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Language Is the Perfect Instrument

Words: 4854 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34736050

Consider the fact that the Iroquois are said not to have had a strong word for the singular "I," and that they subsequently developed what was arguably the longest lasting communal representative democracy the world has ever known. The Inuit, whose culture revolves around the arctic world, have dozens of words for snow - this sort of technical knowledge allows quick and accurate transmission of conditions and training in survival.

In Western terms, one remembers that Jesus Christ was said to be "The Word," yet in the original Greek this indicates not only a spoken word but also the Logos - the root term for intellectual reason, for Meaning within context (be that the context of a sentence, a life, a history, or a universe); logos was rational order. The difference between saying that a religious figure is the Word (which at its most profound seem to indicate a kind…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Atkins, J.D.C. (1887). Report of the commissioner of Indian affairs. House Exec. Doc. No. 1, Pt. 5, 50th Cong., 1st Sess. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Boston Language Institute. "TEFL FAQ  http://teflcertificate.com/faq.html 

Ethnologue. "English  http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp?code=eng 

Macha, Freddy. "Tanzanian Independence Day Abroad. http://www.unclesamofafrica.com/TanzaniaGuardian.htm
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Language and Cultural Literacy in Health Policy Realm

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46559178

Hispanic Health Policy

As described by the Latino Policy Institute at the Hispanic Health Council website, there are many issue that face Hispanics and Latinos when it comes to health policy and execution. In general, the biggest barriers are cultural and language barriers experienced while giving and providing health care of any sort. However, a problem identified by the aforementioned Institute is that very few of the people that have experienced and seen the barriers feel there is an actual problem that has to be identified and dealt with. Of course, this is less than true and must be recognized for what it truly is. While the language and cultural barriers experiences when giving healthcare are not seen as a problem by many providers, a problem absolutely exists and it is hurting Hispanic patients and citizens every day.

Analysis

To expound and expand on the details of the item mentioned…… [Read More]

References

HHC. (2016). HispanicHealthCouncil -- Program: Latino Policy Institute. Hispanichealth.com. Retrieved 28 July 2016, from http://www.hispanichealth.com/hhc/latinopolicyinstitute

Sanchez, G. (2012). The Implications of ACA Ruling on Latino Voting Behavior. Latino Decisions. Retrieved 28 July 2016, from  http://www.latinodecisions.com/blog/2012/07/03/the-implications-of-aca-ruling-on-latino-voting-behavior/
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Language in Clients With Schizophrenia

Words: 1736 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70660220

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Done, D.J. Crow, T.J. Johnstone, E.C. Sacker, a. (September 1994) Childhood Antecedents of Schizophrenia and Affective Illness: Social Adjustment at ages 7 to 11.BMJ, 309:699-703.

Teacher appraisal using the national child development study was utilized to examine differences between normal individuals and those who exhibit adult psychological disorders. "At the age of 7 children who developed schizophrenia were rated by their teachers as manifesting more social maladjustment than controls (overall score 4.3 (SD 2.4) v 3.1 (2.0); P… [Read More]

Harrison contends that there is a growing body of data, though as yet inconclusive, with regard to control and repeatability that shows some differences in brain MRI between patients with and without mood disorders. Interestingly the areas of the brain that are shown to be affected in those with mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder are areas of the brain which control language function, not in its source but in its ability to be transmitted by the patient. This could indicate some correlation, in behavioral indices where patients with bipolar disorder report a sense that they cannot think straight or communicate their thoughts effectively. "The neuropathology is postulated to contribute to the pathophysiology and dysfunction of the neural circuits which regulate mood and its associated cognitions, behaviours and somatic symptoms."

Done, D.J. Crow, T.J. Johnstone, E.C. Sacker, a. (September 1994) Childhood Antecedents of Schizophrenia and Affective Illness: Social Adjustment at ages 7 to 11.BMJ, 309:699-703.

Teacher appraisal using the national child development study was utilized to examine differences between normal individuals and those who exhibit adult psychological disorders. "At the age of 7 children who developed schizophrenia were rated by their teachers as manifesting more social maladjustment than controls (overall score 4.3 (SD 2.4) v 3.1 (2.0); P
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Official Language for the United States

Words: 1484 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 99207071

United States make English its Official Language?

The calls for English to be adopted as United States' official language have been prevalent since 1919 when President Theodore Roosevelt stated that the country has room for only one language i.e. The English language. The advocacy for English-only in the United States has been fueled by attempts to develop a unique American nationality. Actually, President Roosevelt advocated for English to be adopted as the official language of the United States because of the explicit and unqualified link between language and citizenship. However, since the beginning of this advocacy the issue on whether the United States should make English its official language has attracted various arguments and counter-arguments between supporters and opponents. The determination of a suitable position regarding the issue requires an evaluation of arguments by both sides.

Advocacy for English as America's Official Language

In contrast to popular belief, the United…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brice, Brandon. "Why English Should Be the Official Language of the United States." Washington Times Communities. The Washington Times, LLC., 13 Apr. 2013. Web. 23 Nov. 2014. .

Fabian, Jordan. "No, It's Not Necessary to Make English the Official Language." Online Posting. ABC News. ABC News Network, 14 June 2013. Web. 24 Nov. 2014. .

Jackson, Raynard. "Should English Be Our America's Official Language or Not?" Online Posting. Charisma News - Informing Believers with News from a Spirit-filled Perspective. Charisma Media, 7 July 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2014. .

Miller, Eric C. "Should English Be the U.S. Official Language? -- Eric C. Miller -- Aeon." Aeon Magazine. Aeon Media Ltd., n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2014. .
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Cultural Barriers Cultural and Language

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88514399

nhl.com/sm-reebok-washington-capitals-alexander-ovechkin-language-barrier-player-name-and -- pi-3070445.html

Here, we can see an innovative way of overcoming the inherent language barrier, or at least rendering it secondary to fan intrigue.

hina is another market context where challenges are specific and dominant due both to the dramatic distinction between the hinese language and Romantic or Latin-based tongues and due to hina's isolated and distinctly defined cultural nature. In both of these, we consider that there is a real and difficult obstruction for organizations seeking to establish a meaningful identity.

In consideration of the example of Foster's beer, for one, we are given a narrative detailing a long and difficult process by which the Australian beer distributor was eventually able to penetrate the market. For Foster's, one of the biggest problems was its prior strategic dependence on its name and Australian identity, which are easily and charmingly conveyed in advertisement in America. In a non-English speaking market,…… [Read More]

China is another market context where challenges are specific and dominant due both to the dramatic distinction between the Chinese language and Romantic or Latin-based tongues and due to China's isolated and distinctly defined cultural nature. In both of these, we consider that there is a real and difficult obstruction for organizations seeking to establish a meaningful identity.

In consideration of the example of Foster's beer, for one, we are given a narrative detailing a long and difficult process by which the Australian beer distributor was eventually able to penetrate the market. For Foster's, one of the biggest problems was its prior strategic dependence on its name and Australian identity, which are easily and charmingly conveyed in advertisement in America. In a non-English speaking market, this is a harder association to draw. Such is to say that "The brand name is an essential part of marketing and it not only helps to identify a product but also creates value through consumers' association with the brand (Kohli, Harich, & Leuthesser, 2004). Cultural differences are therefore of major concern when managing brands in China." (Chung, 2) This is especially true coming from the Australian market, where the association between the brand name and a high standard of quality would negatively translate to mean high cost in the Chinese market, where income is decidedly more modest.

Another instance comes to us from China of cultural barriers creating a distinct challenge for internet search engine giant, Google. Google's ideology places it in a spot of unparalleled challenge, even further observable as it attempts
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Cultural and Linguistic Barriers to

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19345798



Cultural differences extend to language. In some instances, this merely necessitates "code-switching" -- the use of different words and speaking patters in different cultural settings (e.g. The difference between conversation at a business meeting and a baseball game, although with intercultural issues the impact of code-switching becomes far more profound). On a less esoteric level, however, there is the simple issue of language barriers in providing equal multicultural care. Evidence shows that simply increasing he availability of multilingual care -- especially in populations with a large number of non-English speakers -- greatly increases the quality of healthcare and overall health of immigrant populations (Ngo-Metzger et al., 2003).

This suggests one of the main ways that the healthcare industry can combat these barriers -- simply educating more providers in cultural differences, and actively recruiting new students and practitioners from among different cultures and across linguistic lines will greatly improve the availability…… [Read More]

References

Ngo-Metzger, Q., Massagli, M., Clarridge, B., Manocchia, M., Dvais, R., Iezzoni, L. & Phillips, R. (2003). "Linguistic and cultural barriers to care." Journal of general internal medicine, 18 (1), pp. 44-52.

