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Austen the Influence of Class
Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78361618
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This is a fact that Austen herself most certainly appreciated as an unmarried female of the same social set she was writing about, which explains the centrality of this concept to so many of her novels. Persuasion is far from the only Austen novel where conflicts between emotional love and the necessary practical considerations of marriage arise, nor the only one where ironic changes in circumstance lead to the formation and/or solidification -- as well as the dissolution -- of friendships. Similar circumstances occur in Emma and Pride and Prejudice, for example, and Anne Elliott could certainly have taught Emma Wodehouse and Elizabeth Bennett something about love and politics as these two heroines of these respective novels also navigate the waters of their social class and end up finding themselves husbands, whether or not they even knew they were looking.

Elizabeth Bennett regarded most men with disdain -- most people,…

Austen's Pride and Prejudice as
Words: 592 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71348021
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Having said this, it is difficult to image a man such as Darby falling for her.

The film version of Elizabeth is also changed by certain plot changes that were made in the movie. Perhaps one of the most annoying scenes in the film is when Elizabeth goes outside in her bedclothes. Austen's Elizabeth would have never done such a thing. It is also worth noting that it is difficult to believe that the Bennets were as poor as the film depicted. A few of the party scenes where Elizabeth is the object of Darcy's attention are excluded from the film and they do not allow us to see Elizabeth's true character like we should. It is also worth noting that her personality seems to change halfway through the film. The first part of the film she spends far too much time giggling and in the second half of the…

Bronte & Austen Contrast &
Words: 1945 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81362535
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Rochester was burned and maimed in a fire set by his first wife who had all this time lived in the attic of the house guarded by a nurse. The man who once had the confident gait is seen standing blindly in the rain as Jane approaches the house after her decision is made to return to Rochester. The scene is reversed as Jane stands talking to Rochester who is now groping through air with a stump for an arm and with blinded eyes straining to see and it is now her turn to assure him of her devotion because she is already fulfilled in the knowing that she is just what he wants:

On this arm, I have neither hand nor nails," he said, drawing the mutilated limb from his breast, and showing it to me. "It is a mere stump -- a ghastly sight! Don't you think so,…

Bibliography

Bronte, Charlotte (nd) Jane Austen [Online] located at http://www.literaturepa ge.com/read / janeeyre.html

Austen, Jane (1951) Pride and Prejudice RE #22 Paperback Edition

Bronte, Charlotte (nd) Jane Austen [Online] located at  http://www.literaturepage.com/read  / janeeyre.html

Bronte & Austen: Contrast and Comparison of Rochester & Darby

When Anne Acts Correctly in Austen S Novel Persuasion
Words: 2060 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44988190
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Obedience in Jane Austen's Persuasion

Is obedience a virtue or a vice? Actually, it can be either. As Shakespeare notes, "Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied, / And vice sometime by action dignified" (2.3.21-22). This means that one can obey an unjust order and commit a sin, or one can disobey an unjust order be virtuous. The question of obedience in Austen's Persuasion is a serious one because what hinges upon it is the fate of two individuals who love each other. It is the age-old theme of two people who are in love being separated by some authority figure. Austen explores this tension by locating it in the social context of Bath, where high society flourishes in a state of superficial exuberance. Thus, the question of obedience is tied to the social view of poverty. Anne's family and Lady Russell try to convince her that poverty is the main…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Persuasion. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1899. Print.

Duffy, Joseph. "Structure and Idea in Jane Austen's 'Persuasion'." Nineteenth-Century

Fiction, vol. 8, no. 4 (March 1954): 272-289. Print.

Milgram, Stanley. "The Perils of Obedience." Harper's Magazine, 1974. Web. 28 Nov

Feminist Reading of Austen's Persuasion I Will
Words: 2126 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93736056
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Feminist Reading of Austen's Persuasion

"I Will Not Allow ooks to Prove Anything":

Women Reading and Women Writing in Austen's Persuasion

Feminist criticism is equally concerned with female authorship and with female readership and in the case of Jane Austen, both issues must be addressed. Frantz in 2009 noted that on one level Austen's influence on female readership has been immense: she claims that "readers and authors of contemporary romance claim Jane Austen as the fountainhead of all romance novels," a genre which constituted the "largest share of the consumer market in 2008" but which is assumed to have an exclusively female readership. Yet feminist criticism of the early novel overall has begun to focus specifically on the rationale offered for novel-reading in the eighteenth century, when the printer's apprentice Samuel Richardson wrote Pamela in imitation of what Jenny Davidson describes as "conduct manuals," or books of etiquette for female…

Bibliography

Austen, Henry. "A Memoir of Jane Austen." A Memoir of Jane Austen and Other Family Recollections. Ed. Kathryn Sutherland. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 147-154. Print.

Austen, Jane. Mansfield Park. New Jersey: Gramercy Books, 1981. Print.

Austen, Jane. Persuasion. Project Gutenberg. Web.

Davidson, Jenny. Hypocrisy and the Politics of Politeness: Manners and Morals from Locke to Austen. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Print.

Emma the Marriages in Emma by Jane
Words: 821 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 51025857
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Emma

The Marriages in Emma, by Jane Austin

Emma is the story of four marriages and the realities that motivated these couples to join together. This paper will examine the factors that come into play when a man makes his decision to marry and the degree of love and emotional attachment each relationship reflects. The unions are looked at in order of highest degree of emotional attachment and love to least.

Mr. Elton and Miss Hawkins

Emma attempts to make a match between Mr. Elton, the village vicar, and Harriet Smith, a seventeen-year-old woman of undetermined background. In the process of bringing the two together, Harriet becomes enamored with Mr. Elton and rejects a proposal from Robert Martin, believing, with Emma's encouragement, that Martin is beneath her and Elton would raise her social status.

For his part Mr. Elton is flattered by the attention that Emma gives him during the…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. New York: The Heritage Press, 1964.

Gothic Feminism in Wollstoncraft and
Words: 5296 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87576013
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The lack of rights within marriage that makes women basically "property" to the man is obviously central to this story, as indicated by the way in which Maria is imprisoned. There are a variety of ways in which this most disturbing of issues is addressed in the book. Women who are married loose control over their own bodies, and are required to submit to caresses to which their soul does not consent. One woman in the madhouse is, in fact, there specifically because she could not tolerate her husband's caresses. "she had been married, against her inclination, to a rich old man,... In consequence of his treatment... she had... lost her senses." (1.39) Not only is a woman prone to institutionalized rape, but she also has no right to require the man to remain as he was before they wed. Maria declaims bitterly of how her husband deteriorates into a…

Marriage Is Arguably One of
Words: 1570 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39298218
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223) a person without a condition of some kind, was cruelly marginalized by society, as even the well-meaning people would avoid the connection with someone who was not seen well by the others, so as not to be marginalized in his or her turn. The situation of the woman is again entirely dependent on the man, since the society would not accept a woman who did not perform her usual role as a wife and a mother. Mrs. Smith marriage to a man who was not 'what he ought' obviously affects her long after the death of her husband: "Anne saw the misery of such feelings. The husband had not been what he ought, and the wife had been led among that part of mankind which made her think worse of the world than she hoped it deserved." (Austen, 2003, p. 212) as in Pride and Prejudice, there is an…

References

Austen, J. 1996. Emma. New York: Signet Classics.

