Mercy Killing Essays (Examples)

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Euthanasia Is Illegal Euthanasia Otherwise Known as

Words: 1997 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38325739

Euthanasia Is Illegal

Euthanasia otherwise known as assisted suicide refers to the painless extermination of a patient suffering from terminal illnesses or painful or incurable disease. According to Cavan & Dolan, euthanasia is the practice or act of permitting the death of hopelessly injured or sick individuals in a painless means for the purpose of mercy (Cavan & Dolan 12). The techniques used in euthanasia induce numerous artifacts such as shifts in regional brain chemistry, liver metabolism and epinephrine levels causing death. Advocates of euthanasia trust that sparing a patient needless suffering or pain is a good thing. If an individual is hopelessly hurt or ill with no hope of ever getting well, if such a person is in an unending and unbearable pain and cannot experience the things that make life meaningful, the best option for such patients is euthanasia. Euthanasia raises questions on morals, legal and essence of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Baird, R. Caring for the Dying: critical issues at the edge of life. New York: Prometeus Books 2003, pp.117

Cavan, Seasmus, Dolan, Sean. Euthanasia: The Debate over the right to die. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group, Oct 1, 2000.

Cohen-Almagor, R. Euthanasia in the Netherlands: The policy and practice of mercy killing. Netherlands: Springer, Aug 3, 2004.

Devettere, Raymond. Practical decision making in health care ethics: Cases and concepts. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press, 2009.
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Ethics Project

Words: 4363 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61479708

Life and Death: The Life Support Dilemma by Kenneth E. Schemmer M.D

Kenneth Schemmer in his thorough, thought provoking book brings to life the controversial subject of the life support issue. For years, many all over the country have pondered, "What if a person were in some kind of an accident and the physicians told them that they were not going to make it?" And all that he or she could do is just lie there in extreme pain waiting for their life to the end. Or even worse case scenario what if they happened to end up completely brain dead? These debated questions are taken on by Dr. Schemmer in making his point that life support decisions may not necessarily be the decision of the family, the doctor or the patient but by a higher being that gives life and takes life. Schemmer uses these controversial questions in his…… [Read More]

References:

Court backs right to die | terminally ill have right to refuse medical life support. (1984, Dec 28). The San Diego Union, pp. A.1-1.

Ackerman, T. (2005, Mar 27). Life support battle shifts / A decade ago, patients families had to press for 'right to die. Houston Chronicle, pp. 1-B.1.

Allen, P. (2000, Oct 07). Right to die upheld despite new euro law, doctors can end life support rules judge. Daily Mail, pp. 33-33.

Dolan, M. (2001, Aug 10). Justices deal setback to right-to-die movement; health: State court bans removal of life support from conscious patients whose wishes are not clear. Los Angeles Times, pp. A.1-A.1.
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Euthanasia the Foremost Contentious Concern Lately Has

Words: 4959 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97241063

Euthanasia

The foremost contentious concern lately has been the issue of granting legal status to the right to die with dignity, or euthanasia. Similar to the issue of death sentence or suicide, euthanasia is contentious as it entails killing an individual through a conscious decision. (The right to a dignified death - need for debate) "Euthanasia" derived from the Greek term implying "good death" is some activity we perform or otherwise which results in, or is planned to result in death, to liberate a person from pain. This is occasionally known as "mercy killing." (Reflections on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide) Giving a legal sanction to euthanasia is a vital referendum upon the social standing of those incapacitated in America nowadays. (Euthanasia: The Disability Perspective on the Right to Die Movement) Euthanasia can be attained either though an intentional process, or by refraining to take an action intentionally. In any one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abergavenny, Roger Dobson. (22 February, 2003) "Society should accept that euthanasia is a personal decision, report says." British Medical Journal. 326:416. Retrieved from  http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/326/7386/416/d  Accessed on 4 May, 2005

"Arguments against Euthanasia: Euthanasia is against the word and will of God." Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/ethics/sanctity_life/euthagod.shtml Accessed on 3 May, 2005

"Arguments against Euthanasia" Retrieved from  http://www.euthanasia.com/argumentsagainsteuthanasia.html  Accessed on 3 May, 2005

'Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia" Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=cmed.section.17469  Accessed on 3 May, 2005
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Pros and Cons of Euthanasia

Words: 918 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56216886

Euthanasia, Should Terminally Ill Patients Be Allowed to End Their Lives Via Assisted Suicide

TEMINALLY ILL PATIENTS BE ALLOWED TO END THEI LIVES VIA ASSISTED SUICIDE

Euthanasia, notably called assisted killing or mercy killing, is perhaps one of the medical prescriptions that have always raised varied and multifaceted arguments, most of which have never reached any solid conclusion. Clinicians are prone to take every necessary step necessary to keep the health of a patient at stable conditions. Nonetheless, there come a time when the patient knows, together with the clinician, that there is a lesser chance of survival. In such situations, health professionals are stuck between assisting the patient to die, notably by using an external means, or letting him or her to fight for life until death, something that might be painful, both to the clinicians, the patients, and even the loved ones. Assisting a patient to die, with…… [Read More]

Reference

Weber, W. (2000). Dutch Proposal for Children's Right To Euthanasia Withdrawn. Lancet, 356(9226), 322.
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Dax's Case in 1973 Donald

Words: 1831 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30903241

While he did not necessarily appreciate or approve of Dax's wish to die, he was also "not inclined to force upon the patient care he did not wish to receive," (7). Dr. Meier's position seemed overall the most neutral of all involved. He knew that part of the reason why Dax was determined to die was because he had overheard an "off-handed remark" made by a careless surgical resident, (34). Meier went on to apply what he learned through Dax's case to caring for the disabled and dying who, like Dax, often wish to die (206).

Psychiatrist Dr. White was instrumental in helping Dax regain confidence and self-esteem through his ordeal. While he did help Dax wean himself off of sleeping pills and emerge from a deep depression into a life of productivity, Dr. White still did not heed Dax's wishes or "participate in his suicide," (27). Like the other…… [Read More]

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Rise of Advanced Technologies in the Medical

Words: 1474 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44926912

rise of advanced technologies in the medical field, especially those that sustains life, has brought issues in the ethics and morality of those involved in the field of medicine. Most significant to these issues is the practice of Euthanasia on patients diagnosed to have no chance of surviving and regaining life after any treatment has been implemented. In view of the issues on Euthanasia, this paper aims to present a discussion of this medical practice by analyzing the stands and views of Ned Cassem, James Rachel, Sidney Hook, and Leon R. Kass. This paper also aims to explain the meaning of "good death" as mentioned by Ned Cassem.

On many medical books and dictionaries, "euthanasia" or "mercy-killing" is defined as ending a life of a terminally ill patient by ways such as removing life support machines or stopping treatments that somehow prolongs life. The basic reason why euthanasia is performed…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chung, Ken. On James Rachels and "Active and Passive Euthanasia."

Publish.Uwo.Ca. 28 Dec. 2002. http://publish.uwo.ca/~kchung23/rachels.htm

Hook, Sidney. "In Defense of Voluntary Euthanasia.."

The New York Times (1 Mar. 1987).
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Nazi Concentration and Death Camps

Words: 8103 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9321545



The German suffering after the first world war and the humiliation of Germany with other nations gave the Nazis the opportunity to feed hatred of the Jews and at the same time promise that if the People gave in to the Nazi ideology, they would be in the land that would hold them a superior way of life. That the followers of Hitler followed the Ideals as true and that they also created in their own minds the need to eliminate groups of people who disagree like the communists and the Jews was the fundamental cause of the holocaust. Why did it come about? It was argued that while the political climate of the times did not show much promise, Hitler was able to deliver what he promised even if it was based on evil. This gave him ground support. One of the chief supporters of Hitler, and Aman who…… [Read More]

References

Abzug, Robert H. 1985. Inside the Vicious Heart: Americans and the Liberation of Nazi

Concentration Camps. Oxford University Press: New York.