Uba, L. (1992). "Cultural barriers to health care for southeast Asian refugees." Public health reports, 107 (5), pp. 544-8.
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Formulaic Language in the Year

Words: 1481 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80963136

acial or ethnically-based teasing and peer pressure has long been associated with academic achievement, as Tyson et al. point out in his 2005 report studying the behaviors of blacks and whites during high school. While Tyson et al. also suggests that "school structures" are somewhat to blame for "stigmas" of "acting white" or "acting high and mighty" (582), he maintains that that teasing and peer pressure and also important components.

Because of the profound social implications of interactions between formulaic speaking and non-formulaic speaking students, teachers in the third year classroom need to be aware of students' interpretation of the formulaic speaking students, monitoring the communication between the groups. In addition to being aware of the situation, teachers should use the problem to educate students about stereotypes and teasing in addition to encouraging formulaic speaking students to express themselves in the language of instruction. Thus, third year students' use of…… [Read More]

References

Hamilton, Kendra. (2005). The Dialect Dilemma. Black Issues in Higher Education. 22

O'Neil and Gish. (2008). Customer did not provide the rest of the citation.

Pearson, David P., Hiebert, Elfrieda H., Kamil, Michael L. (2007). Theory and Research into Practice: Vocabulary Assessment: What We Know and What We Need to Learn. Reading Research Quarterly. 42 (2), 282-296.

Perez, Samuel a. (2000). Using Ebonics or Black English as a Bridge to Teaching
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Official Language Movement Hispanic Cultural Interest the

Words: 816 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2251317

Official Language Movement: Hispanic Cultural Interest

The focus of this work is the official language movement and bilingualism in education politics in the United States, which is an important Hispanic-American cultural interest.

One of the fastest growing groups in the United States is the group of Hispanics and it was reported in the 1990 U.S. census that there were 22.4 million Hispanics or Latinos in the United States, which was up from 14.5 million in 1980. (Garcia, 2011, paraphrased) Hispanics are reported to be concentrated in the states of California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois, all of these states that when taken together "comprise over half of the electoral vote majority needed for election to the presidency." (Garcia, 2011)

Age a Key Factor that Limits Political Participation

There are several factors that are reported to hinder the political participation of Hispanics as well as hindering their development "into a…… [Read More]

References

Constitutional: Official Language (2011) U.S. Constitution Online. Retrieved from:  http://www.usconstitution.net/consttop_lang.html 

Garcia, Maria-Cristina (2011) Hispanic-Americans: An Under-Represented Group in American Politics. ARNET. Retrieved from:  http://www.americansc.org.uk/Online/garcia.htm 

Huntington, Samuel (2004) The Hispanic Challenge. Foreign Policy. May 2004. Retrieved from:  http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/blogs/gems/culturalagency1/SamuelHuntingtonTheHispanicC.pdf
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Communication and Language for Teaching and Learning Math in English in Hong Kong

Words: 1076 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 74992214

English in Teaching and Learning Math in Hong Kong

With the intermingling of cultures, business, and globalization in general, it is difficult to imagine that English would not be spoken or at least understood in some form in any part of the world. If nothing else, Internet communication has opened up myriad opportunities for people to learn about any amount of cultures and languages they wish. In terms of business, as mentioned, the world has also become increasingly globalized. Businesses that can expand globally tend to be stronger financially and have greater longevity than those who cannot. Often, an ability to communicate internationally is at the heart of business success. For this reason, the medium of instruction in schools, and especially non-English speaking countries, have come to the forefront of educational attention. In Hong Kong, social and political changes have given a unique dynamic to whether or not English should…… [Read More]

References

Education Commission (2005, Dec.). Report on Review of Medium of Instruction for Secondary Schools and Secondary School Places Allocation. Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of The People's Republic of China. Retrieved from:  http://www.e-c.edu.hk/tc/reform/resources/MOI&SSPA_report_Eng.pdf 

Poon, A.Y.K., Lau, C.M.Y. And Chu, D.H.W. (2013, March). Impact of the Fine-Tuning Medium-of-Instruction Policy on Learning: Some Preliminary Findings. Literacy Information and Computer Education Journal, Vol. 4, Iss.1. Retrieved from: http://infonomics-society.org/LICEJ/ImpactoftheFineTuningMediumofInstructionPolicyonLearningSomePreliminaryFindings.pdf

Tsui, A.B.M. (2008). Medium of Instruction in Hong Kong: One Country, Two Systems, Whose Language? Medium of Instruction Policies: Which Agenda? Whose Agenda? Edited by James. W. Ollofson and Amy B.M. Tsui. Taylor & Francis e-Library.

Zeng, W. (2007). Medium of Instruction in Secondary Education in Post-Colonial Hong Kong:
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Lessons Learned From Barriers in Care

Words: 615 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23722312

barriers that emerged and are list in D3.

Access to readily accessible primary care resources. Time constraints and busy office hours is a barrier that hinders the overall patient experience. Serious issues can potentially arise when care is not given in an adequate manner. Namely, a customer can become irritable and frustrated, which makes care much more difficult. In rare instances, an illness can worsen while waiting for a primary care resources. This ultimately makes treatment much more costly and time consuming. As a result, valuable resources may be consumed for a problem that could have otherwise been prevented through proper staffing. This action plan will attempt to address this issue by providing adequate staffing during peak office hours. A common complaint is the inability to simply speak with the actual provider of services or primary care manager. To insure availability, at least two managers will be on duty at…… [Read More]

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Language of Silence

Words: 662 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33316455

Language of Silence

Maxine Hong-Kingston describes the difficulties of growing up a Chinese-American girl with her powerful essay entitled, "The Language of Silence." The author begins the essay with an anecdote about her mother cutting her frenulum, her tongue, so that she might be able to speak better. Ironically, this act had the opposite effect: the young girl used silence to cope with her fears and anxieties about straddling two cultures. Hong-Kingston's essay is filled with stories like this one, in which the young Chinese-American girl struggles with her identity as being both Chinese and a girl. The central metaphor for the essay is silence, silence that can be both power and pain. The notion of finding her voice becomes the central symbol of the essay, because Hong-Kingston realizes that her voice equals self-expression. In order to navigate between her two cultural roles, Hong-Kingston builds up a barrier between her…… [Read More]

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Barriers to Corneal Donation

Words: 1244 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89881049

Corneal Donation within Hospitals and Medical Communities: Issues Surrounding Post Mortem Donations of Tissue

Qualitative Study

The purpose of this study is to identify barriers to corneal donation within hospitals and medical communities. A large body of research has focused on issues surrounding the post mortem donations of tissue. This research will take a different approach, examining what barriers exist within hospital and medical communities in an attempt to determine how these barriers may be overcome.

The number of potential corneal donors far surpasses the number of people available for traditional organ donations and in some states consent of the medical examiner alone is enough to allow use of corneal donations (family consent not required) (Lewin, 2000).

Traditionally the most significant barrier to organ donation and transplantation has been acquisition of organs and tissues (Murray et. al, 2002). The need for cornea tissue is rising. The average wait time for…… [Read More]

References

Gortmaker SL, Beasley CL, Brigham LE, Franz HG, Garrison RN, Lucas BA, Patterson RH, Sobol AM, Grenvik NA, Evanisko MJ. Organ donor potential and performance: size and nature of the organ donor shortfall. Crit Care Med 1996; 24(3):432-9.

Halloran, P.F. (2003). "Transmission of Donor Melanoma to Multiple Organ Transplant Recipients." American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 4 Issue

Hawkins, B.R. (1993). "The HLA System and Transplantation Matching in the 1990s." Journal of the Hong Kong Medical Association, 45 (2): 77-86

Jensen, T.R. (2000). "Organ Procurement: Various Systems and Their Effectiveness." Houston Journal of International Law, Vol. 22, Issue 3.
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Barriers and Challenges to Institution

Words: 6571 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20299865

Preparers, auditors, and users of financial statements must encourage and support compliance with the substance and form of the international standards; (3) the adoption and implementation of the international standards require action at both the national and international levels. At the national level, it is important that governments, regulators, and national standard setters place international convergence as a priority on their agendas. At the international level, it is important that the international standard setters establish processes and procedures that facilitate national input and lead to the development of high quality standards that are globally accepted; (4) Finally, it is clear that to achieve international convergence, action is necessary at all points along the information supply chain that delivers financial reporting. Boards of directors and management, who have the primary responsibility for financial reporting, as well as auditors, standard setters, regulators, and other participants in the financial reporting process, such as…… [Read More]

References

ACCA Chief Executive Calls for Revamp of IFRS Standards (2007) Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. 2007. Online available at  http://www.accaglobal.com/archive/news/general/2422215 

