Imperialism Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Regional Identity

Words: 2325 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42806713

Regional Identity

Over the years, regional identity has played a major part in helping specific regions to embrace their culture and traditions. In many cases, these views are often expressed in different forms of literature and songs. However, as globalization has become more dominant, these beliefs have come into conflict with other regional influences. This is because many of these traditions are being replaced by new ideas that are attempting to impose their values and ideas upon everyone inside a specific area. To fully understand what is taking place, there will be a focus on the songs Allentown and here I Come From in conjunction with insights from Fetterley. This will be accomplished by determining if these songs are resisting the mainstream, examining if they cite local identity in order to advance cultural imperialism (according to Fetterley) and the differences between them. Together, these elements will provide insights that will…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Allentown." You Tube, 1982. Web. 28 Oct. 2012

"Where I Come From." You Tube, 2011. Web. 28 Oct. 2012

Fetterley, Judith. Writing Out of Place. Urbana: University of Illinois, 2003. Print.
View Full Essay

WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
View Full Essay

Sociology and Anthropology

Words: 850 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24423930

Sociology and Anthropology

After 1880, Africa underwent a major transformation with the European powers effectively dividing the continent among themselves. Over the next 100 years, nearly every major decision affecting the region would be made in a European capital. Then, each nation was able to gain their independence. To fully understand what took place requires: carefully examining the rationale for imperialism in Africa and studying the British vs. French colonizing missions. These factors will highlight the kinds of approaches that were used by the Europeans and the long-term impact of colonization. (Ciment, 2007, pp. 19 -- 24)

The ationale for Imperialism in Africa

The Europeans had different reasons for colonizing Africa. A few of the most notable include: to protect their own economic interests, maintain a balance of power and control key areas that are strategic importance. In the case of protecting their own economic interests, the Europeans believed that…… [Read More]

References

Ciment, J. (2007). Atlas of African -- American History. New York, NY: Facts on File.

Foster, D. (2002). The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa. New York, NY: Wiley.
View Full Essay

Non-Western World by Western Powers In the

Words: 1682 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77943346

Non-estern orld by estern Powers:

In the period between 1870 and 1914, estern powers took over the main portions of the non-estern world when there was considerable discussion and debate regarding the cause of this takeover. Despite the controversies surrounding this decision, the estern powers were motivated by various factors behind the takeover. The takeover of the non-estern world by estern powers is commonly known as imperialism or European imperialism. The term imperialism is used to refer to the process of expanding one state's control over another through various forms. Some of the major forms that characterize the takeover include direct rule and indirect rule with the former involving annexing territories outright and subjugating people who lived in these territories. In contrast, indirect rule is a process where estern powers reached agreements with local leaders and governed through these agreements. Regardless of the form of imperialism, the takeover by estern…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"ECONOMIC IMPERIALISM." Oxford University Press. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 8 May 2013. .

"FC122: European Imperial Expansion in Africa (c.1870-1914)." The Flow of History - A Dynamic and Graphic Approach to Teaching History. The Flow of History, n.d. Web. 08 May 2013. .

Mills, Wallace G. "European Motivations in the Scramble." The Scramble and Motivations. Saint Mary's University, n.d. Web. 08 May 2013. .
View Full Essay

European Union Member States Relations With Their Overseas Territories

Words: 17554 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16781713

political framework of EU and OCT

European Union (EU) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) are in association with each other via a system which is based on the provisions of part IV of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU (TFEU), consisting of detailed rules and measures which are laid down in the document issued on 27th November 2001 title Oversees Association Decision. The expiry date of this association decision is 31st December 2013. Stress has been laid down by the European Council in its conclusions issued on 22nd December 2009 that the relationship between OCT and EU should continuously be updated in order to reflect latest developments not only in EU and OCT but thorough out the world. The commission has also been encouraged to make revisions to the Overseas Association Decision and present it in front of the council prior to July 2012 (Hill et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Agnew John, "Geopolitics re-vision world politics," Routledge Taylor & Francies Group, pp 1-5

Alan Taylor, American Colonies: New York: Viking, 2001, pp. 57 -- 8.

Baldwin, David. Ed. Neo-Realism And Neoliberalism: The Contemporary Debate, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Balzacq, T. (Ed.). Understanding securitization theory. The design and evolution of security problems. Oxon: Routledge, 2010.
View Full Essay

Shooting an Elephant by George

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5287631

However, when his assistance is needed by the townspeople, the two very different populations show similar responses to the bloody scene of shooting an elephant, "It was a bit of fun to them, as it would be to an English crowd; besides they wanted the meat," (Orwell, 649).

