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Deciding Whether or Not to

Words: 1965 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 84288410



The author currently contract with Verisma. Record Jacket Release Manager Overview is the current system that they use to scan the documents (Verisma ystems) that they are sending out for Guthrie Clinic. The author, however, is considering implementing EMR.

There are essentially five top medical records that are considered to be most proficient for using as EMR. One of these is the Hyland oftware OnBase, for scanning the medical instittuion's medical record releases into the patients chart. This is the system that the authors of this essay will be switching to within the next few months that will categorize their medical record releases and help streamline the process to bring it in-house.

It is ranked as one of the top five her products and is supposed to impact staff in a magnificent way making work easier and more reliable for them (Health Data Management )

ources

Arkin, J. (2007). The…… [Read More]

Sources

Arkin, J. (2007). The emr & roi making the important decisions. Advance for Health Information Professionals, 17(9), 19. Retrieved from  http://health-information.advanceweb.com/article/the-EMR  -- ROI-Making-the-Important-Decisions.aspx

AHIMA. (2003). Electronic document management as a component of the electronic health record. AHIMA Brief, Retrieved from www.AHIMA.org

Conn, Joseph. "Data security, job security; Attendees at annual AHIMA conference turn attention to legal, staffing issues." Modern Healthcare 15 Oct. 2007: 31. Academic OneFile. Web. 21 May 2012.

Dooley, a. r. (2002). Health management information systems: methods and practical applications (book). American Journal of Health Behavior, 26(3), 231.
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Activity Studies Found Common Features High-Performing Health

Words: 1147 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12396916

Activity Studies found common features high-performing health departments manage diabetes. These departments include receiving external funding programming, a -management education program recognized American Diabetes Association, partnership opportunities.

While obesity and obesity-related complaints such as Type II diabetes are a problem all over the United States, in my home state of Georgia, the condition has been of particular, growing concern. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), "64.8% of adults were overweight, with a Body Mass Index of 25 or greater" and "29.6% of adults were obese, with a Body Mass Index of 30 or greater" in the state (Georgia's response to obesity, 2012, CDC). Even more worrisome, amongst adolescents who should be at the most active stage of their lives, "14.8% were overweight (>85th and < 95th percentiles for BMI by age and sex) 12.4% were obese (>95th percentile for BMI by age and sex)" (Georgia's response to obesity,…… [Read More]

References

Rivard, P. (2003). Accountability for patient safety: A review of cases, concepts, and practices.

Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors. Retrieved:  http://www.macoalition.org/Initiatives/docs/Accountability%20LitReview%20Final_Rivard_new%20copyright.pdf
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We Can but Should

Words: 932 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44744325

Health Information & QR Codes

asic medical information and medical history is critical in case of medical emergencies. If first responders do not have that information patients can be put at risk for medication reactions, medical complications, and treatment processes can take longer as healthcare providers are left to explore the patient's condition in the dark. When the medical information is non-attainable, patients can also be put at risk for death in cases of coronary and heart health issues. QR codes are scanned by smartphone or mobile phones containing camera software that link to a website URL to retrieve basic medical information that is used to get the patient help.

ERMedStat (Harrington, 2012) is a company that uses QR codes and smartphones to provide first responders with basic medical history. The information contains blood type, emergency contacts, allergic reactions, medical complications, and a list of medications. The company does not…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Harrington, C. (2012, Mar 7). Maryville company uses QR codes to share medical histories in emergencies. Retrieved from knoxvillebiz.com:  http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2012/mar/07/marville-company-uses-qr-codes-to-share-medical/ 

How it Works. (n.d.). Retrieved from Lifesquare: https://www.lifesquare.com/how

Staff, T.N. (2012, Sep 26). New QR Codes Tell Paramedics Your Medical Info. Retrieved from Tech News Daily: http://www.technewsdaily.com/6264-new-qr-codes-tell-paramedics-your-medical-info.html
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My Part of This Project Is to Be Network Database Administrator

Words: 1103 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 69437365

Computer Science

As the database network administrator assigned to the reworking of this expanding medical practice, my primary concern will be to balance the need for a large staff to be able to access the data (with differing levels of access allowed to people in different positions) while at the same time adhering to the standards of medical confidentiality as they are outlined in the HIPPA statutes and as supplemented by the medical ethics of this practice, which we assume to be of the highest since the staff are expending time and money to bring their system into compliance with current law and practice.

The first part of my job would be to create the basic categories into which all of the relevant data can be sorted. One of the key roles of designing a database is that of reducing the complexity of the real world into a manageable degree.…… [Read More]

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Strategic Planning Document Statement of

Words: 2480 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79320801



STEP 8 - INTEVENTION IMPLEMENTATION PHASING

The initial implementation of the automated calling system will require a significant amount of data entry concerning patient contact data; however, this data can be integrated in digital form from existing healthcare information management system as discussed further below.

PLANNING MODULE III - DETAILED HIMS PLANNING and COSTING

Although the actual acquisition of the automated calling system selected for this initiative will be completed by the hospital's purchasing department, a preliminary review of available representative systems that meet the needs of the ENT department is provided in Table 1 below.

Table 1

epresentative Automated Calling Systems and Specifications

Vendor

Description

Comments

Voicent

(http://www.voicent.com/)

BroadcastByPhone: Automated dialing software can reach people by phone or by voice mail with personalized messages the auto-dialer uses a computer to deliver personal calls or leave answering machine messages in a human voice or a computer-generated voice. Calls are delivered…… [Read More]

References

Cyr, F., King, M.C. & Ritchie, P.L. (1999). Quality management for psychology services in health care facilities. Canadian Psychology, 36(3), 201-204.

Tidwell, R. (2004). The 'no-show' phenomenon and the issue of resistance among African

American female patients at an urban health care center. Journal of Mental Health

Counseling, 26(1), 1-3.
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Security and Control of Health Data

Words: 3766 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68825610

Health-Care Data at Euclid Hospital Security and Control: A White Paper

Protecting Health-Care Data

The efficiency of the modern healthcare system is increasingly becoming reliant on a computerized infrastructure. Open distributed information systems have been initiated to bring professionals together on a common platform throughout the world. It needs to be understood that easy and flexible methods of processing and communication of images; sound and texts will help in visualizing and thereby cure illnesses and diseases effectively. Another aspect is that the easy access and usage can risk patient privacy, accountability, and secrecy associated with the healthcare profession. Therefore, Information Technology -- IT must be able to focus mainly on improving the health of the patient and should not put the patient's health in danger. (IO Press)

This implies that right data has to be made available to the right person at the right time. IT strongly affects the confidentiality…… [Read More]

References

A WWW implementation of National Recommendations for Protecting Electronic Health

Information.  http://medg.lcs.mit.edu/people/psz/secman.html 

Accessed 21 September, 2005

IO Press. Retrieved from  http://www.iospress.nl/loadtop/load.php?isbn=9051992661
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Strategic Plan Part III Financial Goals

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95907449

Bon Secours Project

I n 1824, in Paris, amidst the devastation following the French Revolution, a group of 12 women came together to form the congregation of the Sisters of Bon Secours, French for "Good Help" and the Sisters' purpose was to nurse the sick and dying in their homes (Bon Secours, N.d.). The group later arrived in the United States towards the end of the nineteenth century and has been operating there ever since. The organization has grown to include many locations in several states on the East Coast. The organization still operates with their Catholic heritage in mind and much of the cares provided in these organizations are charity cases. The organization consists of a staff of over 21,000 and well over 60 facilities in six states. The current business model is a regional model. The organization has significant access to resources and there should be no issues…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bon Secours. (2012). 2011 Annual Report. Retrieved from Bon Secours:  http://www.bshsi.com/assets/hso/BSHSI_Annual_Report-2011FINAL.pdf 

Bon Secours. (2013). Locations. Retrieved from Careers at Bon Secours:  http://careers.bonsecours.com/locations.html 

Bon Secours. (N.d.). About us. Retrieved from Bon Secours Health Systems:  http://richmond.bonsecours.com/about-us-about-bon-secours.html 

Eoyang, O. (2001). Facilitating Organizational Change: Lessons from Complexity Science. Jossey-Bass.
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Care Information Systems and Medical Records

Words: 1454 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50831582

Evolution of Health Care Information Systems Physician's Office Operation

Filling in the hole of health care information technology will endorse safe, capable, patient-centered, and patient care that is fruitful in a timely way. In this essay, the theme is to look into two modern health

care organizations and then compare and contrast many characteristics that will involve the kind of evidence systems are using at the moment, investigate the transmission of information 20 years ago and how the substitute of data today. Furthermore, this essay will cover two major events and technology developments that have inclined present Health Care Informational Services practices.