Diaconu, Paul and Coman, Nicoleta (2007) Accounting Research from the Globalization Perspective. International Journal of Social Sciences Vol. 1 No. 2, 2007. Online available at  http://www.waset.org/ijss/v1/v1-1-5.pdf 

FASB and IASB Agree to Work Together toward Convergence of Global Accounting Standards (2002) Business Wire 29 October 2002. Online available at  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_2002_Oct_29/ai_93509154 

Hegarty, John; Gielen, Frederic; and Barros, Ana Christina Hirata (2004) Implementation of International Accounting and Auditing Standards: Lessons Learned from the World Bank's Accounting and Auditing ROSC Program. September 2004. Online available at  http://www.worldbank.org/ifa/LessonsLearned_ROSC_AA.pdf .
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Language Proficiency and Content Understanding

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 18461851

Seamless Bridge

As language may be viewed as a vehicle by which a student can better achieve academic success (Gottlieb, 2006), language proficiency assessments are ways in which the teacher can review whether or not the student is developing language proficiency rather than just content understanding. Thus the idea that students who are learning an additional or second language will seamlessly bridge into grade-level content once they reach the highest level of proficiency is a simple extension of the reality that language affords the user: it is the means by which understanding and success in a culture wherein that language is used can be obtained. Thus, if an ELL develops a true understanding and grasp of the language, the grade-level content that the student should be able to grasp is made available to him: it opens up because the language proficiency acts as the key what would otherwise be a…… [Read More]

References

AdLit. (n.d.). Building Trust with Families. Retrieved from  http://www.adlit.org/media/mediatopics/ells/ 

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English language learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
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Language of Apparel From France Cultures

Words: 1372 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73266906

Clothing and Culture

Clothing, in the modern definition, is considered to be fiber or textiles that are worn on humans, and one of the anthropological features of human culture and society. The type (color, style, fit) of clothing is typically dependent upon a number of variables -- geography, weather, gender, status, physical state, work activities, and even status symbols. From a practical standpoint, clothing serves as protection from external weather, or for safety reasons (constructing, cooking, hiking, sports); it may protect the wearer from flora and fauna (nettles, bites, thorns); it may insulate against hot or cold conditions; and may even provide a hygienic barrier. Often, studying the aspects of clothing and society tells scholars a great deal about the particular culture -- not just in external appearance but in the technology of textile production, weaving, and adornment (oucher & Deslandres, 1989).

Evolution of Clothing Styles: Scholars are uncertain as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blum, S. (Ed.). (1982). Eighteenth-Century French Fashion Plates. New York: Dover Publications.

Boucher, F., & Deslandres, Y. (1989). 20,000 Years of Fashion. New York and London: H.N. Abrams.

Delpierre, M. (1997). Dress in France in the 18th Century. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Doyle, W. (2001). The Ancien Regime. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
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Speaking in the Target Language Is the

Words: 3146 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76841042

speaking in the target language is the expectation that a proficient speaker will sound like a native speaker. Is this an appropriate or realistic expectation?

Not a long while after the emergence of the subject of second language acquisition (SLA), which most of the scholars think came around the time of initial years of 1970s, there has been a need to develop ways by which to measure the development of the second language, aside from the usage of detailed homogeneous skill tests which were mostly appropriate to fulfill other objectives.

As per Freeman's (2009) information, the first declaration of this need was made by Kenji Hukuta (1976). Kenji Hakuta was concerned in knowing the path of his subject Ugusiu's English language development over a period of time. Besides the aforementioned practitioners, other L1 acquisition scholars had carried out for the pupils learning English as a national language. In the research…… [Read More]

References

Bardovi-Harlig, K., & Dornyei, Z. (1998). Do language learners recognize pragmatic violations? Pragmatic vs. grammatical awareness in instructed L2 learning. TESOL Quarterly, 32, 233 -- 259.

Bialystok, E. (1991). Achieving proficiency in a second language: A processing description. In R. Philipson, E. Kellerman, L. Selinker, M. Sharwood Smith, & M. Swain (Eds.), Foreign/second language pedagogy research: A commemorative volume for Claus Faerch (Vol. 64, pp. 63 -- 78). Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Bialystok, E. (1993). Symbolic representation and attentional control in pragmatic competence. In G. Kasper & S. Blum-Kulka (Eds.), Interlanguage pragmatics (pp. 43 -- 59). New York: Oxford University Press.

Bouton, L.F. (1988). A cross-cultural study of ability to interpret implicatures in English. World Englishes, 7(2), 183 -- 196.
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Chinese Language and Identity

Words: 2586 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97979356

Chinese as the native language and culture to research. Include such information as the need to communicate, social organisation (tribes, cities, etc.) contacts with other cultures, development of a written language, nonverbal aspects of language (such as inflection and body language), changes over the centuries, etc.

Chinese culture and language

Chinese cultural values play an important role in shaping the community's social norms, with the majority of individuals in China being inclined to take on attitudes that are in accordance with their traditions. Chinese language needs to be understood as being much more than a dialect, as it has a strong socio-cultural effect on its speakers and as it affects individuals in a cognitive-linguistic way. The impact of such ideas on concepts such as people, families, and communities can be observed by addressing the way that they function with the language as a central model facilitating better connections between bodies.…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gu, S. (2011). "A Cultural History of the Chinese Language." McFarland.

He, A.W. & Xiao, Y.(2008). "Chinese as a Heritage Language: Fostering Rooted World Citizenry." Natl Foreign Lg Resource Ctr.

Postiglione, G.A. (1999). "China's National Minority Education: Culture, Schooling, and Development." Psychology Press.

Wang, Y. (2013). "Language, Culture, and Identity Among Minority Students in China: The Case of the Hui." Routledge.
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Nature of Language Heidegger in the

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61017450

Nature of Language / Heidegger

In "The Nature of Language" Heidegger (1982) posits that most people would say that they are close to language because they speak it -- but it is not that simple. He claims that our relation to language is "vague, obscure" -- and even -- "almost speechless" (p. 58). This notion makes our relationship to language much more complicated if we are to assume that what Heidegger says is correct. Not only is the idea complex, but it is nearly incomprehensible. Isn't language, after all, about speech? How can our relationship to it thus be something deemed as speechless? To complicate matters even further, Heidegger says that philosophers have come up with what is called "metalanguage" for which to use as the focus of their examination of different languages. Heidegger states: "Metalinguistics is the metaphysics of the thoroughgoing technicalization of all languages into the sole operative…… [Read More]

References:

Heidegger, M. (1982). On the way to language. Harper One; 1st edition.

Olivier, A. (2008). On the nature of language -- Heidegger and African philosophy. South African journal of philosophy,27(4), 310-324.
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Acquisition of Language Is a

Words: 2064 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60998297



Reardless or whther the second language learner is a child or an adult there must be a concerted effort put for the to understand the cultural context of the second language. This responsibility lies with instructors and students. The instructor has te responsibility to teach certain cultural nuances ad habits and the learner has the responsibility of having an open mind so that the culture can be acquired. Failure to do so make it extremely difficult for an individual to acquire a second language. The impact of second language acquisition is that it serves as a conduit between the first culture and the language of the second culture. Once cultural context is understood the individual understands how to use the language and how to understand pothers when they use the language. This ability to communicate is often an aspect of language acquisition that is difficult to understand because the rules…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bowlin, Carla Mackenzie Culture and language: communication barriers for Hispanic immigrants working in the U.S. And their Anglo-managers. Appalachian State University, 2006. Print

Citron, James L. "Can Cross-Cultural Understanding Aid Second Language Acquisition? Toward a Theory of Ethno-Lingual Relativity." Hispania 78.1: (1995) 105-113. Print

Hidasi .Judit The Impact of Culture on Second Language Acquisition.  http://www.childresearch.net/RESOURCE/RESEARCH/2006/exfile/HIDASI.pdf 

Ilieva, R. . "Exploring culture in texts designed for use in adult ESL Classrooms." TESL Canada Journal, 17.2 (2000):50-63.Print
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Speaking in the Target Language Is the

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89934301

Speaking in the Target Language Is the Expectation That a Proficient Speaker Will Sound Like a Native Speaker

One of the most important aspects when talking about the impact of class size, level, student age and purpose of class in Iraq is the concept of 'willingness to communicate' between and amongst the teachers and students in the L2 setting. Research on WTC within the context of France, have previously been based around initial testing of teachers and students' enthusiasm in learning a L2 are more predisposed to depend on information gathered at one point of time, often gathering through a sole instrument and to regard only numeric conclusions. For instance, the wide cross sectional research by MacIntyre et al. (2002) which sought to identify the impacts of age and sex on WTC, employed a questionnaire that required the respondents to rank themselves on eight scales. It was carried out with…… [Read More]

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Marketing Barriers to the Growth

Words: 2513 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27684896

(Harris & Dennis, 2002, p. 72) These human factors will be explored in more detail below.