Aroneanu, Eugene; Whissen, Thomas. 1996. Inside the Concentration Camps:

Eyewitness Accounts of Life in Hitler's Death Camps. Praeger: Westport, CT.
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Terri Schiavo Conflict

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86343865

Terri Schiavo- a Case of Life-Ethics

Mercy Killing, euthanasia, life support, brain damage are some of the hotly debated issues today in medical and legal circles. When is a person really dead? Why should life support system be provided? When can it be removed? Under what circumstances a person can be killed by the medical staff? There questions, as disturbing as they may be, are high pertinent to the case of Theresa Schiavo, the 41-year-old woman who died on March 31st, this year after her feeding tube was removed. (BBC News)

Terri Schiavo, as she is popularly known now, suffered a serious brain injury in a cardiac arrest in 1990 which may have been triggered by her suspected bulimia. She was then married to Michael Schiavo and apparently living a happy life. Terri's parents, obert and Mary Schindler, wanted to keep her alive with the use of a feeding tube.…… [Read More]

References

1) Disabled state - special legislation for Terri Schiavo -- 39-year-old woman in vegetative state since 1990 Christian Century Nov 29, 2003

2) Robert Marus, Florida dispute renews life-ethics controversy - News Terri Schiavo Christian Century Nov 15, 2003

3) Excerpts from the Supreme Court decision in Washington v. Glucksberg allowing states to ban doctor-assisted suicides "The State Has an Interest in Preventing Suicide . . . And Treating Its Causes', Washington Post, Friday, June 27, 1997; Page A18

4) "Brain-damaged Terri Schiavo dies" Story from BBC NEWS:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/americas/4398131.stm  Published: 2005/03/31
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Ethics Argument Against Euthanasia Refers

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81125106



Possibly the only exception to the immorality of suicide arises as a function of the philosophical impossibility of violating the fundamental right of the individual - both at law and in moral principle - of refusing medical treatment. Adults who are mentally competent to make decisions for themselves cannot be compelled to accept medical treatment unless their illness presents a health risk to others, such as in the case of infectious tuberculosis (Miller 1984). In that case, it is not suicide specifically that is the issue, since it would be conceptually impossible to allow the (competent) refusal of defining medical procedures deemed "necessary for continued life" first, and second, to require an individual to seek unwanted medical care for some conditions but not others.

However, even if the mentally competent individual may refuse life-saving medical care himself, allowing the same decision made for an incapacitated person by another by proxy…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, N., Bruckner, M.D. (1985) Medical Ethics: A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professional. Massachusetts: MIT.

Breitman, R. (1998) Official Secrets: What the Nazis Planned, What the British and Americans Knew. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Dershowitz, a.M. (2002) Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York: Little Brown & Co.

Garner, B.A. (2001) Black's Law Dictionary. St. Paul: West Group.
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Euthanasia the Word Euthanasia Has Been the

Words: 822 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63222205

EUTHANASIA

The word Euthanasia has been the cause of much debate about its legality and whether such a practice is even ethical or not. The anti-argument for this cause has mostly been raised from more controversial background, while the pro argument has come up from the liberal camp. The reason for such ferocity in the debate has been the resultant of the lack of understanding of the real meaning of the world, since mostly its real meaning has been distorted to find definitions that would suit each camp. Therefore the most primary step in this regard than becomes to take into consideration the definition of the word itself.

The dictionary defines the term Euthanasia as "the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in relatively painless way for reasons of mercy" (Euthanasia). However, the general perception of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Definition of Euthanasia. 4th April 2011. 24th September 2011 .

Euthanasia. n.d. 24th September 2011 .
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Active Passive Euthanasia

Words: 2210 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51244341

Euthanasia (active and Passive)

A Moral Philosophy Paper

Euthanasia is the practice of ending a person's life for the sole purpose of relieving the person's body from excruciating pain and suffering due to an incurable disease. The term euthanasia is often referred as mercy killing or the 'good death' as derived from the Greek. Euthanasia can be classified into four categories. In active euthanasia, a person's life is terminated by a doctor through a lethal dose of medication. Passive euthanasia implies non-provision of life-sustaining treatment to a patient based on logical reasoning or in other words doing nothing to save a person's life by abstaining to give life saving measures like putting a person on artificial respirator. Simple way of distinguishing active and passive form of euthanasia is a mere difference between act and omission. The other forms include voluntary euthanasia in which a person's consent is obtained for either…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Article on Introduction, background, laws, prevalence and ethical concerns on Euthanasia, Msn Encarta

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761562836/Euthanasia.html

Euthanasia Should Be Legal, The Guardian Newspaper, 12/9/2004

Euthanasia, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
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Why Euthanasia Should Be Legal

Words: 3408 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77877098

Euthanasia Should e Illegal

Euthanasia is the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing death, as by withholding extreme medical measures, a person or animal suffering from an incurable, often painful, disease or condition (Euthanasia, Infoplease.com). Today, medical advances have made it possible to prolong life in patients with no hope of recovery, and the term negative euthanasia has arisen to classify the practice of withholding or withdrawing extraordinary means (e.g., intravenous feeding, respirators, and artificial kidney machines) to preserve life. Positive euthanasia, on the other hand, has come to refer to actions that actively cause death such as administering a lethal drug.

Much debate has arisen in the United States among physicians, religious leaders, lawyers, and the general public over euthanasia (Euthanasia, Infoplease.com). Pro-euthanasia societies were founded in 1935 in England and 1938 in the United States. The Hemlock Society is one group that has pressed for right-to-die…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective." PlanetPapers. 07 Dec. 2003. http://www.*****/Assets/1710.php.

Bopp, James, and Coleson, Richard. "The Constitutional Case Against Permitting Physician-Assisted Suicide for Competent Adults with "Terminal Conditions." Oregon Right to Life. 07 Dec. 2003. http://www.ortl.org/suicide/constitutional_case_2.html.

Burke, J. Balch and O'Steen, David N.. "Why We Shouldn't Legalize Assisting Suicide." National Right to Life Committee. 08 Dec. 2003. http://www.nrlc.org/euthanasia/asisuid4.html.

Chastain, Jane. (2003, Sept. 4). "Another 9-11 Date With Death." WorldNetDaily.com. 08 Dec. 2003.  http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=34416 .
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Euthanasia an Ethical Dilemma Awaiting Full Review

Words: 1181 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19060070

Collaborative Learning Community -- Analysis of an Ethical Dilemma

Collaborative Learning Community: Analysis of an Ethical Dilemma

Euthanasia and related ethical implications

Euthanasia, referred to as "mercy killing" in common parlance, is the action of ending the life of an individual suffering from painful and extended injury or illness (Center for Health Ethics, 2011). Euthanasia implies that another individual, excluding the patient carries out an action with the intention of ending the patient's life, for instance, a lethal dose of medicine being injected into the patient. It might be voluntary if the patient approves of it, involuntary if the patient says no to it, or even non-voluntary if the patient is unable to approve of it. In euthanasia, an individual makes the means of death available in addition to acting as death's direct agent (American Nurses Association, 2013).

Euthanasia is the act of putting the life of a patient to…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association . (2001). Code of Ethics for Nurses with interpretive statements. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Publishing.

American Nurses Association. (2013). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and Aid in Dying. ANA Center for Ethics and Human Rights.

Bartels, L., & Otlowski, M. (2010). A right to die? Euthanasia and the law in Australia. J Law Med, 532-55.

Bulow, H., Sprung, C., Reinhart, K., Prayag, S., Du, B., & Armaganidis, A. (2008). The world's major religions' points-of-view on end-of-life decisions in the intensive care unit. Intensive Care Med, 423-30.
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Voluntary Euthanasia Be Legal

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42326286

euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide on ReligiousTolerance.org, most people in North America die "a bad death," one characterized by pain, being unable to participate in their medical treatment program, or after spending over ten days in intensive care. A prevailing belief that any sign of life is preferable to death fuels arguments against the practice of voluntary euthanasia, distinguished from involuntary euthanasia in that the suicide is requested directly by the person in question. Euthanasia is one of the most controversial subjects in medial ethics today. On one side of the argument, organizations like the Hemlock Society have pushed for legislation that permits physician-assisted suicide (PAS). These efforts have met with a degree of success in the United States; in 1994 Oregon passed the Death with Dignity Act allowing PAS. However, there is even a distinction between voluntary euthanasia and PAS: with PAS, the physician simply provides the means with which…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Introduction." Religious Tolerance.org.  http://www.religioustolerance.org/euth1.htm .

Gula, Richard. "Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Killing or Caring?" Christian Century. 5 May 1999. Online at Find Articles.com.  http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1058/14_116/54588537/p1/article.jhtml?term=euthanasia .

Leutwyler, Kristen. "In Cases of Euthanasia, Men Most Often Kill Women." Scientific American. 24 Sept 2001. Online at  http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=000B5030-819D-1C61-B882809EC588ED9F&catID=1 .
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Active and Passive Euthanasia Why Does James

Words: 1642 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93828109

active and passive euthanasia. Why does James achels think there is no moral difference between them?

