Nuclear Proliferation Essays (Examples)

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Nuclear Weapons Knowing Why States Build Nuclear

Words: 2096 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57353318

Nuclear Weapons

Knowing why states build nuclear weapons is important for us in order to determine the future of international security and to direct foreign policy efforts in such a way so as to limit the spread of such dangerous armaments. Nuclear weapons are explosives which derive their ability to destroy from chemical reactions, either fission or fusion or a combination of both reactions. These reactions release an enormous quantity of energy, having the capability to destroy even vast cities even if the mass containing the explosive is very little. Such is the power of nuclear weapons.

Since the Soviet Union's dissolution, the key foreign policy interest of several powerful states has been to control the spread of nuclear arms. Those states which are armed with nuclear weapons or are associated with nuclear arm possessing countries continuously pressurize non-nuclear states to not develop their own weapons. The reason these states…… [Read More]

References:

Hansen, Chuck. Us Nuclear Weapons the Secret History. Crown.

Hoffman, David. The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy. Anchor, 2010.

Pavil, Podvig. Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces . 2004.

Polmar, Norman. U.S. Nuclear Arsenal: A History of Weapons and Delivery Systems Since 1945. Naval Institute Press, 2009.
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Proliferation Nuclear Weapons

Words: 2979 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60872855

Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Facilitators and Detractors

Ever since the first atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has been polarized into two different groups: one that supports nuclear proliferation, and another that vehemently campaigns against the piling up of nuclear material in the world. Both groups have their own arguments to justify their stand. While those who oppose nuclear weapons argue that nuclear proliferation endangers the very existence of the world and international peace, the supporters of nuclear weapons argue that nuclear weapons are required as a deterrent force. The American policy of minimum deterrence echoes this sentiment. However, considering the fact that the world reached dangerously close to an all out nuclear war way back in the eighties during the cold war years, points to the fact that the policy of minimum deterrence can, in the hands of hot-headed heads of states, become a very…… [Read More]

References

GCSE History, 2003, "The Cold War: Causes," retrieved at http://www.thehistorychannel.co.uk/classroom/gcse/cold_war.htm. On July 6, 2003

Dukes Paul, 2001, "A long view of the cold war," History Today, Issue: Jan, 2001

John Lewis Gaddis, Russia, the Soviet Union and the United States: An Interpretive History, Wiley, 1990
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Nuclear Weapons in North Korea

Words: 1919 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86959774

At some point one must recognize that even if we identify a strategy to convince North Korea to cease its nuclear programs, history has shown us that their agreement means very little. Further, critics of attempts to neutralize North Korea point to the lack of sanctions that have been imposed for non-compliance with agreements (Kim, 2010).

Major concerns for the international community when addressing this issue is their ultimate willingness to engage in a war with North Korea should it become necessary. Due to the failure of strategic negotiation and hard line tactics there is little that can be done to ensure that negotiations do not result in war. Yet a war would surely lead to catastrophic results including deaths of thousands of soldiers including U.S. troops and the potential for nuclear activity by North Korea (Muravchik, 2003). One must consider the fact that North Korea has accepted the possibility…… [Read More]

References

Barry, M.P. (2007). North Korea requires long-term strategic relationship with the U.S. International Journal on World Peace, 24(1), 37-41.

Kim, S.S. (2010). North Korea's nuclear strategy and the interface between international and domestic politics. Asian Perspective, 34(1), 49-85.

Laney, J.T., & Shaplen, J.T. (2003). How to deal with North Korea. Foreign Affairs, 82(2), 16-25.

Morgan, P.M. (2006). Deterrence and system management: The case of North Korea. Conflict Management Peace Science, 23, 121-138. doi: 10.1080/07388940600665768
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Nuclear Crisis in Iran at

Words: 368 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 510218

This does not build trust" (Dupre, 2007).

Tehran's main revenue still comes from oil, and a realist would suggest hitting Iran where it could 'hurt' it, economically. This would mean threatening to isolate Iran from the international community by seeking other sources of oil on the part of the United States, unless Iran abides by the non-proliferation treaty, and that the U.S. should pressure Iran's major oil 'clients' to find other sources, with incentive packages offered to those states, such as India. Ultimately, "Iranian authorities know that there is no other alternative than Iran's integration in the international society and becoming a key constructive player in the region," and that it cannot become a rogue state like North Korea because it is dependant upon the commerce of oil with other nations (Dupre, 2007). Other nations that might be damaged by its nuclear capacity with economic and political leverage must capitalize…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dupre, Bruno. "Iran Nuclear Crisis: The Right Approach." Carnegie Endowment for Peace. Feb 2007. [11 Feb 2007] http://www.carnegieendowment.org/publications/index.cfm?fa=print&id=19002

Idealism." IR Theory. [11 Feb 2007]

 http://www.irtheory.com/know.htm
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Nuclear Weapons as They Relate to United

Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33692638

nuclear weapons, as they relate to United States history. It will begin by first examining the circumstances surrounding the development of fissile materials, and will continue by speaking about the Second World War, as well as what prompted the U.S. - Germany - ussia race for developing nuclear weapons. Then, the paper will also examine lasting effects of the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and will comment upon the influence that nuclear weapons issues have on foreign policy as well as how much harm they could cause today, and how the world can and should stop these weapons from existing in the world. With regards to this latter point, the paper will have to examine a short chronology of the development of these weapons and will therefore include those countries that are utilizing such technologies today, as well as how the U.S. sees these countries and what policies are in…… [Read More]

References:

"Our History." National Nuclear Security Administration. Web. 30 Oct. 2011. .