2.3. Human Barriers

As is evident from the above discussion, while many of the barriers to e-marketing are technological and demographic in nature, what is also apparent from the literature on the subject is that there are many human barriers to these developments. Central to these human barriers is resistance to change. As one pundit states, there are a number of reasons why people may be unwilling to accept organizational and technological changes implicit in e-marketing; for example when their stability and security is threatened and "… Coping strategies and comfort zones are affected." (Harris & Dennis, 2002, p. 74) This can occur when new emerging technologies are introduced.

The growth of e-marketing methods can therefore cause anxiety in some people who may feel threatened by these new technologies and approaches to marketing and…… [Read More]

References

Bielski, Lauren (2006) 'Debit's Growing Popularity', ABA Banking Journal, vol. 98, no.1.

Chan-Olmsted, S 2002, 'Branding and Internet Marketing in the Age of Digital Media', Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, vol 46, no. 4, pp. 641+.

Dholakia, N, Fritz W, Dholakia R. And Mundorf N (Eds.) 2002, Global E-Commerce and Online Marketing: Watching the Evolution, Quorum Books, Westport, CT.

Doyle P. 2000, Value-Based Marketing: Marketing Strategies for Corporate Growth and Shareholder Value, John Wiley & Sons, New York.
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Nursing Culture Overcoming Barriers to Change Introduction

Words: 5230 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4699596

Nursing Culture: Overcoming Barriers to Change

Introduction and Theoretical Framework

This program of study continues personal research and professional practice in the field of nursing within the area of public and private health systems. In an era characterized by increasing calls for more efficient approaches to healthcare delivery and accountability on the part of healthcare providers, there is a growing need for identifying opportunities to overcome organizational barriers to change that facilitate the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices over time. In order to accomplish this challenging enterprise, the nature of existing organizational barriers must be better understood, an issue that directly relates to the problem to be considered by the study proposed herein and which is discussed further below.

Statement of the Problem

According to Mannion, Davies and Marshall et al. (2005), the results of much of the research to date have identified a relationship between nursing culture and…… [Read More]

References

Banyard, V.L., & Miller, K.E. (1998). The powerful potential of qualitative research for community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology, 26(4), 485.

Burton, S., & Steane, P. (2004). Surviving your thesis. New York: Routledge.

Dennis, C., & Harris, L. (2002). Marketing the e-business. London: Routledge.

Department of Health. (2000). The NHS plan: A plan for investment, a plan for reform. London:
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Warsaw Cultural Dimensions and Barriers

Words: 1933 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28295777

Importantly, there is a certain structure and decorum involved in business negotiations. For example, the atmosphere is usually relaxed and contemplative and "…periods of silence are not uncommon and are an essential part of negotiating" (Doing usiness in Poland | Polish Social and usiness Culture). Consequently, small talk is not seen as part of the negotiating situation. However, before a business meeting casual conversation is usually part of the process.

5. Conclusion: Recommendations

In terms of the above analysis a number of central aspects emerge. The most significant is the Polish respect for authority and hierarchy which must be balanced against their strong sense of individuality. Small points of etiquette, such as shaking hands and addressing people formally at first, are also important to remember.

In the final analysis, the most important aspect of interacting with someone for Warsaw is to not only be aware of their customs but also…… [Read More]

Bibliography

About Poland, viewed 15 December, 2011,

Batorska-Miller, K 2007, Understanding communication and body language of polish people, viewed 15 December, 2011,  http://www.helium.com/items/550690-understanding-communication-and-body-language-of-polish-people .

Corruption through our Culture (based on Geert Hofstede Analysis 2011, viewed 15 December, 2011, <  http://imsingh1999-mannu.blogspot.com/2011/05/corruption-through-our-culture.html >.

Cross Cultural Business. Doing Business with Poland: Do They Know It's Lunchtime?, viewed 15 December, 2011, .
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Emotional Barriers to Peace Solutions

Words: 488 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58136552



However, seeking solution to conflicts is not an easy task. The conflict needs to be seen in a different perspective and it has to be accepted as not necessarily harmful and will actually help in the growth and development of a person. Contributing actions to the conflict also has to be recognized and weaknesses and imperfections have to be accepted. Awareness to these realities and acceptance of self and the other persons is also important.

yback, on the other hand, shared about Emotional Intelligence. He said that it is the ability to be aware and to become sensitive of feelings. He added that it is the ability to resist impulsive and thoughtless responses to other's actions. He explained that sensitivity to feelings helps let down emotional barriers and enables attentive listening and open communication. Again, becoming Emotionally Intelligent is not easy to achieve. yback said that it may necessitate change…… [Read More]

References

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition. (2000). Houghton Mifflin Company.

Ryback, David. (1998). Putting Emotional Intelligence to Work: Successful Leadership is more than IQ. Boston Butterworth-Heinemann.

Fisher, E., and Sharp, S. (2004). The Art of Managing Everyday Conflict: Understanding

Emotions and Power Struggles. Westport, Conn. Greenwood Publishing.
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Yiddish as a First Language in Ultra-Orthodox

Words: 3999 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 60238313

Yiddish as a first language in Ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities, compared to the use of local vernacular (for example, Hebrew in Israeli-ased Jews, or English in London and New York-ased Jews): in Hasidic Jews, the use of Yiddish is widespread, whereas in other Jewish groups, the local vernacular is more common.

This paper discusses the reasons behind these differences, and looks at the functions that Yiddish serves in these Hasidic Jew communities. The paper also looks at the effects of outside pressures has on the use of Yiddish, and on issues of identity in general.

The paper also looks at the religious issues related to the use of Yiddish, and at heritage issues in general. The paper also looks in detail at the use of Yiddish as a cultural isolating mechanism, as a way to create barriers between Hasidic Jews and non-Hasidic Jews, and also Hasidic Jews and non-Jews (gentiles).

The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abraham, J.E. (1985). Perceptions of English Learning in a Hasidic Jewish Sect.

Abrams, D. And Hogg, M.A. (2000). Social Identity: Constructive and Critical.

Belcove-Shalin, J. (1995). New World Hasidim: Ethnographic Studies of Hasidic Jews in America.

Ben-Rafael, E. Language and Social Division -The Case of Israel.
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American Sign Language

Words: 1635 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 10253866

sign language in public settings for people who are deaf.

Writing notes as a way to communicate with people who are deaf is convenient, for people with normal hearing, and recommended, by people with normal hearing. In the world of hearing people, recommendations for using note writing as a way to communicate with people who are deaf is common.

Communication at work. Employers are advised to supplement their communication with employees who are deaf by writing notes. For example, Equal Access Communication, an advocacy organization suggests that supervisors may wish to keep a white board or a chalk board by the work area of an employee who is deaf. The supervisor is reminded to keep the writing simple and concise, first establishing the subject to be discussed and then providing an explanation. Further, the supervisor is reminded that the person who is deaf may experience difficulties understanding idioms or double…… [Read More]

References

Emmorey, K., Borinstein, H.B., and Thompson, R. (n.d.). Bimodal bilingualism: Code-blending between spoken English and American Sign Language, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies and University of California, San Diego. Retrieval  http://emmoreylab.sdsu.edu/pdf-bilingual/bilingual1.pdf 

Teplin, E. (2008, August 26). Representing deaf and hard of hearing people: Legal requirements & practical suggestions. The Hennepin Lawyer. Retrieved http://hennepin.timerlakepublishing.com/article.asp?article=1246

Internet sources accessed http://www.signofthetimes.us/Medical.htm

 http://www.ashoka.org/goudenove_francois
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English as a Foreign Language in America

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21192317

Foreign Language Learning

In DeJong's Foundations for Multilingualism in Education, the idea that multilingualism should not be viewed as a specialty but rather treated as a norm is a good one, as Dutta indicates in his experience of growing up using various languages, believing them to be one entity not separate as they are viewed in the West (DeJong, 2011, p. 1). For instance, the UK's tendency to "teach" a separate language in one class but to ignore it in all other occasions does not help to support the actual learning or usage of that language. Yet schools still have a tendency to feel the need to label students and language learners as though they needed to be marked as special or different. It should be the norm for all to learn multiple languages especially at a younger age in order to develop skills and open doors for later careers.…… [Read More]

References

DeJong, E. (2011). Foundations for Multilingualism in Education: from Principle to Practices. Caslon Publishing.

Samway, K and McKeon D. (2007). Myths and Realities: Best Practices for Language

Minority Students. Heinemann.
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Combined Worksheet Barriers to Effective

Words: 4060 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 80580518

The awareness of those assumptions, in conjunction with case elements, creates a new way of looking at case studies. One is more alert to the prejudices and other assumptions experienced by people in the work place, or even other environments.