2003. Persuasion. New York: Penguin.

1983. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Bantam Classics.

Sensibility Women's Identities Are Determined and Limited
Words: 3459 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9019013
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Sensibility omen's Identities Are Determined and Limited by the Expectations of Their Societies

Literature written by and about women lends itself very well to feminist interpretative approaches of various kinds. Such approaches often examine the literature of earlier centuries for signs of discontent with or subversive suggestions against aspects of a society in which men have exclusive control of power. Such an approach is especially fruitful to use when examining Jane Austen's novels since she was writing in a cultural climate that did not accept direct opposition to the status quo. Only through an indirect critique could she publish views critical of the prevailing laws and conditions under which women of her time were forced to live.

By 1811, when Sense and Sensibility was published, an intense backlash against the women's rights fiction of the 1790s had made the publication of blatantly feminist works impossible in England. Yet the women's…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Sense and Sensibility. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989.

Cosslett, Tess. Woman to Woman: Female Friendships in Victorian Fiction. Atlantic Heights: Humanities P, 1988.

Chodorow, Nancy. The Reproduction of Mothering. Berkeley: U. Of California P, 1978.

Defoe, Daniel. Moll Flanders. Ed. And Introduction by David Blewett. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1989.

Impressions in Pride and Prejudice
Words: 1285 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77508781
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These two instances of prematurely formed first impressions make up one way in which the "prejudice" of the title is shown in the novel. The characters in this novel are very quick to form opinions of each other, doing so even before they meet each other, and this has a major effect on their relationships. The result of these first two cases of unseen first impressions is actually positive, and fairly quickly resolved -- Jane and Mr. Bingley end up falling in love, proving the correctness of their hastily formed first impressions. These are instances where the affects of first impressions on character relationships are actually beneficial, because they are fulfilled. More often in the novel, however, the gossip and ballroom behavior that tends to lead to first impressions between the characters -- especially the Bennett sisters and the various men they become involved with -- ends with a different…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin, 2003.

Sensibility and Paul De Man Conclusions Despite
Words: 1993 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 70054660
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SENSIBILITY AND PAUL DE MAN "CONCLUSIONS"

Despite the fact that De man was not a trained philosopher his post war theoretical work is majorly concerned with the nature of the subject and the language in addition to the role played by language and subject in the larger epistemological question of how and what one can claim to know. As a scholar in the field of literature, however, he often took his departure from, and kept returning to, the problems that mostly affect literature in terms of language and criticism. De man did some work in literary theory and criticism dating back to 1950s, although this work cannot be associated with any previous school of criticism that were flourishing during that era. (De man 567)

esearch questions

What major theme does Austen bring about in her book 'sense and sensibility'

What styles does she use to build on the major theme?…

References

Moore, Lisa L. Dangerous Intimacies: History of the British Novel. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2000.

O'Farrell, Mary Ann. The Nineteenth-Century English

Novel and the Blush. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1995.

Stoval, Bruce. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen. 4th Ed.

Characters and the Way They
Words: 2484 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5305878
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y the final chapter, although Huck has come to like Silas and Sally, he knows that they are still a part of the society he has come to distrust and fear so, before the dust from his adventures is fully settled he is already planning to detach himself again:" but I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before" (chapter 43, Electronic text center, University of Virginia Library).

In Austen's novel the theme is to show the violation of the moral and social codes and its disastrous results in a humored way. While human follies and stupidities lead to the violation of the code and only the self-knowledge can prevent the human error, Jane Austen's main theme becomes to know yourself. Through self-analysis Emma changes…

Bibliography

Twain, Mark (1835-1910)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library

 http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Huc.html

Emma vs Clueless This Paper
Words: 874 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21838662
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She is "handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition" (7). In this respect, Heckerling pays tribute to Austen in creating a similar character. Because of their wealth, both Emma and Cher are spoiled, in control socially, and tend to think too highly of themselves. This is a result of the lack of a maternal figure in their lives, as well as their fathers' over-indulgence. Cher has everything a teenage girl could want: money, her own Jeep, a huge wardrobe, et cetera. Like a lot of girls, she spends a large amount of time and money at the mall; however, she spends hundreds and thousands of dollars on her clothes, not the kind of money a typical teenager would spend. Because her father is so busy with his court cases, he has little time to spend with her to give her guidance and discipline. An example of…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. London: Penguin Books, 2003.

Clueless. Dir. Amy Heckerling. Perf. Alicia Silverstone and Stacey Dash.

Paramount Pictures, 1995.

Huckleberry Finn Emma Woodhouse and
Words: 1750 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37338772
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sher, Emma, Huck Finn, they all have a mentor at some point in their lives. Huck is guided by Jim, who although described like a child who needs constant guidance (like all the slaves were thought to be in that time), is often sounding like the voice of reason. sher is helped to follow his love for art by his mother first, then the Rebbe steps in and brings him under the guidance of Jakob Kahn, an experienced and famous artist who will act as his final mentor.

The protagonists in all three novels are very strong willed, intelligent young people who are willing to sacrifice a lot for their personal freedom and for their right to remain true to themselves. They are prepared to go a long way to find their vocation or the meaning of their life. lthough acting in their own interested, they are also dedicated to…

Austen, J. Drabble, M (contributor). 1996. Emma. Signet Classic

Potok, C. 2003. My Name is Asher Lev. Anchor

Twain, M. 1994. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: unabridged. Courier Dover Publications

Daughters in Literature Requires a Thorough Analysis
Words: 1924 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52079961
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Daughters in literature requires a thorough analysis of gender roles and norms. The concept of daughter is directly linked to gender roles, as being a daughter entails specific social and familial responsibilities. Daughters' rights, roles, and responsibilities vis-a-vis their male siblings can therefore become a gendered lens, which is used to read literature. This is true even when the daughters in question are not protagonists. For example, Sonya in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is not a protagonist but her supportive role has a tremendous impact on main character Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov. Likewise, no one of King Lear's three daughters is the play's protagonist but they nevertheless propel the plot of the play and are central to its outcome. Virginia oolf's To the Lighthouse barely features any of the Ramsay daughters, and yet there are ample textual references to the role of daughters in families and correspondingly, the role of…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Edited by James Kinsley. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Crime and Punishment. Translated and annotated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. New York: Vintage Books, 1993.

Shakespeare. William. King Lear. Edited by Stephen Orgel. New York, N.Y: Penguin Books, 1999.

Woolf, Virginia. To the Lighthouse. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. [1981], c1955.

Urgency to Marry in 18th
Words: 849 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27366419
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Through their relationship, we see how Charlotte decided to marry him because she did not want to be left alone and without anyone at all.