"N Korea Helping Iran with Nuclear Testing - Telegraph." Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph Online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph - Telegraph. Web. 30 Oct. 2011. .
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Nuclear Weapons Analysis

Words: 1143 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98824224

ACH

The United States and the Soviet Union participated in a unique standoff that sought to achieve dominance through the use of technological weaponry and the ideas of mutually assured destruction (MAD). The intelligence community during this time was often caught up in ways to truly understand the enemy and find ways of deflecting the political and military impact that this weapons race produced during the Cold War. Looking back on the situation, it appears that there were many ways to interpret the actions of this enemy and provide new and important insight that could contribute to the common defense of this country and its way of life.

The purpose of this essay is to re-evaluate the Intelligence Community's effort against the Soviet Union during the Cold War. This will be accomplished by utilizing a system of Analysis of Competing Hypothesis to determine the actions and behavior of the Soviets…… [Read More]

References

Central Intelligence Agency (nd). Analysis of Competing Hypotheses. Viewed 30 Aug 2014. Retrieved from  https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/books-and-monographs/psychology-of-intelligence-analysis/art11.html 

Nitze, P.H. (1997). Is it time to junk our nukes?. Washington Quarterly, 20(3), 97-101.

Parrington, A.J. (1997). Mutually Assured Destruction Revisited. Strategic Doctrine in Question. AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL AIRPOWER JOURNAL.

Shultz, G.P., Perry, W.J., Kissinger, H.A., & Nunn, S. (2007). A world free of nuclear weapons. Wall Street Journal, 4, A15.
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Nuclear WMD a Real Threat

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16358750

It has been viewed to manipulate the treaty for its gains in terms of securing security. After the treaty was signed, the international community's interest to agree to rules that had been accepted created a source of safety. The current world has termed the treaty as a regime.

In the U.S. context, their aim is to provide security for their citizens because of the nuclear weapons threat. The treaty has been signed by more than 180 states worldwide. In order to ensure that there is safety while nations continue with their nuclear program, a separate organization was created to oversee the process of monitoring such activities: the International Energy Atomic Agency (IAEA). U.S. As the hegemonic state has the power to protect other nations from harm: other nations view this as a mutual benefit. While the U.S. gain more power plus safety from states that are within the NPT treaty,…… [Read More]

References

Forsberg, R. (2005). Nonproliferation Primer: Preventing the Spread of Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Weapons. Michigan: MIT Press

Gallacher, J, Blacker, C. & Bellany, I. (2005). The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. New York:

Routledge

Kessler, J. (2005). Verifying Nonproliferation Treaties: Obligation, Process, and Sovereignty.
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Nuclear Weapons and Physicist's Moral

Words: 3229 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76531330

This debate is stated to have been lost by ethe and he finally agreed to work as a consultant since he had failed to dissuade the building of a thermonuclear bomb and provided contributions to the effort focused toward design of the bomb. In contrast the physicist Teller had "been obsessed with the need to develop the hydrogen bomb ever since Enrico Fermi, suggested the possibility to him in 1941." (Arms Control Association, 2005) it is reported that Teller was "lionized by the right as the "father of the H-bomb and became the leading proponent of the need to stay ahead of the Soviets in the arms race and for the deployment of ballistic missile defenses." (Arms Control Association, 2005) Prior to these events ethe and Teller, were very close friends and remained on the opposite sides of the debates for arms control through their entire lives. In 1945, an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Byers, Nina (2002) Physicists and the 1945 Decision to Drop the Bomb. Physics Journal archives 13 Oct 2002. Online available at http://arxiv.org/html/physics/0210058

Bethe, Hans a. (1950) "The Hydrogen Bomb: II," Scientific American, April 1950.

Hans Bethe (1906-2005) Arms Control Today - Arms Control Association. 2005 April. Online available at; http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2005_04/Bethe.asp

Hans Bethe et al. (1984) "Space-Based Ballistic-Missile Defense," Scientific American, October 1984.
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Npt -Non-Proliferation Treaty Ever Since the First

Words: 1855 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92332179

NPT -Non-Proliferation Treaty

Ever since the First World War, various countries in the western world had started researching in military weapons and artillery in order to strengthen their country's security. Newer and more advanced weapons continued to be inducted in the armed forces of developed and industrialized nations in the world particularly Soviet Union, United States of America, United Kingdom, Japan and Germany. While all these countries had started their researches for development of nuclear weapons as early as 1930s, the United States of America officially emerged as the first country to have nuclear weapons developed.