2. What did you learn about yourself in the course of this exercise?

That, prior to the course, my awareness of these issues was limited. That age discrimination takes on a greater meaning in the work place than not hiring someone because of their age. That when you hire someone, it should be on an equal basis, one of job related duties to the skill, the environment, and even the existing staff. Sometimes, especially when one is over qualified or over educated for a position, it is going to be more problematic than hiring someone who needs to be trained.

3. What did you learn about others in the course…… [Read More]

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Understanding Barriers to Effective Online Learning

Words: 1326 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92522621

Kiefer, K. (2007). Chapter 8: Do students lose more than they gain in online writing classes? In Joe Lockard and Mark Pegrum (Eds.), Brave New Classrooms: Democratic Education and the Internet (pp. 141-151). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.

Introduce the topic and introduce the author and essay. Then state your thesis.

Writing courses in higher education are increasingly being offered in online environments, right along with many other academic coursework. Opinions about how well this online writing instruction is working vary widely. Kate Kiefer contributed a chapter to the book Brave New Classrooms: Democratic Education and the Internet. As a composition specialist teaching graduate writing theory and undergraduate composition courses, including a course titled Computers and Composition, Kiefer is solidly qualified to provide scholarly commentary on the very field in which she labors. In the early 1980s, Kiefer began a long-standing interest in computers and writing, co-founded and…… [Read More]

References

Bacow, L.S., Bowen, W.G., Guthrie, K.M., Lack, K.A., and Long, M.P. (2012, May). Barriers to adoption of online learning systems in U.S. higher education. Ithaka S+R. Retreived  http://www.sr.ithaka.org/sites/default/files/reports/barriers-to-adoption-of-online-learning-systems-in-us-higher-education.pdf 

Pickett, M.C. (2009). Overcoming technology barriers in adult online learning environments with modular instructional design. Proceedings of the ASBBS Annual Conference in Las Vegas, in February 2009, 16(1). Retreived http://asbbs.org/files/2009/PDF/P/PickettM.pdf

[Type text]
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Cross-Cultural Barriers to Mental Health

Words: 803 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 14721311



ecommended policy

To deal with these difficulties, several recommendations can be formulated:

1. Cross-cultural variables: Ethnic matches should be arranged between client and therapist. These will be effective in dealing not only with communication problems, but also with cultural perceptions of the disease as well as with possible social stigmas attached to the disease. The therapist, sharing similar cultural background to the patient understands the patient's concern and speaks the patient's language therefore is more able than another to 'pull' her through.

Other recommendations include items such as that Government should allocate more funding to establishing specific mental health treatments that are run by and appeal to the various ethnic minorities. In a similar manner, government should increase their funding for research and clinical training of ethnic and racial minority members (e.g. The minority Fellowship Program and the CO). Finally, general Mental health services should incorporate cross-cultural communication variables in…… [Read More]

References

Leong, F.T.L., & Lau, A.S.L. (2001). Barriers to providing effective mental health services to Asian-Americans. Mental Health Services Research, 3, 201 -- 214.

Leong, F.T.L., & Kalibatseva, Z. (2011) Cross-cultura Barriers to mental Health services in United States. Cerebrum. The DANA Foundation.  http://www.dana.org/news/cerebrum/detail.aspx?id=31364
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Intercultural Usability How Language Affects

Words: 381 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 97626983

" (Ford and Kotze, date unknown) The work of Spencer-Rodgers and McGovern (2002) entitled: "Attitudes Toward the Culturally Different: The Role of Intercultural Communication arriers, Affective Responses, Consensual Stereotypes and Perceived Threat" report that testing was conducted for the purpose of examining the psychological impact of intercultural communication barriers on intergroup attitudes. It is reported that it was indicated by regression analyses indicated that "....intercultural communication emotions were strongly and uniquely related to prejudice toward a culturally diverse outgroup: foreign students." (Spencer-Rodgers and McGovern, 2002)

ibliography

Spencer-Rodgers, Julie and McGovern, Timothy (2002) Attitudes Toward the Culturally Different: The Role of Intercultural Communication arriers, Affective Responses, Consensual Stereotypes, and Perceived Threat. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. Vol. 26, Issue 6. 1 Nov 2002.

Ford, Gabrielle and Kotze, Paula (date unknown) Designing Usable Interfaces with Cultural Dimensions. Online available at: http://hufee.meraka.org.za/Hufeesite/staff/the-hufee-group/paula-kotze-1/publications/ford-kotze-final-revised.pdf

Karasawa, Minoru and Sayaka, Suga (date unknown) Retention and Transmission of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Spencer-Rodgers, Julie and McGovern, Timothy (2002) Attitudes Toward the Culturally Different: The Role of Intercultural Communication Barriers, Affective Responses, Consensual Stereotypes, and Perceived Threat. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. Vol. 26, Issue 6. 1 Nov 2002.

Ford, Gabrielle and Kotze, Paula (date unknown) Designing Usable Interfaces with Cultural Dimensions. Online available at: http://hufee.meraka.org.za/Hufeesite/staff/the-hufee-group/paula-kotze-1/publications/ford-kotze-final-revised.pdf

Karasawa, Minoru and Sayaka, Suga (date unknown) Retention and Transmission of Socially Shared Beliefs: The Role of Linguistic Abstraction in Stereotypic Communication. Chapter 11. Shared Beliefs and Linguistic Abstraction.
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Benefits Barriers and Characteristics of Critical Thinking

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65826555

Characteristics

The intellectual standards of critical thinking

Critical thinking is described as the ability of an individual to think in a rational and clear manner with the aim of improving the quality of the reasoning process (Moore, 2007). It requires mastery of the application of different intellectual standards to elements of reasoning in various scenarios or problems. Although there are many applicable intellectual standards, some of the most important are: clarity or understandability of points, accuracy of information, how exact or precise the details are, relevance of a specified subject or even topic area, the depth in handling complex issues, the breadth of the train of thought, the logic and sense behind a thought, and the fairness or biasness of the thinker in regard to an issue (Moore, 2007).

The benefits of critical thinking

Critical thinking enables an individual to solve problems in a systematic way in any area of…… [Read More]

References

Lavery, J. & Hughes, W. (2008). Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills. (5th Ed.). Buffallo, New York: Broadview Press.

Moore, T.D. (2007). Critical Thinking and Intelligence Analysis. Washington, DC: NDIC Press.

Palomar Community College District (2015). Blocks to Critical Thinking. The Palomar College Library. Retrieved on 20 January 2015 from  http://www.palomar.edu/reading/Thomsons120/Blocks%20to%20Critical%20Thinking.htm
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Qi Plan Analysis Barriers and Implementation

Words: 1651 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29116331

QI Plan: Analysis of Methodologies / QI Plan: Analysis, Barriers, and Implementation

Improvement Methodologies

Information Technology

Benchmarking

Mission, Vision, Strategic, and Operational Plans

Barriers and Challenges

Successful Implementation

Improvement Methodologies

Analyze each methodology you researched. Explain the pros and cons of each methodology for your chosen area of improvement.

They are an easy technique, however, quite time consuming methods. The outcomes might differ only marginally in case of questionnaires and surveys, however, could offer a general view.

Pros

They are affordable; it is possible to design questions that are significant to particular regions of interest (competencies, individuals, surroundings and many more); Simple to gather and study outcomes (CHTesourceGroup, 2011).

Cons

Privacy might be compromised with e-mail, or even phone assessments; the questions asked are often not equivalent to the language or literacy level of the particular population (CHTesourceGroup, 2011).

Interviews

It is the most satisfactory technique that can be utilized…… [Read More]

References

Aihw. (2015). Hospital Performance Indicator. Retrieved on 4th October, 2015 from  http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=6442456514 

Cleary, B.A. (2009). Using Check Sheets to Improve Data Analysis. Quality Digest. Retrieved on 4th October, 2015 from  http://m.qualitydigest.com  / http www.qualitydigest.com inside quality-insider-article using-check-sheets-improve-data-analysis.html

CHT Resource Group. (2011). Client Satisfaction Quality Improvement Tool and Sample Surveys. California Family Health Council.

Lobo, C.L. (2015). "Control Charts An Important Tool in Quality Control to Save Money. Tech Talks." Nrmca.org.
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English Usage of Language

Words: 1593 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26679930

female of a dog or other animals of the dog family e.g. fox a gray hound *****. However, when used as slang it implies derogatory characteristics of a woman especially a cruel and unpleasant one. In terms of relating it to something or somebody it implies 'making bad or critical comments about someone/something or complaining' inclusive of 'unpleasant situation etc.'.

