 1761 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32743451

On the contrary, a comprehensive medical care solution that tackles the main issues driving up health care costs in America is possible. The main problem experienced by the average American is that health insurance premiums are cost prohibitive for the middle-class, but being uninsured can bankrupt a family forced to deal with even a minor catastrophic illness. Therefore, a national health insurance program has to be part of the solution. However, one cannot overlook the role that unpaid medical bills and exorbitant malpractice premiums also play in the modern healthcare crises. As a result, the solution must include a way to reduce malpractice premiums through tort reform, and a way to reduce the percentage of medical bills that go unpaid. The proposed three-prong approach would tackle all of those issues, without forcing any unwilling person to participate in a nationalized healthcare program.

orks Cited

American Tort Reform Association. "Medical Liability…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Tort Reform Association. "Medical Liability Reform." ATRA Issues. 2007.

American Tort Reform Association. 6 Nov. 2008

Kershaw-Staley, Tracy. "Miami Valley Hospital Files Lawsuit Over Unpaid Medical Bills."

Dayton Business Journal. 2008. Dayton Business Journal. 6 Nov. 2008
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Health Care Healthcare Questions Compare

Words: 1206 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31894204

Also, as care is prioritized, those individuals deemed to be in a less urgent need of care are given a lower priority, which results in a wait list. Finally, as physicians are compensated on the same level of salary, fewer people may be attracted to the profession for its financial rewards. In a public system, patients shop around less for providers because most providers charge the same fees. ithin a public system there is less 'siphoning' of middle-income people to higher-cost physicians with short waiting lists.

Visit: is this hospital? hat would your policy response be?

According to its website, the Cambie Surgery Centre is a private healthcare clinic. The site notes that the "BC provincial government looks to private health care facilities like the Cambie Surgery Centre to help ease the long public wait lists." The hospital is a paying hospital that uses sophisticated technology to perform its…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cambie Surgery Centre." Official website. 7 Apr 2008.

Economies of scale." Investopedia. 7 Apr 2008. 

Economies of scope." Investopedia. 7 Apr 2008. 

Green, David G., Ben Irvine & Ben Cackett. "Health care in Germany." 2005.
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Healthcare Policies Hospitals Should Not

Words: 2007 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78180326

In fact Congress should pass a bill that gives that prescription drug benefit to Medicare patients.

QUESTION NINE: In the United States, healthcare is so expensive that over 45 million people are without health insurance. It is a broken system, leaving out many people, especially children. Recently the executive branch vetoed a bill that would have provided health insurance to millions of middle and low-income children, indicating a lack of government concern for the well being of the population. Bush said it was too expensive, yet it's not too expensive to continue spending billions on an unpopular war in Iraq. Meanwhile, for the past 45 years, Canada has had a "government-funded, national healthcare system..." based on these five principles, according to, it is universally available to permanent residents; two, it is comprehensive; three, it is available regardless of income; four, it is "portable within and outside" Canada; and five,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2007). Fact Sheet: Nursing Shortages.

Retrieved Feb. 7, 2008, at

Duke, Elizabeth. (2004). Report to Congress. The Critical Care Workforce: A Study of the Supply and Demand for Critical Care Physicians. U.S. Department of Health & Human

Services / Health Resources & Services Administration. Retrieved Feb. 6, 2008, at
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Healthcare in the 21st Century

Words: 757 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83679936

One such barrier is the pattern of supply-driven care that has proven extremely costly on the average consumer and patient. Essentially, this method of healthcare has created a multi-billion dollar industry, where patients' needs are put to the side in order for healthcare organizations to make the largest profit margin possible through a system that resembles a production line more so than a hospital facility. Unfortunately, "producers control demand" (O'Toole, 2009, p 48). With so many major companies profiting from this style of healthcare, they will undoubtedly put up a fight for reform initiatives like the Triple Aim Initiative, which is hoping to rework the system in order to save consumers the burden of costs, without reducing the quality of the care they receive. Moreover, the physician-centric model of most of today's healthcare systems also proves a barrier to the aims of the Triple Aim Initiative. Essentially, under this model,…… [Read More]


O'Toole. Eileen. (2009) Healthcare in the 21st century. The Nurse Practitioner, 34(7), 46-50.

World Health Organization. (2013).World Health Statistics 2013: Indicator Compendium. Web.
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Systems Theory Discuss Relationship Systems Theory Healthcare

Words: 1238 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68949566

Systems Theory

Discuss relationship systems theory healthcare deliver U.S. - What current concepts healthcare explained helped a system theory approach? - What system theory? - How researchers (Ludwig von Bertalanffy Everett M.

Systems theory and diffusion of innovation theory

Systems theory

Systems theory was not specifically designed to cope with the challenges of the U.S. healthcare system, although it has been frequently applied to some of its issues. Systems theory was originally coined by the scientist Ludwig von Bertalanffy to sum up his idea that the 'whole' of systems -- both biological and otherwise -- were larger than the sum of their parts. According to von Bertalanffy, "in the past, science tried to explain observable phenomena by reducing them to an interplay of elementary units investigable independently of each other, conceptions appear in contemporary science that are concerned with what is somewhat vaguely termed 'wholeness', i.e. problems of organization, phenomena…… [Read More]


Diffusion of innovation theory. (2013). University of Twente. Retrieved:

This website contains excerpts from E.M. Rogers' work on diffusion of innovation theory, along with a helpful graphical representation of how the information is disseminated.