While development of nuclear weapons was initially considered as an individual nation's effort to strengthen its country's security and sovereignty, it was in August 1945 when the idea of nuclear proliferation and nuclear warfare alarmed the international community. This was when the United States of America bombed to cities in Japan, Hiroshima and Nagasaki,…… [Read More]

References

Alley, R. 2000, 'Reinvigorating Nuclear Disarmament', New Zealand International Review, vol. 25, no.5, pp.11.

The Disarmament Debate: The Fate of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty 2005, Harvard International Review, vol.27, no. 2, pp. 72+.

Litman, L. 2003, 'Cleaning House: Dirty Bombs and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty', Harvard International Review, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 32+.

Lund, M. 2009, 'The Eighty Percent and Twenty Percent Solutions to Nuclear Proliferation', Brigham Young University Law Review, vol. 2009, no. 3, pp. 741+.
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Case Against Nuclear Energy

Words: 2543 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82717671

Downside of Nuclear Energy:

Energy production has been a major issue that has attracted huge concerns in the recent past because of the negative environmental impacts associated with generating energy through burning of fossil fuels. A growing interest in nuclear power has significantly increases during this period as it is considered as a real solution to energy security and means of dealing with climate change. Actually, there have been concerns on whether nuclear power is the solution or answer to a warming planet or it is dangerous and expensive to meet the future energy needs of the modern society. hile some people have argued in support of the use of nuclear energy as a solution to these problems, others have opposed such attempts. These varying opinions have been based on arguments and counter-arguments that demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear energy.

Increased Attention on Nuclear Power:

As previously mentioned,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Adamson, Greg. We All Live on Three Mile Island: The Case against Nuclear Power. Sydney: Pathfinder, 1981. Print.

"The Case against Nuclear Power and the Case for Real Solutions to Energy Security and Climate Change." Greenpeace International. GREENPEACE. Web. 31 May 2014. .

Totty, Michael. "The Case For and Against Nuclear Power." The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company, 30 June 2008. Web. 31 May 2014. .

Williams, Chris. "The Case against Nuclear Power." ISR - International Socialist Review. The Center for Economic Research and Social Change. Web. 31 May 2014. .
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U S Nuclear Policy Non-Proliferation vs

Words: 3464 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71951760

S. had provided the technology needed to promote the development of nuclear weapons. However, the U.S. argued that it had provided civilian instead of military technology, therefore had not violated the treaty.

The Politics of Proliferation

The politics of non-proliferation are complex. In the case of the U.S., the agreement and terms must satisfy every party involved. On one hand, the U.S. is under an obligation built on trust, that it will reduce the number of nuclear weapons in its arsenal. However, it must still maintain an arsenal that is capable of acting as a deterrent against first attach by non-treaty countries with nuclear weapons. These two goals compete with one another. The U.S. is not the only nuclear weapon owner with this conflict. Every member of the non-proliferation treaty faces this same dilemma.

Nuclear arms negotiations have taken place amidst an atmosphere of deception and mistrust. Full disclosure is…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, L. 2007. "U.S. Policy and Pakistan's Nuclear Weapons: Containing Threats and Encouraging Regional Security." The Heritage Foundation. July 6, 2007. http://www.heritage.org/Research/asiaandthepacific/tst062707.cfm (Accessed August 21, 2008)

Kerr, P. 2004. "Libya Vows to Dismantle WMD Program. Arms Control Today." January/February 2004. http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2004_01-02/Libya (Accessed August 21, 2008)

Lavie, M. "Israel Stands by Vague Nuclear Policy." December 7, 2006. Washington Post. www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/07/AR2006120701234.html)

Levy, D. 2007. "U.S. nuclear policy goes from MAD to NUTS, Panofsky says." Stanford Report. April 18, 2007. http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2007/april18/pief-041807.html (Accessed August 21, 2008)
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U S Selling of Nuclear Materials and Technology

Words: 1181 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66540273

Selling Nuclear Technology

The sale of United States nuclear technology to other countries has gained more criticism, especially in light of the September 11 attacks and the current war against Iraq. Despite these security concerns, however, many corporations still advocate efforts to repeal federal laws regarding the sale of such technology to countries such as China. This paper examines the pros and cons of both positions, paying particular attention to the history and ramifications of continued sale of nuclear technology.

The United States should continue selling nuclear technology

Common perception holds that foreign countries like China, Pakistan and Algeria are the main supporters of the sale United States nuclear technology. However, many American companies such as estinghouse, Bechtel and General Electric support the move to allow the export of American nuclear technology and parts to countries such as China.