Orwell furthers this blend of modern and primitive as seen through the use of his language. The narrator describes the scene of the village as using the native terms, yet juxtaposes this with eloquent English adjectives, "It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside," (Orwell, 650). It is the description of a scene as witness from an outsider, (Rodden, 390). The narrator's response to the eastern village is combined with his own distain based on being familiar with more "civilized" representations of society. This is also apparent through the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant." Mixing the Methods.

Rodden, John. George Orwell. Transaction Publishers. 2002.

Stevens, J.P. "Shooting an Elephant: Rhetorical Analysis." Bookstove. 2008. Retrieved on October 26, 2008 at http://www.bookstove.com/Classics/Shooting-an-Elephant-Rhetorical-Analysis.72092
View Full Essay

White Man's Burden Black Man's

Words: 854 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53607840



This article makes several key points. The first is that the imperialist attitude was hypocritical. This is explicitly stated: "That sense of moral responsibility, however, was often misplaced or, even worse, laced with hypocrisy." The second is that the historical white view of imperialism is that it was beneficial. The author uses Kipling's White Man's Burden as an example of the pro-imperialism stance. The third key point is that the black man has suffered greatly from imperialism, but valiantly lives on. The author uses the text The Black Man's Burden to illustrate his point.

The document is significant because it presents the case in favor of and against imperialism. Furthermore, while The White Man's Burden is a well-known piece, its counterpoint is less well-known, so the article lends some exposure to The Black Man's Burden. What I learned from this article was to appreciate the different perspectives on history that…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Duiker and Speilvogel's Book World History Since

Words: 1038 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15971492

Duiker and peilvogel's book, World History ince 1865, Volume II examines the emergence of imperialism promoted by Europeans and the resulting affects of their determination to expand, far surpassing imperial Rome.

Great Britain, France, Holland, Belgium, Italy, Germany, pain, Portugal and even Russia intruded forcefully into Africa, Asia, the Middle East and the outh Pacific and finally sought out the North and outh Poles. Today, there is common agreement that European overseas expansion was a constant factor of the nineteenth century, with British commercial activities the most obvious.

But the key aspect of this mobile expansion and what dominated world history from 1500 to the present is the gradual integration of the world into a European-dominated global system. One of the more interesting aspects of this "globalization" is to understand that countries outside of Europe were not victims of this movement. Historical, social, economic and political dynamics contributed to European…… [Read More]

Sources

World History Since 1865. Volume II. William Dukier. Jackson J. Spielvogel.. Wadsworth Publishing.

Europe in Retrospect. Raymond F. Betts. 2000. www.britannia.com/history/euro. http://mars.wnce.edu/courses/worldlectures/imperialism.
View Full Essay

Klare Thirty Years War Michael

Words: 2300 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33770050

On the contrary, a realist would look at global terrorism as an international disaster that affects everyone irrespective of cultural background, gender, race or even religion.

Journal #6, Question 6

Fukuyama contends in "The West Has Won" that radical Islam does not constitute a serious alternative to Western liberal democracy. Do you agree or disagree?

Fukuyama shows his contentment with the approach that that depicts the West to have won and that radical Islam does not constitute a serious alternative to the Western liberal democracy. The group of suicide bombers targeting United States is tiny compared to the total number of people opposed to U.S. policies on international relations and fight against terrorist groups. Thus, the extensive hatred, disquiet and dislike seemingly represent something much deeper than mere opposition to U.S. policies that governs its association with other countries around the world. Fukuyama believes that one of the fundamental causes…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Causes of World War One

Words: 1893 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56235563

Wilson was one of the massive supporters of this League of Nations as he felt it would help in being responsible in preventing subsequent wars. One major aspect of the treaty of Paris in 1919 was that it contained the Treaty of Versailles, one which has a major goal of disciplining Germany and forcing a sense of punishment and finality of Germany. For instance, Germany lost many colonies and investments in lieu of this treaty and their ability to forge a military was crippled and limited to a fraction of its original size; the German air force was also similarly crippled. Germany was also further bankrupt in the reparations that it was ordered to pay -- the equivalent of $132 billion gold marks. These intense punishments were a major aspect of the treaty and were something that did cause a deadlock at certain points in the negotiating process (MacMillan, 195).…… [Read More]

References

Afflerbach, H. (2007). An Improbable War?: The Outbreak of World War I and European Political. New York: Berghahn Books.