Active euthanasia is the "mercy killing" of a life to prevent further suffering; passive euthanasia is deliberately allowing that life to die of "natural" causes. James achels believes there is no moral difference between active and passive euthanasia for a few reasons. First, in many cases where passive euthanasia is allowed (meaning it has already been decided that the life is not worth saving) but active euthanasia is against the law, the patient suffers more, longer, and needlessly by being allowed to die on their own. Therefore, since active euthanasia in these cases would prevent that suffering, active euthanasia is clearly less immoral than passively standing by. Still, achels' argument for moral equality between the two is that in each case it has been decided that the life at stake is not worth saving:…… [Read More]

References

Foot, P. (2002). Moral Dilemmas and Other Topics in Moral Philosophy: Killing and Letting Die. Oxford, England: Clarendon.

Hardwig, J. (1997). Is There A Duty to Die? The Hastings Center Report, 34+.

Harris, J. (1975). The Survival Lottery. Philosophy, 81-87.

Rachels, J. (1975). Active and Passive Euthanasia. The New England Journal of Medicine, 78-80.
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Geriatric Right to Die the

Words: 2635 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10740441



One solution of this issue can be that the closest most guardians is given the permission and right to take the decision about the life of the patient who is not able to communicate or express his wish. The guardian who should be responsible to take this decision should be the one who will be having direct impact of the death of the patient.

Community & Health Care esolution

Different communities have varied opinions in regard to right to die for geriatric. Although few of the countries have legalized this matter and have given the right to patient to decide whether he wanted to live more or not, but still there are campaigns in those countries that do not support the way patients should be given death and is also considered another way of committing suicide. Communities think if the right is legalized it will give doctors the right do…… [Read More]

Reference

Gastmans C. & Lemiengre. J. (2007). Development and communication of written ethics policies on euthanasia in Catholic hospitals and nursing homes in Belgium (Flanders), Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Vol 63, Issue 1. pp 188 to 195, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=06716113-81ca-4db0-a772-51ae3b6dd9ca%40sessionmgr15&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009306329

Kenny, R.W. (2007). An effect of communication on medical decision making: answerability, and the medically induced death of Paul Mills., Department of Public Relations, Mount Saint Vincent University. Vol 22, issue 1, pp. 69 -- 78, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=c57afac0-3522-4bc8-8c8e-a0a7732261ee%40sessionmgr15&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009640106

Lemiengre K. (2008). How do hospitals deal with euthanasia requests in Flanders (Belgium)? A content analysis of policy documents. Health Promotion/Education, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=37d04412-5a09-4727-92f0-398ccb54533a%40sessionmgr13&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009908744

Levett, C. (2011). Dying with dignity -- the case for end of life choices, Australian Nursing Journal, vol. 18, issue 8, pp. 48, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=078d26de-de1f-4206-80ba-d37b9a51f264%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2010954963
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Analyzing Ethical Issues in Healthcare

Words: 899 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17607319

Ethical Issues in Healthcare

Euthanasia

Euthanasia is also termed as 'mercy killing', involves concluding the existence of a terminally ill patient on deathbed due to a life-threatening illness. In essence, another individual decides to conclude the existence of the patient by multiple methods, such as using a lethal dosage of injection. The patients can choose euthanasia (voluntary), reject using euthanasia (involuntary), or could be unable to response, depending on their neural function. It is undertaken without the consent of the patient (non-voluntary). As euthanasia dictates authority over the life of an individual, it also allots this authority to an individual to act as an agent of death (American Nurses Association, 2013).

Euthanasia is a word taken from the Greek language, two words mainly, 'eu' and 'thanatos' which means 'good death'. As opposed to being condemned to an excruciating death, euthanasia provides a better opportunity to relieve a person of his…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. (2013). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and Aid in Dying. ANA Center for Ethics and Human Rights.

Bartels, L., & Otlowski, M. (2010). A right to die? Euthanasia and the law in Australia. J Law Med, 532-55.

Ebrahimi, N. (2012). The ethics of euthanasia. Australian Medical Student Journal.

(1969, December 31). Ethical Dilemma Faced by Professional Nurses on Abortion Issue.
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Nazi Policy and Cultural Minorities

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38988342


It was this same concept which began to impose harsh discriminatory
tactics against homosexuals. In fact, in a most ironic twist referent to
Nazi sadism, the treatment of homosexuals was often documented to exceed in
its abuse but also in its sexual manipulation, this group. Specially
recipient of abuse in the concentration camps, homosexuals were guilty of a
crime against Germany in their simple state of being, even as this
discrimination was not passed along to German SS guards and other Nazis
notoriously documented as having sodomized and sexually abused homosexual
inmates. In addition to their relegation to concentration and death camps,
homosexuals were subjected to the abuse of German's Nazified medical
community. To this end, "in 1935, a new law legalized the 'compulsory
sterilization (often in fact castration) of homosexuals.' A special
section of the Gestapo dealt with them.Along with epileptics,
schizophrenics and other 'degenerates', they were being eliminated."…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Laska, V. (1983). Women in the Resistance and in the Holocaust.
Greenwood Press.

Speigel Online. (2007). New exhibition documents forced prostitution in
concentration camps. Speigel.de.

Traditional Values Coalition (TVC). (2005). Hitler targeted the
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John Steinbeck's Morose Preoccupation

Words: 1526 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29703683

John Steinbeck's Morose Preoccupation

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a somewhat strange, surprising read. The author selects a very unlikely setting, a farm populated predominantly by hired hands, for a tale that is largely predicated on the conception of friendship and its myriad interpretations -- and applications. However, there is a definite undercurrent that some readers might find disturbing that is present in some of the most poignant notions of this tale. That undercurrent is one of death, the virtue that Western civilization seemingly extols above most other ones. An analysis of some of the more pivotal moments in this novel reveal that ultimately it is a morbid one in which death is seen as the ultimate expression of friendship: which is more than a little morose, to say the least.

Thematically, it is difficult to distinguish the motifs of friendship and death that are tightly intertwined in…… [Read More]

References

Steinbeck, J. (1993). Of Mice and Men. New York: Penguin Books.
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The Man Turned to Mouse

Words: 1526 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83541259

John Steinbeck's Morose Preoccupation

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a somewhat strange, surprising read. The author selects a very unlikely setting, a farm populated predominantly by hired hands, for a tale that is largely predicated on the conception of friendship and its myriad interpretations -- and applications. However, there is a definite undercurrent that some readers might find disturbing that is present in some of the most poignant notions of this tale. That undercurrent is one of death, the virtue that Western civilization seemingly extols above most other ones. An analysis of some of the more pivotal moments in this novel reveal that ultimately it is a morbid one in which death is seen as the ultimate expression of friendship: which is more than a little morose, to say the least.

Thematically, it is difficult to distinguish the motifs of friendship and death that are tightly intertwined in…… [Read More]

References

Steinbeck, J. (1993). Of Mice and Men. New York: Penguin Books.
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Euthanasia and Particularly the Question

Words: 2136 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87469290

56). This refers the fact that the AMA "…allows the withdrawal of what it calls extraordinary means of preserving life" (Sullivan, 1977, p. 56). Ordinary means refers to " & #8230;All medicines, treatments and operations which would offer a reasonable hope of benefit for the patient ands which can be obtained and used without excessive expense, pain and other inconveniences" (Sullivan, 1977, p. 57). Extraordinary means refers to "… all those medicines, treatments, and operations which cannot be obtained without excessive expense, pain, or other inconveniences, or which, if used, would not coffer a reasonable hope of benefit" (Sullivan, 1977, p. 57).

The implied intention is therefore to do as much as possible ensure the continuation of life without promoting suffering in the face of a hopeless situation.

If we take this point into account then the intention of the AMA document becomes clear and the views that achels suggest…… [Read More]

References

Decisions Near the End of Life: CEJA Report (1992) Jama, 267( 16), pp. 2229-2233)

Callahan D. ( 1992) When Self-Determination Runs AmoK. Hastings. Hastings Center

Report, March- April.

Kuhse H. And Singer P. Killing and Letting Die (Publishing details not provided)
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Euthanasia Pro Debates Regarding the

Words: 3344 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2927528

He argues that if society were to allow the terminally ill to commit suicide, then it would be a small step to allow other members of society -- like the handicapped -- to do so as well. This is not a completely trivial argument for two reasons: first, it is the point-of-view held by the majority of the Christian right -- a powerful political force in the Untied States; and second, if we accept his principle that life is intrinsically valuable, regardless of individual's rights over their own bodies, then we should be inclined to believe that active euthanasia is always wrong. Yet, Otremba is willing to concede that passive euthanasia may, sometimes, be permissible; this, however, only under the conditions of extreme suffering and impending death.