For these companies, the reasons are economic. Domestic demand for nuclear…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hedges, Stephen J. "China's surprising nuclear helpers." U.S. News and World Report. September 29, 1997. Proquest database.

Lee, Rensselaer. Smuggling Armageddon. New York: St. Martin's Griffin Press, 2000.

Muradian, Vago. "U.S. Gov't Eyes Resuming Weapons Sales To Pakistan, Indonesia." Defense Daily International 21 September 2001. 7 December 2001 http://www.clw.org/atop/restrictions_ddi092101.html.

Nunn, Sam. "U.S. investments in a peaceful Russia." Issues in Science and Technology. Summer 1995. 11(4): 27-31. Proquest database.
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Nuclear Ores and Its Life Cycle

Words: 3810 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88244684

Nuclear Fuel Cycle is a set of different processes that utilize nuclear materials and then returns them to their initial state, in a cyclical manner. It begins with the mining of naturally occurring nuclear materials from the environment, and ends with safe and proper disposal of nuclear waste products back to the environment. Production of energy from Uranium requires several unique processes. One of the terms used in this production of nuclear energy is front end, referring to the entire set of processes involved in making nuclear energy from the uranium ore in the nuclear fuel cycle. The processes involved are: [1] mining, [2] crushing, [3] processing, [4] enrichment, and [5] the fabrication of fuel. After being used to produce energy, the nuclear material is now known as spent fuel. The spent fuel has to be converted in a reprocessing or storage facility if the company wants to recycle it.…… [Read More]

References

Carlsen, B.W., Phathanapirom, U., Schneider, E., Collins, J.S., Eggert, R.G., Jordan, B., ... & Yacout, L. (2013). Environmental Impacts, Health and Safety Impacts, and Financial Costs of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (No. INL/EXT-14-32302). Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

CAS. College of Agricultural Sciences. (2009). Manufacturing Fuel Pellets from Biomass. Retrieved from: http://extension.psu.edu/publications/uc203

ELAW. Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide. (2015). Overview of Mining and its Impacts. Retrieved from: https://www.elaw.org/files/mining-eia-guidebook/Chapter1.pdf

IAEA (2006). International Atomic Energy Agency. Storage and Disposal of Spent Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste. Retrieved from: http://www.iaea.org/About/Policy/GC/GC50/GC50InfDocuments/English/gc50inf-3-att5_en.pdf
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Chinese Acquisition of Nuclear Weapon

Words: 5510 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17026016

Wilson earned a doctorate degree in Johns Hopkins University, and became a professor of political science. Wilson experience and academic background influenced his thought. Wilson focused on peace and international cooperation, and envisaged a new world order based on the rule of law, formation of international organizations and acceptance of shared values. Wilson also advocated for the covenants of peace by reducing armaments among nations. 28.

The idealists thought led to the formation of League of Nations to bring about cooperation among states as well as guarantying peace and security of all countries.29. Between 1920s and 1930s, idealist doctrine dominated international relations and the idealist believe made Britain to be slow in re-arming itself in the face of German with the believe that the League of Nation would prevent the outbreak of Second World War . 30. While idealist doctrine reigned between 1920s and 1930s, idealistic thought was struggling to…… [Read More]

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Weapons Proliferation

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24911035

Weapons Proliferation, simply defined, is the rapid increase or spread of weapons in the context of global security. If we are to measure the weapons capabilities of the world, the United States retains the lion's share: in 2002 the Economist estimated that American military spending would exceed 379 billion in 2003 (Economist, 6/18/2002.) For comparison's sake, Russia, the world's second largest nuclear power, had a total GDP of merely 346.6 billion in 2002 (Economist, 7/22/2003.) However, the "balance of terror" that underscored the cold war era was in many ways much safer than the current situation. Whereas 'weapons proliferation' once referred to the number of weapons in existence, it has taken on a new meaning; it now is usually meant to reflect the number of political entities capable of using weapons of mass destruction. The number of such countries has increased beyond UN Security Council permanent members to include India,…… [Read More]

Be Afraid. Economist, September 4th, 2003

Lord Hutton's Eyebrows. Economist, September 4th, 2003

Brecher, Gary. Bezerkers with Red Stars: North Korean Scenarios. The Exile, June 2, 2003.
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Against Nuclear Power When Considering the Ever-Changing

Words: 1271 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50888172

Against Nuclear Power

When considering the ever-changing and highly competitive global landscape of international relations and business today, all nations and their respective economies must be able to effectively globalize their energy operations in order to reach a greater potential resource base and sustain fiscal durability in the long-term. In accomplishing the aforementioned tasks, many nations have placed environmental considerations at the bottom of the ladder of priority. However, with countless new environmental initiatives cropping up each day, it behooves any and all government and big business personnel to gain a greater respect for the fragile environment in which we live. Terms like "emissions," "energy consumption," "fossil fuel depletion" and "carbon footprint" are increasingly becoming a part of the average global citizen's vocabulary. The future of all nations lies in the hands of those who seriously embrace the importance of such rhetoric. Accordingly, several energy-producing options have been considered and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bodansky, D. (2004). Nuclear Energy: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2nd Edition ed.). New York, NY: Springer-Verlag LLC.