Kaminski, J. (Spring 2011).Diffusion of innovation theory. Canadian Journal of Nursing.
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Healthcare in Finland Norway or Sweden or Switzerland

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45622070

Healthcare in Sweden

The healthcare system in Sweden is used as one of the model systems in the world. hen Johan Hjertoqvist from the Timbro Policy Group spoke before the Montreal Economic Institute in 2002, he said, " refuse to accept the consumer as an equal partner, you still look upon the client, the patient, as an inferior partner in the relation" and "you deny the need for good working condition when it comes to the staff, etc." (, he stressed the need to move interests and priorities away from the processes and production organization to "the quality of the outcome for the consumer" ( seems to be synonymous with healthcare in Sweden.

Two important characteristics of the Swedish healthcare system are that it is "decentralized and it is run on democratic principles" ( residents of Sweden are covered by the national health insurance system which covers medical care, pharmaceuticals,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fact Sheets on Sweden: The Health Care System in Sweden. Swedish Institute. May 1999. 06-27-2003).

Gennser, Margit. "Sweden's Health Care System." .

A accessed 06-27-2003).

Hadenius, Stig; Lindgren, Ann. "Sweden: On Sweden Health care." Countries of the World. January 01, 1991.
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Healthcare Leadership & Prejudices Healthcare

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3466094


Prejudice and ethical/leadership issues with healthcare are nothing new but the fight to keep those standards and ethics on an even keel and prevent racism, bigotry and predudice of any sort including based on class, money, political ideology, nationalism, and so forth should be stomped out and eviscerated whenever it can be. People are people and should treated with dignity and respect regardless of their race, gender, beliefs and so forth. Even convicted murderers and rapists should not be treated disdain due to their actions because doing otherwise lowers the ethics and standards of the healthcare community that can and should still apply at all times.


Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),


Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., ay, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences…… [Read More]


Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),


Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., Ray, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences on ability to afford prescription medications.
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Healthcare Institutions Are Seeking New

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2633007

Cost is one of the primary issues -- it is cheaper to go to an RN than a doctor, and walk-in clinics have lower overhead costs than physician's offices, which is of great concern to uninsured or minimally insured patients. ait time is another concern -- clinics provide immediate treatment, patients do not have to wait for appointments for a brief, routine procedure, which insured patients may balk at if they merely wish to get a routine culture for strep throat. Using the Internet to access information about insurance and care results in lowered administrative costs for providers, less need for phone operators to provide advice, and results in additional speed for the consumer, in accessing records.

For a patient without insurance, ordering drugs online and not having to pay for a 'live' consult may be more cost-efficient, despite the higher costs of the drugs. Healthcare companies' desire to make…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kantor, Aileen. (Dec 1991). "New role for nurses." Business & Health. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at

Wal-Mart to expand walk-in clinics in stores." (24 Apr 2007). AP Wire. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at MSN.
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Healthcare Reform Review of Literature

Words: 6070 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45810582

(Menzel, 1990, p. 3) Fisher, Berwick, & Davis alude to the idea of integration in health care, with providers linking as well as creating networks of electronic medical records and other cost improvement tactics.

The United States and other nations over the last twenty or so years, have begun a sweeping change in health care delivery, regarding the manner in which health information is input, stored and accessed. Computer use in the medical industry has greatly increased over the last thirty years the culmination of this is fully networked electronic medical record keeping. (Berner, Detmer, & Simborg, 2005, p. 3) the electronic medical record trend began in the largest institutions first, as hospitals and large care organizations attempted to reduce waste and improve patient care, while the adoption has been much slower among physician's practices and smaller medical institutions. (Hillestad, et al., 2005, pp. 1103-1104) Prior to this time medical…… [Read More]

Resources, and Utilization
Kahnamoui, N. (2004). Electronic medical records. pp. 1-31.

Kant Patel, M.E. (2006). Health Care Politics and Policy in America. Armonk, NY: ME Sharp Inc.

Kumar, K., & Subramanian, R. (1998). Meeting the Expectations of Key Stakeholders: Stakeholder Management in the Health Care Industry. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 63 (2), 31-38.

LeGrand, J. (2009). Choice and competition in publicly funded health care. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 4, 479-488.
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Health Care Debate Over the

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17337115

At which point, the overall costs of care will be passed on to the tax payer in the form of higher taxes. This leads to a decrease in the overall quality of care and it will not slow the price increases, as the government seeks to restrict access to these services. Then, when the program becomes broken (such as: what is happening to Social Security) removing or reforming the bureaucracy is nearly impossible. (Messerili, 2010)

A second argument that many critics make about universal health care is: it will stifle innovation. Whenever, the government is running any kind of program, they will place a large number of restrictions and regulations on the industry. When this takes place, you are causing some of the best and brightest minds to seek careers in other fields, as the restrictions from the government are too cumbersome. A good example of this would be: the…… [Read More]


Trends in Health Care Costs and Spending. (2006). Retrieved March 13, 2010 from Kaiser Foundation website:

Andersen, R. (2007). Changing the U.S. Health Care System. Washington D.C: National Academy Press.

Gratzer, D. (2002). Better Medicine. Toronto, on: ECW Press.