Neuropsychology Essays (Examples)

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Facts About Schizophrenia

Words: 1907 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78290732

Schizophrenia in Neuropsychology

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a rare but complex type of mental disorder which often has life-altering ramifications. Even though less than 1% of people all over the world are at risk of developing schizophrenia those who do may end up suffering from hallucinations, delusions and end up having difficulties in occupational and social situations they are in. with the knowledge of the symptoms and risk factors of the disorder which includes the onset of manifestation of the symptoms one can be able to spot the warning signs of this disorder.

Schizophrenia distorts the way a person thinks, expresses their emotions, acts, perceives reality and relates to other people. Those who have chronic schizophrenia have a problem when it comes to their functioning in the society, at their places of work, in schools and even within their relationships. Schizophrenia can leave an individual that is suffering from it frightened…… [Read More]

References

Sajatovic M, Mullen JA, & Sweitzer DE. (2006). Schizophreniform Disorder;Diagnostic Features. Retrieved April 30,2014 from  http://www.health.am/psy/schizophreniform-disorder/ 

Ford, J, Krystal, J & Mathalon, D.(2009).Oxford Journals Schizophrenia Bulletin Vol.33,Issue 4.Pp 848-852. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from  http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/4/848.full 

Krans, B.(2010). Understanding Schizophrenia. Retrieved April 30,2014 from http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/schizophrenia

Medwire News.(2011). MRI highlights neural basis for schizophrenia deficits in social cognition. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from http://www.medwirenews.com/47/95129/Psychiatry/MRI_highlights_neural_basis_for_schizophrenia_deficits_in_social_cognition.html
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Effectiveness of CRISS

Words: 921 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58505982

CRISS- Annotated Bibliography

Annotated… [Read More]

Philip Levin, Ph.D, Director, The Help Group/UCLA Neuropsychology Program

http://www.thehelpgroup.org/pdf/adhd-dys/Levin_ReadingDisabilities.pdf

Overview of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) that went into effect July 1, 2005. Included changes to the assessment of learning disability which improves early remediation for those children at risk in reading as early as Kindergarten. Language Development, Behavioral Development and Pre-Academic Skills Development are the key components discussed.
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Issues in the Field of Neuroscience

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46472615

.....neuroscience is one of the most common scientific field of study that basically involves study of the nervous system. Most of the jobs in neuroscience involves dealing with some problems that do not necessarily involve working in the lab. An example of such jobs that interests me is neuropsychology, which is an area in neuroscience that focuses on the science of brain-behavior relationships. I find clinical neuropsychology as an interesting field of neuroscience since it combines concepts of psychology in the study of the nervous system, particularly brain-behavior relationships. Given the combination of neuroscience and psychology, clinical neuropsychology will enable me to feel empathy for my patients/clients when addressing their issues (Ogden, 2012). In light of my passion for this field, brain functions and neuroscience that I find interesting are neurobiological theories that explain dysfunctions in language, behavior networks, vision, memory, and emotion. These brain functions and neuroscience are interesting…… [Read More]

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Medical Disorders Face Recognition

Words: 1892 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81215349

Prosopagnosia

According to A.J. Larner's book, "A Dictionary of Neurological signs," prosopagnosia is a neurological condition, "a form of visual agnosia characterized by an inability to recognize previously known human faces or equivalent stimuli (hence a retrograde defect) and to learn new ones (anterograde defect)" (Larner, 2010). Larner further distinguishes between two forms of prosopagnosia: apperceptive and associative agnosia. This "category-specific recognition disorder," as G, Neil Martin calls it in his "Human Neuropsychology" is often, but not always, associated with other forms of visual agnosia such as alexia or achromatopsia.

Prosopagnosia can be congenital or developmental, or a consequence of brain damage, following a stroke, a brain injury, or caused by a degenerative disease (Kinai, 2013) . There are two types of prosopagnosia: apperceptive prosopagnosia and associative prosopagnosia. This form of visual impairment has various degrees of manifestation, from mild to severe and can or cannot be associated with other…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowles, Devin C. McKone, Elinor. Dawel, Amy. Duchaine, Bradley. Palermo, Romina. Schmalzl, Laura. Rivolta. Davide. Wilson, Ellie. Yovel. Galit.

Cognitive Neuropsychology, "Diagnosing prosopagnosia: Effects of ageing, sex, and participant-stimulus ethnic match on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Cambridge Face Perception Test." Available at:  http://www.faceblind.org/social_perception/papers/Bowles%2009%20CN.pdf 

Sperry, Roger Wolcott. Ed.Trevarthern, Colwyn B. 1990. Brain Circuits and Functions of the Mind: Essays in Honor of Roger Wolcott Sperry, Author. Cambridge University Press

Newman, Nancy J. Miller, Neil R. Biousse, Valerie. 2008. Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-ophthalmology: The Essentials. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Psychologist and Taking Cases

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52032632

psychology case presented.

Q1) What are Some Prominent Ethical Issues to Consider in the Evaluation of this Individual?

Ethics require that only the skills that one is competent in should be provided by psychologists, without crossing over to areas in which they lack expertise. Thus, lacking the skills of a neuropsychologist, the psychologist cannot perform his role. Competence in this context requires that the psychologist be up-to-date on new information that comes up in his/her field and in the techniques that are applied in the practice. Binder and Thomson (1995) reiterate this, stating that through the acquisition of new information and skills, the expert is able to hone his/her skills and knowledge, remaining relevant to the practice.

When procedures are performed by those who are not skilled in them, misdiagnosis may result. As Nagy (2011) puts it, passing over duties, such as administering tests and designating scores to the untrained,…… [Read More]

References

(n.d.). American Psychological Association (APA). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. Retrieved November 8, 2015, from http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/index.aspx

Binder, L., & Thompson, L. (1995). The ethics code and neuropsychological assessment practices. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology,10(1), 27-46. Retrieved, from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0887617793E0004U

Nagy. (2011). Ethics in Psychological Assessment. Essential ethics for psychologists: A primer for understanding and mastering core issues. Washington, DC.
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Prospective Memory and Aging Prospective

Words: 6199 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16388304

Windy McNernev and obert West (2007), both with the University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, India, explain that returning the DVD while running errands depicts an illustration of effective prospective memory. Substantial documentation signifies that in various instances, the accessibility of one's effective memory ability or attentional resources can be vital for the comprehension of deferred intentions.

ichard L. Marsh, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, Jason L. Hicks, Louisiana State University, Baton ouge, Louisiana and Gabriel I. Cook (2006), University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, examine whether ask interference, having an intention, creates a cost to other ongoing activities. In the journal article, "Task interference from prospective memories covaries with contextual associations of fulfilling them," Marsh, Hicks and Cook report contemporary research indicates that particular intentions held over the shorter term interfere with other tasks. As the collective effect of such costs would prove prohibitively costly in everyday life, Marsh, Hicks…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Breneiser, J.E., & McDaniel, M.A. (2006). Discrepancy Processes in Prospective Memory Retrieval. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 13(5), 837+. Retrieved December 9, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5035215935

Brewer, G.A., Knight, J.B., Marsh, R.L. & Unsworth, N. (2010). Individual differences in event

based prospective memory: Evidence for multiple processes supporting cue detection.

Memory & Cognition. Psychonomic Society, Inc. Retrieved December 10, 2010 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-2018212151.html
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Hardwired Is Human Behavior Response

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1905842

" (ND, p.1) According to Ryan the human brain is an "evolved system" and one that is organized "to an underlying evolutionary logic." (ND, p.1) It is the claim of evolutionary psychologists that "the human brain has not changed" and furthermore, that it has not been "under any evolutionary pressure to do so -- in any significant way over the past 100,000 years, and therefore, modern man maintains the 'mind' of his Stone Age ancestors." (ND, p.1)

Lynch (2004) author of 'The Neuro Revolution: How rain Science is Changing Our World" states that "emotions and feelings are mediated by distinct neural systems. Whereas emotions are automatic responses to stimuli, feelings are 'private, subjective experiences' that emerge from the cognitive processing of an emotion eliciting state."(p.1) Therefore, it can be understood that indeed human brains are to some extent hardwired however, the individual's cognitive processing capacity has a great deal to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Clark, William R. & Grunstein, Michael. Are We Hardwired?: The Role of Genes in Human Behavior. Oxford University Press, New York, NY, 2000.

Benderly, B.L. Are We Hardwired? The Role of Genes in Human Behavior. Genome News Network. 2000 Nov 3. Online available at:  http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org/articles/11_00/Hardwired_review.php 

Tancredi, L. Hardwired Behavior. What Neuroscience Reveals about Morality. 2005. Cambridge University Press. Online available at: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805218/60017/sample/9780521860017ws.pdf

Ryan, Terry. Review: How Hardwired is Human Behavior? The 21st Century Learning Initiative. Online available at: http://www.21learn.org/archive/articles/ryan_nicholson.php
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Adult Male Stutterer an Analysis

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49022880

"In other words, these results may reflect the effects of disorganization in interhemispheric processing of information, as well as intrahemispheric competition" (Fitzgerald & Greiner, 1992, p. 396). In fact, because every individual is unique, formulating across-the-board generalizations about adult stutterers can be misleading, but there have been some valuable insights gained from the treatment of adult stutterers and these issues are discussed further below.