Compare and Contrast Doctor's Workplace Operation

These day's doctor's office operation is familiarizing to the health care reform that was sanctioned in 2010 by the Obama organization. During sometime in October of 2013, the exchanges in health insurance was available on the market for customers on order to…… [Read More]

References

Burke, D., Wang, B., & Wan T.T.H. & Diana, M. (2009). Exploring Hospitals' Adoptionof IT. Journal of Medical Systems, 21(9), 349 -- 355.

Callen, J., & Braithwaite, J. & . (2008). Cultures in Hospitals and TheirInfluence on Attitudes to, and Satisfaction with, the Use of Clinical InformationSystems. Social Science and Medicine, 65(4), 635-639.

Finchman, R., & Kohli, R. & . (2011). Editorial Overview -- The role of IS inHealthcare. Information Systems Research, 22(3), 419-428.
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Person for Mental Illness the

Words: 1953 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 10571299

, 2001). (Corrigan, Watson, Byrne & Davis, 2005, p. 363)

Individuals who then enter the system and attempt treatment are taking a leap of faith that doing so will improve rather than continue to degrade their life and their options in it. Though HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) attempts to resolve issues of confidentiality, creating strict rules for who when and how communications about one's health can be communicated between individuals attempts to aide all health care clients they are specifically helpful with regard to mental health clients. Possible barriers they create with regard to the sharing of information between clinicians can also be specifically troubling in the mental health arena as the individual must be shown to be giving consent in some way to these communications and they also bar clinicians from sharing information with the individual's support network, such as family, unless permission has been granted…… [Read More]

References

Suicide. (2007). In the Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Corrigan, P.W., Watson, a.C., Byrne, P., & Davis, K.E. (2005). Mental Illness Stigma: Problem of Public Health or Social Justice?. Social Work, 50(4), 363.

Heeringen, K. (Ed.). (2001). Understanding Suicidal Behaviour: The Suicidal Process Approach to Research, Treatment, and Prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Seaburn, D.B., Lorenz, a.D., Gunn, W.B., Gawinski, B.A., & Mauksch, L.B. (1996). Models of Collaboration: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working with Health Care Practitioners. New York: Basic Books.
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Security Privacy in Health Care the Protection

Words: 2180 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29161614

Security Privacy

In health care, the protection of confidential patient information is an important key in to addressing critical issues and safeguarding the privacy of the individual. To provide more guidance are federal guidelines such as: the Health Care Insurance Affordability and Accountability Act (HIPPA). On the surface, all facilities are supposed to have procedures in place for discarding these kinds of materials. ("Summary of HIPPA Privacy ule," 2102)

In the case of St. John's Hospital, they have become known for establishing practices of innovation (which go above and beyond traditional safety standards). Yet, at the same time, there are no critical internal controls governing how this information is thrown away. What most executives are concentrating on: is meeting these objectives from an external stakeholder perspective.

This is creating problems inside the facility, as the custodial staff able to go through the garbage and read this information. The reason why,…… [Read More]

References

Summary of HIPPA Privacy Rule. (2012). HHS. Retrieved from:  http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/summary/index.html

Alguire, P. (2009). The International Medical Graduate's Guide. Philadelphia, PA: ACP Press.

Johnston, A. (2012). State Hospitals become more Transparent. Times Record News. Retrieved from:  http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2012/jan/13/state-hospitals-become-more-transparent/ 

Kilipi, H. (2000). Patient's Autonomy. Amsterdam: ISO Press.
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Social Engineering Information Security

Words: 3036 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47978737

Social Engineering and Information Security

We are in an age of information explosion and one of the most critical problems facing us is the security and proper management of information. Advanced hardware and software solutions are being constantly developed and refined to patch up any technical loopholes that might allow a hacker attack and prevent consequent breach of information security. While this technical warfare continues, hackers are now pursuing other vectors of attack. Social engineering refers to the increasing employment of techniques, both technical and non-technical, that focus on exploiting the cognitive bias in humans as the weakest link in computer security. What is shocking is the fact that in spite of the great vulnerability to human exploitation, there prevails a seemingly careless attitude in this regard in the corporate world. While more and more money is spent on beefing up hardware security and in acquiring expensive software solutions, little…… [Read More]

References

1) Christopher Hadnagy (2011), 'Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking', Wiley Publishing Inc.

2) Greg Sandoval, (Feb 2007), 'FTC to Court: Put an end to pretexting operations', Retrieved Mar 5th 2011 from,  http://news.cnet.com/FTC-to-court-Put-an-end-to-pretexting-operations/2100-7348_3-6159871.html?tag=lia;rcol 

3) Mindi McDowell, (Oct 2009), 'National Cyber Alert System: Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing attacks', retrieved Mar 5th 2011 from, http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/tips/ST04-014.html

4) Sonja Ryst, (July, 2006), ' The Phone is the latest Phishign Rod', retrieved Mar 5th 2011 from,  http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jul2006/tc20060710_811021.htm
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Protection of Proprietary Information Is

Words: 1206 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64022405

This education program must include all levels of the institution from the highest level of management, physicians, nurses, technicians and support staff. As much as possible, it should also include all outside vendors and casual hires.

Although employee leaks remain the primary source for the loss of proprietary information attacks on information systems by hackers, viruses, worms and the occasional angry employee are becoming an increasingly more serious problem. The actual seriousness of this problem is skewed due to the fact that most institutions do not report such occurrences in order to avoid the negative publicity associated with such breaches.

Security breaches of this nature have traditionally been relegated to the exclusive province of it personnel. It was believed that such personnel were best able to handle such problems and, for the most part, that remains the case but due to the increase in such occurrences collateral damage must now…… [Read More]

3 Health Information Privacy. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2010, from Department of Health and Human Services:  http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy

4 Nickels, William, McHugh, James, McHugh, Susan, (2008). Understanding Business, McGraw-Hill

5 Security Research in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon. (2010). Retrieved November 29, 2010, from Computer Science Department:  http://www.csd.cs.cmu.edu/research.areas/security
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Philosophy of Misleading the Art

Words: 1156 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 20058756

Aristotle's elements of honor state:

"The elements of honour are: sacrifices, memorials both in verse and without metre, rewards, sanctuaries, precedence, tombs, statutes, public maintenance, barbarian practices, such as genuflection and standing back, and gifts, which are valued by all recipients. Indeed, a gift is a surrender of property and an indication of status, which is why it is sought by the mercenary and the ambitious, providing as it does what they both seek, as the mercenary are after possessions and the ambitious are after status (Aristotle, Lawson-Tancred, p. 89)."

The wars begun after September 11, 2001, have long ceased to be about bringing to justice the perpetrators of evil and destruction, and have become the mechanisms to obtaining possessions (material wealth) for politically aligned news media, and the elevation to status for the right and the left public officials who gain support and attention for saying the right things,…… [Read More]

References

Aristotle and Lawson-Trancred, H. (1991). The Art of Rhetoric, Penguinclassics.com,

Penguin Classics.

Birenbaum, a. (1997). Managed Care: Made in America, Westport, CT., Praeger

Publishers.
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Professionals Who Are Trained in

Words: 2507 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 91184450

Beyond the ability of the individual to carry out daily activities, there is the issue of quality of life. So a person who can get up and go to work but finds no pleasure in normal activities is someone whose symptoms still merit concern from the mental health professional (Hood & Johnson, 2006, pp. 27-9.)

Psychiatrists: The Medical Model of Treatment

For many people the most obvious professional to seek treatment from when faced with the symptoms of mental disorders is a psychiatrist. (Maybe because we've grown up reading the psychiatry cartoons in The New Yorker!) Psychiatrists are medical doctors and so their basic response to the symptoms of mental disorders will tend to be a medical one. This encompasses an overall examination of the person's health. (For example, a psychiatrist might run a series of thyroid function tests to determine if a patient's depressive symptoms were related to thyroid…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR Fourth Edition.

Davies, T. (1997, 24 May.). ABC of mental health: Mental health assessment. BMJ: 314.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. New York: Wiley.

Hood, A. & Johnson, R. (2006). Assessment in counseling: A guide to the use of psychological procedures. Washington DC: American Counseling Association.
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Adams K E 2012 Benefits of

Words: 1586 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 30007095

Researchers identified key barriers to physicians' use of EMRs. They then suggested policy interventions to overcome these barriers, including providing work/practice support systems, improving electronic clinical data exchange, and providing financial rewards for quality improvement.

ne of the most important contributuons to essay since it suggests barriers to EMR and ways to overcome those barriers.

15. Bates, DW et al. (2002) a Proposal for Electronic Medical Records in U.S. Primary Care J. Am Med Inform Assoc; 10:1-10

This paper, developed by the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics, a collaborative group sponsored by a number of primary care societies, argues that providers' and patients' information and decision support needs can be satisfied only if primary care providers use electronic medical records (EMRs). Although robust EMRs are now available, only about 5% of U.S. primary care providers use them. Recently, with only modest investments, Australia, New Zealand, and England have achieved…… [Read More]

One of the most important contributuons to essay since it suggests barriers to EMR and ways to overcome those barriers.