Thus, its literal meaning is quite different from its common usage. How the literal meaning fell devoid giving birth to a totally new, informal and derogatory meaning is questionable. Although the formal version of the term is still used to imply the gender difference a male dog and a female dog, the informal term still prevails. There lies no apparent connection between the two meanings and it is not easy to comprehend how the two evolved simultaneously for the same word. Attitudes play a major role, the term '*****' is…… [Read More]

References

Naylor, Gloria. "The Meanings of a Word." Language Awareness. Ed. By Paul Eschholz, Alfred Rosa, and Virginia Clark. New York, New York. REL. St. Martin's Press.

S.I. Hayakawa "Right Word -- A Modern Guide to Synonyms" Harper & Row, Publishers.

Judith Ortiz Cofer, "The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria"
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Organization Would Introduce a Policy

Words: 669 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92876676

These include shared accounts, unique user accounts without required passwords, unique user accounts where the password does not need to be changed, and administrators who use their privileged accounts to perform user activities. Shared accounts are a poor choice because they allow too many people access to the same thing (Stone, 2008). The administrator accounts have the same problem. Unique user accounts are a better choice, but if the password never needs changing it can eventually be hacked, and if the password is not needed at all there is very little to stop other people from using the account even if it is supposed to be unique to a particular user (Stone, 2008). That is worth considering, because it is much safer to have unique user accounts with required passwords that have to be changed as strict intervals.

Shared user accounts and unique user accounts that are not password protected…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C. (2005). What's the difference between policies and procedures?, Bizmanualz.

Stone, D. (2008). Global public policy, transnational policy communities and their networks. Journal of Policy Sciences.
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Connected Immigrant Communities Chaney 2010

Words: 4201 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 69242488

Meng and Meurs (2009) examine the effects of intermarriage, language, and economic advantage. They find that immigrants who have some skill in the dominant language of the country to which they immigrate tend to intermarry and earn more income (Meng and Meurs). Marrying outside of one's culture may influence language acquisition due to social and economic needs to advance within the adopted culture.

Moua and Lamborn (2010) note that ethnic socialization practices by parents of immigrant adolescents strengthen the ethnic heritage connection between adolescent, parent, and ethnic community. These include native language use, marriage ties, taking part in cultural events, sharing history, and preparing traditional foods (Moua and Lamborn). As noted previously, immigrant parents tend to congregate in ethnic communities, where they are essentially immersed in the ethnic culture. The native language is often the most utilized if not the exclusive language in the home. However, children are acculturated into…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Akresh, I. "Contexts of English Language Use among Immigrants to the United States." International Migration Review (2007): 930-955.

Bacallao, M and P. Smokowski. "The Costs of Getting Ahead: Mexican Family System Changes After Immigration." Family Relations (2006): 52-66.

Blatchley, L and M. Lau. "Culturally Competent Assessment of English Language Learners for Special Education Services." Communique: Newspaper of National Association of School Psychologists May 2010: 1-8.

Bleakley, H and A. Chin. "Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation Among U.S. Immigrants." American Economic Journal of Applied Economics (2010):  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2813069/pdf/nihms-132959.pdf .
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Hispanics and Mental Issues

Words: 1106 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 43042792

Mental Health Issues in Hispanic Community

The Hispanic community comprises of one of the fastest growing ethnic/racial groups within the United States. According to census results of 2000, the number of Hispanics in the United States has increased by about 60% over the last decade. This is from 23 back in 1990 to 35.5 million in 2000. In March 2002, the number of Hispanics in United States was 37.4 million. Hispanic population in the United States in 44 million now this is about 14% of the U.S. population. Nearly 805 of all the Hispanics in the U.S. are either immigrants or children of immigrants. It is expected that by 2050, the Hispanic population will be 108 million and about a quarter of the population in United States.

Sociocultural and historical factors suggest that the Hispanic community needs mental health services greatly. Hispanics in general have low economic and education status.…… [Read More]

References

Escarce, J & Kapur, K. (2008).Hispanics and the Future of America: Access to and Quality of Health Care. Retrieved August 5, 2014 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19910/ 

Talamantes, M., Lindeman, R & Mounton, C. (2009). Health and Healthcare of Hispanic/Latino-American elders. Retrieved August 5, 2014 from http://web.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/hispaniclatino.html

Morales, L., Kington, R., Valdez, R & Escarce, J. (2007).Socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors affecting Hispanic health outcomes. Retrieved August 5, 2014 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1781361/ 

Vega, W. (2008). Mental Health issue affecting Latino youth and families. Retrieved August 5, 2014 from http://www.sdprc.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/keynoteaddress-pte.pdf
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Stone Hammer Poem & Surfacing

Words: 1243 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95093261

The mystery, which is representative for Kroetsch, would simply disappear once someone would give a translation for his poem.

Readers are likely to think that the poem is too authoritarian in the beginning. Their inability to understand its meaning when trying to relate to the exact meaning of the words used Kroetsch used would be frustrating. However, this is essentially wrong. The author wants people to feel free and to think what ever they want to instead of limiting themselves to a simple and rather restrained idea at the time they read his poem.

The protagonist in "Surfacing" is to a certain degree comparable to Kroetsch, as she too is discontented with the strict nature of language and with the fact that it does not give people total freedom. The use of language however affects Atwood's creation to a higher degree. It transpires the will to virtually abandon everything related…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Atwood, Margret. (1972). "Surfacing."

2. Kroetsch, Robert. (1975). "The Stone Hammer Poems." Nanaimo, B.C.: Oolichan Books.
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Assigning Expatriates Unfortunately There Are

Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15979481

This particular cultural difference can be solved by a briefing of nuance related to communication by the organization that is employing the expatriate. Again, such lessons should be studied both prior to and during the expatriates work in the foreign country. In terms of accounting for cultural differences in leadership styles and organization, the best way for an expatriate to overcome such obstacles is to learn by experience. Moreover, he or she must keep an open mind, and be cognizant of the fact that because a particular approach or style of working and leadership worked in the past does not mean it will necessarily work in the present, foreign environment.

Ultimately, it is up to the multi-national corporation to consistently remind the expatriate of these facts. He or she must be open to accept the fact that by going to a new place with a different culture, he or she…… [Read More]

References

Javidan,, Dorfman, P., De Luque, M., & House, R. (2006). "In the eye of the beholder: Cross cultural lessons in leadership from project GLOBE." Academy of Management Perspectives, 20 (1): 67-90.

Nardon, L., Steers, R. (2007). "The new global manager: learning cultures on the fly." Organizational Dynamics. 37 (1): 47-52.

Suutari, V. (1998). "Problems faced by western expatriate managers in Eastern Europe: Evidence provided by Finnish expatriates in Russia and Estonia." Journal for East European Management Studies. 3 (3). Retrieved from  http://www.academia.edu/1752568/Problems_faced_by_Western_expatriate_managers_in_Eastern_Europe_Evidence_provided_by_Finnish_expatriates_in_Russia_and_Estonia
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Neo-Confucianism Is a Philosophy Which Was Born TEST1

Words: 1227 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: Array

teaching English to non-English speaking people for the purpose of conflict resolution

This paper presents a discussion regarding the importance of teaching English to non-English speaking people for the purpose of conflict resolution. The writer uses several examples of common conflicts in which the understanding of the English language would have made communication much easier. There were six sources used to complete this paper.

GETTING PEOPLE ON THE SAME PAGE IN COMMUNICATION

With the technological boom of recent decades and the globalization process of the world, the need for a universal language is becoming crucial. Today, more than ever before, people are dealing with each other on international levels in business, as well as social relations. This new blending of the world's cultures and nations has brought forth the very real understanding that a universal language is going to become paramount to the success of the process. English has been…… [Read More]

References

Boel, Bruce (1997). Women and Conflict Resolution. Vol. 62, Contemporary Women's Issues Database, 12-01-1997, pp 10.

Ferrechio, Susan (1999). Teaching the danger in assumptions., The Washington Times, 02-19-1999, pp C5.

Pean, Hervey (2000). Learning America Programs, boosted by VISTA workers and volunteers, help immigrant children adjust to a new life.., The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, 08-03-2000, pp J6.

Roberts, James. (1995). Communicating through language barriers. Management Monthly.
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Worldviews Their Development and How

Words: 2116 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88607249

It outlines those programs and benefits to be offered on campuses to help service international students more effectively. Japanese students are here identified. Since they speak English as second language, they have more stress, requiring more time to read their textbooks, receiving the abuse from students that are enrolled with them in classes or who are being taught by them when they serve as graduate assistants. This causes miscommunication and a loss of learning comprehension. The fact is that the native born student may feel resentment about being passed over for assignment to the teaching assistantship when it is given to the foreign born student. A series of programs is suggested to provide cultural sensitivity for the foreign student and then a staged program series to help the foreign student adapt (Lin, & Yi, 1997, 473-80).