Pride and Prejudice allows us to see the different types of marriage through each relationship. Not all marriages are equal and husbands and wives are never easy to understand. Lydia marries ickham and their marriage is shallow as the two are inexperienced in the ways of a healthy relationship. Lydia may be a beautiful woman but she is ignorant when it comes to her husband and his behavior. Lydia's relationship with ickham weakens over time and the two grow apart. From this couple, we can see how a good marriage takes hard work and commitment. Things will not improve if each partner goes his or her separate ways and the couple spends more time apart than they do together. This frustration is viewed by Jane…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

Ending or a Beginning to
Words: 1006 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72292150
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In this simple, somewhat old-fashioned novel in which happiness is demonstrated by young girls successfully marrying, the ending of the novel is much more preferable to the beginning. The novel ends, of course, with Elizabeth marrying Mr. Darcy in a state of happiness. The beginning of their relationship, however, was characterized by a sense of tension and perhaps even mutual dislike on the part of both parties, as Mr. Darcy refuses to dance with Elizabeth due to his displeasure with his surroundings. However, much as the narrator in "Happen Endings" alludes to, the subsequent events that occur after this initial one are what set up the happy ending. Mr. Darcy is eventually attracted to Elizabeth's intelligence and caring, compassionate nature. In fact, the ending of this novel shows how the pair are able to overcome a number of obstacles, even Elizabeth's initial refusal of Mr. Darcy's proposal -- all of…

Works Cited

Atwood, Margaret. "Happy Endings." 1983. http://users.ipfw.edu/ruflethe/endings.htm

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Barnes and Noble. 2004. Print.

Wharton, Edith. The House of Mirth. Online Literature. 1905.  http://www.online-literature.com/wharton/house_mirth/

Emma Is a Likeable Character or Not
Words: 1808 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23179919
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Emma is a likeable character or not. Emma is an interesting and complex character, and she can be quite unlikable, especially when she meddles in the affairs of others and does not recognize the danger of that meddling. However, in the end she shows that she has grown up, can take responsibility for her actions, and is finally ready for true love, so she is a likable character.

Emma is an interesting character, but she does become likable, even though she can be callous, and is truly a snob. Austen introduces Emma at the beginning of the book by saying, "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her" (Austen 3). Immediately many female readers might be put off,…

References

Jane Austen. Emma. Ed. James Kinsley. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Life of a Clergyman in Victorian Society
Words: 1323 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69218875
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life of a clergyman in Victorian society as presented in the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. The paper explains how the society of those days perceived Church and focuses on the negative portrayal of clergymen by Austen.

PIDE AND PEJUDICE: LIFE OF A CLEGYMAN

Pride and prejudice is undoubtedly the most important work of Jane Austen and one, which presents Victorian society in its true light. The novel sheds light on the society of those days and shows how various characters evolved under restriction posed by societal rules and regulations. This is probably one reason why we find Austen's clergymen to be repressed figures who were more inclined to serve themselves than others. The negative portrayal of the life of a clergyman in Pride and prejudice is closely linked with the fact that Victorian society was a highly class conscious society where people of humble professions were not…

References

Pride and Prejudice:

 http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pride_and_Prejudice 

Anthony Trollope's views: Introduction to Pride and Prejudice:

 http://www.penguin.co.uk

Home a Round Character Has Multiple Dimensions
Words: 458 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45333776
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Home

A round character has multiple dimensions as a human being, and strikes more than one 'note' in the text -- for instance, the snobbish Mrs. Elton of Emma is a one-dimensional presence in that novel, while Hardy's Bathsheba is contradictory as a real human being, and one cannot predict her likely actions.

Retrospective narration is narrated from the point-of-view of a present day narrator, looking into the far-off past of a long-ago world, like Hardy's third person omniscient narrator of Far from the Madding Crowd, or a narrator looking back on his own life, like Dickens' David Copperfield.

Didactic literature teaches an explicit lesson of how one ought to behave, like Jane Austen's Emma, or how human life evolves in strange ways in the point-of-view of the narrator, as in Joseph Andrews by Fielding.

A novel of manners is plot-driven in terms of questions about how its characters should…

Shaw Rhys
Words: 2213 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32923381
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Shaw's primary purposes in writing Pygmalion, the story of a phonetics professor who, on a bet, transforms a guttersnipe of a flower girl into a lady, was to educate. The title of the play comes from the Greek myth of Pygmalion, a sculptor who created a statue of surpassing beauty; at his request, the gods animated the statue as Galatea. The myth is updated, and substantially altered, by Shaw; instead of a statue, Galatea is Eliza Doolittle, a Covent Garden flower girl, whose accent immediately marks her out as from the very bottom of the English class structure. Professor Henry Higgins, an expert on accents and pronunciation, represents Pygmalion. He undertakes to transform her speech so that she can be taken for a duchess at a society party and succeeds in spite of the inherent difficulties.

In his foreword to the play, Shaw writes, "It is so intensely and deliberately…

Bibliography

1. Page, E. Postcolonial Discourse in Wide Sargasso Sea  http://www.qub.ac.uk/en/imperial/carib/sargasso.htm 

2. The Victorian Web, www.victorianweb.org/post/caribbean/dominica/rhys/ripple18.html

3. Romantic Times Book Club, "Plain Jane - What's the Appeal? www.romantictimes.com/f_reader/f3a_49.html

4. Literary Encyclopedia, Article on Jean Rhys www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=8787

Clueless Movie vs Emma Novel
Words: 1483 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 76163583
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Because of the differences in their social status to Robert/Travis', they cannot conceive of Harriet/Tai's attraction to and ultimate love for him, the one due to his wealth and the other due to his habits. This change is necessary for the sympathies of the audience to remain intact. Had Cher objected to Travis simply on the grounds of his financial standing, the audience would not have any sympathy for her. But because he is a stoner and somewhat stupid, her desire to find Tai someone better makes some sense. In Austen's time, class and money were everything; people could be cut off for marrying beneath them, so such a seemingly shallow stance on Emma's part would have been not only understood, but expected.

Character is by no means the only -- or even the most important -- adjustment that Heckerling made in adapting Emma into the movie Clueless. The entire…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. New Milford: Toby Press, 2003.

Green, Lindsay. Emma, by Jane Austen, and Clueless, Directed by Amy Heckerling. Sydney: Pascal Press, 2001.

Guney, Ajda and Yavuz, Mehmet Ertug. "The Nineteenth Century Literature and Feminist Motives in Jane Austen's Novels." New World Sciences Academy, Vol 3, Iss. 3 (2008). 523-31. Accessed via Ebsco Host 9 November 2008.  http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=11&hid=6&sid=49eaeb54-778c-4498-ba7a-4cd389bb44d2%40sessionmgr104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&an=33019184 

Macdonald, Gina and Macdonald, Andrew. Jane Austen on Screen. Boston: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Storni Alfonsina You Want Me White the
Words: 1783 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 32838464
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Storni, Alfonsina. "You ant Me hite." The Norton Anthology of orld

Vol. F. Ed. Sarah Lawall and Mayard Mac. New York: Norton, 2002. 2124-2125

The poem titled "You ant Me hite" written by Alfonsina Storni explores the issue of women mistreatment by men. The women complain how men expect them to be virgins when they (men ) are not.

Atwood, Margaret and Martin, Valerie.The Handmaid's Tale . Anchor.1998

In this book the author portrays how women are only valued for their fertility and they are allowed access to education in the patriarch society. This work is important to the research since it shows how women were mistreated by being regarded as sex symbols as well as not being allowed access to education.

Staves, Susan. Married omen's Separate Property Rights in England, 1660(1833. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1990.

This work is a recollection of the actual case studies and examples of various…

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Oxford: Heinemann, 1996.

Atwood, Margaret.The Handmaid's Tale . Anchor.1998

Staves, Susan. Married Women's Separate Property Rights in England, 1660(1833. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1990.