Treatment of Adult Stuttering.

esearch has shown that approximately 80% of stutterers manage to completely recover from the condition without any clinical intervention, a process that typically takes place during early adulthood or adolescence; such recovery from childhood stuttering is thought to be attributable to increased self-esteem, acceptance of the problem and the resulting relaxation (Gibbons & Sims, 2006). In fact, according to Boberg (1993), "Adult stutterers consist of less than half of all those who ever stutter and should, therefore, be considered a functionally distinct…… [Read More]

References

Attanasio, J.S., & Packman, A. (2004). Theoretical issues in stuttering. New York: Taylor & Francis.

Boberg, E. (1993). Neuropsychology of stuttering. Edmonton, Alberta: University of Alberta Press.

Fitzgerald, H.E., & Greiner, J.R. (1992). Bimanual handwriting reveals delayed interhemispheric integration in childhood stuttering. Developmental Neuropsychology, 8(4), 396.

Gibbons, J.L., & Sims, A.C. (2006). Stuttering. In Encyclopedia Britannica premium service. Retrieved November 26, 2006, from Encyclopedia Britannica Online:  http://www.britannica.com/ .
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Cognitive Changes Developmental Cognitive Occur Starting Age

Words: 2472 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19195806

Cognitive Changes

Developmental cognitive occur starting age 50 moving end life.

Developmental and cognitive changes

The essay aims at exploring the developmental and cognitive changes that occur starting at the age of fifty years moving through end of life. The developmental changes are easily noticeable or observable, hence not much of literature or scholarly articles have been written about it. On the other hand a lot of materials, studies and researches have been conducted on cognitive changes because cognition is a key requirement needed in both the young and old to meet the job demands, challenges of education and day-to-day life of an individual (MacDonald, Hultsch, & Dixon, 2003, p 32-52).

Before the essays embark on the changes that occur at the age of fifty and beyond its important to consider the early changes right from when a baby is born up to middle life for us to understand the…… [Read More]

References

Anstey, K., Hofer, S., & Luszcz, A., (2003). Cross-sectional and longitudinal patterns of differentiation in late-life cognitive and sensory function: The effects of age, ability, attrition, and occasion of measurement. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 132, 470 -- 487.

Ball, K., et al. (2002). Effects of cognitive training, interventions with older adults. Journal of the American Medical Association, 288, 2271 -- 2281.

Dixon, R., De Frias, M., & Maitland, S.B. (2001). Memory in midlife. In M.E. Lachman (Ed.), Handbook of midlife development New York: Wiley (pp. 248 -- 278)...

Finkel, D., Pedersen, N.L., & Harris, J.R. (2000). Genetic mediation of the association among motor and perceptual speed and adult cognitive abilities. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 7, 141 -- 155.
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Communications in a Business Setting Compromise the

Words: 3226 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49574590

communications in a business setting compromise the work of that business, a solution must be found for the benefit of the company and of all who work there. Problems can arise when employees whose tasks require written communications skills are deficient in those skills. Problems can arise also when employees are expected to both understand and explain matters verbally and nonverbally.

The cure for the first problem could be as simple as sending the employee in question for writing instruction.

The cure for the second is, however, much less straightforward. The problem might arise because of the use, or misuse, of strategic ambiguity either by the employee exhibiting the problem, or by managers and colleagues who deal with her. Or it might be caused by an unrecognized personal problem of the employee, for example, a drinking/drugs problem or a cognitive disability of short or long duration. This paper looks at…… [Read More]

References

Ames, Genevieve M., Joel W. Grube, and Roland S. Moore. 'The relationship of drinking and hangovers to workplace problems: an empirical study." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 58, no. 1 (1997): 37+.

Cooper, Lynn O. "Listening competency in the workplace: a model for training." Business Communication Quarterly 60, no. 4 (1997): 75+.

Crombie, Winifred, and Helen Samujh. "Negative messages as strategic communication: a case study of a New Zealand company's annual executive letter." The Journal of Business Communication 36, no. 3 (1999): 229.

Krider, Diane S., and Peter G. Ross. "The experiences of women in a public relations firm: a phenomenological explication." The Journal of Business Communication 34, no. 4 (1997): 437+.
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Positron Emission Tomography

Words: 2676 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69626907

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

PET represents a new step forward in the way scientists and doctors look at the brain and how it functions. An X-ray or a CT scan shows only structural details within the brain. The PET scanner gives us a picture of the brain at work. - What is PET?

The epigraph above is reflective of the enthusiasm being generated among clinicians concerning the advent of positron emission tomography and its potential for imaging the human brain. The introduction of sophisticated neuroimaging techniques such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has shifted the emphasis of neuropsychology from lesion localization to diagnosing the etiology of diseases (Maruish & Moses, 1997).

Behavioral neurology also benefited from innovations in neuroimaging techniques. The advent of improvements in the imaging of brain anatomy through computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MI), as well as functional imaging with single photon emission…… [Read More]

References

Charney, D.S., Hoffer, P.B. & Kosten, T.R. et al. (1995). Opiate Dependence and Withdrawal: Preliminary Assessment Using Single Photo Emission Computerized Tomography. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 21(1), 47.

Imaging Parkinson's. (December 14, 2002). Science News, 162(24), 382.

Jensen, K.B. (1991). Humanistic scholarship as qualitative science: Contributions to mass communication research. In K.B. Jensen & N.W. Jankowski (eds.). A handbook of qualitative methodologies for mass communication research (17-43). New York: Routledge.

Lincoln, Y.S., & Guba, E.G. (1990). Judging the quality of case study reports. Qualitative Studies in Education, 3(1), 53-59.
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Effect of Brain Injuries on Cognitive Functioning

Words: 1373 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53488360

Applied Behavioral Analysis on How Brain Injuries Impact One's Cognitive Ability Levels

How Brain Injuries Impact One's Cognitive Ability Levels

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) has considerable impacts on the normal functioning or operation of the brain. In most cases, brain injuries damage nerve cells to an extent that these cells no longer transmit information to each other in the ordinary manner. Brain injuries are usually divided into three major categories i.e. mild, moderate and severe depending on the extent of neurological damage that takes place. Given their impact on neurological functioning, brain injuries have impact on one's cognitive ability levels. Some of these impacts include cognitive disabilities, depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and effect on life roles at different development stages and ages. Therefore, the extent with which brain injuries affect a person's cognitive ability levels is an important topic of study. Is there a direct link between brain injuries…… [Read More]

References

Juengst, S.B., Adams, L. M., Bogner, J.A., Arenth, P.M., O'Neil-Pirozzi, T.M., Dreer, L.E., & Wagner, A.K. (2015, November). Trajectories of Life Satisfaction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms. Rehabilitation Psychology, 60(4), 353-364. Doi: 10.1037/rep0000056

Massy. J. S., Meares, S., Batchelor, J., & Bryant, R.A. (2015, July). An Exploratory Study of the Association of Acute Posttraumatic Stress, Depression and Pain to Cognitive Functioning in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuropsychology, 29(4), 530-542. Doi: 10.1037/meu000192

McDonald, S., Gowland, A., Randall, R., Fisher, A., Osborne-Crowley, K., & Honan, C. (2014, September). Cognitive Factors Underpinning Poor Expressive Communication Skills after Traumatic Brain Injury: Theory of Mind or Execution Function? Neuropsychology, 28(5), 801-811. Doi: 10.1037/neu0000089

Meyers. N. M., Chapman, J.C., Gunthert, K.C., & Weissbrod, C.S. (2016, January). The Effect of Masculinity on Community Reintegration Following TBI in Military Veterans. Military Psychology, 28(1), 14-24. Doi:10.1037/mil0000097
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elderly'showing early'signs of dementia

Words: 1243 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94615915

Brain training with non-action video games and its effects on brain health among the elderly showing early signs of dementia

Specific Aims

Past researches have revealed the potential contribution of video game-playing to the improvement of certain cognitive functions among healthy aged individuals (Lampit, Hallock & Valenzuela, 2014; Jak, Seelye & Jurick, 2013). Drawn by the above results reached by scholars in the field, game-making firms have developed and released several kinds of games aimed at brain training (for instance, Brain Age, Brain Challenge and Big Brain Academy). Ever since their earliest releases into the gaming market, games of this sort have enjoyed immense popularity worldwide (Toril, Reales & Ballesteros, 2014; Nouchi et al., 2013). Among the anticipated advantages of such games is improved cognitive functions (for instance, recall, processing pace, executive function, and concentration), indicated often using the term 'transfer effect'.

This research project specifically aims at examining the…… [Read More]

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aged population'showing early'symptoms of dementia

Words: 1640 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88630435

Mental therapy using non-intense video games and how it affects brain health among the aged population showing early symptoms of dementia.

The deterioration of cognitive abilities and brain tissue due to age could have several adverse effects on mental systems and could even lead to dementia. Thus, researchers are trying to discover methods which could help keep brain function, independence, health and cognition among aged people in its best shape. Usually, with age, the white and gray matter of the brain shrivels with this action seen more in its prefrontal cortex than other regions. Other affected brain parts are the cerebellum, the prefrontal cortex on the side as well as the central temporal lobe structure which includes the hippocampus. Despite this, the occipital cortices and the entorhinal do not experience any form of shrinkage (Ballesteros et al., 2015). Common symptoms of this shrinkage include reduced memory strength, lower mental processing…… [Read More]

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Cognitive and Affective Psychology According

Words: 2587 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25257859

The psychotherapist's role is then to enhance the already existing tools to help those who need it develop their intelligence and problem-solving abilities in order to promote the healing process.

