New England Colonies Essays (Examples)

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In Massachusetts the puritans were in a mission to purify the Church of England and were intolerant when it came to religion. hode Island viewed church and state as separate entities. The settlers here posed a challenge on the protestant beliefs and therefore granted religious freedom to everyone (eligion Shaping New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies, 2011).
When comparing the settlement of these two colonies it is seen that settlement in the southern colonies took a longer as opposed to the settlement in New England. Jamestown, Virginia was the first to be settled in 1607, followed by Maryland in 1634, North and South Carolina in 1663 and the last original colony Georgia was settled in 1732.the settlement in New England took place in merely eighteen years. Plymouth was the first in 1620, Massachusetts followed in 1630, hode Island and Connecticut were settled in the same year 1636 and New Hampshire….

Colonial Unrest
To be sure, the smattering of colonial unrest that occurred in North America throughout history still echoes and occurs even to this day in some forms. Back in 1676, it started with Bacon's ebellion in Pennsylvania when there were squabbles about alleged non-payment for services rendered and the wrong group of Indians were attacked in retaliation for one of those squabbles. The latter led to more conflagrations (NPS, 2015). Indians were also at the center of the unrest to be found in Massachusetts (and other areas) circa 1723 in the form of the Northeast Coast Campaign which itself was a part of the larger Father ale's War in New England and parts of Canada (On War, 2015). ace also became an issue in unrest like the New York Slave evolt in 1712. Since the slaves were held in close quarters at most times and not in the fields, they….

(Winthrop)
In comparison the works all also demonstrate the extreme difficulty that must have been experienced by the colonists when they sought to move to places where there was no infrastructure. The Plymouth and Jamestown accounts even say something so similar it could have been written about the same place and peoples, "But when they departed, there remained neither tavern, beer house, nor place of relief" (Smith) and "Being thus passed the vast ocean, and a sea of troubles before in their preparation (as may be remembered by that which went before), they had now no friends to welcome them nor inns to entertain or refresh their weatherbeaten bodies; no houses or much less towns to repair to, to seek for succor." (Bradford)

In contrast the works offer a divergent general feel, as the Jamestown colony sets up a small government simply to oversee the development of the common goal, a….


Also, the land in New England did not allow for vast fields of crops, such as Virginia was blessed with. Small farms were the rule of the day in New England.

Another very different part of life for New England was that they had a better relationship with the Indians than the Chesapeake settlers did. The Pokanokets even signed a treaty with the Pilgrims, "and during the colony's first difficult years the Pokanokets supplied the English with essential foodstuffs" (31).

Further, when the Massachusetts Bay Company (MBC) was established in 1629, Congregationalist merchants "boldly decided to transfer the headquarters of the MBC [from England] to New England" (31). This allowed the settlers to handle their own affairs, "secular and religious, as they pleased." This dynamic was very different from the forced ties the Virginians had with the English crown.

Still another major difference (from Chesapeake) in the development of the New England colonies….

England Had by Late 1600s
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Moreover, the Quakers turned down New England's request for assistance during the New England-Indian Wars.
The colonists set up an agricultural economy where they grew their own food like corn and wheat. The cattle they raised gave them meat, milk, and butter. They also kept chicken and sheep. The colonists who settled in Pennsylvania came for religious reasons. They wanted religious freedom. Penn branded the Catholic Church as a "Whore of Babylon" and Puritans as "hypocrites and revelers in God." After Penn had written "The Sandy Foundation Shaken" the Bishop of London ordered that he be imprisoned until he recanted his written statements (Anonymous, 2012).

African slaves in the southern colonies like the South and North Carolina worked in the rice field. Some had good knowledge of rice growing having come from rice growing regions in West Africa. by, 1708, majority of people of living in the rice growing regions in….

Founding European Colonies in the New World
Founding of European Colonies in the New World

The New World was not founded over night. It was, in fact, a very laborious period where several European colonies worked for centuries to secure a new spot in a virgin territory, filled with natural resources the continent of Europe had never seen before. Early struggles and hardships eventually led to successful colonies which, over time, developed into their own autonomous nations.

There were a number of events which led to the early development of European colonies in the context of the New World. Essentially, some of the greatest navy developments in Europe took place during this time period. Countries like Spain and Portugal began building up their navy in an attempt to hold greater competitive advantage over their other European counter parts. There were a number of wars and conflicts during the period, where several European nations….

British colonizers took a different approach as compared to Dutch and French settlers in America. The former actively pursued their apparent "God-given" power to carry out farming, fishing and hunting activities within Native Americans' lands and water resources.
Chesapeake and Middle Colonies

The region lying between the Chesapeake (i.e., Virginia and Maryland) and the New England colonies encompassed New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Delaware (i.e., "middle colonies") which were formerly Dutch colonies. By the year 1670, the largely-Protestant migrant group from the Netherlands boasted the world's biggest mercantile fleet as well as the loftiest living standards. They were in control of trade in the northern European region and grew into one among the most liberal and multicultural European communities, in addition to being the British's fiercest rival in international trade. They welcomed and supported religious and cultural diversity unlike a majority of America's other colonizers from the European continent.