Hatch, M., Ron, E., Bouville, A., Zablotska, L., & Howe, G. (2005). The Chernobyl Disaster: Cancer following the Accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Epidemiol Review, 27 (1), 56-66.

Jo, D.-J., & Gartzke, E. (2007). Determinants of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 51 (1), 167-194.

Ryan, V. (2009). Advantages and Disadvantages of Wind Power. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from  http://www.technologystudent.com/energy1/wind8.htm
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Control of Proliferation of Weapons

Words: 1819 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85430327

If there are people, of whatever nationality, who will be found guilty of creating and scattering MD, will be subjected to penalties and/or punishment which will be imposed by the overall leader o the UN itself. More so, countries which will be proven allowing the research and development and eventual use of MD should also be asked to answer from the call of the UN.

The entire populace can also share their efforts to controlling the use of any form of MD, thereby preventing any possibility of massive deaths or environment destruction. People must voice out their concern. The people should be activist enough in letting their leaders know how they want the use of MD to be abolished. The media can play a detrimental role in airing and showing how the people, across all nations, are against any form of MD. Newspapers, magazines, TV programs, radio stations, are good…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, Robin, 2005. A step in the right direction: the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction. Ploughshares Monitor

Everett, R 2004. Introduction to Weapons of Mass Destruction - Radiological, Chemical and Biological. Langford Chichester: John Wiley & Sons

Kalyadin, Alexander 2003. A strategy for active Non-Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Publication: Military Thought
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Iran and Their Nuclear Development

Words: 1953 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69946272

One nuclear expert notes, "For countries that think the United States constitutes a threat, how should they react? In effect, there is no way to deter the United States other than by having nuclear weapons. No country can do that conventionally. The United States can overwhelm other countries conventionally."

Clearly, the United States has nuclear capabilities, but they have only used them once, in a time of war. Today, the message is clear. Those countries that have nuclear capabilities do not use them, for they know if they do, they will suffer the same nuclear consequences. Thus, the world stays "safe" because no one is ready to make the first move. Some say Iran is simply attempting to defend itself, while others are not so sure.

In conclusion, the Iranian nuclear development program is becoming increasingly difficult to manage by regulatory organizations, and it seems Iran will do what it…… [Read More]

References

Editors. Q&a: Iran and the Nuclear Issue. BBC News. 3 Dec. 2007. Newspaper online. Available at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4031603.stm.Internet. Accessed 15 Dec. 2007.

Sadjadpour, Karim. "The Nuclear Players." Journal of International Affairs 60, no. 2 (2007): 125+.

Sagan, Scott, Kenneth Waltz, and Richard K. Betts. "A Nuclear Iran: Promoting Stability or Courting Disaster?" Journal of International Affairs 60, no. 2 (2007): 135+.

Schake, Kori. "Dealing with a Nuclear Iran." Policy Review, no. 142 (2007): 3+.
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The Case Against Nuclear Energy

Words: 2175 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26378205

Nuclear Energy

The modern world has been characterized with several environmental issues in the recent past including natural resource depletion, climate change, pollution, and overpopulation. However, climate change has attracted significant attention because of increased environmental impact of industrialization and globalization. Climate change is largely attributable to the current energy sources, which continue to affect the environment. As a result, the search for a suitable energy source with little to no environmental effect has become a major issue for policymakers, governments, and environmentalists. Despite conventional views that nuclear power is unsuitable, recent studies and statistics have considered it a clean energy source. This has contributed to arguments and counter-arguments on whether nuclear energy is clean and safe for the environment. Despite having little to no emission of dangerous gases, nuclear energy is unsustainable when considered from an economic and social perspective.

The Case for Nuclear Energy

In the past few…… [Read More]

References

Cavanagh, R. & Cochran, T. (2013, November 6). Nuclear Energy Film Overstates Positives, Underplays Negatives. CNN. Retrieved February 9, 2016, from http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/06/opinion/pandora-nuclear-energy-opinion-cavanagh-cochran/

Kemfert et al. (2015, November). European Climate Targets Achievable Without Nuclear Power. DIW Economic Bulletin, 5(47), 619-625.

Koffler, D. (2008, July 8). The Case for Nuclear Power. The Guardian. Retrieved February 9, 2016, from http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/jul/08/nuclearpower.energy

Totty, M. (2008, June 30). The Case For and Against Nuclear Power. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 9, 2016, from http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB121432182593500119
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Halting the Revival of Nuclear

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19358859

In addition, problems would also exist outside of the nuclear power plant itself, with the suppliers of the nuclear material also being a possible target of attacks or a source of materials for weapons. This shows that what Ansolabehere suggests as one problem is really a whole range of problems.