Fundamentally, it is a precarious moral position to contend that each and every human life demands society's active preservation. Otremba, and many others,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Callahan, Daniel. (1992). "When Self-Determination Runs Amok." Hastings Center Report, March/April.

Dworkin et al. (2003). "Assisted Suicide: the Philosophers' Brief." Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine: Sixth Edition. London: McGraw-Hill. Pages, 382-393.

Emanuel, Ezekiel J. (1994). "The History of Euthanasia Debates in the United States and Britain." History of Medicine, Vol. 121, Issue 10.

International Anti-Euthanasia Task Force. (2000). "Arguments for Euthanasia are Unconvincing." Euthanasia: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.
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Israeli Cinema

Words: 1495 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38534293

cinematic image of the Sabra beginning with the early Zionist films, through the national-heroic mode, and ending with the critical attitude of the late 1970s and 1980s

The 1955 film Hill 24 Doesn't Answer is one of the first products of Israeli cinema. It is meant to be a stirring portrait of the new Jewish state. It dramatizes the then-recent war of independence. The film shows the war bringing together Jews of disparate backgrounds, all united by the need to defend Israel. "In Israeli culture, the figure of the Sabra" during the time period when Hill was made was considered a kind of ideal national type, exemplifying the new Jewish attitude that was free from fear and persecution (Avisar 132). The national ideal of a state that could triumph against all odds and was strong, both spiritually and militarily, is conveyed by the film through the physical strength and determination…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Avisar, Ilan. "The national and the popular in Israeli cinema." 2005. 24.1 (2005): 125.

Charlie Ve'hetzi. Directed by Boaz Davidson. 1974

Hill 24 Doesn't Answer. Directed by T. Dickenson. 1955.

Smith, Anthony. "The formation of national identity." Identity. Oxford, 1995.
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In Support of Euthanasia

Words: 1827 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27114240

Euthanasia is an emotionally charged topic of debate, and it is easy to lose sight of the facts when people talk about wanting to kill themselves for whatever reason. Most of the people that seek physician-assisted suicide are suffering from terminal illnesses that cause them a great deal of pain that cannot be properly controlled with medications. For these individuals, the relief of death is preferred to their continuing suffering. The ethical debate over euthanasia, though, is colored by millennia of human thinking concerning the value of life and biblical proscriptions against suicide in any form. This paper examines the arguments in support of euthanasia as well as arguments against the practice to determine the facts and to provide rationale in support of legalizing euthanasia.

2.

Introduction:

Humans can be said to really own one thing outright: their lives. There are laws in most countries, though, that prevent people from…… [Read More]

References

Keown, J. (2002). Euthanasia, ethics, and public policy: An argument against legalization.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Marcoux, I. & Mishara, B.L. (2007, May/June). Confusion between euthanasia and other end-

of-life decisions. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 98(3), 235.
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Plato's Dialogues

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72860264

Euthanasia in the Style of Plato

Euthanasia -- a Moral Duty or a Moral Wrong?

In Ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt, the general view for society was that if an individual was no longer interested in continuing their existence, society had no right to ensure that they remain alive. The idea of euthanasia, or ending one's life to alleviate physical or mental suffering, has thus been a continual controversy for thousands of years. In modern times, in the 1930s there were organizations that aided in awareness and legalization of voluntary and assisted suicide (the Hemlock Society, the Voluntary Euthanasia Society). The issue became media frenzy in the late 1990s with the media attention surrounding assisted suicide -- and continues to remain a contentious and debated issue. While there is no universal answer for the topic -- much like there are different protocols for different diseases -- it is clear that…… [Read More]

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Inferred From the Content That

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57793693

In fact, he says, the challenge of Down's syndrome (not a fatal condition) is enough to prompt parents to terminate their children's lives, a controversial claim. There is no direct evidence provided to suggest that this is an action taken by many parents. The paragraphs that follow points out that there is a contradiction in this kind of thinking by parents, because if you argue that the child's life is worth preserving, the necessity of a simple operation should not stop you from preserving it. Many times, he negates this distinction, terming it "irrelevant" (Rachels 78-80).

Next he brings up a more philosophical argument of the ethics of whether "killing someone is morally worse than letting someone die" (Rachels 78-80). This next paragraph introduces the investigation of two specific cases, which appear to be hypothetical and/or fictional in nature. He further uses these scenarios to point out the moral quandary…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rachels, James. "Passive and Active Euthanasia." New England Journal of Medicine. 292.

(1975): 78-80.
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Tried to Expand on Areas

Words: 1629 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96301073

Freedom of choice includes the right to die and the right to choose assisted suicide.

3. An older argument in favor of assisted suicide that has been recently resurfaced with the implementation of a national health care bill could be termed the "economics argument" which states that the costs of keeping people alive who are going to die anyway is exceedingly high, higher than the benefit that the money and energy to maintain life bring. Life prolonged unnecessarily is costly to society and that money and those resources are being wasted and could be used more productively.

4. In essence, the final common argument us used in a number of legal and ethical situations and pretty much states that assisted suicide is already being performed in many hospitals, hospices, and nursing homes by physicians and nurses. It makes sense to formally legalize it so people will not have to sneak…… [Read More]

References

Block S.D. & Billings J.A. (1994). Patient requests to hasten death. Evaluation and management in terminal care. Archives of Internal Medicine, 154, 2039 -- 2047.

Gomez, C.F. (1991). Regulating death: Euthanasia and the case of the Netherlands. New York: Maxwell McMillan.

Kane, L. (2010). Doctors struggle with tougher-than-ever dilemmas: Other ethical issues. Medscape Today News,  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/731485_7 , accessed 5-21- 2011.

Meier, D.E., Emmons, C.A., Wallenstein, S., Quill, T., Morrison, R.S., & Cassel, C.K. (1998). A national survey of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 338, 1193 -- 1201.
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Sociological Differences Amongst Cultures of

Words: 2246 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74741143

Many cultural studies state that the Qur'an provides for the mercy killing of women who have been failed to have been adequately protected and have, as a result thereof, been raped. In fact, Muslim countries have a disproportionate amount of honor killings; yet, this should be understood as a cultural phenomenon as the scripture and the practice of the Qur'an do not dictate or specifically set forth the proposition that women should die as a result of being assaulted (Quraishi,, 2000).

Conclusion and Commentary:

Importance of Cultural elativism and Understanding the Sociological Differences Between Women of the United States and Women of Islam

After September 11th and the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City by Osaama Bin Laden and his progeny, a cultural relativist approach which bases itself in understanding the Islamic worldview became under attack and, as a society, we have created less understanding,…… [Read More]

References

Ahmed, a.S. (1994). Living Islam: from Samarkand to Stornoway. New York: Facts on File.

Ashraf, S. (1998). Shattering Illusions: Western conceptions of Muslim women. Stanford Boothe Prize for Excellence in Writing. Retrieved from Questia.com.

Brandt, R. (2009, September 11). 10 Differences Between Christianity and Islam | Relijournal. Retrieved May 7, 2010, from http://relijournal.com/religion/10-differences-between-christianity-and-islam/

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Sociology of the Church. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04060a.htm
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Enemies of Science Haldane P 225

Words: 1081 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96827417

HALDANE

"Some Enemies of Science" J.B.S. Haldane

The vivisection debate: J.B.S. Haldane's "Some enemies of science"

The vivisection debate is an old one. As early as 1928, the scientist J.B.S. Haldane rigorously defended the practice of vivisection against its earliest detractors, arguing that even moderate government regulation of scientific behavior to protect animal rights was hypocritical, given the way that animals were treated in other spheres of human life. In contrast, David Suzuki's 1989 essay "The pain of animals" highlights the central paradox of animal experimentation. On one hand, animal experiments are only useful because of our biological similarities to animals. On the other hand, we assert our right to exploit animals based upon our inherent differences from them. The intelligence of animals such as the chimpanzee is analogous to a two-year-old child and yet through logical sleight of hand we justify using chimps in the laboratory by calling them…… [Read More]

References

Haldane, J.B.S. (2004). Some enemies of science. The Nelson Introduction to Literature (2nd

Ed). Valleau, Al & Jack Finnbogason. (Eds.). Toronto: Thomson Nelson.