Stewart, Maaja A. Domestic Realities and Imperial Fictions: Jane Austen's Novels in Eighteenth-Century Contexts. Athens: U. Of Georgia P, 1993.

Senselessness and Secretiveness The Role
Words: 1493 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55660555
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Colonel Brandon is a quiet and reserved man who loves Marianne. Of course the question arises as to why Brandon did not reveal illoughby's character: unlike the intemperate Marianne, Brandon shows too much reserve. illoughby, despite his faults, is attractive because of his passionate love of sentimental verse, but Marianne must learn to look beneath the surface of both her two suitors. This is made difficult by Brandon's reserve and sense of propriety. Until Brandon speaks the truth, Marianne and Elinor do not know that behind illoughby's charming demeanor there is an ugly, sensual and mercenary side. Beneath Brandon's seemingly implacable surface there is a man who is good, kind and truly romantic, given that the reason he took on his ward Eliza was that she was the daughter of a woman he loved, who was forced to marry his brother.

Brandon's actions, beneath his surface of good sense, actually…

Work Cited

Austen, Jane. Sense and Sensibility. Originally published 1811. Project Gutenberg.

February 16, 2010.  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/161/161-h/161-h.htm

Heritage British Cinema and Thatcherism
Words: 5866 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36273614
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There has been a lot of debate and discussions on how exactly these so called heritage films must be interpreted, in academic circles as well as in the mainstream press, and in the more specialized film publications.

As a part of the debate, certain issues became more important than others, and some of them were that a limit must be imposed on this type of trend in production, and that in terms of subject matter of the film, the sources from which the film would draw, the casting in the film, and the style. Would all these factors be able to make up and contribute to a major genre of films? As a matter of fact, heritage films do indeed operate at the culturally respectable end of the market, and they are also the main players in the British Art Film genre. The heritage film generally has a sort of…

References

Biography for Colin Welland. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0919815/bio 

British Cinema in the eighties, Cinema, - Review - Book Review. Film Quarterly. Summer, 2001. Accessed 21 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.gobelle.com/p/articles/mi_m1070/is_4_54/ai_76997332 

Chariots of Fire, 1981. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082158/ 

Frederic; Brussat, Mary Ann. Spirituality and Health, Movie Review, Maurice. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.spiritualityhealth.com/newsh/items/moviereview/item_9017.html

Hypochondriasis An Overview Description of
Words: 1386 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12214467
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2).

The availability of the Internet, many beleaguered doctors fear, will make it easier for hypochondriac patients to find new and rare illnesses to diagnose themselves with -- however, even doctors acknowledge the value of the Internet in their own work, when cases baffle them. "eb-based search engines such as Google are becoming the latest tools in clinical medicine, and doctors in training need to become proficient in their use....Using clusters of symptom-related words, they [the doctors] searched Google for a correct diagnosis and compared the internet diagnosis with those in the journals....Google searches found the correct diagnosis in 15 - or 58 per cent - of cases proving, say the authors, that the engine is a useful aid, particularly if the condition has 'unique' symptoms...But patients doing a Google search may be less likely to reach the correct diagnosis" ("GPs should Google diagnosis: study," Nine MSNBC, 2007). Again, one…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. Full e-text available 18 Apr 2008 at  http://www.austen.com/emma/ 

GPs should Google diagnosis: study." Nine MSNBC. 18 Nov 2007. 10 Apr 2008. http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=160924

Hypochondriasis." The Cleveland Clinic Department of Patient Education and Health

Information. 17 Apr 2008. http://www.clevelandclinic.org/health/health-info/docs/3700/3783.asp?index=9886

Madness in Women in Most of the
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Madness in Women

In most of the novels and the works in consideration we see the struggle for expression and the quest to overcome masculine oppression (on the part of the author) finds expression as a deteriorating mental state of the character.

Largely guided by their urge to break off from the shackles of the society and the pining for the freedom that has been sadly denied to them, women exhibit a kind of madness in their effort to restore the balance. This is fairly obvious from the many literary works created by women. These works invariably depict the quest for freedom and very often they end up as the lamenting tones of a deranged personality. In most of the novels and the works in consideration we see the struggle for expression and the quest to overcome masculine oppression (on the part of the author) is expressed as a deteriorating…

Daily Life In Fact it
Words: 2283 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 36665264
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In this novel, class has more to do with breeding and background than it does with simple wealth. Class is a complex concept, and this has made it very difficult to negotiate shifts and changes in one's class status. The Great Gatsby illustrates that class is capable of producing deep-seated prejudices that cannot simply be altered by external factors like money.

Another very famous novel that affirms these class divisions and the barriers to class mobility is Jane Austen's Emma. The main character thinks of herself as a very good matchmaker, and one of the many conflicts in the novel involves Emma trying to match her friend Harriet up with Mr. Collins, and dissuading her from her romantic feelings for the farmer Mr. Martin. Emma foolishly believes, simply because she likes Harriet as a friend, that Harriet will be accepted into the upper reaches of the eighteenth century British class…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. New York: Bantam, 1984.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. Mew York: Scribner, 1995.

Shaw, George Bernard. Pygmalion. Mineola, NY: Dover, 1994.

Steinbeck, John. The Pearl. New York: Penguin, 1992.

Fiction's Come a Long Way Baby the
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Fiction's Come a Long Way, aby

The development of fiction from its nascent stages until today's contemporary works is a storied one. Many features mark contemporary fiction and differentiate it from the classics of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries: For one, modern writers use different perspectives to narrate: In some works, the narrator switches from third-person omniscient to first person, and in some contemporary works, even the challenging second-person. Experimentation in styles also marks contemporary fiction: Nabokov, perhaps fiction's greatest ever stylist, has written one novel penned to ladies and gentlemen of the jury, and another as literary criticism on a purposefully mediocre poem. (Nabokov: Lolita and Pale Fire).

ut one of the most pronounced shifts in fiction over these centuries has been the move from stuffy, high art to a fixation on and immersion in pop culture. George Eliot, for instance, in "Daniel Deronda," interspersed a very staid…

Bibliography

Cisneros, Sandra: Woman Hollering Creek. New York: Vintage.

Cisneros, Sandra: Mexican Movies. New York: Vintage.

Cisneros, Sandra: Barbie-Q. New York: Vintage.

Johnson, Samuel: Rasselas. New York: Oxford.

Huckleberry Finn Emma My Name
Words: 1204 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88675695
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Huckleberry Finn's violent, alcoholic father, after Finn escapes from the Widow, is an extremely negative paternal force of socialization. Finn, rather than be integrated into society like Emma, must leave society and find his own values, rather than the hypocritical values imposed upon him by others. The most fundamental of these values are his friendship with Jim, an escaped Black slave, who is his truest friend in the novel. Jim follows Huckleberry Finn everywhere, and Finn saves his life on several occasions by lying. Huck feels guilty because he has been taught this is 'stealing' another person's property, because Jim is 'owned' but Huck's natural humanity tells him otherwise. Unlike Emma's natural, ungoverned impulses, which led her to play with the fates of others, Huck's natural inclinations are the best part of his character, unlike his friend Tom Sawyer who is more socialized in morals and books (the sort of…

Waifs in Literature in the
Words: 1992 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18530831
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Oliver went home with the elderly gentleman and his family and for the first time in his life, Oliver found himself in a situation where someone cared for him.