Louis, W. (2006). Ends of British Imperialism. New York: I.B.Tauris.

MacMillan, M. (2007). Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World. New York: Random House Publishers.

MacMillan, M. (2009). The War that Ended Peace. New York: Random House Publishers.
View Full Essay

Constructing Responses Titles I Listing In Response

Words: 2184 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3485179

constructing responses titles I listing. In response make show reference entry. (01) Discuss

One of the most powerful movements that transformed European society during the early modern era was the dissemination of information and the propagation of reading material due to Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the printing press around 1450 A.D. The movement that would prove to have the most impact upon society as a whole, however, was the imperialist movement that many credit to have originated with Columbus' journeys to the Americas, the first of which was in 1492. The imperialist movement would allow the appetite for power and conquering to expand beyond Europe and eventually encapsulate the entire globe. This movement is directly responsible for today's globalization, and the previous (and perhaps current) colonization and tyranny of many non-European nations. Another major movement during this time period was the beginning of the Protestant eformation, which began around 1517…… [Read More]

References

Benjamin J. Kaplan (2007), Divided by Faith. Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Bentley, J., Ziegler, H., Streets, H. (2006). Traditions & Encounters: A Brief Global History. New York: McGraw Hill

Equiano, O. Life On Board. International Slavery Museum. Retrieved from  http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/slavery/middle_passage/olaudah_equiano.aspx 

The Applied History Research Group, 1998. The Ottoman Empire. Retrieved from http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/islam/empires/ottoman/
View Full Essay

End Game of Globalization Nothing Is More

Words: 2052 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5458185

End Game of Globalization

"Nothing is more insidious than the liberal fain of equality between people who are demonstrably and desperately unequal…American liberalism, in other words, remade itself to fulfill the task that social democracy fulfilled elsewhere. It became a progressive force, absorbing yet dampening the leftward impulse of socialism…a liberalism quite at home with racism and class exploitation, yet one which responded when necessary to political pressure (as in the granting of female suffrage). Liberalism expanded into a bipolar role of co-opting any progressive urge among the multiracial working class while also viciously repressing that same force when it organized too much of a challenge to the power of capital or the liberal state."

~Smith, 2005

There are many countries that perceive the United States of America as an example of imperialism. There are many cultures that adamantly resist western culture, western practices, and western ideals. They are enraged…… [Read More]

References:

Smith, Neil. (2005) The End Game of Globalization. Routledge: United Kingdom.
View Full Essay

Neo-Confucianism Is a Philosophy Which Was Born TEST1

Words: 1082 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

political, economical and social factors affect Human Rights and the perception of these rights as they reflect in different countries and ethnic groups. While the UN may have created the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, but up until today, many countries (including prominent western countries) continue to infringe on a person's inalienable rights as a human being.

Of these human rights, those stated in Article 27 appear to be mostly infringed upon when cultures come together in a single community, or a country's population begins to consist of more and more cultures. This multi-culturalism should in actuality promote peace and understanding, and in many cases it does, nevertheless there are still cultural relativism issues within many communities in specifically Western countries.

Cultural Relativism is defined as the position where all points-of-view, and opinions are considered equally valid. What a person considers as truth is relative to that person's…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

1500 History of World Societies

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40673914

The British created a well-educated, English-speaking Indian elite middle class d. new jobs were created for millions of Indian hand-spinner and hand-weavers

The Indian National Congress can best be described in which of the following ways:

Answer:

a. An Indian Civil Service that administered British rule.

b. A group of upper-caste professionals seeking independence from Britain.

c. white settlers who administered British rule.

d. anglicized Indians who were the social equals of white rulers.

Under the Culture System, Indonesian peasants had to Answer:

a. learn to speak and read Dutch b. plant one-fifth of their land in export crops to be turned over to the Dutch colonial government c. convert to the Dutch Reformed Church d. join large state-run farms.

Modern Vietnamese nationalism traced much of its inspiration to Answer:

a. Japanese modernization.

b. China's "Hundred Days" Reform program.

c. The U.S. Declaration of Independence.

d. British Fabian socialism.