Question 2

1:

Both the cognitive and affective domains are important considerations within psychotherapy. Indeed, the two often function within a causal relationship to each other. In the Communicative Theory of emotion, as expounded by Brett et al. (2003), for example, emotions are directly related to conscious or unconscious cognitive evaluations. These cognitive evaluations then cause an emotional response, which might include happiness, sadness, or anger. The subconscious internalization of the original cognitive evaluation and accompanying emotion could then result in behavior-related problems such as prejudice. Sometimes such behavior problems are so deeply seated that they need to be treated by means of psychotherapy.

Cognitive therapy, as explained by Michael Herkov (2010), acknowledges the relationship between thought (the cognitive aspect)…… [Read More]

References

AudioEnglish.net. (2010). Cognitive Neuroscience. http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/cognitive_neuroscience.htm

Brett, a., Smith, M., Price, E., & Huitt, W. (2003). Overview of the affective domain. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved [date], from http:/www.edpsycinteractive.org/brilstar/chapters/affectdev.doc

Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. http://web.uvic.ca/psyc/tuokko/Ethical%20Principles%20of%20Psychologists.pdf

Eysenck, Michael W. & Keane, Mark T. (2005). Cognitive Psychology: a student's handbook. East Sussex: Psychology Press Ltd.
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Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at: http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
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History of Psychology Is a

Words: 992 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24675908

The concepts of short- and long-term memory, as well as input and output all fit well within the language of computer science and psychologists quickly determined that they could use computers to study human thought and behavior (Wallace et al., 2007). Not only did the computer provide a way of looking at human thought, the use of the computer within the science of psychology also helped to add legitimacy to psychology as a scientific field of inquiry (Neisser, 2009).

But why do the roots of cognitive psychology represent one of the most influential periods in the whole history of psychology with respect to modern day psychology? Today, nearly all areas of psychology include some understanding and investigation of cognition. Some of the biggest developments in psychology have included studies in the field of neuropsychology and we now know more about the inner functioning of the human brain than ever before…… [Read More]

References

Goodwin, C.J. (1999). A History of Modern Psychology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Macleod, C.M. (1992). The Stroop task: The "gold standard" of attention measures. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 121, 12-14.

Neisser, U. (2009). cognitive psychology. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Retrieved July 17, 2009, from Grolier Online http://gme.grolier.com.ccny- proxy1.libr.ccny.cuny.edu/cgi-bin/article?assetid=0066790-0

Wallace, B ., Ross, a., Davies, J.B., and Anderson T., (eds) (2007) the Mind, the Body and the World: Psychology after Cognitivism. London: Imprint Academic.
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Huntington's Disease and Laboratory Investigation

Words: 1975 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25460220

HD is extremely debilitating, and if the patient lives long enough, the symptoms can become extremely severe. It is not uncommon for patients who suffer from the disease to suffer extreme depression and sometimes suicide, so developing medications that could delay or slow the disease are extremely important, and laboratory testing should definitely continue in this area.

Laboratory work in the past decades has helped develop a much deeper understanding of the disease. A group of writers note, "Within the last 4 decades, great strides have been made that have furthered our understanding of the neural bases of HD" (Montoya, Price, Menear and Lepage 2006). This is also extremely important in the understanding and eventual eradication of the disease.

All of these results are extremely positive for families who know they suffer from the disease, and for hopefully preventing the disease in the future. Without laboratory testing and research, many…… [Read More]

References

Editors. 2010. Huntington's Disease. [Online] Available at:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/huntington/huntington.htm  [Accessed 18 May 2010].

Goolkasian, Virginia. 2001. Delving into Huntington's Disease. USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), September, 34.

Klager, Joseph, Ayana Duckett, Susan Sandler, and Carol Moskowitz. 2008. Huntington's Disease: a Caring Approach to the End of Life. Care Management Journals 9, no. 2: 75+.

Lechich, Anthony J., Deborah Lovecky, Carol Moskowitz, Sybil Montas, Ayana Duckett, Anne Pae, Kathy Knoblauch, David Saks, Dorothy Toliver, Eileen Fogarty, and James Pollard. 2008. Survey of Community-based Programs Serving U.S. Families with Huntington's Disease: Perceived Barriers and Facilitators in the Residential Placement Process. Care Management Journals 9, no. 2: 65+.
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Control Our Dreams Without Waking

Words: 1521 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65594525



hen people who experienced lucid dreams were studied in order to determine their brain activity during lucid dreaming, it was found that their cerebral hemispheres behaved similarly to how they did while they were awake. The left cerebral hemisphere was more active when people sang in their dreams while activity in the right cerebral hemisphere would intensify when the subjects counted (Laberge, p. 300).

One of the most common concepts present in the reports of those who claim to have experienced a lucid dream is the one relating to sexual activity. Laberge was also engaged in studying sexual activity during lucid dreams and found that the body reacted to sexual stimuli imagined by the person sleeping similarly to how it would react if the subject was awake. In spite of the fact that most subjects who underwent lucid dreams reported having orgasms, they did not show any signs of actually…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Bulkeley, Kelly. (1997). An Introduction to the Psychology of Dreaming Westport, CT: Praeger.

2. Shulman, David and Stroumsa, Guy G. eds. (1999). Dream Cultures: Explorations in the Comparative History of Dreaming. New York: Oxford U.S..

3. Southern, S. Darkness into Light: The Dream Journal of an Addicted Trauma Survivor. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling 24.2 (2004).

4. (1992). The Neuropsychology of Sleep and Dreaming, ed. John S. Antrobus and Mario Bertini. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Memory Models and Assessment the

Words: 851 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45547878

More generalized assessments include the Wechsler Memory Scale, created by the founder of the IQ test of that name, which offers a generalized assessment of different memory types (sensory, short, and long-term) and is most appropriate for adults.

In general, two basic types of neuropsychological memory tests exist. "In almost all objective tests, quantitative results are compared with some normative standard, including data from groups of non-brain injured persons and groups of persons with various kinds of brain injury. If the norms are based on age and educational achievement, valid comparison can be made between an individual's performance and that of persons in known diagnostic categories as well as persons who do not have a diagnosis of brain injury. Qualitative assessment of neuropsychological tests provides a look at the processes an individual may use in producing the quantitative scores. Analysis of the pattern of performance among a large number of…… [Read More]

References

Human memory: Atkinson-Shiffrin Model. (2010). IPFW. Retrieved February 9, 2010 at  http://users.ipfw.edu/abbott/120/AtkinsonShifrin.html 

SCATBI. (2010). Academic Therapy. Retrieved February 9. 2010 at  http://www.academictherapy.com 

Swiercinsky, Dennis. (2001). Neuropsychological testing. Brain Source. Retrieved February 9,

2010 at http://www.brainsource.com/nptests.htm
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Drew White 1750 Danny Gamache

Words: 2065 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70281003

There are rumors, the Forbes report goes on, "that the owners are looking to sell the team, which has sizeable debt and has had a hard time attracting season ticket holders" (Forbes).

Another struggling franchise mentioned often in analysis as a financial loser is the Atlanta Thrashers. Forbes reports the team lost 10% of its value in the 2008-09 season and is now worth $143 million. Local revenue per fan is $10 and the Thrashers' debt is 46% of its total value; player salaries were $39 million and gate receipts were $23 last season. "A nasty and continuous legal battle amongst the eight owners…has resulted in the team turning to Goldman Sachs for investors"

(Forbes). Although the Thrashers are not in the so-called Sun Belt, Atlanta is not known for ice, snow, and cold, like the more traditional hockey venues experience.

The financial struggles of some teams today is not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Badenhausen, Kurt, Ozanian, Michael K., and Settimi, Christina. (2009). "NHL Team Valuations: The Business of Hockey." Forbes Magazine. Retrieved Dec. 1, 2009, from  http://www.forbes.com .

Baird, Michael (2005). "NHL Finances: Skating On Thin Ice." Sports Facility Reports. Retrieved Nov. 30, 2009, from http://www.law.marquette.edu/s3/site/images/sports/facilityarticlelled.pdf.

Forbes (2009). "NHL Team Valuations: #18 Tampa Bay Lightning." Retrieved Dec. 2, 2009 from
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Sandwich Generation Caregiving and Alzheimer's

Words: 3114 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88702489



A driver came to the house and picked Robert up five days a week at 7:30 and brought him home at around 4:00 P.M. The couple received a grant from United ay to fund the service they received from the Respite Center, which cost around $200 per week. The Respite Center had well-thought-out activities designed for seniors with dementia and Alzheimer's, and those activities "helped slow down his Alzheimer's" (Claunch). Those activities include arts and crafts, chair aerobics, games, socializing, breakfast, lunch and a snack, Claunch explains. On many days a special visitor or group comes to entertain the seniors; among those groups are the Gulf Coast omen's Club, the Garden Club, PAS Ministry, gospel groups, line dancers, pianists and sing-along singers.

hen an Alzheimer's patient is stimulated (by being entertained, walking, or engaging in a game of some kind that challenges the mind but does in minimally) the nerve…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Assist Guide Information Services. (2009). Caregiving. Retrieved November 10, 2009,

From http://www.agis.com.