Another important point to note is that the possibility of nuclear power plants becoming a source of nuclear weapons and becoming terrorist targets is only a possibility. In contrast, storage of nuclear waste and the safety of nuclear power plants is a current problem that already exists for the power plants in operation. Grossman (p. 206) notes that current nuclear power plants were not designed for more than 40 years of use and are considered hazardous. Grossman (p. 207) also notes that the government is currently planning to store nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountains, an area that is near…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ansolabehere, S. "The Future of Nuclear Power." In Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Environmental Issues. Ed. Thomas A Easton. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005, p. 192-204.

Grossman, K. "The Push to Revive Nuclear Power." In Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Environmental Issues. Ed. Thomas A Easton. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005, p. 205-209.
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Scientific Progress Scientific Responsibility Nuclear

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94001606

In fact:

In the months following the accident, although questions were raised about possible adverse effects from radiation on human, animal, and plant life in the TMI area, none could be directly correlated to the accident. Thousands of environmental samples of air, water, milk, vegetation, soil, and foodstuffs were collected by various groups monitoring the area. Very low levels of radionuclides could be attributed to releases from the accident. However, comprehensive investigations and assessments by several well-respected organizations have concluded that in spite of serious damage to the reactor, most of the radiation was contained and that the actual release had negligible effects on the physical health of individuals or the environment. (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission).

hile the Three Mile Island incident did not cause the same type of damage as Chernobyl and the destruction from Chernobyl was less than people initially believed it would be, it is clear…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kinley, D, Ed. Chernobyl's Legacy: Health, Environmental, and Socio-Economic Impacts and Recommendations to the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine.

Chernobyl Forum: Vienna, 2006.

TXU Energy. "Nuclear FAQS." TXUCorp.com. 2008. TXU Energy. 8 June 2008 http://www.txucorp.com/power/faqs.aspx.

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. "Fact Sheet on the Three Mile Island Accident."
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Global Social Economic Perspectives Global

Words: 2927 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12766737



Those countries who have developed their own WMD programs and have not signed various non-proliferation agreements, highlights this hypocrisy that is existing in the international community. Where, no one is willing to force new countries that develop their own WMD programs to commit to such standards. This is problematic, because it telling the world that those countries not committing to various non-proliferation efforts, can maintain their programs (in secrecy) despite the international standard that is in place. At which point, other nations will seek to start their own WMD programs, as they see this as a double standard. Where, you are not supposed to have these weapons, yet once you do they may not apply.

When you combine this with the fact, that those countries that have not signed various international accords are also not making such disclosures to the IAEA; will more than likely be inclined to pass this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cimbala, S. (2005). Nuclear Weapons and Strategy. New York, NY: Routledge.

Gardner, H. (2007). Risks of Nuclear Proliferation. American Global Strategy and the War on Terrorism. (pp. 81 -94) Aldershot, UA: Ashgate.

Heng, Y. (2009). The Proliferation Security Initiative. Risk, Global Governance and Security. (pp. 87 -- 95). New York, NY: Routledge.

Lia, B. (2004). Weapons of Mass Destruction. Globalization and the Future of Terrorism. (pp. 39 -- 48). New York, NY: Routeledge.
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Weapons of Mass Destruction

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95212840

Weapons of Mass Destruction

Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century Security Environment

The apparent anti-proliferation approach of the George W. ush Administration to nuclear and other Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) seems to coincide with the perspective of Scott Sagan in The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate, as opposed to the deterrence perspective of his co-author, Kenneth Waltz. Security for major nations is currently under greater threat by the destabilizing effects of terrorism than it is by annihilation through conventional warfare. The Cold-War approach of deterrence is not adequate against enemies who are more concerned with their philosophical endurance than their physical survival. The modern landscape of nuclear arms reduction by major world powers, while many quasi-minor countries scramble to attain nuclear status explicitly underscores the delicate problem of securing safety while upholding widely accepted tenets of Just War Theory.

The Spread of Nuclear Weapons is the work of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. "Just War Theory." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Alex Moseley, Ph.D. 2001. 16 Apr. 2003 http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/j/justwar.htm.

2. Review of: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate. Helen E. Purkitt. United States Naval Academy. 16 Apr. 2003 http://www.nwc.navy.mil/press/Review/1996/autumn/nuc-a96.htm.

3. Sagan, Scott D., and Kenneth N. Waltz. The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate. New York: W.W. Norton, 1995.
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International Organizations Have a Charter

Words: 1060 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20300483

The effect of these sanctions can range from the alterations in the foreign policy to the declining export of oil for the country. One domain that has been exposed to restricted development is the oil industry. However it is also noteworthy that the economy of Iran is not entirely dependent on the export of oil for its growth (Momeni, Najafi, & Fathollahi, 2012). Moreover, the sanctions had a negative impact on the potential influx of foreign investors while Iran has also contested these sanctions on various grounds in different organizations. Such a situation has influenced the pace of development of the country. Nevertheless other researchers have persuasively argued that these sanctions have targeted the oil and gas industry, but other businesses embedded in the traditional industries of Iran had trivial effects from such sanctions. Therefore, it has been concluded that the business related to small firms have displayed no significant…… [Read More]

Reference:

Abbott, K.W., & Snidal, D. (1998). Why states act through formal international organizations. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 42(1), 3-32.