15. Bates, DW et al. (2002) a Proposal for Electronic Medical Records in U.S. Primary Care J. Am Med Inform Assoc; 10:1-10

This paper, developed by the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics, a collaborative group sponsored by a number of primary care societies, argues that providers' and patients' information and decision support needs can be satisfied only if primary care providers use electronic medical records (EMRs). Although robust EMRs are now available, only about 5% of U.S. primary care providers use them. Recently, with only modest investments, Australia, New Zealand, and England have achieved major breakthroughs in implementing EMRs in primary care. Substantial benefits realizable through routine use of electronic medical records include improved quality, safety, and efficiency, along with increased ability to conduct education and research. Nevertheless, barriers to adoption exist and must be overcome. This paper is a valuable summing up of the importance of EMR to medical institutions, the challenges, and how institutions can meet these challenges.
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Advances in Digital Medical Imaging

Words: 1416 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81044696

Advances in Digital Medical Imaging

Origin

In the past few decades advances in healthcare have emerged, as new forms of technological integration are implemented as part of the overall healthcare management system. Healthcare providers, doctors and patients require more technological integration into the system providing real time data analysis and the possibility of enhancing medical knowledge. Sharing that knowledge can lead to what many describe as "digital medicine" where stored clinical data can generate medical knowledge which can be widely distributed, incorporated into decision support systems, and lead to more effective medical practices (ouler & Morgenstern, 2005). Digital medical image processing within the healthcare area has its origins in the 1970's when computed tomography was introduced as the first digital modality. In the decades that followed, advances in digital medical imaging technology have dramatically affected the planning and design of diagnostic interventional radiology facilities. Soon after the advent of computerized…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bang, C. (2005). Digital Imaging Drives Health Care Design. Building Operation

Management, July.

Becker, S. (1994). Costs and Benefits of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems.

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, vol. 1, no. 5: 361-371.
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Knowledge Concerning Ethical Issues Involved

Words: 4963 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86009486

100). Much of the focus of personnel selection using psychological testing was on new troops enlisting in the military during two world wars and the explosive growth of the private sector thereafter (Scroggins et al., 2008). Psychological testing for personnel selection purposes, though, faded into disfavor during the 1960s, but it continues to be used by human resource practitioners today. In this regard, Scroggins and his colleagues advise, "Many H practitioners, however, have continued to use personality testing with an optimistic and enduring faith in its ability to discriminate between good and poor job candidates" (p. 101).

In cases where cheating is suspected (such as in the case of an teen applicant possibly using a smartphone or consulting crib notes during testing by visiting the restroom), psychologists have a professional responsibility to conform to relevant privacy laws with respect to the results of such tests, including following the decision-making model…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, F.P. & Murdin, L. (2001). Values and ethics in the practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Bersoff, D.N. (2008). Ethical conflicts in psychology. American Psychological Association.

Bonventre, V.M. (2005, Spring). Editor's foreword. Albany Law Review, 68(2), vii-ix.

Charman, D. (2004). Core processes in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy: Advancing effective practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Is the Ankle Sprained Broken or Dislocated

Words: 856 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 45710204

Musculoskeletal Examination

Is the ankle swollen?

Does it hurt when you do not put pressure on it?

How did you hurt your ankle in the past?

Was it a tear or a sprain or a break?

Does your ankle look twisted?

Is there any numbness in your ankle?

Are you able to put any weight at it all, or is it impossible to put any weight on it?

Is there any bruising?

You did not hear a cracking sound, it was distinctly a popping sound?

Can you describe the pain when you put pressure on it from 1-10: 1 being hardly any pain and 10 being intolerable?

Can you roll your foot around from side to side?

Can you move your foot at all if you hold your leg out from where you are seated?

Differential Diagnoses:

The differential diagnosis consists of a likely high ankle sprain. The popping sound…… [Read More]

References

Lynch, S. (2012). Assessment of the injured ankle in the athlete. Journal of Athletic

Training, 37(4): 406-412.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2015). HIPPA privacy rule and sharing information related to mental health. Retrieved from  http://www.hhs.gov /hipaa/for-professionals/special-topics/mental-health/index.html

Walker, H., Hall, W., Hurst, J. (2015). Clinical Methods. Boston: Butterworths.
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ABC Healthcare S Technical Security Recommendations

Words: 3096 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95283387

Technical Security Recommendations for ABC Healthcare IT Infrastructures

ABC Healthcare has been facing a multitude of challenges ranging from the security of the IT infrastructures to the compliance of regulatory policies. In the United States, the lawmakers are increasing putting more restrictive in the regulatory environment because there have been more attacks in the healthcare environment, damaging the organizational information systems and using worms and virus to gain access to non-authorized sensitive data. The issues are making the stakeholders of ABC Healthcare demand for more flexible access to their information systems. Moreover, increasing regulatory pressures within the healthcare environment with regards to the management of the information systems has made ABC Healthcare to decide to implement more prudent information systems security. The goal of ABC Healthcare is to implement good information systems to abide by regulatory policies of HIPPA and SOX (Sarbanes-Oxley). Typically, both SOX and HIPAA mandate healthcare organizations…… [Read More]

Kizza, J.M. (2015). Guide to Computer Network Security. Springer.

Krogh, P. (2009). The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers, 2nd Edition, p. 207. O'Reilly Media.

Mell, P. & Grance, T. (2011). The NIST Definition of Cloud Computing (NIST SP 800-145). National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
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Health Concern Database Query Report

Words: 1015 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94272223

Overview
Human immunodeficiency virus - HIV continues to be a serious health concern across the world. In essence, HIV brings about harm to the body of an individual by destroying infection fighting white blood cells. Not all persons with HIV end up developing AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), which is the last HIV infection stage. In the United States, Centers for Disease and Control – CDC (2018) points out that HIV has been on the decline within the last decade as a result of targeted efforts to prevent the same. However, according to CDC, “progress has been uneven, and the annual infections and diagnoses have increased among some groups.” It is important to note that there are a wide range of HIV transmission modes, with some of the most prominent modes being unprotected sex, via blood-borne exposure, and from an infected mother to her child (Schulz, 2016). This text concerns itself…… [Read More]

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Lone Star Transcript Accurate and

Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Marketing Plan Paper #: 58919280



Certified in Medical Terminology

80 WPM Typing Aptitude

40-Hour Work Shifts A.M. And P.M.

Expediter Transcriptionist for RUSH/STAT Transcription

In-House IT to Ensure System Security and Operations

QUALITY CONTROL STRENGTHS: Quality control is essential to the customer, and to us, to ensure accurate and timely products and services. Our transcriptionists receive:

Continuing Education Services in Industry Related Education

Yearly Medical Terminology Testing

HIPPA Updates and Testing

We perform:

Random Quality Verification/Checks

Proofreading

WEAKNESSES: LoneStar recognizes its weaknesses as areas of potential growth.

Does not Service Hawaii or Alaska

Out-Sourced Competition

In-Country Competition

MARKETING PLAN:

LoneStar can address its weaknesses with growth, expansion, and by providing quality, timely, and accurate products, and developing sound and personalized business relationships. LoneStar will make in-person visits to the current customers on a bi-annually basis to solicit feedback and hands-on industry input and recommendations as to how we can better serve our clients.

LoneStar will…… [Read More]

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Motorcycles Supporters of Sustainability Are

Words: 5139 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24665927

(the Disaster Center's Motor Vehicle Accident Death and Injury data Index, par. 1)

Accidents due to motor vehicles were the second major reasons of police deaths by the end of the century, accounting for more than 2,000 deaths or 15% of all deaths. About, 1,000 more officers comprising of 7% of all loss of lives were hit and met death by passing motor vehicles while they were not in their vehicle, rendering this group the fourth main reason for law enforcement deaths during the last century. Drunken driving was responsible for 315 cases of these vehicle-linked deaths. During the initial part of the last century, the second most important cause of police deaths were accidents due to police deaths. Practically from 1910-1939, 485 officers lost their lives in motor cycle accidents, as opposed to 323 officers who met death in other automobile accidents. With legal enforcement starting to more and…… [Read More]

References

Alcohol and Motorcycle Accidents. http://www.texasmotorcycleaccident.com/article.asp?artid=52

Automobile & Motorcycle Accidents Information. 2007.  http://www.injuryboard.com/view.cfm/Topic=31 

Based on the U.S. Annual death rate of 8.7 per 1000.  http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=203x347144 

Blanchard, E. B; Hickling, E. J; Taylor, a. E; Loos, W. R; Forneris, C. a; Jaccard. J. Who develops PTSD from motor vehicle accidents? Behavior Research Therapy. vol. 34, no. 1, January, 1996. pp: 1-10.
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Gynecologist in This Presentation the Author Will

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30551799

Gynecologist

In this presentation, the author will give an overview of the procurement and analysis of medical records required for a patient who needs to see a gynecologist for abnormal uterine bleeding at a gynecological office. This previously would have been purely a paper process, including the internal office process with regard to patient forms (information and release paperwork), the internal hospital facility process of form processing and finally the same process in the gynecologist's office. However, the rise of the Obama health care plan has mandated a transition to electronic records over the next five years, so this must be factored into the process now as well (Childs, Chang, & Grayson, 2009). Both electronic and paper records will however have the same basic features as listed below.