Suzuki, David. (2004). The pain of animals. The Nelson Introduction to Literature (2nd

Ed). Valleau, Al & Jack Finnbogason. (Eds.). Toronto: Thomson Nelson.
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Israeli Cinema

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34015599

alking on ater: Film Interpretation

The protagonist Eyal of the film alking on ater (2004) is a member of Israel's secret service organization, the Mossad. This is communicated in the first scene of the film, which depicts an apparently ordinary family in a boat. Suddenly, Eyal kills the father of the family with a lethal injection. The audience is immediately predisposed not to like Eyal, until they discover that he is actually fighting for the forces of 'good.' Or, at least the forces deemed to be 'good' in Israeli society, given the profound ambiguity with which Eyal regards his role.

In the next scene, the viewer learns that Eyal is considering leaving the secret service. This is revealed when he is seen getting his next assignment: to kill an aged Nazi war criminal who is still on the loose. Eyal knows that many of his ancestors died in the Holocaust.…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Walking on Water. Directed by Eytan Fox. 2004.
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Robert Latimer Case Ethics the Robert Latimer

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41190412

obert Latimer Case

Ethics

The obert Latimer case details the tragic situation of a father caring for a severely disabled child pushed to his breaking point. After witnessing the suffering of his daughter Tracy through numerous invasive and minimally effective procedures, Latimer eventually decided to take his child's life (Eckstein 1995). For doing so, he was convicted of homicide and although the case was tried in 1995, it still presents a number of troubling ethical challenges to medical ethicists today.

From a deontological or Kantian point-of-view, or the notion that one must behave as if setting a moral law for all time, Latimer's actions are immoral if it is assumed that intentional killing is always wrong, particularly of a disabled person who is not in full possession of his or her ability to determine if he or she is happy or not. A Kantian would ask the question -- if…… [Read More]

References

Eckstein, C. (1995). Tracy Lynn Latimer: Better off dead? CHN.

Social contract theory. (n.d.). Retrieved from:

 http://www.csus.edu/indiv/g/gaskilld/ethics/sct.htm 

Theoretical approaches. (n.d.) Penn State. Retrieved:
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Euthanasia

Words: 1494 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88332800

Euthanasia

In addition to racism, political and philosophical ideologies, and abortion, euthanasia is one of the foremost issues that divide people in the United States and the rest of the world. Some deem euthanasia as mercy killing. Others simply call it, killing. It is the taking of one's own life when a medical condition or illness becomes unbearable in terms of physical or emotional manifestations. Euthanasia is also called Physician's Assisted Suicide. The political mongering and the role of the religions cloud the whole issue of euthanasia. The Hippocratic Oath also becomes a football that is tossed around with abandon. How literally can, "(Physicians) First, Do No Harm" be taken. (Miles, 2004) In fact, does prolonging pain serve the Oath to its original intent? This essay will discuss these manifestly arguable issues.

Dr Kevorkian is known as Dr. Death. (Vonnegut, 1999) This benevolent, unassuming medic made it his lifelong ambition…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Betterhhumans.org. (2003). No Good Arguments against Euthanasia: Report. Betterhumans.org. Retrieved August 20, 2003, from the World Wide Web:  http://www.betterhumans.com/Errors/index.aspx?aspxerrorpath=/searchEngineLink.article.2003-02-21-3.aspx 

Biblegateway.com. (2003). Bible. Biblegateway.com. Retrieved August 20, 2003, from the World Wide Web:  http://www.biblegateway.com/cgi-bin/bible 

Griffiths, J., Bood, A., & Weyers, H. (1998). Euthanasia and law in the Netherlands. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

Hare, R. (1971). Personality and Science: an interdisciplinary discussion. Edinburgh: CIBA Foundation.
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Euthanasia Should Physicians Be Allowed to Assist

Words: 2286 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20322552

Euthanasia: "Should physicians be allowed to assist in patient suicide?" (No)

Euthanasia is, quite literally, a "life and death" issue. It is no surprise, therefore, that it evokes heated debate among doctors, lawyers, philosophers, academicians as well as the general public all over the world. Although, recent developments in modern medicine have given it a new dimension, euthanasia is by no means an exclusively modern-day concern. Even the ancient Greeks had pondered over the issue centuries ago, albeit without reaching a definite conclusion about its merits or otherwise. In more recent times, euthanasia has been the subject of discussion in various forums including the Supreme Court of the United States with similar inconclusive results. Despite considerable debate and weighty arguments by either side, several key euthanasia questions remain unresolved such as "Should physicians be allowed to assist in patient suicide?" which is the subject of this paper. In the following…… [Read More]

References

Angell, Marcia. "The Supreme Court and Physician-Assisted Suicide -- The Ultimate Right," Article reproduced in "Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Bioethical Issues," pp. 80-87

Evans, Hilary M.D. "Pitfalls of physician-assisted suicide" (September 1997) Physician News Digest. Retrieved on October 28, 2003 at  http://www.physiciansnews.com/commentary/997wp.html 

Foley, Kathleen M. "Competent care for the Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide." Article reproduced in Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Bioethical Issues," pp. 88-95

Hendin, Herbert "Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in the Netherlands: Lessons from the Dutch," 277 Journal of the American Medical Association, (June 4, 1997), p. 1720-1722
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Active and Passive Euthanasia in

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47727719

136).

A major factor underlying whether active or passive euthanasia is legal is whether the doctor intends to kill the patient or not (Lewis, 2009, p. 126). Rachels hits on the intent piece in one of his constructed examples, "Rather, the other factors - the murderer's motive of personal gain, for example, contrasted with the doctor's humanitarian motivation -account for different reactions to the different cases." The Colombian Constitutional Court actually ruled doctors are negligent if they ignore a terminally ill, competent patient's request for active euthanasia, a position which actually moves closer to Rachels' side of the debate (Michlowski, 2009, p. 192). The Canadian Medical Association's inquiry into Belgian euthanasia included asking about the doctors' "explicit intention of hastening the end of life or of enabling the patient to end his or her own life" (Chambaere et al., 2010, p. 896). This intent underlies the principle of "double effect,"…… [Read More]

Nor do professional associations provide a clear consensus to anyone outside their membership, because they often contradict each other. Many of them disagree with the AMA position Rachels frames his argument in terms of. The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) asserts "Most would choose to live if they had full confidence that the care system would serve them well," and so justifies continued prohibition of voluntary assisted suicide and monetary compensation for the practice thereof, using most of the criteria discussed in my research. On the other hand, the American Psychological Association's assertion that the cognition behind the terminally ill patient's decision to die differs from the logic employed by the clinically depressed in deciding to commit suicide is echoed by the American Public Health Association, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and the American College of Legal Medicine, who justify their recommendation against the negative associations between suicide and what they describe as "the principles of personal autonomy and free will" on grounds of material difference long recognized by the U.S. Supreme Court (Tucker & Steele, 2007, p. 325).

A fourth commonality that runs through the discussion but with much less prominence is a qualification that a patient's decision can be overridden if euthanasia has significant effects on people other than the patient, although those effects are even more rarely, if ever, defined. The Columbian courts qualified their acceptance of personal autonomy as sovereign under the constitution with the competency requirement but also where the exercise of that autonomy carried only " private nonpublic effects" (Michlowski, 2009, p. 192). The petitioner who brought the Columbian complaint claimed in part that non-voluntary euthanasia ("mercy-killing" to the 1973 AMA) left the doctor free to "end the lives of those who are regarded as an obstacle, a nuisance, or whose health raises high costs" (Michlowski, 2009, p. 186), but the court took it upon itself to generalize this even farther. This 'externality' effect rarely appears in such abstract terms, but runs throughout the research and opinion on the ethics of euthanasia in various guises.

The newer AMA policy statement claims euthanasia "would pose serious societal risks," without elaborating specifically what those may be (1996). Numerous patients have included consideration of their family's emotional pain caused by prolonged terminal illness as a factor leading them to choose euthanasia (Chambaere et al., 2010, p. 897); but fewer overtly discuss the callous topic of monetary expense as a factor in that decision. Tucker and Steele mention that voluntary euthanasia consumers may consider the cost to their estate, but only in passing (2007, p. 322). Campbell (2005, p. 45) claims family concern is justified under some Buddhist and Hindu perspectives if the choice to take life is made out of compassion for
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Philosophy the Murder-Cannabalism of Bernd

Words: 1953 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6521115



Question 5:

Since the events of September 11th, terrorism has been a crucial concern for Americans specifically, and the global society in general.