Finally, the needs of students with special needs can not be ignored. Unfortunately, many…… [Read More]

References

Asherman, Ira, Bing, John W., & Laroche, Lionel. 2000. Building trust across cultural boundaries . [Obtained from]  http://www.itapintl.com/facultyandresources/articlelibrarymain/ 

Culture communication and language. [Obtained from] 11 August 2010 from  http://www.maec.org/cross/4.html 

Edmundson, Andrea. 2007. Globalized e-learning cultural challenges. Hershey:

Informaiton Science Publishing.
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Reckoning Life Has Some Form of Development

Words: 1395 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7220126

Reckoning

Life has some form of development through a range of events that could be considered rites of passages for every person. These experience that individuals face during their lives is substantial different yet contains many similarities at the same time. This essay will look at two accounts of different experiences by two famous authors that tackle aspects of what it means to face different stages in one's life. Both stories offer insights as to how our identity is shaped by our memory and our memory can be shaped by a plethora of individual and cultural experiences. Memory certainly serves as a "catch-all" term that encompasses a widespread range of factors that occur in the human experience.

Eva Hoffman's memoir, Lost in Translation, illustrates events from her life as she emigrated from Cracow, Poland to Vancouver, Canada. N. Scott Momaday's, The ay to Rainy Mountain is also about a journey…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hoffman, E. Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language. New York: Penguin, 1990. Print.

Kensinger, E. And D. Schacter. "Memory and Emotion." N.d. Boston College. Web. 28 October 2012.

Lanigan, J. "All Stories So Far." 1 Septiember 2009. English. Web. 28 October 2012.

Momaday, S. The Way to Rainy Mountain. University of New Mexico Press, 1976. Print.
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Bilingual Bilingue Research Paper Bilingual Bilingue by

Words: 2231 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16984807


Lastly, the more personal issue discussed in Bilingual/Bilingue
should be evaluated, and that is the relationship between the girl's father
and a second language. This is a primary focus of the work as her father
resists the English language and he is unable to accept it within his
household. This seems to confuse the girl in the poem, yet it does not
disturb her. She understands that it is her father who fails to understand
both her love for English and undying love for her father. This is
consistent with a recent psychological study entitled, "Effects of Language
Usage on the Emotional Experience of Spanish-English and English-Spanish
Bilinguals" in which bilingualism does not appear to hinder the emotional
experience of those children who are bilingual (Guttfreund 1990).
Nevertheless, bilingualism is a personal experience and the relationships
involved with language differences vary from person to person and there is
no way…… [Read More]

Works Cited
Anonymous. "Stances on Multilingual and Multicultural Education." Language
Arts 84 (2006): 171. 15 Apr. 2007
.

Cox, Annabel. "Gustavo P?Rez Firmat's "Bilingual Blues" and "Turning the
Times Tables": Language Choice and Cultural Identity in Cuban-American
Literature." Neophilologus 91 (2007): 63. 15 Apr. 2007
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Constructivism in TESOL

Words: 5320 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31439046

Constructivism in TESOL-1

ABEVIATIONS

EFL - The term is the main topic on which the paper is based upon (English as a foreign language). It does not refer to the student learning English language which is not his or her native language nor is it being spoken in their native country English is totally a foreign language.

ESL -- This refers to English as a second language. Students who learn English as a second language intend to use it in places where English is a native language and it ain't their first or native language..

ELF - The term does stand for English as a lingua franca

EAL - Stands for English as an additional language. The term (EAL) is only applicable to certain countries where English is just an extra language.

EAP -- In this specific study means English for academic purposes

EIL - The abbreviation stands for English…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, R, & Freebody, P. (1981) Vocabulary knowledge; Comprehension and teaching: Newark, NJ: International Reading Association,

Bain, K., (2004) What the Best College Teachers Do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Blake, R. (2000) Computer-mediated communication: Language Learning & Technology, 4(1), 120 -- 136,

Jonassen, DH (1999) Constructing learning environments on the web: Engaging students in meaningful learning: Educational Technology Conference and Exhibition 1999: Thinking Schools, Learning Nation.
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Minds Possible Worlds Introduces the Concept of

Words: 1405 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80520195

Minds, Possible Worlds introduces the concept of "transactional self," or the self that is continually engaged in and developed from active relationships. These relationships "are premised on a mutual sharing of assumptions and beliefs about how the world is, how mind works, what we are up to, and how communication should proceed," (Bruner, 1986, p. 57). Almost a form of mind reading, transactional consciousness permits psychologists to make generalizations about typical human transactions and also pathological interactions with the world. Thus, a person intuits how others feel or think. Much of what we attribute to intuition, empathy, or even psychic powers can be conceptualized as an underlying intelligence about the transactional self.

Research, although burdened by methodological hindrances, reveals the nature of the transactional self. People tend to gravitate towards those who are perceived to like them. Questioning the underlying thought process, Bruner posits that the tendency to befriend those…… [Read More]

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The Impact of Using Bilingual Call Compared To Family Interpreters Research Paper

Words: 3427 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 13469735

Introduction

Elderly Hispanic between the ages of 50 to 75 is only eloquent in their native language. They are referred to as Limited English proficient (LEP) patients. As a result, they are disenfranchised due to the language barrier which often necessitates for an interpreter. In urgent medical cases, ad hoc interpreters who are often family members act as interpreters between the patient and the physician. However, the NSW policy stipulates a standard procedure where professionals such as bilingual calls are invited to offer interpretive services under such circumstances.

The inherent challenge limits the LEP patient’s receipt of primary and preventative care. This challenge is prevalent in elderly Hispanic immigrants and Mexican Americans. There is 18.3 % prevalence of diabetes among the Hispanic communities for undiagnosed and diagnosed patients. They are predisposed to diabetic disorders due to cardiometabolic abnormalities. There is a relatively high margin in the prevalence of the disorder…… [Read More]

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Mental Retardation This Work Examines

Words: 6188 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58210378

Jones relates that statement of Corrigan: "Our work suggests that the biggest factor changing stigma is contact between people with mental illness and the rest of the population. The public needs to understand that many people with mental illness are functioning, fully contributing members of society." (Jones, 2006) Jones states that "the social cost of stigma associated with mental illness is high because it translates into huge numbers of people with treatable mental illness not getting help." Jones relates the fact that the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) is a group of advocates that works toward fighting the "inaccurate, hurtful representations of mental illness" that are found in the media. Jang (2002) states that the National Health Law Program has a priority to access of healthcare. In fact, the Executive Order (EO 13166) was focused toward the implementation of guidelines in overcoming the language barriers. Jang states that LEP…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, S.K. & Middleton, V.A.

Explorations in privilege, oppression and DiversityBrooks Cole 2005. ISBN0-534-51742-0

Barber, J.G. (1995). Politically progressive casework. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 76(1), 30-37.

Children Who Can't Pay Attention/ADHD (2004) Facts for Families. Academy of child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Online available at  http://www.aacap.org/page.ww?section=Facts+for+Families&name=Children+Who+Can%27t+Pay+Attention%2FADHD
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Eradicating Suicide Canadian Aboriginal Youth

Words: 3080 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28505221

CANADA'S ABOIGINAL PEOPLE

Suicide amongst Canada's Aboriginal People

Suicide amongst Canada's Aboriginal People

The aboriginal people of Canada have faced injustices perpetrated through colonization, cultural prejudice, and forced assimilation among many other social injustices. The perpetrators, who include the Canadian dominant population, did this without considering the aboriginal people's well-being. Therefore, in an attempt to reduce the social problems they faced, the aboriginal people taken part in habits such as alcoholism, violence, and suicide. The aboriginal youth remain the most affected, mainly because of the development of suicidal thoughts, which have driven them to commit suicide (Kirmayer, & Valaskakis, 2009). To make it worse, the aboriginal people are denied access to healthcare services, which has contributed to lack of identification of suicidal youths.

The social problems they face result to depression, and some of the people opt to take part in some life-threatening habits, for example, suicide (Lavelle & Poole,…… [Read More]

References

Baskin, C. (2011). Strong Helpers' Teachings: The Value of Indigenous Knowledge in the Helping Professions. Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholar's Press.

Blackstock, C. (2009). The Occasional Evil of Angels: Learning from the Experiences of Aboriginal Peoples and Social Work. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 4(1), 28-37.

Hart, M., Sinclair, R., & Bruyere, G. (2009). Wi-cihitowin: Aboriginal social work in Canada.