The…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Ad to Present the Civil

Words: 3003 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24463986

S. responded to the Great Depression by electing FDR, who brought out his Alphabet Programs which were supposed to put the nation back to work with public works projects. When that failed to restore the economy, the world elected to start with a new war: WWII. Germany had been buried by the Western powers following WWI -- and now the country threatened to assert itself once more. Russia was in the middle of its own revolution: Stalin was liquidating the kulaks and rounding others up and shipping them off to the Gulag. That did not help Russia's economy any more than FDR's Alphabet program -- but it did not matter: war was on the horizon. Japan was being strangled by Western powers: the American military-industrial-congressional complex essentially forced Japan to attack -- and then sat back and let it happen when Japan finally decided to bomb Pearl Harbor. Thus, America…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Presumption Often Promulgated by Scholars

Words: 4661 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43906482

They goal for globalization is to increase material wealth and the distribution of goods and services through a more international division of labor and then, in turn, a process in which regional cultures integrate through communication, transportation and trade. The overall theory is that if countries are tied together cooperatively economically, they will not have needed to become political enemies (Smith 2007). Notice the continuum here -- globalization, like modernization, is a process, but a process that insists movement from A to B. is not only desirable, but necessary to become part of the Global Club. hile this is primarily an economic determinant, nothing exists in a vacuum. Therefore, economics drive technological, social, cultural, political, and even biological factors. And, with this exchange of paradigms, there is transnational circulation of ideas, languages, popular culture, and communication through acculturation. Typically, we see the movement of globalization moving into the developing world…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, C 2000, Home and Exile, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Adams, W 2006, The Future of Sustainability: Re-THinking Environment and Development in the 21st Century, viewed December 2011,  http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/iucn_future_of_sustanability.pdf 

Aristotle VII, 'Politics', pp. 1339a 29-30.

Bartlovich, C, Mannur, A (eds.) 2001, Marxism, Modernity and Post-Colonial Studies, Cambridge University Press, New York.
View Full Essay

Evolution of Horses

Words: 1292 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9433519

Horses have been an important and influential part of North American and European history. In his book, Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, Alfred W. Crosby argues that horses helped to bring about European's successful colonization of a number of temperate regions such as North America, Australia, New Zealand, and some parts of South America. He argues that the profound success of horses in these regions resulted from the filling of an empty biological niche, and that the arrival of horses on the plains in North America resulted in profound changes in the lives of North American Indians. In his article, The ise and Fall of Plains Indian Horse Cultures, Pekka Hamalainen argues that the common view that horses brought success to Native Americans is fundamentally oversimplified. He suggests that the common focus on only the successful incorporation of horses by the Lakota people has distorted modern understanding of…… [Read More]

References

Crosby, Alfred W. Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900

(Canto). Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Hamalainen, Pekka. The Rise and Fall of Plains Indian Horse Cultures." Journal of American

History, 90 (Dec. 2003): 833-62.
View Full Essay

Politics Literature and the Arts

Words: 793 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50071972

Terror, Imperialism, And Totalitarianism

Imperialism is defined in the abstract, quite often, as the ideology of 'carrying the white man's burden,' in other words, of carrying the white cultural burden of civilization to the native or darker peoples of the world. But in practice, imperialism often has a less lofty goal and terror rather than teaching is the method used to enforce imperialism's 'laws' and values of social and political control. In the past, such as in French-controlled Algiers, depicted in the 1965 film directed by Pontecorvo "The Battle of Algiers," imperialism is often enforced through a series of dominating policies or military actions by a stronger European nation. One country seeks to exert its control over another country or territory, often to gain an economic or political advantage in a particular region.

In the film, the Algerian people fight long and hard to wrest control over their own territory…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. 1958.

"Battle of Algiers." Directed by Pontecorvo. 1965.

Camus, Alberto. "Caligula." 1936.

"The Great Dictator." Directed by Charlie Chaplin. 1940.
View Full Essay

Race and Poverty Journal Introduction

Words: 6115 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15335842



Reactions

The apparent point here is that land traditionally belonging to native tribes will be used to mine in the interest of the developed world. It makes me feel both sad and powerless. I do not have all the information, but stories like this always make me feel that those with the greatest physical, technological, or financial power, or all three, tend to have more power than even those with the right to a certain piece of land or way of living.

The second point confirms the previous observation, that the consistent support of those in power has resulted in the approval of the project without any regard for the rights of those who have possessed the land for far longer. Again, this gives me a sense of powerlessness when faced with decisions by politicians who have only their own interest at heart.