Claunch, Shannon. (2009). Council on Aging: Respite Center Cares for Community.

News Herald. Retrieved November 11, 2009, from  http://www.newsherald.com
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Blind Prosopagnosia Davis 2007

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49292689



Davis (2007) stated that baseline testing must be performed at a young age so that children with prosopagnosia do not grow feelings of isolation and depression for now, there is no treatment available with prosopagnosia same with dyslexia or autism, however once parents become familiar with their child who have this condition, parents will be able to adjust with the situation, although it can be difficult emotionally, specifically if their child cannot identify them as his/her parents; on the contrary, it is not as good as when parents reprimand their child for something that can not be managed and for the children who have prosopagnosia, it can be reassuring to be acquainted with why their parent can be at times appear unaware to them.

Duchaine and Garrido (2008) said that the results are constant with face-specific processes, but it is also consistent with other accounts of face recognition, cases illustrating…… [Read More]

References

ABC News (2007, July). Faceblindness: Forgetting Familiar Faces, People With the Disorder Have Normal Vision Otherwise. Retrieved on March 21, 2009 at http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=3361813&page=1&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312.

Burman, C. (2002). Prosopagnosia (Face Blindness). Retrieved on March 21, 2009 at http://www.prosopagnosia.com/main/pa/.

Choisser, B. (2002). Face Blind! Retrieved on March 21, 2009 at  http://www.choisser.com/faceblind/ .

Davis, J. (2007, March). Face Blind. Wired Magazine. Retrieved on March 21, 2009 at http://io.uwinnipeg.ca/~ptrapnel/stories/FaceBlind.html.
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Blind by Joshua Davis Is

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 848529

In that regard, I liked the simple description (p 71) that "[i]n exchange for shining a light on the disorder, prosopagnosia had made him an adult."

That also raises another question I would pose to my classmates: At what point does a person become an adult? What do you think Duchaine would have done with his life if he had never discovered Bill Choisser's website?

The essay suggests other important possible implications of the neurological phenomenon responsible for the way human beings process and remember visually identifying information about one another. Specifically, it implies that just as the basis of human facial recognition is a hard-wired physiological process, so may be the manner in which human beings respond to skin color. If that is true, it may change the way we understand racism and ethnic biases based on physical appearance. The fact that components of racism me be hard-wired in…… [Read More]

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Aging With a Billion Baby

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81510185

It often means interventions opening the doors of our lives to strangers, healthcare providers, whose job it is to assist the elderly in achieving and maintaining the highest quality of life possible until the individual crosses from this existence into the mystery of the next one.

Some of the physical conditions that are associated with aging are Alzheimers disease, which while associated with aging can manifest onset well before what many people might view as 'elderly." It is perhaps because it afflicts people at earlier ages that Alzheimers is one of the physical problems associated with aging that receives a lot of attention, and, therefore, more funding than some others areas of health problems associated with aging. Alzheimers is often diagnosed as dementia, an irreversible or reversible condition depending on the specific cause. It is, however, difficult to diagnose and treat because it has numerous potential causes, all of which…… [Read More]

References

Aging Gracefully: Lifespan vs. Healthspan. (2006, February). USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), 134, 1+. Retrieved February 1, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5015929981 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104804428

Ebersole, P., & Hess, P. (1998). Toward Healthy Aging: Human Needs and Nursing Response. St. Louis, MO: Mosby. Retrieved February 1, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104804433 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=111738587

Mezey, M., Fulmer, T., & Abraham, I. (Eds.). (2006). Geriatric Nursing: Protocols for Best Practice. New York: Springer. Retrieved February 1, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=111738587 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27715236

Nussbaum, J.F. & Coupland, J. (Eds.). (1995). Handbook of Communication and Aging Research. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved February 1, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27715236 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104631054
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Psychologic Effect on People in

Words: 3632 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8814890

This revision, they note, was "partly in recognition of research demonstrating that traumatic events were in fact not uncommon. DSM-IV defines the traumatic stressor as when a person 'experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event or events that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others" (Vasterling and Brewin 6).

The diagnostic criteria established by the Fourth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) for PTSD state that an individual must have:

itnessed, experienced, or otherwise been confronted with an event that involved actual or possible death, grave injury, or threat to physical integrity; and,

The individual's response to such a traumatic event must include severe helplessness, fear or horror (cited in Clancy 2004).

According to Clancy (2004), a number of professions such as law enforcement, firefighters and combat veterans tend to experience a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baum, Andrew, Tracey a. Revenson and Jerome E. Singer. Handbook of Health Psychology. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2001.

Breton, J.J., Valla, J.P. And J. Lambert. (1993). "Industrial disaster and mental health of children and their parents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 32: 438-445 in Richman and Fraser at 134.

Browne, Ivor. (1990). "Psychological Trauma, or Unexperienced Experience." Re-vision 12(4): 25.

Clancy, Kris. (2004, March). "Reducing Trauma's Toll: Managers in Fields Such as Security Must Be Aware of Trauma-Related Stress and Find Ways to Assist Employees in Dealing with it." Security Management 48(3): 30-31.
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Psychology - Biological Psychology Biological

Words: 794 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75541191



Important Theorists and their Contributions:

roca contributed greatly to the initial recognition of the importance of specific brain regions to particular aspects of human psychology and behavior in the middle of the 19th century. Shortly thereafter, William James published one of the first formal academic explanation of biopsychology just before the turn of the 20th century, titled the Principles of Psychology (Dennet, 1991; Pinker, 2002). James acknowledged that personal experience and external environmental factors played a role in human psychological development, but only in so far as they represent sets and types of automatic, involuntary, and inherent biological responses to circumstances (Dennet, 1991).

Approximately 60 years later, Walter Hess pioneered a method of directly exploring the role of specific brain regions and structures through the use of electro- stimulation (Gerrig & Zimbardo, 2005). y implanting electrodes into anesthetized laboratory animals, Hess demonstrated that specific behaviors could be triggered by electrically…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dennet, D. (1991). Consciousness Explained. New York: Little Brown & Co.

Dennet, D. (1996). Kinds of Minds: Toward an Understanding of Consciousness. New York: Basic Books

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005). Psychology and Life. 17th Edition. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Pinker, S. (2002). The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature.
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Scientific Theory in Scientific Investigation

Words: 2513 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91974570

Once again, time is an indicator. When a significant amount of evidence for a theory is readily available, the theory tends to be older and concomitantly more accepted by the scientific community. If there are significant gaps in the evidence, the theory can benefit from further investigation.

The same is true of the complexity level of the theory is not very high. More components can then be added by further investigation.

A theory can also be evaluated according to its ability to serve as an indicator of future phenomena. This makes a theory applicable to further scientific investigation, and furthermore also allow for further development in the theory itself. If the theory is for example a consistently accurate predictor of future events or phenomena, it can be viewed as valid. If it however proves inaccurate in one or some of its predictions, further evidence and modifications will be necessary.

Furthermore,…… [Read More]

Sources

BBC. Science and Nature: What is psychology? Oct, 2008.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/articles/psychology/what_is_psychology.shtml 

Carter, J. Stein. The Scientific Method. Nov. 4, 2004. http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Courses/bio104/sci_meth.htm

Theory Evaluation. 2008.  http://arti.vub.ac.be/memos/AI-Memo-93-07/subsubsectionstar4_2_3.html 

Wilson, Jerry. Scientific Laws, Hypotheses, and Theories. 2007. http://www.wilstar.com/theories.htm
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Slips if IT's Not One

Words: 5007 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43071533

(apaport 1942: 149)

It is important here to have some framework with which to discuss parapraxes

Aitchison, as a psycholinguist blends both the disciplines of psychology and linguistics to give a more balanced view overall. She proposes first two broad definitions for type of parapraxis. (1998: 244) the first is when a wrong item or word is unintentionally chosen, these are generally referred to as slips of the tongue and an example would be, "Did you remember to buy some toothache?" eplacing the word toothpaste, which was intended, with toothache, which was unintended. She also refers to these more properly as slips of the brain. Secondly there is a classification of errors that are due to the faulty assemblages of the language within the statement. The word choice is usually correct but the grammatical assemblage of the statement is not. Here is an example she uses of this:, "Someone's been…… [Read More]

References

Aitchison, Jean. 1998. The Articulate Mammal: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics. London: Routledge.

Bear, Gordon. 1992. 'A Freudian Slip?.' Teaching of Psychology 19:174-175.

Coles, Robert (2000) Darwin, freud, and adam phillips. Raritan 19 (4), p1

De Chumaceiro, Cora L. D'az. 1997. 'Serendipity and Its Analogues in Runco's Problem Finding, Problem Solving, and Creativity.' Creativity Research Journal 10:87-89.
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Discovery of Psychology at the

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8563197

They developed several laws and principles to describe human experiences and perceptions. The cognitive movement was pioneered by the works of Chomsky and Piaget and focused on the role of cognition in relation with the outer environment (which provides input for information processing) and behavior.