The Quakers or….

New Start as a Theme
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Thus, the term "a new start" came to embody a lofty ideal and it was considered to be more important from the simple fact that the respective period in history dealt with the particular issues addressed by people such as Thomas Paine. For instance, he tried, through his writing to give a new incentive for the people fighting for the independence from Britain and from this point-of-view he is remembered as an important figure of the era (Philip, 2005).
Without a doubt there are periods in history that are dominated by certain interpretations of the notion of "a new start." This is precisely due to the fact that the American literature, it its attempt to escape the influence and the stereotypes of the British creations, have searched for new sources of inspiration. In this sense, while in the British Isles the romantic view of the world was still predominant, in….

hythms of Colonial Life
It is a misconception at the outbreak of the evolutionary War that the colonists from Massachusetts Bay and Chesapeake Bay regions had solidarity on their side. It is a theme of American patriotism one would like to believe but could not be further from the truth. The truth is the colonies had vast differences. This paper will discuss the environmental and volitional factors that contributed to these differences. Environmental factors include geography, climate and soil. Volitional factors include goals of the founders, decisions concerning land ownership, labor systems, and religious practices. These factors contributed to important demographic and economic changes "in the years between settlement and the War of Independence" (51). Did these changes bring the two colonies closer together or create a larger divide? I believe these changes set in action the characteristics that make each region unique and definitely created a divide in cultural perspective.

Environmental….

It also set up a conflict between labour and capital, a variation of the old conflict between peasants and nobility. Because it was based on a competitive "free" market, capitalism inherently sought labour-saving and time-saving devices by which it might increase efficiency and productivity. In other words, manufacturing and production processes were sped up through specialisation (division), automation, mechanisation, routinisation, and other alienating forms of production in which the human being was less a personality at work and more a replaceable cog in a much larger system. This changed the way construction products were made. The concept of capitalism itself envisioned the mass production system and then made it a reality.
Furthermore, with the rise of the factory and the mechanisation of labour, farming began a decline and people flocked to the cities to find other types of work. Added to this there were advances in medicine which meant that….

English Colonies
Many Europeans viewed America as the New World. To them this was a world full of new expectations, opportunities and, for others, the chance of a new beginning. The success, or failure, of the early settlers was largely dependant on the motives and expectations that they brought with them, but also on the way in which they dealt with the problems awaiting them in their new land. Just as with the Spanish settlers of the 16th Century, the inhabitants of the first permanent English colonies, at Jamestown in Virginia and Plymouth in New England, came to America with differing motives and an individual set of expectations. Records appear to suggest, however, that in pursuit of their opportunities, the colony at Jamestown adopted an approach that was similar to that of the Spanish, unlike their counterparts in Plymouth.

Those who traveled to America did so for a wide variety of….

James II. had pursued it from a very different point-of-view when he consolidated the northern and middle colonies under Sir Edmund Andros (Appleby, 1984). The high-handed proceedings of Andros and his master rendered the Americans averse from any future plans of federation imposed from without, and the social and religious differences between the various regions long prevented the rise of any motion to union from within. All had their disagreements with the home government, but none had sufficient sympathy with their neighbors to fight their battles in common. Nevertheless, the French peril from 1689 onwards rendered co-ordination at least of military effort desirable, and plans were discussed from time to time which, whilst themselves abortive, kept alive the idea of union which bore fruit at length in the Philadelphia Congress of 1774. In all these plans the initiative came from the British government or its representatives; the royal officials….

Northern and Southern Colonies before the Civil War
In the middle of the 19th century, the industrial revolution that was growing depicted the presence of the two countries all of the most progressive independent states. The symbolic status in England laid the foundation of working class exploitation, urbanization and industrialization and the other one based on village, farmhouse, agriculture, and trustworthy relations between tenants and squires in 1845. egarding the census of the 1850, the population of the United States was about twenty-three million; this was a rise from thirteen million in the year 1830. As of 1850, the North saw increased populations of immigrants incoming. The census that was carried out in 1860 showed the population of the United States to be about thirty-one million. This represented a thirty-nine percent increase in a span of ten years where the South only had eighth million whites compared to twenty million….

history slavery North Atlantic British colonies United States
Observations egarding Slavery

One of the primary methods of resistance for people of African descent who existed in servitude in the North Atlantic British colonies and in the United States was rebellion. Although far from occurring frequently, armed, violent revolt from chattel slaves helped to shape the history of their descendants in these locations. One of the most notorious of these uprisings was known as the Southampton Insurrection led by Nat Turner in Virginia's Southampton County in August of 1831. The effect of Turner's armed insurrection, and those of others in the Southern United States and in other North Atlantic British colonies can be evidenced in the amended legislature which ultimately influenced the future and perception of both slaves and former slaves for several years to come.