The patient has called the office requesting an appointment. The patient said that the gynecologist admitted her to the hospital, performed the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Appleby, K.S., & Tarver, J. (2006). Medical records review. New York, NY: Aspen

Publishers.

Childs, D., Chang, H., & Grayson, A. (2009, January 9). President-elect urges electronic medical records in 5 years. Retrieved from  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/President44/story?id=6606536&page=1 .

Health information privacy. (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy/
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Technology Has Revolutionized Society Communication Transportation Commerce

Words: 1736 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84215378

technology has revolutionized society: communication, transportation, commerce, and especially medicine. . Ironically, for centuries and still in Oriental Medicine, healthcare was and is tailored to the individual. Even the Greek Physician Hippocrates wrote that he prescribed sweet elixirs to some and astringents to others depending on their individual condition (Pray, 2008). 21st century medicine, though, is more about an individual person's genetic code, and is made possible by advances in genetic technology and engineering. This is partially due to the Human Genome Project, a massive program completed in 2003 that focused on the identification of the individual genes that make up human DNA with the overall hope that it would initiate genomic medicine -- healthcare delivered based on the individual's medical history and genetic profile (About the Human Genome Project, 2011). Traditionally, medicine diagnoses human illnesses based on quantitative and qualitative signs and symptoms. With the advent of genetic technology,…… [Read More]

References

About the Human Genome Project. (2011, September 19). Human Genome Management Information Systems. Retrieved from:  http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources  / Human_Genome/project/about.shtml

Gattaca. (1997, March). Retrieved from International Movie Database:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119177/ 

Personalized Medicine - An Overview. (2011, January 11). Retrieved from: U.S. News Health report: http://health.usnews.com/health-conditions/cancer/personalized-medicine

Public Law 110-223. (2008). The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008. Retrieved from:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-110publ233/content-detail.html
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Rights and Responsibilities How Do the Rights

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81840082

ights and esponsibilities

How do the rights and responsibilities of patients differ from the rights and responsibilities of employees? How are they similar?

Until recently, patient responsibilities were seldom directly 'spelled out' in the American healthcare system. This changed with the passage of HIPAA in 1996. HIPPA "sets forth policies and standards for how patient information, including doctors' notes, medical test results, lab reports, and billing information may be shared" (Torrey, 2012, HIPPA). It gives patients the right to access their information and demands that patient data be treated in a secure fashion. Also under the law, patients have a right to informed consent over the procedures they undergo, so that they or a designated caregiver can make decisions about what they perceive to be their best interests. Ultimately, the healthcare system must serve the needs of patients, not physicians and other healthcare employees. That is why patients must give…… [Read More]

References

Bollinger, Caroline. Access denied. Prevention. Retrieved:

 http://www.prevention.com/health/healthy-living/new-birth-control-ban?page=3 

Torrey, Tricia. (2012). HIPAA. About.com. Retrieved:

 http://patients.about.com/od/obtainingrecords/a/hipaa.htm
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Mental Health Illness the Ability

Words: 1546 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28829089

This creates a nerve with the client that their private information is going to be unprotected and confidentiality is going to be broken . There is no safe way to keep all information private. However, all mental health professionals must take all necessary precautions to keep client information private .

Conclusion

As you look around the mall, classroom, church, family history, friend's family, or place of employment, you're sure to know someone with a mental illness, or someone who might of attempted suicide . Assessing and treating these disorders is essential in the mental health field, more trained mental health professionals are needed, more agencies, and more funding . Otherwise if society keeps assuming that the mind and brain are separate and that mental disorders are " different" or " bad" misunderstanding, mistreatment, and stigma will persist in this society . We need to stop seeing individuals with mental health…… [Read More]

Reference

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (Revised 4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

American Association of Suicidology. ( 2006, February), U.S.A. suicide: 2003 official final data. Retrieved March 19, 2010, from http:/ / www.suiciodology.org.

Bonner, L. ( 2001). Rethinking suicide prevention and manipulative behavior in corrections. Jail Suicide Mental Health Update, 10(4), 7-8.

Bonner, L. (2006) . Stressful segregation housing in psychosocial vulnerability in prison suicide. Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior, 36,250-254.
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Leadership Models by Examining the

Words: 1718 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37963434

The administrative support staff who is dealing with frustrated doctors who cannot adjust to the new computer tablets they are using as an alternative to paper files may require a transactional leader who can provide the organizational support needed to move through an uncomfortable transition. A single leader cannot always be everything to everyone. By learning one's leadership strengths and weaknesses and understanding the leadership skills needed to achieve the organizational objectives, the leader can begin to develop and foster his or her leadership team with people who offer complimentary skills and leadership styles.

eferences

Avolio, B.J. & Yammarino, F.J. (2002). Transformational and charismatic leadership: The road ahead. San Diego, CA: Emerald Group Publishing.

Business leadership: A Jossey-Bass reader. (2003). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Clawson, J.G. (2009). Level three leadership: Getting below the surface. (4th ed.). Upper Saddle iver, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Dulewicz, C., Young, M., & Dulewicz, V. (2005, Spring).…… [Read More]

References

Avolio, B.J. & Yammarino, F.J. (2002). Transformational and charismatic leadership: The road ahead. San Diego, CA: Emerald Group Publishing.

Business leadership: A Jossey-Bass reader. (2003). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Clawson, J.G. (2009). Level three leadership: Getting below the surface. (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Dulewicz, C., Young, M., & Dulewicz, V. (2005, Spring). The relevance of emotional intelligence for leadership performance. Journal of General Management, 30(3), 71-86. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
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Skills Regarding Nursing Care Nursing

Words: 887 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1093923



Informed Decision Making (Nursing Role)

The nurse has the utmost responsibility in educating the patient and his/her family about the proposed treatment plan, the availability of alternative interventions, and in general plays a vital role in promoting informed decision making. [ANMC], (2005)] The nurse being more familiar with the patient has a better understanding of the patient's understanding capabilities and can therefore decide as to what type of teaching method a patient is best suited for. While for some patients a simple printed information leaflet is suffice for others a more detailed presentation involving a video maybe necessary. This again helps the patient better understand the procedures and helps them in their decision making process. [Mark H. eers, (2006)] In the case of new treatment modalities that are available with recent medical advancements, the nurse can greatly assist the patient in making well-informed decisions about the available treatment choices. Gene…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) ANMC, (2005), ' Code of Ethics of Nurses in Australia', retrieved 5th Sep 2010, from,  http://www.nrgpn.org.au/index.php?element=ANMC+Code+of+Ethics 

2) Jeanette Ives Erickson, RN, (2005), 'Caring for Patients while Respecting their Privacy: Renewing our Commitment ', retrieved 5th Sep 2010, from,  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/506840 

3) ISONG, (2005), 'Informed Decision Making and Consent: The Role of Nursing', retrieved Sep 5th 2010, from,  http://www.isong.org/ISONG_PS_informed_consent.php 

4) Mark H. Beers, MD & Thomas V Jones MD et.al, (June 2006) 'The Merck Manual of Geriatrics: Chapter 8: Nursing', Pub by Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.
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Attitude Survey on Healthcare Reform

Words: 1223 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 14095765

Thereby we can conclude if their support or lack thereof for healthcare reform is based on understanding of facts, or is being shaped by other factors, ostensibly the information being made public by politically affiliated media and elected officials in support of one party or the other.

The Survey: Healthcare eform

I voted for President Obama

YES

NO

Didn't Vote

I support healthcare reform

YES

NO

No Opinion

I have health insurance or Government Program

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have Medicare

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have Medicaid

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have CHAMP/VA

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have TICAE

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have group benefit insurance

YES

NO

Don't Know

I have private health insurance

YES

NO

Don't Know

The Health Insurance Privacy

And Portability Act applies to me

YES

NO

Don't Know

The Employee etirement Income

Security Act applies to me

YES

NO…… [Read More]

References

CNN (2009). Brown Wins Massachusetts Senate Race, CNN Politics, found online at http://www.cnn.com/2010/POLITICS/01/19/Massachusetts.senate/index.html, retrieved February 1, 2010.

Monette, D., Sullivan, T., and DeJong, C. (2008). Applied Social Research: A Tool for Human Services, Thomson Books, Belmont, CA.
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Memorial Herman Business Research Applications

Words: 1338 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16578268

Being able to merge the resources of a variety of different specialists is one strength of the Memorial Herman approach. In the future, as the interrelationship between the body and the brain, and psychological disorders and overall functioning has become an accepted part of mainstream science: studies such as these will be even more important for research institutes. Memorial Herman is clearly on the cutting-edge of the field in this regard.