Oliver's moral character was somewhat better than Moll's. Despite the fact that he had no moral guidance, he recognized that stealing was wrong. Dickens writes,

hat was Oliver's horror and alarm as he stood a few paces off, looking on with his eyelids as wide open as they would possibly go, to see the Dodger plunge his hand into the old gentleman's pocket, and draw from thence a handkerchief…in an instant, the whole mystery of the handkerchief, and the watches, and the jewels, and the Jew, rushed upon the boy's mind (82).

Moll, on the other hand, turned to theft deliberately when she was too old to turn the heads of men. Unlike the young Oliver who was too young to…

Works Cited

Defoe, Daniel. Moll Flanders. New York: Penguin Group, 1996. Print.

Dickens, Charles. Oliver Twist. New York: Peebles Press International, n/d. Print.

Fielding, Henry. Joseph Andrews. United States: Martin C. Battestin, 1961. Print.

Gast, M.A. Nicole. Marriages and the Alternatives in Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice.' 2005. Web. 20 Apr. 2010.

Irony in the Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield
Words: 3634 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 30546095
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Failure of Family: The Irony of the Vicar of akefield

Tolstoy states that every happy family is the same (Tolstoy 1). He says this because happiness is the effect of a life well lived and not of any other cause, which is also the philosophy of Plato (Plato 47). Unhappy families, however, are unhappy mainly because they have failed to live well, or virtuously. That is the case of the Primrose family in The Vicar of akefield: the family undergoes terrible misfortunes mainly because it fails to live for the good or to understand its own place in the world. The primary responsibility for the misfortune falls on the parents who fail to recognize their own faults and do not raise their children correctly. The parents also fail to realize who they are in social terms and thus deceive themselves as to their actual social value. This paper will show…

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. UK: Dover, 1995. Print.

Dahl, Curtis. "Patterns of Disguise in The Vicar of Wakefield." ELH -- Johns Hopkins

University Press, vol. 25, no. 2 (1958): 90-104. Print.

Goldsmith, Oliver. The Vicar of Wakefield. UK: Dover, 2004. Print.

Maria Edgeworth's Belinda
Words: 2770 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90561892
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feminist implications of Maria Edgeworth's novel, Belinda. In many ways, Edgeworth's Belinda seems to flaunt the 19th century ideas about the proper behavior of women in society.

Yet the novel also indicates and does little to challenge many the accepted roles of women in society. The relative success of Jane Austin's novels in comparison to Edgeworth's may be related to our modern conception of an English lady as cultured and demure above all. All in all, Belinda is an important look at women's roles in 19th century Europe.

A chapter-by-chapter summary of the plot may be useful in putting the rest of the essay in context. Edgeworth's novel is made up of an impressive 31 chapters. Chapter I simply introduces the reader to the characters, and chapter II Masks continues a conversation between Belinda Portman and the Lady Delacour, after which they leave to the house of Lady Singleton for…

Works Cited

Columbia Encyclopedia. Sixth Edition, Copyright - 2003. Maria Edgeworth. 07 December 2003. Available online at  http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/E/EdgewortM1.asp 

Edgeworth, Maria. 1811. Belinda. A Celebration of Women Writers. Available online at  http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/edgeworth/belinda/belinda.html 

Le Faye, Deirdre. 1999. The British Library Writer's Lives. Jane Austen.

McCann, Andrew. 1996. Conjugal Love and the Enlightenment Subject: The Colonial Context of Non-Identity in Maria Edgeworth's Belinda. In: Novel: A Forum on Fiction, vol. 30, no. 1, p. 56-77.

Gothic Literature in 18th Century England
Words: 2747 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83808044
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Relationship of "The Old English Baron" and "Vathek" to 18th Century English Gothic Fiction

The rise of Gothic fiction in English literature coincided with the advent of the Romantic Era at the end of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th century. Gothic masterpieces such as Shelley's Frankenstein, Lewis's The Monk, and Stoker's Dracula would capture the imagination by fueling it with the flames of horror, suspense, other-worldliness and mystery. These elements are significant because the Age of Enlightenment had been characterized by a cold, objective, analytical focus on nature and humankind. It had been based on the concept that reason was sufficient to explain all events in the world and in fact all creation. Yet as Shakespeare's Hamlet reminded readers, "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, / Than are dreamt of in your philosophy" (Shakespeare 1.5.167-168). Part of this interest in the Gothic was inspired…

Realism and Compromise
Words: 1189 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52706821
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Victorian Prose and Poetry, by Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom. Specifically, it will discuss ealism and compromise in Victorian Literature. How do Victorian writers search for realistic compromises with the world around them?

VICTOIAN LITEATUE

In Victorian literature, ealism followed the age of omanticism, and ealism quickly evolved into Naturalism, practiced by many authors of the time, including Jack London, Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, and Sinclair Lewis. "There was a time when the intellectual and spiritual life of Europe as a whole was dominated by neo-classicism; it was dominated in the next era by omanticism; and then it was dominated by ealism, which developed into Naturalism" (Baker 58). ealism in literature attempted to portray things as they really were, scientifically and without emotion, placing man in balance with nature.

The task of realism, Howells felt, was to defend "the people" against its adversaries. The realist, he wrote, "feels…

References

Baker, Joseph E., ed. The Reinterpretation of Victorian Literature. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1950. Borus, Daniel H. Writing Realism: Howells, James, and Norris in the Mass Market. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1989.

Decker, Clarence R. The Victorian Conscience. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1952.

Stedman, Edmund Clarence, ed. A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895; Selections Illustrating the Editor's Critical Review of British Poetry in the Reign of Victoria. Boston; New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1895.

Trilling, Lionel and Bloom, Harold, eds. Victorian Prose and Poetry. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.

Influential Victorian Literature Scott and Historical Fiction
Words: 2772 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75596424
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Sir Walter Scott was a writer a part of the romantic era, roughly 1797 -- 1837. Scott was born slightly before the beginning of this era, in 1771, and died nearly at the same time the period changed in 1832. Scott is known as a novelist, playwright, and poet of Scottish descent. The beginning of the omantic period is typically attributed to the publication of Wordworth's and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads, and closed with the rise into power of Queen Victoria. This is a period in literature that produced outstanding lyrical poetry, a few dramas, and several novelists that were popular, including Scott. Scott was known for the ability to blend European history into entertaining narratives. Scott happened to have mass appeal during this period, able to reach readers of various classes and places within the Victorian era. At the time of the omantic Era, authors such as Jane Austen were…

References:

Edinburgh University Library. "Walter Scott." Edinburgh University Library, Web, 2014, Available from:  http://www.walterscott.lib.ed.ac.uk/home.html . 2014 March 04.

MacKenzie, Robert Shelton. Sir Walter Scott: The Story of His Life. Kessinger Publishing, 2009. Print.

Scott, MD, Professor Walter. The Complete Works of Sir Walter Scott: With a Biography, and His Last Additions and Illustrations, Volume 7. Nabu Press, 2010. Print.