As Wilkins (2005) notes, although it is generally agreed to be justifiable to commit violence in the act of self-defense against aggressors, many of the victims of terrorism are innocent of any crime, and that the question of "collective guilt" must come into play when determining the justification for terrorism. There is a "distinction between moral guilt and metaphysical guilt (which) can be explained partially in terms of the difference between the failure to do one's duty and the failure to perform a supererogatory act. We have a duty to mutla aid to other human beings" (p. 340).

Therefore, it is justifiable to inflict violence upon innocent individuals when this guilt is apparent, such as the case of the plight of the Jews and the aggression of…… [Read More]

References

An-Na'im, A.A. "Islam, Islamic Law." Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach. Ed. May, L., Collins-Chobanian, S., & Wong, K. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005. pp. 101-108.

Bolte, A. "Do Wedding Dresses Come in Lavender? The Prospects and Implications of Same-Sex Marriage?" Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach. Ed. May, L., Collins-Chobanian, S., & Wong, K. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005. pp. 399-410.

Goering, S. "Gene Therapies and the Pursuit of a Better Human." Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach. Ed. May, L., Collins-Chobanian, S., & Wong, K. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005. pp. 659-668.

Leth, F. "Confessed Cannibal Given 8.5-Year Prison Sentence." Title of Source. Day Month Year: pages.
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Newfoundlandese if You Please by Diane Mooney

Words: 2617 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42322096

Newfoundlandese, if You Please" by Diane Mooney brings into attention the existence of diversity in Newfoundland, in the form of linguistic differences and variation. This unique variation of linguistic diversity in Newfoundland is reflected on the fact that it carries with it its history of Irish, English, British, and French influence in its speech. Inevitably, of course, Mooney points out how these foreign European influences through language have helped create distinct cultures and societies within the province. To prove this point, she goes on to enumerate and describe the different languages extant, which include languages originating from East Coast Newfoundland, which is primarily Irish-influenced. Central Newfoundland, meanwhile, have traces of Irish character though it evolved its own language, which sometimes display Irishness or a deviation from its original Irish character. The third comparison, which is that of West Coast Newfoundland, reflects the influence of the French, though Mooney also mentions…… [Read More]

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Agora Film Agora 2009 Is Set in

Words: 1914 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98544632

Agora Film

Agora (2009) is set in Alexandria, Egypt in the 4th and 5th Centuries AD and describes the life and death of the Neoplatonist and Stoic philosopher Hypatia and a freed slave named Davus, who is in love with her. Many of the characters and events depicted in the film are true, such as the Christian Archbishop Cyril, who really did expel the Jews from Alexandria and forced the pagans to convert to Christianity. He was also extremely hostile to pagan philosophers like Hypatia, and very likely ordered his supporters to put her to death in 415 AD. She was dragged from her chariot and dismembered, although in the movie Davus smothers her before the mob tears her body apart, in order to spare her suffering. Orestes, the oman prefect, was also a genuine historical character, who was opposed to Cyril politically and sympathetic to the Jewish and pagan…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Agora (2009). Director: Alejandro Amenabar. Producers: Mod Producciones; Himenoptero

Damascius (1993). The Life of Hypatia

http://www.cosmopolis.com/alexandria/hypatia-bio-suda.html

Moore, B.N. And K. Bruder (2010). Philosophy: The Power of Ideas, 8th Edition. McGraw-Hill.
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Price Stability

Words: 2682 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16009741

Inflation and Deflation: The Issue of Price Stability

Maintaining relatively stable prices is one of the major concerns in all capitalist economies. History shows us that left to its own devices; the capitalist economies undergo frequent "business cycles" that typically consist of a period of surging economic growth, interrupted by economic crises -- often accompanied by the collapse of the monetary system. Alternate bouts of inflation or deflation can also occur if the money supply in an economy is not controlled. Most advanced countries in the world take measures to keep the price stable. In the United States, the Federal Reserve Bank (known as Fed for short) was created in 1913 to avoid such undesirable movements in the economy. This paper examines the causes and consequences of inflation and deflation and the role of the Federal Reserve Bank in the prevention of inflation and deflation and maintaining price stability. It…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Buiter, Willem H. "Deflation: Prevention and Cure?." European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. 12-05-2003. February 10, 2004.

 http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicLecturesAndEvents/pdf/20030519t1658z001.pdf 

Christiano, Lawrence J. And Terry J. Fitzgerald. "Inflation and Monetary Policy in the Twentieth Century." Economic Perspectives. 27. 1. (2003): 22+.

Makinen, Gail. "Inflation: Causes, Costs, and Current Status." Report for Congress
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Playing God and Invoking a Perspective

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67281025

Verhey, Allen. "Playing God and Invoking a Perspective." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 20 (1995): 347-364.

Any physician of a moral and ethical frame of mind would be reflexively offended if a patient, or the loved one of a patient, accused that physician of 'playing God.' But what does this phrase mean? According to Allen Verhey's essay on medicine, modern bioethics, and "Playing God and Invoking a Perspective," the phrase "humans should not play God" has been used quite often by individuals of a particular, naturalistic ideological frame of mind to argue against using of supposedly unnatural forms of medicine, technology, and the use of related forms of biotechnology to sustain human life, or to ameliorate the sufferings of human life. The idea that physicians, scientists and medical practitioners should not play God has even been used to argue against such processes as cloning and genetically modified food because these…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lammers, Stephen E., and Allen Verhey, Eds. On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics (1998) [essays by C.S. Lewis, Allen Verhey, Joseph Fletcher, all on reserve in Skillman] Allan Verhey's "Playing God and Invoking a Perspective," first published Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 20 (1995): 347-364.
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Race and World War II

Words: 1854 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2715907

All because of a racially fueled hatred that exaggerated the nature of the merciless war. This image of the cruelty and heartless Japanese is what eventually allowed the American people and government to justify the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The racist attitudes clearly clouded the United State's commitment to defending Democracy, both abroad and within its own borders. One of the worst examples of this merciless prejudice was the removal of the Japanese from cities along the West Coast in Executive Order. The internment of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans clearly threatened the mage of democracy here at home, in the U.S. borders. The research suggests that "after the American entry into the war against Japan, the U.S. military imposed curfews and other restrictions on persons of Japanese descent living on the West Coast, including both naturalized native American citizens, and eventually 'excluded' mot Japanese-Americans from certain Western…… [Read More]

References

Daniels, Roger. "Executive Order No. 9066." Modern American Poetry. University of Illinois. Web.  http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/haiku/9066.htm 

Dower, John. War without Mercy: Pacific War. Random House Digital. 2012.

Lie, John. Multiethnic Japan. Harvard University Press. 2004.

Primus, Richard A. The American Language of Rights. Cambridge University Press. 1999.
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Infanticide as a Charge and a Defense

Words: 4613 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77353952

Infanticide in Australia

Infanticide is the act or practice of killing newborns or infants. It has been committed or performed in every continent and in every level of culture from the poorest hunters and gatherers to the richest and most advanced classes of people and from the time of our ancestors to modern age (Milner 1998). The act or practice has been so rampant that there is enough evidence on record to show that it has been more the rule than an exception and this evidence reflects that parents themselves kill their infants under distressing and stressful situations. The practice or act was so frequent in England in the 19th century that both the medical and the private communities had to think of ways to control the crime (Milner) described by medical practitioners as savage in a contradiction to human progress.

But infanticide is not a modern creation. It was…… [Read More]

References

Burleigh, M. (1994). Return to the planet of the apes? - peter singer in Germany. History Today.  http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/m_mi1373/is_n10444/ai_15912728 

Cooray, M. (2004). Human rights in australia. Youth Matrix. http://www.youthmatrix.com/art_philos_humanrights.htm

Hammoud, AAM. (2004). Status of women in islam. Australian Muslim Community. http://al-emaan.org/wrights1.htm

Knight, K. (2004). Australia. The Catholic Encyclopedia, volume II, online edition.  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02113b.htm
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Moral Legal Political and Practical

Words: 9721 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27501741

The line of legitimacy, separating socially approvable use of force from violence, cannot be effectively drawn without an agreement on what constitutes the optimum amount of force necessary to maintain social order and to protect human rights against encroachment. A society subscribing to infinite morality which condemns all use of force as immoral is doomed no less than a society accepting the absolute pragmatism of tyrants. "

As Oleg Zinam proposes, these two extreme social attitudes to morality are equally unprofitable to the societies that adopt them. The attitude of absolute pragmatism can easily lead to the acceptance of political assassinations, as long as such acts may help the final political purpose. An example of absolute pragmatism can be the regime initiated by Hitler, who ordered the extermination of all Jews in an attempt to "purify" the human race by excluding anyone who did not fill in the Arian ideal.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ben-Yehuda, Nachman. 1997. Political Assassination Events as a Cross- Cultural form of Alternative Justice.