The most important findings so far regard the components of visual perception, the most important stages of development (according to Piaget), how do most of our complex mental processes work (for instance memory, attention, decision-making etc.), how do processes like the orienting response, habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and imitation influence behavior, how does the speech develop, the components of an emotional reaction, the relationship between cognition and emotion, how does the infant attachment develop and what impact it has on adult life, how the concepts of self-concept, self-awareness develop, the concept of self-esteem, the different temperamental types and personality etc.

This multitude of problems…… [Read More]

References

Pillsbury W.B. (1917). The New Developments in Psychology in the Past Quarter Century

The Philosophical Review, Vol. 26, No. 1,Jan., pp. 56-69 Johnson, D. (1998)The Future of Psychology Minds in Brains in Bodies in environments, Science Communication, Vol. 20, No. 1, 28-48
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Audiology the Hypothesis of This

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3560016



In a separate study, researchers at Brandeis University concluded that aging adults with moderate hearing loss may spend cognitive energy on hearing accurately to the extent that their ability to remember spoken language suffers (Medical, 2005).

Although the studies above may have determined that age has some effect on loss of cognitive function, no definitive determination has been made as to whether hearing loss is the cause or simply a part of the reason for loss of cognitive function.

The research proposed will examine the effects of hearing loss on cognitive function regarding verbal recognition and performance of auditory processing. Whether hearing loss in individuals of any age affects their loss of cognitive function will be determined by testing 60 subjects who have experienced hearing loss due to aging or other reasons, compared to a control group of comparable subjects without hearing loss by administering the same test to them.…… [Read More]

References

Andersson, U. 2002, Deterioration of the phonological processing skills in adults with an acquired severe hearing loss. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, Vol 14, Jul 2002, 335-352.

Balota, D.A. (Ed.). 2004, Cognitive Psychology, New York: Psychology Press.

Gates, G.A. Rees, T, S, 1997, Hear ye? Hear ye! Successful auditory aging. West J. Med. Oct. 1997, 167(4): 247-252.

McArthur, G.M. And Bishop, D.V.M. 2004. Which people with specific language impairment have auditory processing deficits? Cognitive Neuropsychology. Vol www.informaworld.com1, Feb 2004.
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Learning

Words: 1738 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68579813



Overall Assessment

Overall each of the articles contribute significantly to the study of PTSD. The impact of memory and learning issues for those that have the disorder should not be downplayed as such issues can negatively impact the quality of life for those with the disorder.

Each of the articles provide answers to disqualify certain hypotheses and qualified others as worth further study Overall Assessment.

With each of the articles the medical and mental health community came one step closer to targeting and discovering exactly where the problem is in learning and memory issues for people with PTSD. Even when the answer is, "no" that is not where the problem is, it helps narrow down where in fact the problem does originate from.

eferences

ACHEL YEHUDA,1 JULIA a. GOLIE,1 LISA TISCHLE,1

KAINA STAVITSKY,1 and PHILIP D. HAVEY1

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 274 Taylor & Francis Taylor and Francis…… [Read More]

References

RACHEL YEHUDA,1 JULIA a. GOLIER,1 LISA TISCHLER,1

KARINA STAVITSKY,1 and PHILIP D. HARVEY1

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 274 Taylor & Francis Taylor and Francis 325 Chestnut StreetPhiladelphiaPA191 NCEN Taylor & Francis Ltd. 36370 10.1080/138033990520223 2005 126 R. Yehuda et al. Learning and Memory in Veterans with PTSD Learning and Memory in Aging Combat

Veterans with PTSD
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Startle Flinch Hick's Law Flexor Extensor

Words: 930 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25746502

, & Mitchell, D. (2001). omatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys with Psychopathic Tendencies?. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 29(6), 499.

Bourne, G.H. (Ed.). (1960). The tructure and Function of Muscle. New York: Academic Press.

Burgess-Limerick, R., Abernethy, B., Neal, R.J., & Kippers, V. (1995). elf-elected Manual Lifting Technique: Functional Consequences of the Interjoint Coordination. Human Factors, 37(2), 395.

Cooley, E.L., & Morris, R.D. (1990). Attention in Children: a Neuropsychologically-Based Model for Assessment. Developmental Neuropsychology, 6(3), 239-280.

Granata, K.P., lota, G.P., & Wilson, .E. (2004). Influence of Fatigue in Neuromuscular Control of pinal tability. Human Factors, 46(1), 81.

Grillon, C., inha, R., Ameli, R., & O'Malley, .. (2000). Effects of Alcohol on Baseline tartle and Prepulse Inhibition in Young Men at Risk for Alcoholism and/or Anxiety Disorders. Journal of tudies on Alcohol, 61(1), 46.

Gunnar, M.R. & Nelson, C.A. (Eds.). (1992). Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience.…… [Read More]

Sokolov, E.N., Spinks, J.A., N nen, R., & Lyytinen, H. (2002). The Orienting Response in Information Processing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Spear, N.E., Spear, L.P., & Woodruff, M.L. (Eds.). (1995). Neurobehavioral Plasticity: Learning, Development, and Response to Brain Insults. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Staples, S.L. (1996). Psychology in Action Human Response to Environmental Noise: Psychological Research and Public Policy. American Psychologist, 51(2), 143-150.
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Auditory Stimulation Its Effect on

Words: 3151 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49875794



Further evidence for the possible value of noise for children with ADHD is presented by Abikoff et al. (1996). These researchers evaluated the effect that extra-task auditory stimulation had on academic task performance of children with ADHD. This was executed by studying both children with ADHD and normal students during the performance of arithmetic tasks during three different auditory stimulus conditions: high stimulation (music), low stimulation (speech) and no stimulation (silence). The findings indicated that the normal subjects performed similarly under all three conditions, while the ADHD subjects performance was significantly better under the music condition that the silence or speech conditions. This information could prove to be valuable for teachers in the classroom environment. The presence of music in the classroom during tasks such as arithmetic might facilitate the performance of students with ADHD. Since normal students performed equally well under all auditory conditions, the presence of music would…… [Read More]

Reference

Abikoff, H., Courtney, M.E., Szeibel P.J., Koplewicz, H.S. (1996). The effects of auditory stimulation on the arithmetic performance of children with ADHD and nondisabled children. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 29(3), 238-46.

Baumgaertal, A. (1999). Alternative and controversial treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 46(5), 977-92.

Gray, L.C., Breier, J.I., Foorman, B.R., Fletcher, J.M. (2002). Continuum of impulsiveness caused by auditory masking. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 66(3), 265-72.

Jackson, N.A. (2003). A survey of music therapy methods and their role in the treatment of early elementary school children with ADHD. Journal of Music Therapy, 40(4), 302-23.
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Turner Syndrome Date Month and

Words: 2711 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46933163

Particularly, the risks of diverse neoplasms have been seen to be raised in Turner Syndrome is quite low quantum, however, except for gut cancer and gonaboblastoma in patients having occult Y chromosome sequences. (Cabanas; Garcia-Caballero; Barreiro; Castro-Feijoo; Gallego; Arevalo; Canete; Pombo, 2005)

Additionally, there appear to have no prior indication of the relationship between the Turner Syndrome and papillary thyroid carcinoma, irrespective of the fact that there has been one report of an anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in a TS patient in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Several epidemiological studies and studies relating to exhaustive long-term monitoring of GH-associated patients have been seen to have benefited therapeutically from GH treatment and found to be safe having no detectable effect on risk of cancer. But the current studies have shown a probable relationship between GH-IGF axis and the pathogenesis of neoplasms. The study on papillary thyroid carcinoma after GH therapy for Turner Syndrome…… [Read More]

References

Cabanas, P; Garcia-Caballero, T; Barreiro, J; Castro-Feijoo, L; Gallego, R; Arevalo, T;

Canete; R; Pombo, M. (2005) "Papillary thyroid carcinoma after recombinant GH therapy for Turner syndrome" European Journal of Endocrinology. Vol: 153; No: 4; pp: 499-502

Dowshen, Steven. (2005) "Turner Syndrome" Retrieved at http://www.kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/genetic/turner.html. Accessed 8 November, 2006

Gordon, John D; Lebovic, Dan I; Taylor, Robert N. (2005) "Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility: Handbook for Clinicians" Scrub Hill Press, Inc.
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Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

Words: 597 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43571515

Ethical Theory and Moral Practice developed as a cohesive field in the late twentieth century, with the establishment of the Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Journal, in 1998. The theory therefore represents a culmination of scholarly thought and analysis in the fields of philosophy, sociology, and psychology. As a cross-disciplinary theory, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice reveals the increasing hybridization of fields that relate to normative ethics.

Because Ethical Theory and Moral Practice is a relatively new field of scholastic inquiry, the field is currently "undergoing change," ("Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" 2008). Changes reflect shifting social, economic, and political realities. Without falling pray to the traps of ethical relativism, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice remains heterogeneous and diverse.

The roots of the theory are difficult to trace because of the "disciplinary cross-pollination" that has occurred ("Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" 2008).…… [Read More]

References

"Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" (2008). Conference 2008. Retrieved online: http://www.bezinningscentrum.nl/links/special_links5/special_links5_conference.shtml

"What Makes Us Moral?" (2011). VU University Amsterdam. Retrieved online: http://www.ph.vu.nl/nl/onderzoek/secties/praktische-filosofie/conference-what-makes-us-moral/index.asp
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Experimental Research and Report Writing Research Has

Words: 2045 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34451425

Experimental esearch and eport Writing

esearch has shown that organizational strategies aid in memorization tasks such as word recall. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of using organizational strategies such as hierarchical categorization in aiding in word recall. Our experiment, a partial replication of the study conducted by Bower et al. (1969), examined the impacts of hierarchical word lists on word recall. College students were presented with word lists that were arranged either randomly or in categories. The number of words correctly recalled was measured for each participant. While our results were not as definitive as Bower et al. (1969) study, they do yield implications for further research for additional age groups.