This is far longer than the mere…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Industrialization in Europe Increased the Development of

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15147623

Industrialization in Europe increased the development of machines, production of goods and new energy resources of other societies. However, it had many positive and negative effects to the society. The building of new empires enabled Europe to gain access to their armies, exports, finances and strategic locations. The paper will analyze how Industrialization in Europe led to imperialist conquest of other societies and what made the European Armies so effective against native resistance.

There are various reasons why industrialization in Europe led to imperialist conquest of other societies. The first reason was the availability of larger consumer markets. Industrialization in Europe allowed other countries in spreading their influence to weaker countries. Because of the spread, the industrialized countries managed to create markets for the manufactured products along with producing some specific products to be sold in these markets. The second reason was the availability of raw materials that was used…… [Read More]

References

European Imperialism and Reactions. (1914) China, Ottoman Empire, and Japan; effects of European imperialism

The British Empire. (2003). The British Empire. Retrieved March 28, 2013, from  http://www.britishempire.co.uk/ 

The West in the Age of Industrialization and Imperialism. (2001). Wake Forest Student, Faculty and Staff Web Pages. Retrieved March 28, 2013, from  http://users.wfu.edu/watts/w04_industr.html
View Full Essay

Challenges in East Asia 1800-1912

Words: 548 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74620984

East Asia, 1800-1912

Even with the fact that it would be absurd to claim that Charles Darwin is responsible for the spread of Imperialism, it would only be safe to say that he played an important role in making particular influential bodies in feeling justified as they were conquering other peoples and imposing their power in these areas. orld powers such as the British Empire and Spain were inspired to look at the world as an environment consisting out of communities who were superior and communities who were inferior. As a consequence, it seemed that only those who were superior were worthy to survive while others needed to make place for evolution.

The fact that the British Empire was one of the greatest powers in the world during the nineteenth century and that Darwin issued a series of theories during the period enabled the English to look at life from…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Hawkins, Mike, "Social Darwinism in European and American Thought, 1860-1945: Nature as Model and Nature as Threat," (Cambridge University Press, 13.03.1997)

"The New Imperialism," Retrieved Southern Utah University Website: http://www.suu.edu/faculty/ping/pdf/TheNewImperialism.pdf
View Full Essay

Age of Discovery The So-Called

Words: 1857 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90739957

y the late 1600's, there were about 750,000 "civilized" inhabitants, i.e. Negro slaves from Africa, working the plantations and by the turn of the century, many of the plantations owners had grown extremely wealthy as a result of slave labor.

During the last half of the 17th century, there were a number of efforts to normalize the slave trade or, in other words, to make it appear legitimate and necessary for the growing economies of Europe. Part of this normalization involved the plantations, due to their overwhelming need for a large labor force. efore this normalization, "indentured servants (i.e. slaves) were freed every few years," but with the introduction of permanent servants, this situation was done away with. Also, as permanent slaves were brought to work the plantations, this gave plantation owners "a greater degree of control over the life of slaves," such as being able to sell off the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clark, George N., Ed. The New Cambridge Encyclopedia of Modern History. MA: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Gustaitis, Joseph. "Special Feature: Slavery in the Americas." The World Almanac. Internet. February 2007. Retrieved at  http://www.worldalmanac.com/newsletter/200702WAE-Newsletter.html 

Langer, William L., Ed. The Rise of Modern Europe. New York: Macmillan, 1965.

Nevins, Allan and Howard M. Ehrmann, Eds. A History of the Modern World. MI: University of Michigan Press, 1990.
View Full Essay

Postcolonial Geography Post-Colonial Geography Questions

Words: 2507 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16647719



Question 3:

In some regards, the idea of 'culture' is highly mutable and subject to widespread variations in characterization. Quite in fact, the concept of culture is highly implicated in the weaponzation of words that may be used by one nation to subjugate another. Ideas about how cultures interact, about which cultures are superior and indeed about whether or not the practices of some peoples should even be called 'cultures' have been subjected to rationalization as colonialist nations have subjugated various parts of the developing sphere. It is this understanding that inclines Said's (2002) perspective in "The Clash of Definitions."