International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol.38: 25-30.

Feliks, Gross. 1974. The Revolutionary Party. Essays in the Sociology of Politics. Westport: Greenwood

Press.
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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85213791

Those with issues to overcome are always more heroic. Hector also becomes a hero when, after at first running from Achilles, he eventually stands up to him and dies a heroic death.

The Iliad is primarily a war epic. In your opinion, is the Iliad condemnation of the it could easily be argued that the Illiad glorifies war, as much of the poem is spent portraying the warriors as brave and courageous, even as they go on killing rampages. Warriors are describes as "masters of the battle cry" and "warlike" in glowing epithets. When Achilles originally refused to fight, he is roundly condemned for it by all of the other Greek characters. Even the weapons of war, such as Achilles impenetrable shield, are glorified. But homer is more complicated than simple -- war also brings death, which he describes in great detail. Hector's death is perhaps the most graphic of…… [Read More]

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Portrayed in Sequential Arts Us

Words: 4281 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54235491

Consequences of these choices only compound his deep-seated insecurities. (Zushi)

Both Ben and Miko are Japanese-Americans, and their shared ethnic background impacts on their lives in significantly different ways. Miko is proactive and politicised -- she is the assistant organiser of a film festival showcasing Asian-American talent. Ben, meanwhile, is a depressive manager of a local cinema, seemingly content in his life of slow-burning frustration and -- not surprisingly -- covert masturbation.

Sexual stereotyping is at the heart of the story. The title itself is a reference to Ben's feeling of inadequacy in the trousers department (underneath the dust jacket, the book cover bears a life-size image of a ruler). At one point, Ben recalls a "stupid joke": "hat's the difference between Asian men and Caucasian men?" The punchline -- "the cauc" -- is both funny and deeply uncomfortable. "I actually heard a girl tell that joke in college! I…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Columbia World of Quotations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. 16 Jan. 2008 www.bartleby.com/66/.

The Comic-Book Heroes with a Touch of Genius." The Daily Mail (London, England) 22 Dec. 2006: 64. Questia. 15 Jan. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5018563927 .

A www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107528075

Dunford, Richard. "Chapter 4 Developing a Research Proposal." Surviving Your Thesis. Ed. Suzan Burton and Peter Steane. New York: Routledge, 2004. 46-58. Questia. 15 Jan. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107528130 .
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Terrorism There Are a Number

Words: 9571 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28900701

Fundamentally, the insurgents are fighting an enemy with superior weaponry, technology, and resources, so therefore, must seek avenues to mitigate these disadvantages. In other words, insurgent forces out vastly outdone in the traditional aspects of warfare, so they are forced to resort to unconventional modes of attack.

Early in his book, the Army and Vietnam, Krepinevich provides the broad game plan an insurgent force must follow to achieve final victory:

As developed by Mao in China and adapted by Giap in Vietnam, contemporary insurgency is a third world phenomenon comprising three phases: first, insurgent agitation and proselytization among the masses -- the phase of contention; second, overt violence, guerrilla operations, and the establishment of bases -- the equilibrium phase; and third, open warfare between insurgent and government forces designed to topple the existing regime -- the counteroffensive phase."

Primarily, this form of warfare consists of the formation of a political…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anonymous. 2004. Imperial Hubris. Washington, D.C.: Brassley's, Inc. Page, xxi.

Barringer, Mark. 1999. "The Anti-War Movement in the United States." The Oxford Companion to American Military History. New York: Oxford University Press Available: www.english.uiuc.edu/maps/vietnam/antiwar.html.

Bush, George W. 2002. "The National Security Strategy of the United States of America." Speeches delivered September 17 and June 1.

Butler, Smedley D. War is a Racket. New York: Feral House, 2003.
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Aid to Dependent Corporations the Government of

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18014298

Aid to Dependent Corporations

The government of United States is incurring heavy revenue loss on account of the corporate sector subsidies and other special rebates. The friendly policies of the government aimed at promoting a positive business climate are sadly being exploited. In their interests to evade tax, businesses today are taking undue advantage of the favorable federal policies. In this regard I feel that our governments tax policies and corporate procedures need to be reexamined in order to eliminate the loopholes in them and at the same time support the common welfare schemes. Let us analyze the scenario in a little detail so that we can better appreciate the situation.

One by one our leading business corporations are reeling under accounting scams. I need not mention how well such a giant corporation like 'Enron' managed to disguise its financial information from the government and the stockholders. In the prevailing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chuck Collins, "Dollars & Sense," 'Aid to dependent corporations: exposing federal handouts to the wealthy', May-June 1995, pg 15
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Nursing and Ethics the Emotional Debate Over

Words: 2128 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10621242

Nursing and Ethics

The emotional debate over abortion had been mischaracterized in the media, and hence disrupted any positive attempt to make progress in resolving the ethical and medical problems which have been created by the practice. A majority of Americans recognize and desire that abortion should be available when the life of the mother is at risk, or in the cases of rape or incest. However, liberal proponets like to expand this definition under the ubiquitous definition of the 'mothers health' which has been used to justify abortion on demand, for any reason. This latter expanded definition is significantly opposed by a majority of the ameircan population. In the midst of this struggle, comes the person needing medical care, who has neither been properly informed as to the dangers of the paractive, nor adequately counseled as to the options which exist regarding the future of her unborn child. The…… [Read More]

Resources

O'rourke, Kevin. PROXY CONSENT: DECIDING FOR OTHERS October 1980 accessed 23 April 2004. Available from:  http://www.op.org/domcentral/study/kor/80100202.htm .

Bernard Lo, (July 2, 1987) "Behind Closed Doors: Promises and Pitfalls of Ethics Committees." NEJM 317;46.

Toward a More Natural Science, (1985) New York: Free Press,; p.211.

Curzer, Howard J. (6/22/1993) Fry's concept of care in nursing ethics. (response to Sara T. Fry, Hypatia, vol. 4, no.2, p.88, 1989) Hypatia.
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Death Penalty as a Deterrent for Murder

Words: 6058 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25585782

Abstract

This paper examines the death penalty as a deterrent and argues that states have not only the right but the duty to apply the death penalty to criminal cases because it is incumbent upon states to back the law with force. The death penalty acts as a forceful and compelling consequence for those who should choose to violate the law and commit murder. For that reason it can be said to be a deterrent. This paper also examines the opposing arguments and shows that those would say it is not an effective deterrent cannot offer any quantitative proof for this argument because no measurements exist that could possibly render such a claim factual or provable. The paper concludes by showing that the death penalty should only be administered in states where there is harmony between social justice and criminal justice.

Introduction

While it may seem ironic that the death…… [Read More]

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Oppose Capital Punishment

Words: 2154 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79163927

Capital Punishment: A Capital Offense in Today's Easily Misguided orld

The debate surrounding the usage of capital punishment in the modern era has raged for generations. hile there have always been arguments for the positive aspects of capital punishment, today's world is less optimistic about the death penalty -- and with good reason. The death penalty affects more than just the convicted, it affects all of society. In order to show why capital punishment should be avoided, it is helpful to draw lessons from history, literature, and psychology.

The historical case for capital punishment has long been made. Capital punishment has existed in every major society in one form or another throughout the centuries. As Michael Kronenwetter states, in every society "all punishment is based on the same simple proposition: There must be a penalty for wrongdoing" (1). Kronenwetter is correct in asserting as much: all major societies have had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arriens, Jan, ed. Welcome to Hell: Letters and Writings from Death Row. UK: UPNE,

2005. Print.

Bacon, Francis. "Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature." Essays of Francis Bacon (The

Harvard Classics), 1909. Web.
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Epistle of Jude Is One

Words: 3417 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36628335

In fact, sexual moral obligations were one of the major concerns addressed by Jude, who cautioned that immoral behavior by teachers was dangerous. He believed that it had the ability to corrupt everyday Christians, and to keep them from attaining salvation. Therefore, he wrote Jude as a way of warning Christians against these false prophets, and against a life of immoral behavior.