Momeni, F., Najafi, S.M.B., & Fathollahi, J. (2012). The Necessity of Economic Structural Transformation in Developing Countries toward a Knowledge-based Economy Case Study: Iran.
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United States Persuade North Korea

Words: 1568 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72784928

The fundamentals of exchange theory are illustrated at Appendix a. This approach to analyzing the current situation in North Korea will help add to the existing body of knowledge by developing fresh insights into the possible motivating factors that have characterized North Korea's negotiations with the West in general and the United States in particular in the past and will help address the hypothesis to be tested which is stated below.

Hypothesis

H1:

The likelihood that it will be possible to persuade North Korea to dismantle its nuclear capability will be increased if American military forces are removed from South Korea.

This hypothesis will be qualitatively tested based on a preponderance of the evidence that results from the critical review of the literature described above.

eferences

Auton, G.P. (2007). "North Korea: Another Country." Korean Studies 31, 100-101.

Barry, M.P. 2007. "North Korea equires Long-Term Strategic elationship with the U.S."

International…… [Read More]

References

Auton, G.P. (2007). "North Korea: Another Country." Korean Studies 31, 100-101.

Barry, M.P. 2007. "North Korea Requires Long-Term Strategic Relationship with the U.S."

International Journal on World Peace 24(1): 37-38.

Catchpole, B. 1998, November. "The Commonwealth in Korea." History Today, 33.
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Technology -- Blessing or Curse

Words: 474 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35198703



Response

Yes, technology generates problems, and it is shrewd and apt to point out that for every net gain to certain members of society via technology there is a net loss. The hand weavers of the 18th century were put out of business by 19th century factories that could manufacture clothing cheaply, computers have probably collectively caused the art of calligraphy to die, and made even professional writers overly reliant on spell check and less willing to rewrite their work from scratch. However, would any of the authors included in the collection summarized in the essay really wish to go back to a world without antibiotics? Technology has enabled people whose vision would be a blur to see with 20/20 perfection, and made travel financially accessible to millions who would have been relegated to the narrow point-of-view of their homes. hile it is easy to find detriments to these benefits…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Vaidhyanathan, Siva. Rewiring the "Nation": The Place of Technology in American

Studies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 2007.
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Security of the U S and Canadian Border

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11673247

security of the U.S. And Canadian border is in peril. There is an unprotected route allowing the free-flow of terrorists from around the world into Canada and then into the U.S. This is a national security situation that threatens our way of life. hat are our options for eliminating this threat?

By definition a liberal is a man or a woman who believes in liberty. Liberalism as a philosophy has evolved as a defense of individual citizen's liberties against the potential tyranny of his or her ruling state. Liberals such as John Locke have typically maintained that humans are naturally in 'a State of perfect Freedom to order their Actions ... As they think fit ... without asking leave, or depending on the ill of any other Man," In other words, unless the individual's liberty impinges upon the liberty of another individual, than that individual should do as he or…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Gaus, Gerald. "Liberalism." The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2001. Available online November 3, 2004 at  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/liberalism/
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Geopolitical Analysis of China From

Words: 3969 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85714287

America's engagement with China, with historic ice-breaking between the two countries carried out by Henry Kissinger, has been complicated. I would suggest that it were the U.S. domestic preoccupations and compulsions that did not allow me to take any bold stance on the issue of Dalai Lama. I disagree with notion that U.S. betrayed the cause of human rights while not choosing to visit Dalai Lama.

It must not be forgotten that unlike ussia, China's geography allows her to exert much more influence than the former. In the words of Kaplan (2010), China is both a land and a sea power. Thus, my foreign policy towards China has been reflective of this potential next power of the world. The U.S. has benefited from the Chinese market significantly in the wake of financial crisis. The author failed to acknowledge the huge compulsions that China faces in meeting its energy and other…… [Read More]

References

Barber, BR 1992 "Jihad vs. McWorld," the Atlantic Monthly 269, no. 3 (March 1992): 53 -- 65.

Cohen, MA, 2011, 'Think Again: The Two State Solution', Foreign Policy, Viewed on 18 June 2013, [http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/09/14/think_again_the_two_state_solution]

Gettleman, J 2010, 'Africa's Forever Wars,' Foreign Policy, 22 Feb 2010.