Wind Done Gone A Legitimate
Words: 397 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24147762
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The Randall novel also violated several caveats placed by the Mitchell estate upon authorized sequels: "that Scarlett never die, that miscegenation and homosexuality be avoided" and Randall further suggests that "Scarlett had a black ancestor, that Tara was really run by savvy slaves who knew how to manipulate their white masters and that Rhett pursued Scarlett only because she looked like her mulatto half-sister, Cynara, who was the true love of his life" (Katutani 2007).

As noted by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in its "Comprehensive Opinion Vacating Preliminary Injunction" dated October 10, 2001, finding in favor of Randall's publishers, copyright law does not protect an artist against criticism or commentary -- far from it, copyright was designed to promote freedom of expression, yet that was exactly what the Mitchell estate was attempting to stifle. (17).

orks Cited

"Comprehensive Opinion Vacating Preliminary Injunction." Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals

October…

Works Cited

"Comprehensive Opinion Vacating Preliminary Injunction." Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals

October 10, 2001. November 7, 2009.

 http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/features/randall_url/pdf/Comprehensive_Opinion.pdf 

Katutani, M. "Critic's notebook: Within its genre, a takeoff on Tara gropes for a place." The New

Women's Education 1840s an Analysis of Women's
Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33826392
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Women's Education 1840s

An Analysis of Women's Education in the 1840s

Women in both Britain and America were set to receive greater attention in the realm of academia in the 1840s than they had in decades prior. The Bronte sisters had both begun their writing careers that same decade and Elizabeth Gaskell's first novel was published at the end of it. Mary Shelley had been writing for nearly three decades already -- Frankenstein being published a year after the death of Jane Austen. Women of letters had obviously received an education -- but from where? This paper will look at women's education in the 1840s and show how it was changing.

Changes

Jane Sherzer (1916) notes that "in West Virginia, in Southern Indiana and Illinois there were no schools for the higher education of women up to 1840" (p. 1), however, she adds that "early in 1840, in Indiana there…

Reference List

Sherzer, J. (1916). The Higher Education of Women in the Ohio Valley. Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly 25(1): 1-22.

Solomon, B.M. (1985). In the Company of Educated Women. Yale University Press.

Tennyson, A.L. (1847). The Princess: A Medley. Boston, MA: Ticknor and Fields.

Spirits Subtext Context and Other
Words: 1419 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57502145
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Class struggles are one type of such instability, and this instability is hinted at again and again throughout the novel. Esteban's rape of one of the servants at the hacienda is indicative of the subjugation and authority that exists within the household, and the fact that this union ends up resulting in a child can be seen as indicative of the generative power of such a power and class structure. This child also ends up having a child, however, and the grandson of this class rape completes the cycle of violence by imprisoning and raping Esteban's granddaughter, showing a new type of class dominance that is representative of the equal evils yet changed perspective of the socialist/Communist regimes.

Gender Struggles and Female Power/Independence

Another very evident strain throughout the House of Spirits, and one that can be seen in both instances of rape along with may other events and details…

Works Cited

Allende, Isabel. The House of Spirits. New York: Dial, 2005.

Garcia-Johnson, Ronie-Richele. "The Struggle for Space: Feminism and Freedom in the House of the Spirits." Revista Hispanica Moderna Volume 47, Issue 1 (1994), pp. 184-93.

Hamner, Lucia C. & a. Harron Akram Loodhi. "In the House of the Spirits: Toward a Post Keynesian Theory of the Household?" Journal of Post Keynesian Economics

Volume 20, Issue 3 (1998), pp. 415-33.

Beyond the Printed Page Kindling
Words: 1430 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 36633414
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"Specifically, it's an extension of the familiar Amazon store (where, of course, Kindles will be sold). Amazon has designed the Kindle to operate totally independent of a computer: you can use it to go to the store, browse for books, check out your personalized recommendations, and read reader reviews and post new ones, tapping out the words on a thumb-friendly keyboard. Buying a book with a Kindle is a one-touch process" (Levy 2007). It encourages consumption and purchasing of literary material filtered through one corporation's portal. Independent bookstores that showcased new authors will find it even more difficult to survive in the new, 'Kindled' world.

The Kindle's domination extends not only to fiction, but also to news. The Kindle "not only displays the news" but it "also speaks it with a computerized voice" with free downloadable new pronunciations for the week's newsmakers (Arango 2009). However, the domination of the Kindle…

Works Cited

Arango, Tim. "The President's Name Trips Up a Would-Be Voice of the News" The New York

Times. 8 May 2009. 19 May 2009.

"e-book overview." e-book fanatic. 2007. 19 May 2009.

http://www.ebookfanatic.com/ebook-overview.html

Vindication of the Rights of
Words: 2169 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 27224399
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Furthermore, this brief introduction details the different types of legislation regarding men and women that Wollstonecraft supported. Next, this chapter moves onto Wollstonecraft's own life and actions, as well as a brief description of the time period in which she lived. These descriptions allow the reader to understand how Wollstonecraft was both revolutionary and conventional, in addition to how society encouraged and discouraged her various roles. Furthermore, I introduce these ideas to personify the struggle in which Wollstonecraft operated every day. It is this struggle that I emphasize during this chapter, giving the reader an idea of the challenging nature of Wollstonecraft's life because of it, in addition to its contribution to her struggle on paper. This chapter also introduces the reactions that others had to her work, as well as a tribute to its lasting contributions. I remark that Wollstonecraft is a strong voice among other female writers and…

Music & Skimmington Riots an
Words: 8558 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34158478
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In this regard, when wage levels fell in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the standard of living for laborers and cottagers in England declined precipitously and they were compelled to use the majority of their cash, garden crops, and milk just to buy bread and clothing (Kulikoff 2000:19). Not surprisingly, many of these workers found it almost impossible in some cases to even survive, even with the entire family - including young children - working as hard as possible (Kulikoff 19).

In some cases, laborers (but not their families) were paid in food and drink as part of their wages and some likely kept fowl or a pig, and cottagers, of course, produced much of their own food; nevertheless, poor landless families ate bread and porridge, on occasion supplemented by milk, ale, cheese, eggs, or cheap meat, a diet that was far removed from the same level enjoyed…

Works Cited

Abramovitz, Mimi. Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present. Boston: South End Press, 1988.

Bonomi, Patricia U. Under the Cope of Heaven: Religion, Society, and Politics in Colonial America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Breen, T.H. The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Daunton, M.J. Progress and Poverty: An Economic and Social History of Britain, 1700-1850. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Futurist Kings Welch and Drucker
Words: 2667 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79061345
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We have come full circle to the days of local businesses, but geography has been eliminated as a barrier to communication. Companies are now expected to contribute to their local economy and culture. Whatever a company does at home will be broadcast to the world, positive or negative. Wal-Mart is highly criticized for its low wages, even though the company admits it does not expect to retain entry level employees. However, the company's support in its local communities wherever the stores are found counter the bad publicity about wages. In fact, Wal-Mart is a good example of several of the tenets listed here, especially that of agility. It has changed its management architecture, so that local managers have the local power to make the individual outlets good citizens of their communities.