Here, Said opposes the idea that there are distinct incompatibilities which persist between civilizations. Instead, he argues that this is the impression which has been foisted upon us by the shifting notions of what is meant by culture, particularly as this depends upon the perspective of hegemonic ethnic groups. This…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bederman, G. (1995). Manliness & Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bender, T. (2006). A Nation among Nations: America's Place in World History. New York: Hill & Wang:

Cabral, A. (1973). National Liberation and Culture. In Return to the Source: Selected Speeches of Amilcar Cabral. New York: Monthly Review Press: 39-56.

McClintock, A. (1995). Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. London: Routledge.
View Full Essay

Qustions to Answer on Human

Words: 1648 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37476910



5. The United Nations International Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is essential for the protection of human rights. However, despite the fact that Australia is considered to be one of the most democratic countries in the world, it fails to take full account of the need to offer maximum protection of human rights especially concerning the aboriginal population. This is why the UN has hard criticized the government for its actions.

Critics have been focused on the administrative aspects of the human rights protection system in Australia in particular on the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission which the Australian government has committed itself to reform (United Nations, 2006). Also, the United Nations raised questions concerning the possibility of the Aboriginal people to benefit from the power of representativeness. However, the government is determined to take these matters under consideration and reconsider the situation through the establishment of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Forsythe, David. Human rights in international relations. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Nye, Joseph. Understanding international conflicts: an introduction to theory and history. New York: Pearson, 2005.

United Nations. Comments by the Government of Australia on the Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. (reports Submitted by States Parties under Article 9 of the Convention. International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination). 2006.
View Full Essay

American Popular Culture Impact Overseas

Words: 4214 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94179363

The cultural practices are evolved and based on the financial, social and moral understanding and capabilities of the local population, and it has been observed that Americans, Asians and Africans share extremely different perspectives and understanding on these issues, therefore the cultural adoption has been intense in countries where the technological revolution has been of the same intensity as in North America (Zelli, 1993). In some of the cases, the Americans companies has attempted to nullify the concerns and shortcomings of the American culture, by incorporating the cultural values of the local region, and has therefore evolve a different taste for the customers to avail, this has further delighted and fascinated the local population of different regions towards the American culture, for example the American culture has major differences with the Islamic culture adopted in Arab countries, therefore to compensate for such difference the American companies introduced the concept of…… [Read More]

References

David W. Noble. Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptional-ism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2002

Tafarodi R., Swann W. Individualism-collectivism and global self-esteem: Evidence for a cultural trade-off. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 1996

Trubisky P, Ting Toomey S, Lin S. The influence of individualism collectivism and self-monitoring on conflict styles. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. 1991

Huesmann, Zelli, Fraczek, Upmeyer. Normative attitudes about aggression in American, German and Polish college students. Presented at Third European Congress of Psychology. Tampere, Finland. 1993
View Full Essay

Stalemate to Crisis the Imperial Republic

Words: 1023 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15584335

Stalemate to Crisis" and "he Imperial Republic."

Questions From "From Stalemate to Crisis" and "he Imperial Republic"

Brinkley, Alan. (2004) he Unfinished Nation: A Concise History of the American people. Volume II. 4th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.

What were the great social issues creating deep divisions in American life in the 1880s and 1890s? Discuss unionization of workers and the discontent felt by the farmers?

Political corruption, America's increasingly marked shift from an agrarian to an industrialist society, and the tariff questions surrounding the sale of American goods abroad, were all the important issues that served to tear the American nation apart during the latter half of the nineteenth century. he rise of agrarian discontent was manifested in the vocal Granger Movement, the formulation Farmers' Alliances, and the Populist movement that swept the American Midwest. Although agrarian discontent declined, after 1898, the origins, purposes, and effectiveness of the Interstate Commerce…… [Read More]

The taking of territories by the United States was hardly justified according to standards of either moral or formal international law, then or now. But the annexation "fever" of the late 1800s clearly benefited politicians wishing to create a greater sense of cohesive unity in an increasingly divided America, an America characterized by warring political and geographic interests and greater levels of economic stratification.

As you look at how the media dealt with the Spanish American War reflect on how the media today deals with both domestic and foreign affairs stories. What is their agenda in 2005 when reporting? Have they handled Afghanistan and Iraq in a similar fashion to the way the press reported the sinking of the battleship Maine? Is the media trustworthy in 2005? Please be more specific on this question.