The Impact of Categorization on Word ecall

Introduction

esearch has shown that organizational strategies aid in memorization tasks such as word recall. Matlin (2002) presents four such organizational strategies: chunking, first-letter technique, narrative technique, and hierarchy technique. In…… [Read More]

References

Bower, G.H., Clark, M.C., Lesgold, A.M., Winzenz, D. (1969). Hierarchical retrieval schemes in recall of categorized word lists. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 323-343.

Cohen, B.H. (1963). Recall of categorized words lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66(3), 227-234. doi:10.1037/h0048846

Longenecker, J., Kohn, P., Liu, S., Zoltick, B., Weinberger, D.R., & Elvevag, B. (2010). Data-driven methodology illustrating mechanisms underlying word list recall: Applications to clinical research. Neuropsychology, 24(5), 625-636. doi:10.1037/a0019368

Marzano, R.J. (2009). Setting the record straight on "high-yield" strategies. Phi Delta Kappan, 91(1), 30-37. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
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Psychiatry Electroconvulsive Therapy Electroconvulsive Therapy

Words: 4067 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34718744

Evidence has been cited suggesting that ECT is particularly efficacious with psychotic depression. Experimental research and reviews of the literature tend to conclude that ECT is either equal or superior to antidepressant medication in the treatment of severe depression. In one study both depressed men and women were helped by ECT, but women tended to improve more with ECT than with imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant. Men tended to improve more with imipramine. Both men and women improved more with ECT than with phenalzine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). It has been suggested that MAOIs and serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSIs) may be less clinically effective than heterocyclic antidepressants for severe depression. Thus, ECT's favorable comparison with imipramine is a strong endorsement.

Adverse Effects

The side effect of ECT that has received the most attention is memory loss. ECT results in two kinds of memory loss. The first involves quick forgetting of…… [Read More]

References

Breggin, P.R. (n.d.). Electroshock: Scientific, ethical, and political issues. Retrieved from http://www.sntp.net/ect/breggin1.htm

Electroconvulsive therapy. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.minddisorders.com/Del-

Fi/Electroconvulsive-therapy.html

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). (2011). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/electroconvulsive-therapy/MY00129
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Prozac Non-Drug or Supplement Treatments

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73897579



Relevant Chapters

Textbook chapters most relevant to this particular component on the relevancy of cost utility and cost effectiveness as it relates to non-pharmacological or supplement treatment effectiveness in comparison to Prozac, will highlight in a balanced manner, the cost benefit of both interventions as evidenced by empirical study. Moreover, the side effects of flouxetine such as nausea, anxiety, insomnia, drowsiness, headaches, and loss of appetite should be taken into consideration when discussing the cost benefit to the client. In addition, any balanced discussion on the subject should include discourse with regard to the propensity for antidepressants to cause increased risk of suicidal ideations as compared to intervention via therapy such as rational emotive or cognitive behavioral therapy (Prigatano & Plinskin, 2003).

Summary

Flouxetine, or Prozac continues to be one of the most prescribed antidepressants for those clinically diagnosed with depression. Since its introduction some 20 years ago, Prozac has…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). APA practice guidelines for major depressive disorder (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Antonuccio, D., Danton, W., & DeNelsky, G. (1995). Psychotherapy vs. medication for Depression: Challenging the conventional wisdom with data. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 6, 574-585.

Barrett, B., Byford, S., & Knapp, M. (2005). Evidence of cost-effective treatments for depression: The McSad utility measure for depression health states. Journal of Affective disordersI, 84, 1-13.

Chambless, D., & Hollon, S. (1988). Defining empirically supported therapies. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 7-18.
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Sensation and Perception Specifically the Interaction Between Taste and Smell

Words: 1236 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24472451

Taste and Smell

Age elated Changes in Perception of Flavor and Aroma

It has been posited that the perception of flavor and aroma are derived from the senses of chemical irritation, taste and smell (awson, 2003).

Together, these senses constitute what has been termed chemosensation, although these sensory systems are purportedly considerably variant in their physiology and anatomy. Nevertheless, they do have the ability to regenerate, and their noted susceptibility to aging and age associated diseases has been noted (awson, 2003). It has been reported that nearly one third of all older individuals report dissatisfaction with their sense of smell and taste, and the actual occurrence of sensory loss amongst the elderly is maintained to be even higher (Pelchat, 2001). Furthermore, it has been asserted that age related sensory loss affects both personal safety and quality of life (awson, 2003). Moreover, the impact of the loss on the elderly's physical…… [Read More]

References

Chodosh, S., et al. (1998). Efficacy and safety of a ten day course of 400 or 600

milligrams of grepafloxacin once daily for treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis: comparison with a ten day course of 500 milligrams of Ciprofloxacin twice daily. Antimicrobial Agents in Chemotherapy, 42(1), 114-120.

Mathey, M., et al. (2001). Flavor enhancement of food improves dietary intake and nutritional status of elderly nursing home residents. Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 56(4), 200-205.

McConnell, R., et al. (1975). Defects of taste and smell in patients with hypothyroidism.
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Clinical Decisions in This Chapter

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71668409

The MMPI-2 has been used successfully to detect feigning in neurological and psychiatric control groups (Klein, 2007). As a result, the MMPI-2 is the most frequently used test in forensic psychological testing. There is, however, still substantial "debate which of the four subscales is most useful for identifying malingering" (Klein, 2007). However, one of the MMPI-2's lingering problems is that it is a test where people can incorporate coaching, so that it is somewhat vulnerable to coaching.

The issue of coaching is critical in the forensics environment. This is because the goal of forensic psychology is to use neuropsychological assessment methods to help in some type of legal proceedings. These proceedings can be civil or criminal proceedings. In both civil and criminal environments, the need for accurate diagnosis can be critical to outcomes for the person being tested and for people being impacted by their testing. Moreover, it can be…… [Read More]

References

Klein, H. (2007). Assessment of malingered neuropsychological deficits. New York: Oxford
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Drug Profile

Words: 1740 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26459243

Drug Profile

Drug addiction is a human issue that cultivates biological, psychological, and social consequences, among others. The manifestation of addiction itself is characterized by physical dependence, and is defined by the uncontrollable, compulsive urge to seek and use drugs despite harmful repercussions (Fernandez, odriguez & Villa, 2011). Philologically, drug use affects the reward center, where dopamine receptors are over-stimulated. Ultimately, the repetition of drug use is encouraged to achieve the same, heightened, pleasure response (U.S. DHHS, 2007). Psychological responses to drug use may reflect motivations caused by positive pleasure, anxiety, or protection. The bodily effects of drugs often reflect the drug's class: stimulants, depressants, narcotics, hallucinogen, and cannabis. Each class represents various drugs and causes distinct biochemical responses. In addition to illicit drugs, prescription drugs are also highly abused and are categorized within the drug classes. Drug addiction does not discriminate between gender, race, sexual orientation or creed, and…… [Read More]

References

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (CDMHAS). (n.d.). Drugs with addictive potential. Retrieved 08 March 2012 from: http://www.ctclearinghouse.org/topics/customer-files/Drugs-with-Addictive-Potential-071105.pdf

Coon, D., & Mitterer, J. (2009). Psychology: A journey. (1st ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Fernandez, G., Rodriguez, O., & Villa, R. (2011). Neuropsychology and drug addiction. Papeles del Psicologo, 32(2), 159-165.

Hyman, S., & Malenka, R. (2001). Addiction and the brain: The neurobiology of compulsion and its persistence. Neuroscience, 2, 695-703.
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Simulated Nature View on Cognitive

Words: 895 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49022707



Research Method

The research adopted pre-test, quasi-experimental, within subject's model that demanded testing before and after introduction of photomurals. The research is based in Sonoma County Male Adult Detention Facility (MADF) in California.

12 officers participated in the pre and post-tests. 8 males and 4 females constituted this population. The subjects' ages ranged between 25 and 50 years with mean age falling at 33.4 years. The experienced years of the subjects varied from 10 to 152 months (mean experience 51.25 months).

Staff members were invited to help in the collection of data through training on the use of polar monitors, their application, and data recording techniques. In the process of data collection, subjects were required to rest quietly during briefing with monitors for about ten minutes. They attended their booking areas with monitors on. They recorded time and nature of unusual activities, scenes or situations during their shifts. Six weeks…… [Read More]

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Perception it Is Widely Known

Words: 1950 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26664561

(Grossman, 2003, Academic Search Elite)

It is hoped that a greater understanding of the human brain's ability to recognize faces in a specific sequence, group of patterns, density and also in whole or part will further assist the purveyors of new technology to train machines to do the same. "The most serious threats to our freedom often advance in small steps. Face recognition systems may one day provide significant benefits in military applications...." (Taslitz, 2002)

Though the different systems still have problems and kinks, specific to each type the promises of face recognition technology being used in this manner is a highly developing theory with a great deal of research to back it. "...the Pentagon is funding a fifty-million dollar initiative to use face-recognition technology a s a means for combating terrorism." (Taslitz, 2002)

Conclusion

The collective information available to the researcher is substantial with regard to the issue of…… [Read More]

References

Bower, B (7/6/2002) "The Eyes Have it," Science News, 162(1) Database: Academic

Search Elite.