So Jack Welch's simple rules for management need to be modified. Even the CEO who followed him has done…

References

Burkhardt, John C. And Overton, Betty J. 1999.; Applied Developmental Science, Vol. 3,

Business Mexico; 7/1/2005.Want to win? Some practical advice from Jack Welch.(Biography)

 http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-142103712.html 

Flaherty, John E.. 1999. Peter Drucker: Shaping the Managerial Mind Jossey-Bass © 1999

Unifies and Permeates an Entire
Words: 1176 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91474170
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Short story -- A brief story where the plot drives the narrative, substantially shorter than a novel. Example: "Hills like White Elephants," by Ernest Hemingway.

Allusion -- A casual reference in one literary work to a person, place, event, or another piece of literature, often without explicit identification. It is used to establish a tone, create an indirect association, create contrast, make an unusual juxtaposition, or bring the reader into a world of references outside the limitations of the story itself. Example: "The Wasteland" by T.S. Eliot alludes to "Paradise Lost" by John Milton.

epetition -- The repeating of a word or phrase or rhythm within a piece of literature to add emphasis. Example: The story of Agamemnon in The Odyssey by Homer.

Blank verse -- Unrhymed lines of ten syllables each with the even-numbered syllables bearing the accents, most closing resembling the natural rhythms of English speech. Example: "The…

References:

Wheeler, Dr. L. Kip. "Literary Terms and Definitions." Web.

"Word List of Literary and Grammar Terms." Web.

Rhetorical Strategy Rhetoric Identities Burned A Rhetorical
Words: 1648 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35094502
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hetorical Strategy hetoric Identities

Burned: A rhetorical analysis of a modern adolescent novel in verse

The book Burned by Ellen Hopkins examines how being raised in a fundamentalist religious faith can make it difficult for an adolescent to establish an independent identity. All adolescents must go through a struggle in our society to establish a positive sense of self, but the protagonist's circumstances make it particularly difficult. In Burned, Pattyn Scarlet Von Stratten, the eldest daughter in a large Mormon family, is sent away to live with her aunt, after her family can no longer control her. Pattyn finds happiness and freedom in the arms of a non-Mormon boy named Ethan. However, that happiness is shattered when she returns home and eventually Ethan dies in a car crash.

This narrative might seem impossibly melodramatic and unrealistic on paper. However, the way that Hopkins conveys it is through a unique style:…

Reference

Hopkins, Ellen. Burned. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2007.

Truman Capote the Life the
Words: 2786 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21527634
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I had to go into town on Saturdays to the dentist and I joined the Sunshine Club that was organized by the Mobile Press Register." He goes on to tell about entering a work of writing on the children's page publication, which he had called "Old Mr. usybody." The first installment of his writing appeared in a Sunday edition under his real name, which was Truman Streckfus Persons. The second installment never was published after the townspeople figured out he in actuality ' was serving up local scandal as fiction'. (Compote in Interview)

Capote and Writing Technique

When asked the question of "Are there devices one can use in improving one's technique? Capote answered by stating, "Work is the only device I know of. Writing has laws of perspective, of light and shade, just as painting does, or music. If you are born knowing them, fine. If not, learn them.…

Bibliography

Epstein, Joseph (2004) a Lad of the World, "Truman Capote and the Cost of Charms" Vol. 101 Issue 12 (Dec 12-2004) Online available at www.weeklystandard.com.

Truman Capote (nd) Speaking of Stories From the Page to the Stage [available Online at www. Speakingofstories.org]

Truman Compote, the Art of Fiction (nd) the Paris Review No. 17

Capote, Truman. A Christmas Memory. New York: Random House Inc., 1956.

Compare Woolf's Jacob's Room and Forster's a Room With a View
Words: 2658 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62164289
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Forster, oolf

At the beginning of E.M. Forster's book A Room with a View, the inn's guest Mr. Emerson states: "I have a view, I have a view. . . . This is my son . . . his name's George. He has a view, too." On the most basic level, this statement is just as it appears: Mr. Emerson is talking about what he sees outside of his window. However, the comment also suggests one of the major themes of this book, as well as another early 20th-century novel, Jacob's Room, by Virginia oolf: That is, the view one social class has of another. These books by Forster and oolf described the times in socio-economic terms as well as how the characters related to them.

Forster's novel A Room with a View details the happenstance of the young middle-class Englishwoman Lucy Honeychurch in the early 1900s on a visit…

Woolf, Virginia. The Death of the Moth, and other essays. Harcourt 1974.

Woolf, Virginia. Jacob's Room. The Literature Network. Website retrieved

April 12,  http://www.online-literature.com/virginia_woolf/jacob-room/

Fashion Romantic Era Fashion in Europe the
Words: 846 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65048304
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Fashion

Romantic Era Fashion

In Europe, the Romantic Period lasted from approximately 1820-1835 and had very distinctive flavor. People were disenchanted with writing and paintings that followed dour religious subject matter for the main part and took away humanity. The Romantic Era can be seen as the birth of the humanist period that continues to this day. People wanted to express themselves as individuals with passion and emotion. This was reflected in the art of the day, in the literature from such great poets and novelists as Edgar Allen Poe and Jane Austen, and in the fashion that became popular for a brief time and then faded away. This was a fashion that was tempered with diversity due to the class of the people wearing it and the utility of the garments. This research paper discusses the fashions of the day and how they were influenced, especially in England by…

Works Cited

Bell, Melissa J. "About the Romantic Period and the French Revolution." (2009). Web.

Jarrett, Susan M. "The Romantic Era: 1820-1850." Costume History Pages, 2011. Web.

Thomas, Pauline Weston. "The Romantic Era 1825-1845 Fashion History." Fashion Era, 2011. Web

Poe Fall of the House of Usher
Words: 1977 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25326984
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Poe, Fall of the House of Usher

Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher" is perhaps the best-known American entry into the genre of Romantic and Gothic tale, yet it is worth asking what elements actually identify it as such. Spitzer describes the level of Gothic excess here:

Roderick and Madeline, twins chained to each other by incestuous love, suffering separately but dying together, represent the male and the female principle in that decaying family whose members, by the law of sterility and destruction which rules them, must exterminate each other; Roderick has buried his sister alive, but the revived Madeline will bury Roderick under her falling body. The "fall" of the House of Usher involves not only the physical fall of the mansion, but the physical and moral fall of the two protagonists. (Spitzer 352).

To a certain degree, this marks Poe's story out for particular…

Works Cited

Allison, John. Coleridgean Self-Development: Entrapment and Incest in "The Fall of the House of Usher." South Central Review 5.1 (1988): 40-7.

Bailey, J.O. "What Happens in The Fall of the House of Usher?" American Literature 35.4 (1964): 445-66.

Butler, David. "Usher's Hypochondriasis: Mental Alienation and Romantic Idealism in Poe's Gothic Tales." American Literature 48.1 (1976): 1-12.

Damon, S. Foster. Thomas Holley Chivers: Friend of Poe. New York: Harper, 1930.

Neo-Classical Art and Romanticism
Words: 906 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 76614217
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Art has always been used as a means of expression and of confirmation of events and movements that take place in the society in that respective period of time. The Neo-Classical and Romanticist art makes no exception to this rule and the two periods have been considered in the history of artistic art as two of the most representative for the expressivity they brought to the world of the arts as well as through the painters they inspired. Jacques-Louis David and Eugene Delacroix are two of the most representative painters of the New Classical period and the Romanticist art and their paintings are significant for the symbols and ideals these two periods provided for the artistic world.