The media's agenda in 2005, as during the Spanish-American War, is always to generate interest in the news and to sell consumption of papers, cable subscriptions, and advertising. However, the public has more media outlets it can use, and is more 'savvy' as to media bias and misrepresentation. Also, the media itself is more self-critical, after realizing that politicians are able to misrepresent the events of today for personal ends. The media seemed to show a sense of 'betrayal' of the truth and trust in the relationship between press and professional politicians, in the way that the threat of weapons of mass destruction was used to justify war in Iraq, as the ways that the White House vacillated on its knowledge of the terrorist threat level before 2001. This sense was not evident in the glorious trumpeting of U.S. justice during the sinking of the Maine. Still, domestic news coverage often has the same sensationalistic tone, specifically in crime reporting, as was common to ages past.
View Full Essay

Social Work the Objective of

Words: 1546 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69852034

Racism, nativism, and exclusion: Public policy, immigration, and the Latino experience in the United States. Journal of Poverty 4, 1-25.

Shacknove, a. (January 1985). Who is Refugee? Ethics 95, 274-284.

Said, E. (1993) Culture and imperialism. www.zmag.org/zmag/articles/barsaid.htm.

Platt, a.M., & Cooreman, J.L. (2001). A multicultural chronology of welfare policy and social work in the United States. Social Justice 28, 91-137.

Reisch, M. (1998). The sociopolitical context and social work method, 1890-1950. Social Service Review, June, 162-181.

Carlton-LaNey, I., & Hodges, V. (2004). African-American reformers' mission: Caring for our girls and women. Affilia, 19, 3, 257-272.

Gordan, L. (2002). If the Progressives were advising us today, should we listen? Journal of the Guilded Age and Progressive Era 1, 1-8.

Gordan, L. (1991). lack and white women's visions of welfare: Women's welfare activism, 1890-1955. Journal of American History, Sept. 559-590.

Williams, L.F. (2003). An assult on white privilege: civil rights and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Takaki, R. (1993). A different mirror. In a different mirror: A history of multicultural America (pp 1-170. New York, NY: Little, Brown & Company.

Kilty, K., & Haymes, M. (2000). Racism, nativism, and exclusion: Public policy, immigration, and the Latino experience in the United States. Journal of Poverty 4, 1-25.

Shacknove, a. (January 1985). Who is Refugee? Ethics 95, 274-284.

Said, E. (1993) Culture and imperialism. www.zmag.org/zmag/articles/barsaid.htm.
View Full Essay

Exterminate All the Brutes the

Words: 2006 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38117430

European entry into Africa is associated with explorers and missionaries. These were people that aimed to improve Africa and the Native groups living in it. However, the reason that the missionaries and explorers set foot as the first group in Africa was to introduce the very deceitful idea that Europe was interested in making life better for these people who knew nothing of civilization. The politics that later set in from the late eighteenth century going forward, clearly expose the foundations of genocide in this continent that was before that full of culture and life. Of importance to note is that the extermination policy first affected the Africans and other Peoples inferior to Europe. However, this same ideology that made Europe bask in the pride of its superiority later culminated to their own Holocaust. Lindqvist powerfully reckons with the past and offers enormous contribution to colonial African Literature as well…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Goodison, Carnille. "Exterminate all the brutes," Monthly Review; an Independent Socialist Magazine 48, no. 8 (1997): 45.

Lindqvist, Sven. "Exterminate All the Brutes": One Man's Odyssey into the Heart of Darkness and Origins of European Genocide. New York: The New Press, 1992.

Smolensky, Ira. "Exterminate all the brutes," Magill Book Reviews. (1997).

Stuttaford, Genevieve. "Forecasts: Non-Fiction," Publishers Weekly 243, no. 5 (1996): 90.
View Full Essay

Cuban Missile Crisis

Words: 2970 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46885298

Cuban Missile Crisis: Why we need more balance of power in the world.