Because of its impressive outreach, the hospital is also able to draw upon a wide array of specific populations, as in the case of studies such as the "Evaluation of cardiovascular effects of smoking cessation in HIV-infected patients" (Bell 2009). Few other hospitals would be able to draw from a large amount of HIV-positive patients who were smokers and willing to participate in research studies. The study may prove beneficial to the research subjects as well as to the…… [Read More]

References

About us. (2009). Memorial Hermann. Retrieved November 12, 2009 at  http://www.memorialhermann.org/aboutus/ 

Bell, Tanvir. (2009). Evaluation of cardiovascular effects of smoking cessation in HIV-infected patients. Memorial Herman. Retrieved November 12, 2009 at http://www.memorialhermann.org/locations/texasmedicalcenter/heartandvascularinstitute/content.aspx?id=5772 

Frazier, Lorraine. (2009). Interactions among depressive symptoms and genetic influences on cardiac outcomes. Memorial Herman. Retrieved November 12, 2009

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Crowding in Emergency Departments Over

Words: 1758 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 19768369

(Shactman; Altman, 2002)

4. ecommendations for Overcoming these Barriers:

Some of the suggestions for overcoming these barriers are (i) appointment of a General Practitioner -- GP officers to work as a Liaison Officer between the ED and the community so that the communication is streamlined as well as processes of referral and feedback and development of clinical pathways. (ii) Expansion of community off-peak facilities, including the setting up of the capacity for community access to X-rays, Scanning, ultrasound, blood tests and observation beds. (iii) Initiation of a project to deal with frequent attenders to the ED through the development of management plans contributed to by the patient, their GP, the ED as also their specialist (iv) Education of the local community such that are aware as to when and under what situations to access ED care or alternative care in the community. (Ardagh; ichardson, 2004)

eferences

Ardagh, Michael; ichardson, Sandra.…… [Read More]

References

Ardagh, Michael; Richardson, Sandra. (2004) "Emergency department overcrowding- can be

fix it" Journal of the New Zealand Medical Association, vol. 117, no. 1189, pp: 27-31.

Brewster, Linda R; Rudell, Liza; Lesser, Cara S. (2001) "Emergency Room Diversions: A

Symptom of Hospitals under Stress-Increased Demand for ER Services" Center for Studying Health System Change. Issue Brief No. 38. Retrieved May, 2009 from  http://www.hschange.com/CONTENT/312/
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Honeypot Help Security Professionals to

Words: 2642 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 16758922



Groups -- People sometimes act as a group to steal information for any number of reasons. They may be a company's customer or vendor, or they may be a fierce competitor trying to steal sensitive trade secrets (Elifoglu, 2002).

Some common threat attack groups include the following:

Saboteurs/Terrorists/Paramilitary Groups;

Domestic or Foreign Criminals;

Vendors;

Customers;

Competitors; and,

Former Employees (Elifoglu, 2002).

In reality, the concept of intrusion detection systems is a straightforward matter of designing a system that can provide alerts when it is attacked. According to Andress (2003), the process of intrusion detection typically requires the identification of unauthorized access into computer systems. For example, this author notes, "obust intrusion-detection systems are placed at strategic locations on the network to look for suspicious usage patterns so that attacks can be detected before an intruder has gained access to the network, application, or operating system" (Andress, p. 66). This author…… [Read More]

References

Andress, a. (2003). Surviving security: How to integrate people, process, and technology. Boca Raton, FL: Auerbach Publications.

Elifoglu, I.H. (2002). Navigating the 'information super highway': How accountants can help clients assess and control the risks of Internet-based e-commerce. Review of Business, 23(1), 67-69.

Grimes, R.A. (2008). Honeypots, honeynets. Honeypots.net. [Online]. Available:  http://www.honeypots.net/ .

Hinojosa, P. (2005). Information security: Where we've been and where we need to go the Journal, 32(7), 36.
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Cryptography

Words: 4153 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91116179

In addition electronic purses can be reloaded using ATM machines or traditional tellers (if the card is connected to a banking account).

Additionally, electronic purses are usually based on smart card technology and necessitate a card reader to fulfill a transaction. Equipment including point of sale (POS) terminals, ATMs, and smart card kiosks can be outfitted with card readers (Misra et al., 2004). Every time the user utilizes the card reader to complete a transaction; the card reader will debit or credit the transaction value from or to the card.

The author further asserts that Smart cards can be utilized for various purposes.

In most cases they are used as stored value cards (Misra et al., 2004). Stored value cards can be utilized at the time of purchase and are preloaded with a certain amount of money. These cards can be discarded after they have been used; however, most stored…… [Read More]

References

AL-KAYALI a. (2004) Elliptic Curve Cryptography and Smart Cards GIAC Security Essentials Certification (GSEC). Retrieved October 8 at  http://www.sans.org /reading_room/whitepapers/vpns/1378.php

ECC. Retrieved October 8 at  http://planetmath.org/encyclopedia/EllipticCurveCryptography.html 

Frauenfelder M. (2005) Make: Technology on Your Time. Oreily Misra, S.K., Javalgi, R. (., & Scherer, R.F. (2004). Global Electronic Money and Related Issues. Review of Business, 25(2), 15+.

Mitrou N. (2004) Networking 2004: Networking Technologies, Services, and Protocols. Springer Murphy S., Piper F. (2002) Cryptography: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press: Oxford, England.
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Online HR How Would You

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41003688



Reviewing the efficacy of the organization's compensation practices in retaining good employees, and for compliance with the Fair Labor Standards Act, and conducting random sample of time records is essential good business practice. Of course, the company's benefits must be in compliance with Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and HIPPA regulations, and all employees must have been notified of the company's Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) policy. Finally, there should be effective and established recruitment, grievance, and exit procedures for employees, and these procedures should be clearly communicated to employees in a handbook ("Auditing your HR department," 2007, the HR Team).

hat could or should be done at Interclean to make the move to "organizational effectiveness?"

The first step to maximizing "organizational effectiveness" is to conduct an audit of how the company is doing in terms of its overall productivity. hile before the individual was the traditional unit…… [Read More]

What could or should be done at Interclean to make the move to "organizational effectiveness?"

The first step to maximizing "organizational effectiveness" is to conduct an audit of how the company is doing in terms of its overall productivity. While before the individual was the traditional unit of HR audits, it is also crucial to examine the organization's design, effective use of technology, the way that labor is organized and delegated, and how decisions are made by management ("Quantifying and Fostering Organizational Effectiveness," 2004, Herman Miller, pp.1-2)

After segmenting different units that contribute to efficacy, such as organizational, workplace, and technological design, the company should then examine their psychological and behavioral effects upon the workforce in terms of esteem, satisfaction, and comfort, and the type of work practices the employees' overall morale encourages. What is the overall positive negative or positive business effect of this psychological state of happiness or unhappiness -- are employees happy to serve customers, to they strive to be on time, or does their productivity and thus customer satisfaction suffer? If certain areas are deemed lacking, or encouraging effective rather
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Hospital That Offers Adult and

Words: 1200 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62187840

Where will you reduce cost?

The running of an ICU is a very expensive affair. Below is the revenue, income as well as expenses (Direct and indirect).

evenues: $4,005,000

Income: $1,200,000

Expenses:

Direct

Labor cost: U.S.$1,020,000

Equipment cost: $600,000

Material costs: $700,000

Indirect expenses

Co-medical service cost: $200,000

Staff Training:$700,000

Cost reduction strategies:

The expenses can be reduced by the adoption of online training programs which are considerably cheaper. The cost of staff training would therefore be reduced by more than half.

Some of the equipment can be hired instead of being acquired if they are never utilized fully in most operations.

Some staff can be contacted as independent contractors on a yearly basis in order to reduce the burden of allowances and taxation.

Identify committees that you might expect to see in the unit and provide a one or two sentence description of the committee function, approximate number of…… [Read More]

References

Treggiari MM, Martin DP, Yanez ND et al. (2007) Effect of intensive care unit organizational model and structure on outcomes in patients with acute lung injury.

Board

Administration

Therapeutic
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Fisher C And Oransky M

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 8297051



Discussion -- Textbook approach gives a great deal of theory; value of the article is in taking the material and applying it to situations that are relevant to one's current profession and/or understanding different approaches to conflict.

Review -- the Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) - the MCMI is a psychological assessment tool that was written to provide information on psychopathology including specifics outlined in the DSM-IV. It is intended for adults over 18 who have at least an 8th grade reading level and who are seeking mental health services. The test was actually developed and standardizes on clinical populations in psychiatric hospitals or individuals with current existing mental health issues. The authors are quite specific about it not being used with the general population or with adolescents, as values will likely not be appropriate for extrapolation (Pearson, 2012).