Ferber, D. (2/14/2004) "Autism Impairs Face Recognition," Science Now, Database:

Academic Search Elite Psychinfo at EbscoHost.com.
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Cognition and Aging

Words: 4217 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31466565

Cognitive Aspects of the Aging Process

The purpose of this work is to define cognition and to explain the effects of aging on the brain in relation to memory, attention, metacognition, effects on languaging and the effects of aging on the executive function and finally cognitive function in very old age. This will be inclusive of primary cognitive diseases found in aging adults such as dementia and Alzheimer's.

Medical science continues to discover more about aging with each passing year. Cognitive effects of aging are one element that the aging individual must face as well as something that family and friends of the individual will cope with at some point. Cognition is defined as "the mental process of knowing, thinking, learning, and judging." (Online Medical Dictionary, 2005) Therefore the elderly experienced "cognitive dysfunction" is defined as "disturbance to the mental processes of knowing, thinking, learning and judging." Disturbances or dysfunctions…… [Read More]

Is there anything special about the aging of source memory?

Psychol Aging. 2005 Mar;20(1):19-32.

PMID: 15769211 [PubMed - in process]
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Activities to Reduce Inappropriate Behaviors Displayed by

Words: 10021 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93835103

Activities to Reduce Inappopiate Behavios Displayed by Childen With Autism and Othe Developmental Disabilities

The pupose of this dissetation study is to test the effectiveness of an eveyday activities-based potocol (Holm, Santangelo, Fomuth, Bown & Walte, 2000) fo managing challenging and disuptive behavios of 13- to 23-yea-old esidential students (male and female) with Autism who live at Melmak Homes, Inc., of southeasten Pennsylvania, and attend school o adult day pogams. Applied behavio analysis and a focus on eveyday occupations (activities) will be combined duing the intevention phase. Reinfocement will be fo subtask completion and duation of paticipation, NOT fo absence of taget maladaptive o disuptive behavios. Behavio analysts, howeve, will document the fequency/duation of the taget behavios duing each condition. Inteventions will occu daily, Monday though Fiday. A single-subject, multiple-baseline, acoss-subjects design with nine subjects will be used to evaluate change in behavios unde altenating conditions. Data will be analyzed…… [Read More]

references, and favorites)

Child and Family Assets

(Abilities, strengths, skills, accomplishments, and capabilities)

Functional and Meaningful Interactions

(Purposeful interactions; ways interests and assets are used in everyday life)
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Technology Use Supporting ADHD and ADD

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70524473

technology plays a very important role in the learning process of students with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). The previous problems encountered by lecturers and ADD/ADHD learners, such as learning adversities caused by complexities in the behavioral patterns, were reduced when technology started to play a role in the educational environment of ADD/ADHD students. Problems even in simple learning intervention are now rarely experienced by both the lecturers and ADD/ADHD learners ever since technology became part of the educational curriculum for special students.

There are different kinds of technologies that are applied these days to facilitate the learning process of ADD/ADHD learners. This includes multimedia computers and televisions among many other learning devices that have been developed. Their use in special classroom environments presents advantages and disadvantages, as how they also do to normal learners who have no disabilities. However, in an advocate to maximize…… [Read More]

References

Sanders, M. Video Game Therapy Scoring Points.

Retrieved on November 12, 2005 from Online.

Web site: http://www.freep.com/money/tech/games10e_20051010.htm

Rizzo, A.A., et. al. (2000). The Virtual Classroom: A Virtual Reality Environment for the Assessment and Rehabilitation of Attention Deficits
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Persuading That Listening to Music

Words: 1603 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93071527

" (Eugenia Costa-Giomi 2004, 141) Among the academic benefits associated with three years of piano lessons, the children tended to have higher math computation scores, higher language scores, and higher self-esteem than children not involved in music.

Many studies and a wide array of empirical evidence supports the hypothesis that music improves the academic performance and test scores of children, including those in Middle and High School, but certainly also including Elementary and College students. These benefits may occur because of the increased activity in the temporal and left-frontal areas of the brain that have been observed during exposure to music, or because music brings "cohesion" to already existing background noise. (Geake & Ivanov 2003) Or perhaps the link between music and academic success may trace back to the Ancient ideas of how the arts affect the essence of the soul. (Costa-Giomi 2004) Regardless of the root cause of why…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Catterall, J.S. (1998, July) Does experience in the arts boost academic achievement? A response to Eisner. Art Education, 51(4), Windows on the World: 6-11.

Costa-Giomi, E. (2004) Effects of three years of piano instruction on children's academic achievement, school performance and self-esteem. Psychology of Music, 32(2): 139-52.

Ho, Yim-Chi, Cheung, Mei-Chun, & Chan, Agnes S. (2003) Music training improves verbal but not visual memory: Cross-sectional and longitudinal explorations in children. Neuropsychology, 17(3): 439-50.

Ivanov, V.K. & Geake, J.G. (2003) The Mozart Effect and primary school children. Pyschology of Music, 31(4): 405-13.
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Musical Activity and Cognitive Aging

Words: 880 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94152998

The assessment was done in one session which included estimation of verbal, attention, memory, working memory, intellectual and language functions of the participants. The researchers used the American Adult eading Test to estimate the premorbid verbal intelligence of the participants where they were required to read irregular words which cannot be pronounced correctly using the rules of phonics out loud. This provided a good estimate of the Verbal IQ of the participants on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. It was also a stable and valid measure of the premorbid intellectual functioning of the older demented and non-demented adults.

The verbal intelligence and general intellectual ability of the study participants was estimated through the administration of the information subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and it provided a stable and valid measure despite the advanced age of the participants. The performance of the subject's verbal memory was measuring using the…… [Read More]

References

Hanna-Pladdy, Brenda, and Alicia MacKay. "The Relation between Instrumental Musical Activity and Cognitive Aging." Neuropsychology 25.3 (2011): 378 -- 86. Print.
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Biological Humanistic Approaches Personality The Paper Cover

Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11424023

biological humanistic approaches personality. The paper cover areas. *Use Maslow's hierarchy discuss extent growth influence personality formation. *Describe biological factors influence formation personality.

Biological and humanistic approaches to personality:

An overview of the debate

Biological theories have become increasingly popular in the field of psychology, as scientists seek to understand the roots of human behavior. Several reasons are at the heart of this shift in emphasis from 'nurture' to 'nature': the first is our expanding knowledge of neuropsychology and how different components of the brain affect behavior. A change in the physical matter or the environment of the brain can result in a change in personality. The second is the expansion of psychopharmacology, whereby aspects of the human character once thought beyond conscious control, such as hyperactivity or a tendency towards melancholy, can be shifted when medications change the individual's brain chemistry. Finally, changes in behavior are evident at different…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, Kendra. (2012). Hierarchy of needs.

http://psychology.about.com/od/theoriesofpersonality/a/hierarchyneeds.htm

Coccaro, Emil F. & Larry J. Siever. (2008). The neuropsychopharmacology of personality disorders. Psychopharmacology: The Fourth Generation of Progress,

Davidson, Richard. (n.d). Towards a biology of personality and emotion. Annals New York
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Parkinson's Disease a Brief Description of Parkinson's

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82724099

Parkinson's Disease

A Brief Description of Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder that occurs in middle-age to older adults. The disorder has a mean beginning of about 55 years of age. The incidence of Parkinson's disorder increases with age. PD affects about 0.15% percent of the population (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). PD was first described in 1817 by James Parkinson's "Essay on the Shaking Palsy."

In 95% of PD cases diagnoses there is no genetic association (no one in the family has it) and these cases are designated as sporadic PD. In the small number of remaining cases the disorder is inherited (Dauer & Przedborski, 2003). A condition known as secondary Parkinsonism that resembles the physical presentation of PD can be brought on by a number of drugs or other conditions such as dopamine antagonist medications, hypoxia, and from brain tumors (APA, 2000).

The Cause…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders, IV- Text Revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Bear, M.F., Connors, B.W. & Paradiso, M.A. (2001). Neuroscience: Exploring the brain,

Second Edition. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Words: 3177 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56691092

Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Personality is defined as a person's exceptional deviation on the general evolutionary design for human temperament. A personality trait refers to a durable disposition to act in a certain manner in different situations. Personality traits represent some of the most significant sets of individual disparities in organizations. It is the comparatively set of psychological characteristics that differentiates one person from another. People should strive to comprehend fundamental personality attributes and the manner in which they influence a person's behavior (Griffin 2007).Most perspectives to personality presuppose that some traits are more fundamental compared to others. This concept underlie that a small number of basic personality traits determine other, more superficial traits. With respect to the biological approach to personality, personality traits are determined by human genetic inheritance, behavioral tendencies that develop from evolutionary history and human conduct that generate through intricate biological…… [Read More]

References

Andrewes, D. (2001). Neuropsychology: From theory to practice. New York: Psychology Press.