Cuban Missile crisis in 1960s may raise a serious political question in retrospect i.e. should America be allowed to exist as the sole superpower and what could be the repercussions of such an existence? Now fifty years or so later, we are in a much better position to answer this question. United States or any other nation for that matter must not work as the sole superpower because it can cause many political upheaval as we recently witnessed. We will discuss the Cuban Missile crisis in detail but first we must establish that American history is fraught with events and wars that were fought on the false belief of America's superiority which made it an imperial power. Examples of these events include the Mexican-American War, the Spanish-American War and not to mention the current conflict with Iraq.…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Rothernberg. R.S. "Crisis Time." USA Today 130.2676 (2001)

Meagher. MR."In an Atmosphere of National Peril': The Development of John F. Kennedy's World View." Presidential Studies Quarterly 27.3 (1997):

Krenn ML. "Robert Weisbrot. Maximum Danger: Kennedy, the Missiles, and the Crisis of American Confidence." International Social Science Review (2002):

Nigro Jr. LJ. "High Noon in the Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis." Parameters 35.3 (2005)
View Full Essay

Eyre End Towards an Appropriate

Words: 2245 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38925195

343). This same pious fellow who reports in his letter that he hears God announcing His approach is also the picture of imperial majesty, brave, stern, and exacting, and of course only working for the betterment of those he is bringing into his empire. St. John's rousing finale allows the work to finish as it almost physically completes a conquering of Jane's secular world, as well.

The celebratory nature of Jane's (and apparently Charlotte Bronte's) attitude towards imperialism is off-putting to some scholars, who find Jane Eyre and other "women's texts" to be a feminist re-appropriation of imperial ideals and mechanisms, and it must certainly be acknowledged that Jane is only able to exalt fully in this image of British dominance when she herself has found the freedom she sought and that was so long denied her as a woman (Spivak, p. 243). More important than the timing of Jane's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. (1850). Accessed 4 October 2012. http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/BroJanI.html

Gilbert, Sandra, & Gubar, Susan. The Madwoman in the Attic. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2000.

Marcus, Sharon. "The Profession of the Author: Abstraction, advertising, and Jane Eyre." PMLA 110(2): 206-19.

Meyer, Susan. "Colonialism and the Figurative Strategy of Jane Eyre." Victorian Studies 33(2): 247-68.
View Full Essay

Universality of the Western Interpretation

Words: 5955 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61470439

Schwartz (2006), many arguments are presented, most of which generally criticize the Western treatment of First Nations people or address women's rights issues. As an example, "Aboriginal Australia: Current Criminological Themes" by ick Sarre (2006) focuses on the affect of British colonialism in Australia on the Aborigines, connecting it to a vast overrepresentation of Aborigines in the Australian penal system. "The Left ealist Perspective on ace, Class, and Gender" by Walter S. DeKeseredy (2006) illustrates the fact that, in the United States, it cannot be said that there is 'justice for all;' "First Nations people and African-Americans are much more likely to be arrested, convicted and incarcerated than members of the dominant culture who commit the same crimes" (p. 49). Throughout most of the articles, different approaches to solving such attitudes are explored, such as the left realist theory and the postmodern perspective.

The Female Circumcision Controversy: an Anthropological Perspective…… [Read More]

References

Abu-Lughod, Lila (ed.). (1998). Remaking Women: Feminism and Modernity in the Middle East.

Princeton: Princeton University Press.

An-Na'im, Abdullahi Ahmed (ed.). (1992). Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspectives: A

Quest for Consensus. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
View Full Essay

Customer's Document to Make it

Words: 1419 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8909766

The elephant's death is also a symbol for the slow death of Burma. Before the arrival of the empire, Burma was free but now it struggles for its last dying breaths under British rule. The meaning of this is clear because the narrator doesn't even try to hide his feelings about the monarchy at all. The British crown is abusing and killing everyone it oppresses and it wounds their officers by making them take part in activities that make all of them go totally against their inner will.

The elephant is the most powerful symbol of all and he finally dies but with alot of agony nor is it guilty of anything but being what it is. Those under British rule are also behaving like they really are and being what they were born to be but the power of the empire is forcing them to bend and behave in…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

America and the Great War and the New Era

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51958895

America and the Great War" and "The New Era"

Brinkley, Alan. The Unfinished Nation. Vol. 2: A Concise History of the American People .4th Edition. McGraw-Hill 2004.

What were the causes of WWI in Europe in 1914? Why was President Wilson so reluctant for the U.S. To get involved until 1917 and what finally put the U.S. "over the edge" and decide to enter the conflict directly?

Nationalism, imperialism, and secret treaties all played a role in the instigation of WWI in Europe, but President Wilson was initially reluctant to become involved, because of a long history of American isolationism in regards to entangling European affairs, particularly the secret alliances that stimulated the conflict. His refusal to involve the U.S. In WWI became a crucial part of his re-election campaign. But President Wilson began to protest German violations of American neutrality more vehemently in his public rhetoric than British violations,…… [Read More]