History -- Published in 1977 by Theodore Millon based on his…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Million, T., et.al. (2006). MCMI-III Manual. Minneapolis, MN: Pearson.

Pearson Educational Services. (2012). The Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

Retrieved from:  http://www.pearsonassessments.com/pai/ca/research/resources/faqs/MCMI-III_FAQs 

Widiger, T., et.al. (1985). The MCMI and DSM-III. Journal of Personality Assessment.
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Interview Nurse Interviewing a Registered

Words: 1685 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 40652095

There is an increased incidence of worry and concern over malpractice claims which increasingly award patients higher amounts of money for patient's winning cases. Unfortunately this has led to many nurses practicing defensive care rather than preventive and supportive care (Guevara & Mendias, 2002: 350). In some cases this may lead to overly conservative treatment of a patient's condition.

Discrepancies in job titles and assignments as well as responsibilities exist (Guevara & Mendias, 2002). Increasingly management responsibilities are delegated to nurses which increases their administrative burden and the potential for malpractice claims when patients receive care from less experienced staff or unqualified staff because of staffing shortages (Guevara & Mendias, 2002).

Strict reimbursement mechanisms, a decreased staff, health service restraints that are brought upon by economic factors and new organizational structures as well as a changing dynamic in the public have all influenced the nursing field" (Guevara & Mendias, 2002:350).…… [Read More]

Reference:

Guevara, Edilma B. & Mendias, Elnora P. "A comparative analysis of the changes in nursing practice related to health sector reform in five countries of the Americas." Pan American Journal of Public Health (2002): 12 (5), 350-355. 20, October 2004, from  http://www.scielosp.org/pdf/rpsp/v12n5/14093.pdf
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Security Overview Businesses Today Are

Words: 3366 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 63694499

(Gartenberg, 2005)

Like all other aspects of business today, security systems often prove to be highly complex and hard (even for the participants) to identify.

The culture of an organization is like the culture of a family, a community, or a nation: Because it surrounds the people in it they often have a great deal of difficulty in recognizing to what extent policies and procedures arise from the constraints of culture and what therefore can be relatively easily changed. Matz (2010) summarizes the ways in which organizational culture both supports an organization and can blind the individuals in it to ways in which their actions may no longer be as effective as they once were:

… the essence of organisational cultures consists of a set of 'unspoken rules' that exist without conscious knowledge of the members of the organisation. Over time the invisibility of the attributes at the deepest level…… [Read More]

References

Dalton, D.R. (2003). Rethinking Corporate Security in the Post 9/11 Era, New York: Butterworth-Heinemann

Deal, T.E. & Kennedy, a.A. (1982). Corporate Cultures: The Rites, and Rituals of Corporate Life, London: Penguin.

Gartenberg, M. (2005). How to develop an enterprise security policy.  http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/98896/How_to_develop_an_enterprise_security_policy .

Johnston, L. & Shearing, C. (2003). Governing Security: Explorations in Policing and Justice. London: Routledge.
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Healthcare - The Truth About

Words: 3685 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27551651



The experiences of seniors within the healthcare delivery system will alter how all Americans view healthcare. The healthcare delivery systems and overall organizational structure in the United States has been slow to adjust but that rest of the world is currently in flux that will migrate into our system. Technological advances in communication have made telehealth and telemedicine vialbel solutions to our outdated healthcare industry orgainzational structre. While these types of advances are only in their infancy, "...there seemed to be broad acceptance that telehealth and telemedicine had provided positive benefits to the worlds healthcare delivery system." (Telehealth Applications) Our technoloically challenged seniors have actually discovered the trend within the healthcare system and telehealth and telemedicine seems to be an advance that will find worldwide support so we as a nation will be reqquired to jump on the bandwagon.

In conclusion, this article review focused on new Healthcare Delivery Systems…… [Read More]

References

Farnsworth, Chris. "The Truth About Fraud" Washington Monthly 01 May 1997.

Joshua-Amadi, Mabel. "Recommendations: A Study in Motivation: Recruitment and Retention in the NHS" Nursing Management. February (2003).

Soloye, Daniel J. "Privacy and Power: Computer Databases and Metaphors for Information Privacy" Stanford Law Review July (2001).

Telehealth Applications. (2004) "Current Telehealth Applications" Retrieved October 26, 2004, at  http://www.startegis.com/epic/internet/inict-tic.nsf/PrintableE/it07545e.html
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Monitoring How Employees Use Information Systems

Words: 2493 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82913511

Electronic Surveillance on-The-Job: The Pros and Cons of Employee Monitoring

Modern technology has allowed employers many new capacities, including the capacity to electronically oversee employees every action while on-the-job. In recent years many employees have argued that surveillance while on-the-job is a violation of their right to privacy. Employers argue however that employees should not have a right to privacy in the workplace, especially as the employer pays them to perform a duty for the employer. Despite this almost 100% of employees likely report at one time or another engaging in some personal business while at work.

Unfortunately, there are few laws that side with the employee at this time. Most laws argue in favor of the employer, as long as the employer tells the employee of their plans about employee surveillance at the workplace. Below we'll discuss what types of surveillance corporations are now using to protect themselves, and…… [Read More]

References

Alderman, L. (1994, December). Safeguard your secrets from your boss. Money, 31-32.

American Management Association AMA. (2005). 2005 Electronic Monitoring &

Surveillance Survey: Many Companies Monitoring, Recording, Videotaping and Firing employees. American Management Association, May 2005. Retrieved June 11, 2005:  http://www.amanet.org/press/amanews/ems05.htm 

Crampton, S.M, & Mishra, J.M. (1998). "Employee monitoring: Privacy in the workplace?" SAM Advanced Management Journal, 63(3):4.
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Interviewing Case Analysis of Counseling

Words: 3074 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97630059

Over the course of the interview I asked the woman questions about her boyfriend but mostly about herself, her happiness and her life of late. The woman described that she had a very busy course load, had to work extra hours to support herself and then found herself working very hard to support a relationship with someone who was inattentive and needy due to substance abuse problems.

Throughout the interview I nodded and affirmed the woman's concerns and feelings, offering support and sympathy through eye contact. The interview concluded when I summarized the situation and affirmed that I had interpreted the situation correctly, and together with the interviewee decided that she needed to spend more time focusing on her own needs and break up with her partner. The client seemed satisfied with this conclusion, which she had come to already but just needed support and reaffirmation that she was making…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (1992). "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Codes of Conduct." APA. Available: http://www.apa.org/ethics/code1992.html

Stewart, C. & Cash, W. (2000). "Interviewing: Principles and Practices." The McGraw-

Hill Company. Available:  http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/speech/stewart9/students/counseling/strategi.htm
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Ruchi Tomar Disadvantages of Electronic

Words: 3472 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 93872950



None of the findings are not surprising to a lot of experts. Apart from large systems that are integrated, like Kaiser Permanente in California and the Veteran's Administration, a lot of doctor practices are adopting different EMs. Also in so many different situations they do not talk to one another (Sittig & Singh 2012). So, a doctor's record is not necessarily able to get access notes from his regional hospital if different systems were utilized. A lot of doctors in that condition could just re-order a test, instead of going through all of the changes of finding the records from the hospital.

Actually many experts make the point that the true power of digital records come when using a sole, unified system that can be retrieved by altered health sites. With the exclusion of large combined health arrangements, there sometimes can be fragmented EMs. Experts mention that perhaps with the…… [Read More]

Reference:

Cook, P.J., Lawrence, B.A., Ludwig, J., & Miller, T.R. (1999). The medical costs of gunshot injuries in the United States. JAMA, 282(5), 447-54.

Eckman, B.A., Bennett, C.A., Kaufman, J.H., & Tenner, J.W. (2007). Varieties of interoperability in the transformation of the health-care information infrastructure. IBM Systems Journal, 46(1), 19-41.

Heselmans, a., Aertgeerts, B., Donceel, P., Geens, S., Van, d. V., & Ramaekers, D. (2012). Family physicians' perceptions and use of electronic clinical decision support during the first year of implementation. Journal of Medical Systems, 36(6), 3677-3684.

Simons, W.V., Mandl, K.D., & Kohane, I.S. (2005). The PING personally controlled electronic medical record system: Technical architecture. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 12(1), 47-54.
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EMR Organizational Change Plan Introducing Electronic Medical

Words: 1595 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67124950

EM

Organizational change plan

Introducing electronic medical records (EM)

Along with expanding health coverage to more Americans, one of the goals of recent federal policy has been the widespread adoption of electronic medical records (EM) by healthcare providers across the nation. "The federal government began providing billions of dollars in incentives to push hospitals and physicians to use electronic medical and billing records" (Abelson, Creswell, & Palmer 2012). Having EMs can be used by providers to gain swift access to comprehensive information about a patient's health history. Some patients forget their history of diagnoses or the medications they are on; sometimes patients must be treated when they are in a mental or physical state where they cannot be forthcoming with information and their friends and families are not nearby. Also, there is the problem of patients attempting to obtain more pharmaceuticals or drugs which they should not be taking. "Electronic…… [Read More]

Reference

Abelson, Reed, Julie Creswell, & Griff Palmer. (2012). Medicare bills rise as records turn electronic. The New York Times. Retrieved:

 http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/business/medicare-billing-rises-at-hospitals-with-electronic-records.html 

Change theory by Kurt Lewin. (2012). Current Nursing. Retrieved:

 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/change_theory.html
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Healthy Again Health Promotion Program Parts B

Words: 754 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74704870

Healthy Again Health Promotion Program

Parts B & C -- Competency Statements and elevant Objectives

Nurse professionals will endeavor to work as a team in collaborative relationships whenever possible.