Ashton, Q. (2012). Advances in Nervous System Research and Application: 2011 Edition. New York: Scholarly Editions.

Carducci, B. (2009). The psychology of personality: Viewpoints, research and applications.

London: John Wiley & Sons.
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Self and Social Psychology Social Psychology Is

Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40851888

Self and Social Psychology

Social psychology is a relatively new field of study in modern science. Its focus is on the identity of the "Self" -- the sense of individuality: the component parts that make up who one "is" and the meaning of the "whole" Self. This paper acts as a referenced for individuals unfamiliar with the general principles of social psychology. It aims to provide the reader with a basic overview of the field and to define key principles often used by social psychologists.

Discovering the Self

Self-Concept, Awareness, and Self-Schemas

Discovering the Self in social psychology can seem as simple as posing the question, "Who am I?" (Myers, 2010, p. 13). But answering the question is where the discovery of Self really begins. One's sense of identity, sense of self, sense of gender, race, categorical social grouping all factor into the answer. "Who am I?" raises the issue…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aronson, E., Wilson, T., Akert, R. (2012). Social Psychology. NY: Pearson.

Hewitt, J.P. (2009). Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology. Oxford University

Press.

Jung, C. (1921). Psychological Types. Zurich: Rascher Verlag.
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Tourette Syndrome the Human Condition

Words: 2284 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72324891

Globus pallidusinterna (GPI) of the patient was treated through DBS. The internal pulse generators (IPG) helped stimulate the inner cognition area of patient's brain. Since the study employed Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for assessing the results after intervention, lateral assessment indicated that 84%improvement in YGTSS was observed by the researchers. Thus, DBS as an effective intervention treatment is corroborated by two results of two independent research studies.

Many people report that since Tourette syndrome is a spectrum condition (that is it ranges from mild to severe and that too depends on the age of the sufferer) therefore associated characteristics and symptoms tend to become less severe as the sufferer ages. hat a Tourette syndrome patient requires most is no extensive cure in the form of administered medication, but instead an encouraging environment and dedicated support system which makes it possible for him or her to lead a completely…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brambilla, a. (n.d.). Comorbid Disorders in Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Centre - IRCCS Galeazzi Milano. Retrieved March 2013

Buckser, a. (2006). The Empty Gesture: Tourette Syndrome and the Semantic Dimension of Illness. Purdue University. University of Pittsburgh- of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education. Retrieved March 2013, from  http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456601 

Coffey, B., Berlin, C., & Naarden, a. (n.d.). Medications and Tourette's Disorder: Combined Pharmacotherapy and Drug Interactions. Retrieved March 2013, from http://www.tsa-usa.org/aMedical/images/medications_and_tourettes_berlin.pdf

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. (n.d.). 4th Edition, 103. American Psychiatric Association.
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Biological Psychology

Words: 712 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67244510

biopsychological approach?

A physiological assumption that relates behavior to the activity of the brain and other organs of the body.

An ontogenetic consumption that describes development of behavior or of a brain structure. C. An evolutionary assumption that examines a brain structure or behavior in terms of evolutionary history.

A functional assumption describing why a particular brain structure or behavior evolved the way it did (Kalat, 2012).

What historical disciplines converge to create biological psychology?

Several areas of psychology are involved in biological psychology including clinical psychology, social psychology, cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology, and bits and pieces from other areas of psychology. All areas of neuroscience and biology are particularly relevant to biopsychology. Comparative anatomy, physiology, medicine (e.g neurology and psychiatry), research methodology, and statistics also contribute to the creation of biological psychology (Kalat, 2012).

3. What are some of the earliest examples of a biological approach to studying behavior?…… [Read More]

References

Pinel, J. (2011). Biopsychology 8th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Kalat, J.W. (2011). Biological psychology (11th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson

Learning.
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Music on Vocabulary Competence Writing Reading Comprehension

Words: 7250 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1305508

Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

EFFETIVENESS OF MUSI ON VOABULARY

The Effectiveness of Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

Most English language learners in high schools show poor vocabulary competence. The main reason for this is the limited level of exposure to the language. It is generally understood and practically acknowledged that words form the basic unit of language structure. Therefore lack of sufficient vocabulary constrains students from effectively communicating and freely expressing their ideas.

Vocabulary competence is critical to developing reading comprehension skills. Lack of vocabulary development is detrimental to the development of metacognitive skill that is important in comprehending advanced texts. omprehension is a major component of development of vocabulary, reading to learn. Therefore, reading comprehension it is quite challenging for students lacking adequate knowledge of meaning of words.…… [Read More]

Chapter IV: Results and Evaluation

The main purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of using music on vocabulary competence, writing, reading comprehension and motivation in English Language Learning in High school students as a part of the learning process in the classroom. Many teachers of English as a second language as well as the learners consider vocabulary as a critical factor in learning the language. Therefore it is important to develop creative and interesting ways of teaching vocabulary in English class. A qualitative study was appropriate for the research for the reason that the objective was exploratory (Creswell, 1998). The significance that was recognized to the singularities of teaching was examined with hermeneutic methods (Creswell, 2002).

In order to give a reply to the answer of the three research questions, mean scores and standard deviations were computed for each of the two groups on each of the three dependent measures at the ending of study. All three of the dependent measures are considered to be the evaluation of the sight-reading, the evaluation of the playing abilit, and the
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Healthcare Master Case Study Baum C M Et

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21878519

Healthcare Master Case Study

Baum, C.M., et al. (2008). eliability, Validity, and Clinical Utility of the Executive Function Performance Test: A Measure of Executive Function in a Sample of People With Stroke The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4); pg 446.

Study rationale. The research study is designed to assess the validity and reliability of a test for executive function in post-stroke occupational therapy patients. Clinical tests of executive function may not be good predictors of a patient's ability to function in day-to-day life. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) employs ordinary daily living skills in which the post-stroke patients are likely to have engaged in the past, and are reasonable target behaviors for adaptation to independent or supported living arrangements. The test is particularly valuable in that it offers a convenient test for executive function using real-world tasks.

esearch design. An experimental design is employed in this study.…… [Read More]

References

Baum, C.M., Connor, L.T., Morrison, T., Hahn, M., Dromerick, A.W., Edwards, D.F. (2008). Reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the executive function performance test: A measure of executive function in a sample of people with stroke, The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4), 446. Retrieved http://www.practicechangefellows.org / documents/Baum_et_al.pdf

Chaytor, N., & Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (2003). The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests: A review of the literature on everyday cognitive skills. Neuropsychology Review, 13, 181 -- 197. Retrieved http://www.dissertations.wsu.edu/Dissertations/

Summer2004/n_chaytor_070604.pdf
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Basal Ganglia

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30344555

Basal Ganglia

The control of motor movement progresses from mastery of gross movement to fine motor control as humans develop (Wilson, 2013). This progression depends on the maturation of the extrapyramidal motor system, followed by the maturation of the pyramidal motor system. The extrapyramidal motor system incorporates multiple areas of the brain that are involved in controlling gross motor movements, including the cerebellum and basal ganglia. The cerebellum functions to coordinate muscle movement in response to sensory stimuli generated by muscles, tendons, the reticular formation, and the vestibular system. By comparison, the role of the basal ganglia in regulating muscle movement is still being investigated. In general terms, the basal ganglia serve as an information relay center for various centers within the cerebral cortex; however, researchers seem to agree that one of the functions of the basal ganglia is to inhibit muscle movements before they can begin.

esearchers have also…… [Read More]

References

Rieger, Martina, Gauggel, Siegfied, and Burmeister, Katja. (2003). Neuropsychology, 17(2), 272-282.

Shohamy, D., Myers, C.E., Onlaor, S., and Gluck, M.A. (2004). Role of the basal ganglia in category learning: How do patients with Parkinson's disease learn? Behavioral Neuroscience, 118(4), 676-686.

Stocco, Andrea, Lebiere, Christian, and Anderson, John R. (2010). Conditional routing of information to the cortex: A model of the basal ganglia's role in cognitive coordination. Psychological Review, 117(2), 541-574.

Wilson, Josephine F. (2013). Biological Basis of Behavior. San Diego: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. ISBN: 978-1-62178-103-5.
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Individual Differences in Mental Abilities Cognition

Words: 2720 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38941016

Nature of Cognition

Ever since Simon and inet developed the first intelligence test in 1905, the field of psychology has maintained a strong interest in the nature of intelligence. How do we think? Why are some people better problem solvers than others? What is cognition, the ability to think about our environment? Why are some people consistently more able to use their brains to think, to remember, and to problem-solve than others?

The first IQ tests were devised to determine which children were mentally retarded. These children were pulled away from mainstream education. However, the tests did an effective job of predicting school success for all students, and their use was broadened (Sternberg, 1999). Multiple tests were developed to measure cognition, which might be defined as the ability to think abstractly. Markman (2001) described it in this way:

Cognition depends on the ability to imagine or represent objects and events…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Academy of Pediatrics. August, 2000. "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders." Pediatrics.

Baker, O. Oct. 1999. "Faulty control gene underlies retardation (Rett Syndrome)." Science News.

Bower, B. Nov 20, 1999. "DNA furnishes tips to mental retardation." Science News.

Eliez, Stephan. Feb, 2000. "Genetics of Childhood Disorders: XI. Fragile X Syndrome." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.