Turner's 1831 rebellion was just the latest in the lengthy list of historical uprisings slaves of African….

What Happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke:
An Unsolved Historical Mystery

The beginnings of European settlement in the Americas are often traced to the Puritans and the founding of the colony at Plymouth. Yet there was a much earlier settlement primarily composed of civilians in the form of the colony of Roanoke, Virginia. Roanoke was founded in 1587 by John White.[footnoteRef:1] White left the colony to obtain more resources and colonists from England and was delayed for three years due to Britain’s war with Spain. When he arrived back on Virginian soil, the entire colony of more than a hundred inhabitants was entirely vacated. The name of a native tribe, “Croatoan” was carved on a post.”[footnoteRef:2] The colony had been plagued by hunger and poor relations with the native population and had apparently fallen victim to some natural or manmade disaster—but what? [1: Andrew Lawler, “The Mystery of Roanoke Endures Yet….

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2 Pages
Essay

Mythology - Religion

Southern and New England Colonies

Words: 780
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

In Massachusetts the puritans were in a mission to purify the Church of England and were intolerant when it came to religion. hode Island viewed church and state…

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2 Pages
Essay

History - Colonial America

Unrest in the New England Colonies

Words: 415
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Colonial Unrest To be sure, the smattering of colonial unrest that occurred in North America throughout history still echoes and occurs even to this day in some forms. Back in…

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3 Pages
Essay

Mythology - Religion

Colonies of New England Were

Words: 928
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

(Winthrop) In comparison the works all also demonstrate the extreme difficulty that must have been experienced by the colonists when they sought to move to places where there was…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Native Americans

Colonies in Early America Differences

Words: 984
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Also, the land in New England did not allow for vast fields of crops, such as Virginia was blessed with. Small farms were the rule of the day in…

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2 Pages
Essay

Mythology - Religion

England Had by Late 1600s

Words: 620
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Moreover, the Quakers turned down New England's request for assistance during the New England-Indian Wars. The colonists set up an agricultural economy where they grew their own food like…

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3 Pages
Essay

American History

Founding European Colonies in the New World

Words: 926
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Founding European Colonies in the New World Founding of European Colonies in the New World The New World was not founded over night. It was, in fact, a very laborious period…

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3 Pages
Essay

History

Chesapeake Middle Colonies Georgia and the Carolinas

Words: 994
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

British colonizers took a different approach as compared to Dutch and French settlers in America. The former actively pursued their apparent "God-given" power to carry out farming, fishing and…

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7 Pages
Term Paper

Literature

New Start as a Theme

Words: 2430
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Thus, the term "a new start" came to embody a lofty ideal and it was considered to be more important from the simple fact that the respective period…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Agriculture

Differences Between the Chesapeake and New England

Words: 762
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

hythms of Colonial Life It is a misconception at the outbreak of the evolutionary War that the colonists from Massachusetts Bay and Chesapeake Bay regions had solidarity on their side.…

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13 Pages
Essay

Architecture

New Reference Is Not Required

Words: 5917
Length: 13 Pages
Type: Essay

It also set up a conflict between labour and capital, a variation of the old conflict between peasants and nobility. Because it was based on a competitive "free"…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Literature - Latin-American

English Colonies Many Europeans Viewed America as

Words: 1185
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

English Colonies Many Europeans viewed America as the New World. To them this was a world full of new expectations, opportunities and, for others, the chance of a new…

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10 Pages
Research Paper

Government

Origins of the Thirteen Colonies

Words: 3081
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Paper

James II. had pursued it from a very different point-of-view when he consolidated the northern and middle colonies under Sir Edmund Andros (Appleby, 1984). The high-handed proceedings of…

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7 Pages
Term Paper

Economics

Development of Northern and Southern Colonies Before the Civil War

Words: 2623
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Northern and Southern Colonies before the Civil War In the middle of the 19th century, the industrial revolution that was growing depicted the presence of the two countries all…

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10 Pages
Essay

American History

History Slavery North Atlantic British Colonies United

Words: 3188
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Essay

history slavery North Atlantic British colonies United States Observations egarding Slavery One of the primary methods of resistance for people of African descent who existed in servitude in the North…

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4 Pages
Essay

American History

What Happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke

Words: 1375
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

What Happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke: An Unsolved Historical Mystery The beginnings of European settlement in the Americas are often traced to the Puritans and the founding of the…

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