Nurses understand and engage in effective communication

Work with team and colleagues to ensure a safe and effective medical environment

Authenticate relationships between colleagues, patients, and stakeholders through mutual respect and honesty

Engender and actively pursue a cycle of learning and improving self and through professional means, others

Create a culture of respect, advocacy, caring, and trust (American Nurses Association, 2013).

Nurses will adhere to the ANA Nursing Code of Ethics in all work situations, and will communicate to supervisor in the event of additional resources or interpretations (American Nurses Association, 2013).

a. Understand and adhere to basic nursing ethical guidelines through advocacy, communication and deliberate leadership by example

b. Deliberately and regularly work to provide patient autonomy, beneficence, fidelity and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Code of Ethics for Nurses. (2012). Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingworld.org/ 

MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.pdf

American Nurses Association. (2013). Professional Standards. Retrieved from:
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Technology and Healthcare Demographics of the Global

Words: 1063 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48110564

Technology and Healthcare

Demographics of the global community are rapidly changing so that each year there are more and more seniors within the population base. This has a profound implication on the healthcare system of many regions since a large number of elderly citizens will be spending their lives in the confines of their home, and some may have chronic illness that require continuous monitoring. Clinical telemedicine is one way to offer greater services to rural or homebound populations. Indeed, a variety of technological advances have made it possible to change the paradigm of healthcare. Clinical information systems, for instance, have expanded in scope and depth. Increased processor speeds and data storage devices have made it possible to collect more data than ever on the detailed encounters that make up the provider-patient care delivery process, and present it more effectively to a wider range of users. Healthcare monitoring is part…… [Read More]

Luppicini, R. And R. Adell, eds., (2008). Handbook of Research on Technoethics. New York: Information Science Publishing Company.

Teo, T., et.al. (2008). "Wireless Healthcare Monitoring Systems. World Academy Of Science, Engineering, and Technology. 42 (1: Retrieved from:

 http://www.waset.org/journals/waset/v42/v42-98.pdf
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Design Telecommunications Network

Words: 1248 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88587662

Telecommunications Network

In an effort to provide better care for its patients, arises the need to design a network able to support a new multi-location dental care practice. In this report, we will provide a clear set of requirements for the network solution, and then identify the information that is to be protected as well as their related security requirements. Also, we will identify the types of network components, devices and equipment that would be involved in meeting the needs of the stationary offices and all four mobile dentists, and then we will provide a network design diagram that shows an appropriate network configuration to meet the requirements. Finally, we will explain the benefits of the proposed network solution, and identify the risks and risk mitigation strategies associated with the proposed network solution.

With five dental offices currently operating, we need to design a network that will integrate databases of…… [Read More]

References

DAUTI, B.A. (2007, April 26). METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORK AND WEB PORTAL FOR THE CITY OF GJILAN. Retrieved August 18, 2012, from UMUC Europe Web site: http://ac-support.europe.umuc.edu

Dr. Cole, E. (2007, October 26). Types of Networks. Retrieved August 18, 2012, from Sans Technology Institute Web site:  http://www.sans.edu 

Stines, M. (2003). Remote Access VPN - Security Concerns and Policy Enforcement. Retrieved August 18, 2012, from SANS Institute Reading Room site:  http://www.sans.org 

White, C.M. (2011). Introduction to Metropolitan Area Networks and Wide Area Networks. In C.M. White, Data Communications and Computer Networks (pp. 276-320). Course Technology Cengage Learning.
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Analyzing Teams

Words: 569 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25644274

Teams

Comment by Sabina:

Analyzing Teams

Working in teams can be very complicated and rewarding. It is important to understand the dynamics of working in teams. One of the fundamental knowledge is that each team member is different, have different abilities, motivations and personality. "Group work requires critical thinking, analytical skills, and excellent communication skills. Individuals with different personalities and different work ethic can be a potential problem" ("Potential challenges with," 2010). When creating an innovative team many different considerations should be analyzed. In this paper I will discuss some of the important aspects of building an effective team, innovate and creative team.

The leader of the team is extremely important (Sarkisian & Bok, 1997). Some of the most important qualities of a great team leader is integrity, high ethical standards, honesty, clear vision, enthusiastic, committed, solution oriented, empowers others, fosters self-motivation, strives for excellence, good communication, a good negotiator,…… [Read More]

References

Naseem, M. (2011). Top 10 Qualities of a Great Team Leader. Retrieved from http://www.get-articles.com/pdfs/4345.pdf

Potential challenges with cooperative learning . (2010). Retrieved from  http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/cooperative/challen.html 

Sarkisian, E. & Bok, D. (1997). Working in Groups. Teaching and Learning, Harvard University. Retrieved from http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/html/icb.topic58474/wigintro.html#GettingStarted
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Social Media and Healthcare

Words: 3856 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25945795

Legal Ethics of E-Mail and Social Media and Its Applicability to the Healthcare Industry

Consequences of Social Media

p.3

Perils of Building an Online Network

p.6

Caution with Employee Email Accounts

p.8

Issues when Endorsing other Companies

p.10

Benefits of Social Media

p.13

p.15

Legal Ethics of E-mail and Social Media and its Applicability to the Healthcare Industry

Social media has without a doubt changed the way we live, the way we view the world and the way we interact with one another. This paper acknowledges the undeniable good that social media has given us, while identifying the many ways that it has created issues and intricacies for the healthcare industry at large. This paper discusses the benefits of social media for healthcare professionals, while identifying some of the dire consequences, the perils of an online network, the issues connected to an employee email account and the caution one must…… [Read More]

References

Americanprogress.org. (2004, July 2). The Civil Rights Act 40 Years Later. Retrieved from americanprogress.org:  http://americanprogress.org/issues/women/news/2004/07/02/891/the-civil-rights-act-40-years-later/ 

Car, J. (2004). Email consultations in health care: 2 -- acceptability and safe application. Retrieved from nih.gov:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov /pmc/articles/PMC514210/" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Healthcare Privacy and Security

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62912507

American History: Discussion

Today, the existence of America is often assumed to be obviously good because of the existence of American democracy and positive American democratic values exported all over the world. However, that was not always the case. The American colonists did not find untouched, virgin land but land that was already occupied by native peoples with unique cultural worldviews. Because the Indians did not 'own' land in a manner that was comprehensible to the Europeans the colonists viewed the territory as effectively 'up for grabs.'

The initial motivation of many of the early colonists was purely mercenary such as in Jamestown: "The colony was sponsored by the Virginia Company of London, a group of investors who hoped to profit from the venture. Chartered in 1606 by King James I, the company also supported English national goals of counterbalancing the expansion of other European nations abroad, seeking a northwest…… [Read More]

References

What is quality improvement? (2014). Duke University. Retrieved from:

 http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_a/introduction/contrasting_qi_qa.html
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The Role of Crc and Cra in Study Initiation Process

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 77374311

Institutional eview Board esponsibilities at Study Initiation

esponsibilities of the IB in the initiation of the trial

IB is charged with the responsibility of protecting the safety and rights of participants in the clinical trial (Woodin and Schneider, 2008). Some IB responsibilities like a trial investigator, monitoring, auditing research records and research participant education are likely to be shifted to special units under the Human esearch Protection program (HPP). Such responsibilities promote sponsor-investigator relationships promoting ethical and safe research practices. In the U.S., IB also serves as the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) privacy committee dealing with research-associated activities. IB is especially useful for multicenter studies as it handles approving informed consent and protocol forms (Schultz, 2008). This makes meeting the regulatory requirements efficient. The responsibility of protecting human study participants is multifaceted. Belmont eport, Helsinki Declaration, and Nuremberg Code stipulate the underlying standards of protecting research…… [Read More]

References

Schultz, J. (2008). Improving Subject Recruitment. Applied Clinical Trials, 17(3), 46-52. Retrieved from  http://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=31443729&site=ehost-live&scope=site 

Woodin, K. E., & Schneider, J. C. (2008). The CRA's Guide to Monitoring Clinical Research. Boston, MA: CenterWatch
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Confidentiality Breaches & Informed Consent when Testing New Drugs