Halifax: Fernwood Pub.
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Warsaw and Munich Comparison Munich

Words: 1256 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 80568756

Munich is famous for many tourist attractions. In the center of the city is the Marienplatz - a large open square with the Old and the New Town Hall. Structures from demolished medieval fortification have survived to this day, including three gates. There are also a number of remarkable churces - the Peterskirche, close to Marienplatz, the gothic hall-church Heiliggeistkirche (The Church of the Holy Ghost), the Frauenkirche ("Dom zu unserer Lieben Frau" - Cathedral of Our Lady), which is the most famous building in the city center or Michaelskirche, the largest enaissance church (Cityguide).

The palaces are another feature of the old city. The Alte Hof, a medieval castle and first residence of the Wittelsbach dukes in Munich can be seen in the inner city. The large esidenz palace is one of Europe's most significant museums of interior decoration. The international renown Nationaltheater is another attraction. As far as…… [Read More]

References

Cityguide, http://www.cityguide.travel-guides.com/

Fodor's,  http://www.fodors.com/miniguides/ 

Wikipedia Online Encyclopedia,  http://en.wikipedia.org/ 

Yahoo! Travel,  http://travel.yahoo.com/
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Consent the Most Important Statement

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3429868

The ethical dilemma that occurs here is related to the necessity of doing the right procedure, but with the reluctance of the patient to provide consent for it.

In the second case, communicating consent and information can be made difficult by language or cultural barriers. The ethical dilemma relates to whether or not the patient properly understands what he is up against and whether he is able to make an informed decision.

3. With traditional medicine, there is a problem of communication and understanding. The Western patients are not used to TCM, it is something new for them, so a lot of time needs to be spent in delivering the appropriate information in terms of principles and practice before anything can actually be done. If this was applied in China, many of the steps could be skipped, because many of the principles are related to Chinese spiritual practice.

4. Again,…… [Read More]

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Effects of Outsourcing in Today's Economy

Words: 3115 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48438653

Outsourcing Its Impact

The effects of outsourcing in today's economy

Effects on People

Being an expatriate

Breaking the language barrier

Culture Shock

Outsourcing and people dynamics: Impact on company

Effects on Economy

Capital flows

Impact on technology

Global management and outsourcing

The effects of outsourcing in today's economy

Outsourcing has become an increasingly popular business strategy for transnational organizations. Many of the U.S. corporations started outsourcing their manufacturing operations since late 1980s. This was due to the potential advantages, both from an economic as well as regulatory perspective that business operations in foreign lands provided to these businesses. Initially, the U.S. firms running in financial troubles chose to set their cost intensive operations abroad such as manufacturing and call centers in low cost countries. Gradually, when the cost benefits were realized, other companies from various industrial sectors also strengthened this trend of outsourcing. Pharmaceutical industry was the first to witness…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bartel, Ann, Saul Lach, and Nachum Sicherman. Outsourcing and technological change. No. w11158. National Bureau of Economic Research, (2005): 1-41.

Caligiuri, Paula, and Victoria Di Santo. "Global competence: what is it, and can it be developed through global assignments?" Human Resource Planning 24.3 (2001): 27-35.

Drezner, Daniel W. "Outsourcing Bogeyman, The." Foreign Aff. 83 (2004): 22.

Dunleavy, Patrick, and Christopher Hood. "From old public administration to new public management." Public money & management 14.3 (1994): 9-16.
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Strength Lies in Your Ability to Give

Words: 572 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73233651

strength lies in your ability to give up something good in order to attain the best. It is not the easiest thing to do since there are many risks involved but if you feel in your heart that best is yet to come and allowing something good to go so you can fulfill your destiny and achieve the best then you should follow your heart. Such an opportunity for me arose at two different points in my life. One was when I was working for Early Bird Messenger Company and realized that if I had entrepreneurial skills and should start working for myself. I loved the idea of being my own boss and that's when I started my own business. This was an exciting new arena for me and I enjoyed following a different schedule, a new routine and simply a new lifestyle. But as all good things must come…… [Read More]

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Bilingual Research Journal Brj According

Words: 2340 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98697474

But in any case, a shortage of qualified bilingual teachers usually makes it impossible. For example, public schools in California enrolled recently arrived immigrants from 136 different countries in 1994, but bilingual teachers were certified in only 17 languages - 96% of them in Spanish. To the extent that LEP [ESL] children received help in other tongues, they received it almost entirely from teacher aides" (Crawford, 1997, "Babel' in the Schools"). A combined blend of immersion and resource support, or a transitional approach is often necessary from an administrative and logistical as well as an ideological point-of-view -- there are simply not enough teachers.

hat approach is best?

Beyond the rhetorical fury of those who are 'English Only' advocates, devout multiculturalists, or concerned parents, it is often hard to find unbiased, quality research about the outcomes of current programs and strategies. The most sophisticated evaluation study of different approaches was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berlitz. (2007). Official Webpage. Retrieved 9 Jul 2007 at  http://www.berlitz.com/ 

Crawford, James. (1997). "Babel' in the Schools." Our World. Retrieved 9 Jul 2007 at http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/JWCRAWFORD/can-bil.htm

Crawford, James. (1997). "Bilingual Education." Our World. Retrieved 9 Jul 2007 at http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/JWCRAWFORD/biling.htm

Crawford, James. (1997). "Controversy over the National Research Council Report: Does
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Bernard Osher Allied Health Scholarship

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30326434

I participated in local programs to feed the homeless through the Ethiopian Christian Fellowship. I volunteered for the Alameda food bank as well as for local hospitals and animal shelters.

My volunteer work brought me out of my shell, and enabled to feel that I could make a difference in the lives of others. By healing others, I healed myself. Through maturity I have come recognize and respect my limits and honor my capabilities. In my ten years living in the United States I have experienced more inside myself than many even better traveled will experience in a lifetime. I have gone from a happy and busy childhood, to being a lonely and miserable man, isolated and old before his time, to once again becoming accepted and beloved person who is a vital part of his community.

Scholarship Statement: Bernard Osher Allied Health Scholarship

The language of health and medicine…… [Read More]

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Economics Studying in United States Have Always

Words: 637 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35979223

Economics

Studying in United States have always felt the need to challenge myself and learn from the situations that I have overcome in my life. These challenges and obstacles have provided me the opportunity to be more independent and responsible. I always hade passion for English and knew that learning it would always be a challenge for me. Therefore, just two-year ago, I decided to take up this challenge and went to study abroad in the United States to begin a new stage of my life.

I knew that studying in U.S. would give me a strong foundation and command over English language. Along with my brother studying in the United States, I had come to face the fact that I had left a comfortable life behind. With a sheltered and dedicated care from my parents in Hong Kong, now, living in the United States, without my parents, I realized…… [Read More]

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Educating Illegal Children Is Educating

Words: 1932 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41240298



Officials in border states see the matter as far more than a scholarly legal debate. Pam Slater, a San Diego County supervisor, called the current system "a travesty" that is bankrupting state and local governments. Educating 355,000 citizen-children of illegal aliens cost California taxpayers $1.7 billion in fiscal 1995-96, for example.

An offer of financial support to children born in the United States is far too great a lure," she said. "This loophole must be closed (p. 5)."

Educating illegal immigrants' children is reflected in the test scores of the border state public schools, and other school systems with a large population of illegal immigrants. While federal and state law prohibits the collecting of information that would specifically target Hispanic children as the problem behind low test scores, one might conclude that for some school districts the language barrier might contribute to those low test scores.

However, while we cannot…… [Read More]

References

Enforcing Immigration Laws. (2007, March 17). The Washington Times, p. A12. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5019905500  http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106216446

Kalmar, T.M. (2000). Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy: Latino Migrants Crossing the Linguistic Border. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106216448  http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001985430

States Pay $7.4 Billion to Educate Illegals; Report Notes Drain on U.S. Children. (2003, August 21). The Washington Times, p. A04. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001985430 

'We Are Overwhelmed'; Caring for Illegal Immigrants Taxes Facilities in Border States. (2002, September 24). The Washington Times, p. A01. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000828657
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Skills Development

Words: 1513 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19029149

elaboration upon my experience as an international student of University of Birmingham. At the time I compose this reflection, I have finished my first year as a Business Management student. My reflection will center with the difficulties encountered in a foreign country, language, and culture. The reader will gain insight as to my personal experience my first year. The reader will understand some of my greatest challenges, personal flaws, and sense of accomplish from completing one full year. By the reflections conclusion, readers will understand how obstacles and weakness transformed in to achievement and deep motivation.

At the beginning of the first semester, my most prominent obstacle was my deficiency in the English language. I could not effectively communicate with other people in a professional or informal context. This was not something I was prepared for. I knew it would be a challenge, but more than just the language made…… [Read More]