Neo-classical art must be seen in the wider context of the 18th century and the era of Enlightenment when the new perceptions on the role of reason were redefined against the concepts of…

Doind a Research Project Pay Green I
Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Film Review Paper #: 48157346
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doind a research project pay green?

I collected an articles .

Joe right's 2005 motion picture "Pride and Prejudice" involves a series of elements related to ideas like family, faithfulness, and marriage. By presenting the central characters as individuals who struggle to remove social status boundaries, the film makes it possible for viewers to gain a more complex understanding of thinking during the late eighteenth century. Elizabeth Bennet is the film's protagonist and by looking at matters from her perspective viewers are able to learn more about her surrounding environment and about the feelings present in a society that promotes a strict set of legislations that are focused both on rational and on moral ideas.

Elizabeth Bennet is a very complex character and it is actually intriguing how her intellect virtually pushes individuals who are unable to adapt on a social level to the limits of her community. Elizabeth gradually…

Works cited:

Grandi, Roberta, "The Passion Translated: Literary and Cinematic Rhetoric in Pride and Prejudice (2005)," Literature/Film Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 1

Holden, Stephen, "Marrying Off Those Bennet Sisters Again, but This Time Elizabeth Is a Looker," retrieved April 7, 2013, from the NY Times Website:  http://movies.nytimes.com/2005/11/11/movies/11prid.html?_r=0 

Neckles, Christina, "Spatial Anxiety: Adapting the Social Space of Pride and Prejudice," Literature/Film Quarterly, Vol. 40, No. 1

"With My Body I Thee Worship: Joe Wright's Erotic Vision in Pride & Prejudice (2005)," Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, Vol. 20.

Nora Ephron and Romantic Comedies
Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 68361704
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On the contrary, "You Have Got Mail" is a new style of comedy movie that involves romance in a much open manner that it could not attract all age groups.

Key Features of New Comedy

Few traits of new comedy are as follows:

It revolves more around a boy and a girl and their love story

It involves a lot of physical relationship between male and female ( Richmond )

Related with love, desire and money

The comedy involves many subjects that were not considered as appropriate to be discussed openly in the past like homosexuality (Duralde).

Sex related jokes have become an integral part of comedy

Sex is also involved in today's concept of comedy

Destructive Impacts of Comedy

Comedy has always been a source of entertainment for every individual of all fields of life. It is a means to relax and with its involvement in Hollywood movies, number…

Bibliography

Bowman, Barbara . Master Space: Film Images of Capra, Lubitsch, Sternberg, and Wyler. New York: Greenwood Press, 1992.

Ciecko, Anne. "Hollywood's "Scriptgirls." Literature/Film Quarterly (2000): 33-55.

Duralde, Alonso. "Where the Gays Are: A Quick Look at the Queerest Movies the Season Has to Offer. (Summer Movie Special)." The Advocate (the national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) (2002): 33-44.

Kaufman, David. "Unfinished Women." 27 January 2003. The Nation. 1 May 2013.

Exploring Gothic Fiction
Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68529819
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Gothic Fiction

Dracula is a far more traditional Gothic novel in the classic sense than the four books of the Twilight series, in which Bella Swan and her vampire lover Edward Cullen never even fully consummate their relationship until they are married in the third book Eclipse, and Bella does not finally get her wish to become a vampire until the fourth and final book Breaking Dawn. Far from being Edward's victim, or used as a pawn and discarded, she is eager to leave her dull, empty middle class life behind and become part of the Cullen vampire family. When she nearly dies giving birth to their half-vampire daughter, Edward finally does 'turn' her to save her life, and to paraphrase the title of the old song, we can only hope that she is satisfied. Bella in fact is a very traditional and conservative character, including her religion and even…

References

Branch, L. 2010. "Carlisle's Cross: Locating the Past in Secular Gothic" in A.M. Clarke and M. Osburn (eds). The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films. McFarland & Company Publishers: 60-79.

Byron, G. 2008. "As One Dead': Romeo and Juliet in the Twilight" in J. Drakakis and D. Townshend (eds) Gothic Shakespeares. Routledge: 167-86.

Meyer, S. 2005. Twilight. Little, Brown and Company.

Meyer, S. 2006. New Moon. Little, Brown and Company.

Slang and Communication in Clueless One Way
Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26308345
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Slang and Communication in CLUELESS

One way that human culture tends to be defined is both the way we are able to manipulate the environment and communicate cognitively with an idea of past, present and future. Communication allows for group behavior to occur, cooperation, problem solving, and the ability to think beyond one's self as an individual and more as a community that can express itself in subtle and artistic ways. Communication is thus the act of conveying information through thoughts and messages, but has a critical point -- to be effective it must be understood. This requires a sender, a message and a recipient in which information exists in the mind of the sender; is formulated in a way that has meaning, and then transmitted to the receiver in ways that they can understand (Chandler, 2010). Slang, in communications is the use of more informal words and expressions that…

Works Cited

Chandler, D. (2010, June). The Transmission Model of Communication. Retrieved September 2013, from aber.ac.uk:  http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/trans.html 

Patel, A. (2012, December 19). Slang Words: What Are Young People Saying These Days. Retrieved September 30, 2013, from The Huffington Post:  http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/12/19/slang-words-2012_n_2322664.html 

Quotes from Cluless. (1995, April). Retrieved September 2013, from IMDb:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112697/quotes

Rise of the Novel Studies in Defoe
Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66865791
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Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson, and Fielding," written by Ian att.

THE RISE OF THE NOVEL

The novel is in nothing so characteristic of our culture as in the way that it reflects this characteristic orientation of modern thought" (att 22). This is how att defines the novel that he discusses and picks apart in his book. att wrote this book in 1957, after studying the 18th century novel for many years. He feels the writing of the three authors he discusses, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, and Henry Fielding, was influenced by broad changes in their society. To make his point, he says, "Defoe, Richardson and Fielding were no doubt affected by the changes in the reading public of their time; but their works are surely more profoundly conditioned by the new climate of social and moral experience which they and their eighteenth-century readers shared" (att 7).…

Works Cited

Johnson, P.A. "The Story of Genre." Suffolk County Community College. 2001.  http://www.sunysuffolk.edu/~johnp63/storyof.htm 

Just, D. "Good Books, Bad Books." Personal Web Page. 25 Feb. 1999. http://djust.hypermart.net/gb13.html

Watt, I.P. The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson, and Fielding. 1st ed. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1957.

True Since We Were Children and We
Words: 2062 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69071477
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true since we were children and we were told by adults that "words will never hurt us." A good many of us would most likely have preferred the sticks and stones because physical injuries often heal far more quickly and far more effectively than psychological ones.

And yet, even as we must all acknowledge the basic principle that words can do real harm, many people continue to insist that sexist language is a trivial concern. This paper looks at the reasons why it is important to be careful about the language that we use. It is all too easy for opponents of care in language to toss off concerns about bias as "political correctness." But it is important that the rest of us insist that "political correctness" can be viewed another way: As basic courtesy and civility.

Because language is one of the most powerful forces that there is, anyone…

References

Cameron, D. (1990). The feminist critique of language. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.  http://www.friesian.com/language.htm l

Spender, D. (1985). Man-made language. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Tannen, D. (1990). You just don't understand. New York: William Morrow.

Spender 14.