Words: 2871 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65570024

Confidentiality Breaches in Clinical Practice

The confidentiality and privacy of patients are considered as one of the fundamental freedoms that they should enjoy and are safeguarded under Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA). It is also a precept of the American Medical Association’s Code of Ethics and the Hippocratic Oath. The breach of confidentiality is unethical and illegal.
Medical professionals are under the obligation of protecting the patient’s confidentiality. Confidentiality and privacy prohibit medical providers from unlawful disclosure of the patient’s information. Some of the inappropriate disclosures include discussing a patient’s case in the elevators or corridors, giving out extra copies of handouts from conferences while they contain identifiable patients’ details and any other possible leakage of information to unauthorized individuals (Beltran-Aroca et al. 52). In clinical practice, the patients’ confidentiality can be breached due to indiscretion, carelessness, and sometimes malice. Medical practitioners are obligated legally and…… [Read More]

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Medical ID Theft and Securing Ephi Medical

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73255136

Medical ID Theft and Securing EPHI

Medical Identity Theft

Medical information can be stolen by 1) the bad guys getting sick and using a victim's information to obtain services, 2) friends or relatives use another friend's or relative's information to obtain treatment, 3) when professionals, such as physicians, fabricate services that did not exist, 4) organized crime, and 5) innocent or not so innocent opportunists (Lafferty, 2007). ad guys that get sick can take a victim's insurance information to obtain services for treatment. Professionals can fabricate false claims to cover medical errors. Opportunists have access to patient data and the ability to steal, use, or sell that information.

Effective security requires clear direction from upper management (Whitman). Assigning security responsibilities and access controls with audit controls to organizational elements and individuals helps to place accountability on individuals. They must formulate or elaborate security policies and procedures based on the organizational…… [Read More]

Bibliography

HIPAA Security Series. (n.d.). Retrieved from HHS.gov:  http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/techsafeguards.pdf

Hoffman, S. & . (2007). SECURING THE HIPAA SECURITY RULE. Journal of Internet Law, 10(8), 1-16.

Lafferty, L. (2007). Medical Identity Theft: The Future Threat of Health Care Fraud is Now. Journal of Healthcare Compliance, 9(1), 11-20.

Whitman, M. & . (n.d.). Case B: Accessing and Mitigating the Risks to a Hypothetical Computer System, pages B1-B24 .
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Current or Proposed Law That Impacts the Delivery of Human Services

Words: 1323 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90140034

Affordable Care Act

A current law that impacts the delivery of human services is the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law by President Barack Obama in March 2010. The legislation (most commonly known as the Affordable Care Act but also referred to as "Obamacare") basically overhauls the existing healthcare statutes and is aimed specifically at reducing the number of Americans who are not covered by health insurance.

Reliable Sources Available to Cover the Law's Implications

There are multiple reliable sources from which to gather information about this major change in the way the healthcare services are available in the United States. The law's implications are spelled out very clearly by the federal website www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (National Center for Biotechnology Information / National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health) (Rosenbaum, 2011).

The Act "…establishes the basic legal protections" that up until now have not be available to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Department of Health and Human Services. (2012). Civil Rights -- Laws and Regulations

Enforced by Office of Civil Rights. Retrieved February 9, 2013, from  http://www.hhs.gov .

Frank, John. (2013). Sen. Phil Berger spreading bad healthcare information, policy experts say.

Charlotte Observer. Retrieved February 9, 2013, from http://www.charlotteobserver.com.
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1996 the Federal Government Passed

Words: 1257 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 76880400

"

ritten Policies

Covered entities must develop and implement written privacy policies that are consistent with the Privacy Rule (OCR, 2003). This policy must address several components. One is that there must be a privacy official. The privacy official is responsible for developing and implementing privacy policies. There must also be a contact person responsible for the receipt of complaints (Ibid.).

The written policy must also cover other key areas. These included workforce training, which should also include any employee under the direct control of the covered entity, even if they are under contract and not an employee of the entity. There must be data safeguards as well, so the written policy needs to include specific procedures for verification of identity, release of information and disposal of PHI.

There must also be a policy with respect to the handling of complaints. This procedure must be outlined in the notice that…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Office for Civil Rights: Health Information Privacy. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from  http://www.hhs.gov /ocr/privacy/index.html

No author. (2003). What is HIPAA? HIPAAps.com. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from http://www.hipaaps.com/main/background.html

Francis, Theo (2006). Spread of Records Stirs Fear of Privacy Erosion. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from  http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06362/749444-114.stm 

Office for Civil Rights: HIPAA Privacy Rule FAQ. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from
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Data Protection and Future Changes

Words: 413 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80537235

Protection and Future Changes

It was moderately challenging to find sufficient sources. After receiving the assignment, I performed an initial search. There were only one or two sources from my original search that I ended up using in the final research essay. Research of any kind requires an above average level of persistence and diligence, so in that case, the research effort put forth was not out of the ordinary.

The only way to determine whether a resource will substantiate evidence is to read it. I read through many abstracts and the first few pages of many resources. I read through the tables of contents and the indexes of resources as well. I had to get a quick but in depth sense of the resources' content before choosing to include it in the final research essay. I had to read many resources to get a sense of the context within…… [Read More]

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Translating Evidence Into Practice Data

Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27653771

Accessed 08 Feb, 2012 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0U/is_12_27/ai_n17165803/pg_4/?tag=content;col1

Part 2

Quality improvement research enables hospitals and doctors a means of maximize their services and ensuring that the patients receive the utmost care. A difficult area for doctors to find a solution was the area of compliance. Many patients fail to accept a physician's advice and their illness continues resulting in repeat hospitalizations and further injury to the patient.

In a study conducted in 1976, concerned physicians wanted to find a means of getting patients to better cooperate with their recommended treatment options. Prior to the study, less than half of the hospital's patients followed their doctor's advice and took their medication as prescribed. The one group that was most notorious for this was high blood pressure patients. So, this was the group that the study targeted and tried to improve the outcome of.

uring the study, doctors were trained on a new…… [Read More]

During the study, doctors were trained on a new communication technique known as patient centered communication. This technique required the doctors to fully listen to the patient's description of symptoms, probe deeper with followup questions, educate the patient on their condition and explain the purpose of the recommended treatment in improving the condition. Half of the patients were treated using this technique while the other half were treated using the standard technique. The result was that the technique doubled the amount of patients who took their medication.

This study followed a Stetler model where the problem of non-compliance was identified and reasons for the problem theorized. A solution was then constructed and attempted alongside a control group and the results were tracked. In this case, the intervention proved successful and the results revealed the improved success rate.

Inui TS, Yourtee EL, Williamson JW (1976). Improved outcomes in hypertension after physician tutorials. A controlled trial. Ann Intern Med. 84(6), 646 -- 651.
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Healthcare Addressing the Issue of

Words: 8204 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34819035

Stated to be barriers in the current environment and responsible for the reporting that is inadequate in relation to medical errors are:

Lack of a common understanding about errors among health care professionals

Physicians generally think of errors as individual that resulted from patient morbidity or mortality.

Physicians report errors in medical records that have in turn been ignored by researchers.

Interestingly errors in medication occur in almost 1 of every 5 doses provided to patients in hospitals. It was stated by Kaushal, et al., (2001) that "the rate of medication errors per 100 admission was 55 in pediatric inpatients. Using their figure, we estimated that the sensitivity of using a keyword search on explicit error reports to detect medication errors in inpatients is about 0.7%. They also reported the 37.4% of medication errors were caused by wrong dose or frequency, which is not far away from our result of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discussion Paper on Adverse Event and Error Reporting In Healthcare: Institute for Safe Medication Practices Jan 24, 2000

Patient Safety/Medical Errors Online at the Premiere Inc. page located at:  http://www.premierinc.com/all/safety/resources/patient_safety/downloads/patient_safety_policy_position_2001.doc 

Medstat / Shortell, S. Assessing the Impact of Continuous Quality Improvement on Clinical Practice: What It Will Take to Accelerate Progress.

Health Policy Monitor (2001) A Publication of the Council of State Governments Vol. 6, No. 1 Winter/Spring 2001 PO18-0101
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Nursing Is Changing Recent Healthcare Legislation Is

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42584620

nursing is changing. Recent healthcare legislation is projected to increase the need for nurses at an exceedingly high rate. Improvements in technology and equipment are providing newer forms of treatment; the role of nurses is expanding to include more diagnostic and rehabilitative work, particularly in light of current demands on physicians. The day in which nurse practitioners can provide patients with holistic treatment augmented by the most innovative technological advancements and discoveries is soon approaching, making this profession one of the most valued throughout the healthcare industry. As a student who has recently completed the first year of a three-year program to earn a Master's of Science in Nursing as a family nurse practitioner, I fully expect to play an important role in the elevation of patient care at a time in which our country needs it most.

My interest in this profession spans well beyond the past 12 months…… [Read More]