Perhaps more significantly, Jude contains a very strong pro-evangelical message, because it encourages Christians to live their religions, making religion a part of daily life. For Jews who lived under religious laws, Judaism was necessarily part of daily life. Every single meal was dictated by religious facets. Moreover, religious law dictated choice of spouse, the ability to marry or divorce, the naming of children, and other facets of daily life. hen Jesus freed Jews of their obligations under Jewish laws, it had the impact of making religion less…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Knight, Kevin. "Epistle of St. Jude." The Catholic Encyclopedia. (2009). New Advent. 28

Mar. 2009 .

Kummel, Werner Georg. Introduction to the New Testament. Trans. Howard Clark Kee.

Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1975.
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Role of Women in Judaism

Words: 3648 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65759748

Nor could a man repudiate the oath made by any of his female relatives." (Azeem, 1995)

VI. The ROLE of the MOTHER

Part two of the work entitled: "Women in Islam vs. Women in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition: The Myth and the Reality" states that in relation to 'mothers' from the viewpoint of the Old Testament, there are several commandments concerning the necessity for kind and considerate treatment of parents and a condemnation for those who dishonor their parents. In Islam, the mother holds a very special place and as described by the Prophet Muhammad as follows: "A man asked the Prophet: 'Whom should I honor most?' The Prophet replied: 'Your mother'. 'And who comes next?' asked the man. The Prophet replied: 'Your mother'. 'And who comes next?' asked the man. The Prophet replied: 'Your mother!'. 'And who comes next?' asked the man. The Prophet replied: 'Your father'" (ukhari and Muslim;…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hughson, G., Johnston, S.A., Bisman, D. (nd) Understanding the Three Abrahamic Faiths: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The Dunedin Jewish, Christian and Muslim Community Liaison Group.

Q&a on Islam and Arab-Americans (2001) USA Today. 30 Sept 2001 Online available at  http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/islam.htm 

Azeem, Dr. Sherif Abdel (1995) Women in Islam vs. Women in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition: The Myth & the Reality. Part I. Online available at  http://www.themodernreligion.com/women/w_comparison_full.htm 

Kingston, SM (1995) Women in Islam vs. Women in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition: The Myth & the Reality. Part II. Online available at: 10 Feb 1995 Online available at  http://www.themodernreligion.com/women/w_comparison_full2.htm
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Jesus' Teachings Prayer & Christian Life He

Words: 35411 Length: 109 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95862373

Jesus' Teachings, Prayer, & Christian Life

"He (Jesus) Took the Bread. Giving Thanks Broke it. And gave it to his Disciples, saying, 'This is my Body, which is given to you.'" At Elevation time, during Catholic Mass, the priest establishes a mandate for Christian Living. Historically, at the Last Supper, Christ used bread and wine as a supreme metaphor for the rest of our lives. Jesus was in turmoil. He was aware of what was about to befall him -- namely, suffering and death. This was the last major lesson he would teach before his arrest following Judas' betrayal. Eschatologically speaking, the above set the stage for the Christian ministry of the apostles, evangelists and priests. Indeed, every Christian is called to give of him or herself for the Glory of God and the Glory of Mankind. The message at the Last Supper was powerful. People have put themselves through…… [Read More]

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Oresteia Story as Trilogy of Events Written

Words: 1229 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23456101

Oresteia story, as trilogy of events written by Aeschylus, revolves around revenge.

In the first sequel, Agamemnon, Clytemnestra murders both her husband Agamemnon and his concubine, Cassandra, a priestess of the Greek god, Apollo. Cassandra had received prophecy of her imminent murder as well as future events that will befall the House of Atreus, but she had been restrained by Apollo from publicizing her vision since she had rejected his advances. Aegisthus's cousin and Clytemnestra's adulterer now assumes the throne with the chorus reminding the audience that avenge will soon ensue. In sequel two, The Libation Bearers, Agamemnon's children Electra and Orestes kill Clytemnestra to avenge the death of their father. He flees the palace with the Furies, deities that avenge patricide and matricide, chasing him and the Chorus informing us that the cycle of revenge will continue.

In the final sequal, The Eumenides, the ghost of Clytemnestra pushes the…… [Read More]

References

Collard, Christopher. Introduction to and translation of Oresteia. Oxford University Press, 2002.

King James Version Old Testament. Nashville, TN: World Bible Society, 1983.
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Religion and Abortion When a Hospital's Moral

Words: 1392 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78594476

Religion and Abortion

hen a hospital's moral and ethical decision making process comes into conflict with the source that provides funds for the hospital -- or goes against the grain of the values of the funding source -- the results can expected to be controversial at best and harmful to humans at the worst. Indeed, to be specific, when the Roman Catholic Church provides funds for a hospital, the Church expects that its tenets, canons, codes of belief and moral values will be reflected in the policies of that hospital. Is this fair to the doctors and nurses in the hospital who have their own oaths to guide their professional actions? And is it fair to the patients who come to the hospital with urgent healthcare needs that to them, supersede any spiritual values or creeds that hospital funding sources might expect to be followed? The answer to both of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Civil Liberties Union. "Tamesha Means v. United States Conference of Catholic

Bishops." Retrieved December 13, 2013, from  http://www.aclu.org . 2013.

Eckholm, Erik. "Bishops Sued Over Anti-Abortion Policies at Catholic Hospitals." The New

York Times. Retrieved December 13, 2013, from  http://www.nytimes.com .
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South African Poetry Analysis

Words: 2887 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67941661

Antjie Krog's Country Of Grief And Grace

Antjie Krog (2000) uses metaphor and extended metaphor throughout the poem "Country of Grief and Grace" -- itself an exploration of existential crisis in South Africa, ravaged by apartheid and violence. Krog descends into this maelstrom to provide the reader a glimpse, a hope, a ray of light that beams through the sludge of hopelessness, despair and grief. Through her use of metaphor and extended metaphor, Krog constructs an alternate way of looking at the world in which she lives -- a framework that invites the reader to question the borders and boundaries of time and space which keep separate the past and the future, the young and the old, the black and the white. By merging or synthesizing the elements of her country into a cohesive whole, Krog shows that all is one -- and in this revelation is the seed of…… [Read More]

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Disaster Recovery in Joplin Missouri

Words: 1551 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65240198

Joplin Tornado Disaster

The Category EF-5 tornado that struck Joplin, Missouri, in 2011 devastated the region, killing 161 people and injuring over a thousand more (Smith, Sutter, 2013). In all, local, state and federal agencies and officials worked together to ensure a better response to the disaster, when compared to the debacle that was the response to Katrina; what was most notable about the disaster recovery in Joplin was that officials allowed the private sector "to lead the response and recovery (Smith, Sutter, 2013, p. 166). In other words, authorities from government agencies took a hands-off approach to the disaster response in Joplin and allowed non-profits and private organizations do the majority of the work. Volunteers took part in providing shelters and faith-based organizations rallied around the community to assist in the various needs using social media to help put out notices, organize and identify strategic aims; local organizations, churches…… [Read More]

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Victor Hugo's Ninety Three

Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50488366

Marquis de Lantenac and Cimourdain: One or Two Versions of Violence?

Our thesis needs to be a little bit more varied than the actual question we will be addressing, because, in my opinion, simply categorizing one or both of the characters as versions of violence needs to be doubled by an analysis of the causes of violence, be they the characters' own interior framework or the external environment in which they live. As such, we will briefly follow upon the creation of each character in Victor Hugo's play.

The first impression we have of Cimourdain is at the beginning of the Second Part, First ook. Noted by the author as having a "pure conscience, but somber" (Second Part, First ook), we are introduced to someone who had been a priest in the Old Regime, but had rejoined the people entirely, serving the cause of the Revolution. As he "adored from…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Hugo, Victor. Quatre-vingt-treize. III Edition IntraText CT. Eulogos 2002. On the Internet at  http://www.intratext.com/X/FRA0024.HTM
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Cold Blood an Analysis of

Words: 1315 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94405379

He has to object to it to keep from confronting it in himself. The Oklahoman is not so cynical, however, for he immediately grasps hold of Parr's contradiction and cries out, "Yeah, and how about hanging the bastard? That's pretty goddam cold-blooded too" (Capote 306). The Oklahoman objects to the murder, which he views as a product of that coldness which he hears in Parr's words. The Oklahoman may represent a kind of outsider, not yet tainted by the American thirst for blood and sentimentality. To save the killer, he is willing to grant mercy, if only it will help put an end to the coldness.

At this point another man, the Reverend Post, interjects his thoughts. He seems to understand something of mercy, but at the same time he despairs of ever seeing it: "ell,' he said, passing around a snapshot reproduction of Perry Smith's portrait of Jesus, 'any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Capote, Truman. In Cold Blood. NY: Vintage, 1994.