Gilboy, GJ and Read, BL 2008, 'Political and Social Reform in China,' Washington Quarterly, summer 2008, pg 143-164.
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Today's International Relations and World Politics

Words: 1652 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33969143

Biggest Challenges

The Three Biggest Challenges Facing the International Community & How They Affect International Relations

In my opinion, the three biggest challenges facing the international community are:

Inequality

Terrorism, and

Nuclear Proliferation

These challenges have assumed crucial importance in recent times and have significantly affected international relations. If the international community fails to tackle these issues satisfactorily over the next few decades, they may become uncontrollable with overwhelming consequences for the whole world. This essay looks briefly at these three issues in turn and explains how they affect the current and future international relations.

Inequality

Economic and social inequality has assumed grotesque proportions in recent times and the indications are that it is on the rise. For example, the richest 1% in the world (50 million people) have income equivalent to the poorest 57% (2.6 billion people) and four fifths of the world's population live below what countries in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cohn, Marjorie. "Understanding, Responding to and Preventing Terrorism." Arab Studies Quarterly (ASQ) (2002): 25+.

Eland, Ivan. "Bush Administration Bluster Exacerbates Nuclear Proliferation." The Independent Institute. May 2, 2005. May 3, 2005.

Elliott, Larry and Charlotte Denny. "Top 1% earn as much as the poorest 57%." Guardian Unlimited. January 18, 2002. May 3, 2005.

"Inequality." World Revolution.org. 2005. May 3, 2005.
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Rise of China

Words: 2354 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45798899

Rise of China

THE POWER OF NUMERS - AND OF ARMS

China, a Growing Threat in Southeast Asia?

The appearance or reality of peace, stability and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region in the 1990s may be drawn from the popular compliance of the countries to the provisions of an agreement (Shuja 1999). This was the Non-Proliferation Treaty or NPT, signed in 1968 and becoming effective in 1970, by the countries or States. Their number increased to 176. They agreed to give up the use of nuclear power for military purposes. Africa, Argentina, razil, Romania and Algeria were examples of such countries. ut this image of peace and unity in the region was shattered and vanished when India and Pakistan conducted nuclear tests in May 1998. India and Pakistan had a long-time feud and the tests sent the message to the rest in the region that the protagonists could be preparing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernier, J. And Gold, S (2003). China's Closing Window of Opportunity. 20 pages. Naval War College Review: U.S. Naval War College

Bremmer, I. (2005). The Dragon Awakens. 7 pages. The National Interest: The National Interest, Inc.

Gearan, A (2006). China Asks for Calm Amid Signs It Is Cracking Down on North Korea. 2 pages. Deseret News (Salt Lake City): Deseret News Publishing Company

Kyodo News. (2005). Taiwan's Chen Presses for arms Purchase in National Day Speech. 2 pages. Asian Political News: Kyodo News International, Inc.
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Aid President George W Bush in Policy

Words: 5641 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99905017

aid President George W. ush in policy formulation. It is an all-inclusive paper dealing with a wide range of issues such as the American economy in general- discussing issues such as budget deficits, tax cuts, medical assistance and benefits for retired people, the weakening American dollar, allocations for the military, intelligence and homeland security, job growth and the regime and policies of free trade. With regards to security, it features the recent American initiate on the war on terrorism. The issue of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and nuclear proliferation are discussed quite at length.

Another aspect listed in the paper is the 'future', as it was viewed from the era of the Vietnam War. The relevance of the cold war is also outlined as a great American victory. Compelling issues such as the role of oil, OPEC, the Middle East and the socio-political and economic situation after the incidents…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bush's tax cut' Retrieved from;

http://amateurpundit.hypermart.net/features107_bushtaxing.htm Accessed on March 5, 2004

Economy: Job Creation' Retrieved from;

http://ipsnews.net/africa/interna.asp?idnews=22469 Accessed on March 5, 2004
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U S National Strategy What Three United States

Words: 4520 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17089313

U.S. National Strategy

What three United States national interests do you think will be at great risk over the next five years? Describe those interests and identify which instruments of national power can be leveraged to protect or advance those national interests and how those instruments can be used.

As President Obama stated in his addresses to Congress in February 2009, the most important problem that the country faced was the economy, which was in the worst recession since the 1930s. This affected both domestic and foreign policy, since the country would probably have to reduce military spending and its commitments overseas as it did during the Great Depression, so for the Obama administration economic recovery was the primary goal. He did promise that "the weight of this crisis will not determine the destiny of this nation" (Obama Address, 2009, p. 1). He promised that the government would deal with…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Address to Joint Session of Congress. Remarks of President Barack Obama, As Prepared for Delivery, Address to Joint Session of Congress, Tuesday, February 24th, 2009.

Comprehensive Regional Strategy on Somalia: A Strategy for U.S. Engagement Report to Congress, February 2007.

JP 3-0 Chapter I.

JP 3 Extract Chapter 2.
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Sino Iranian Relations in Changing

Words: 3555 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53650139

(Mousavin 141 -- 172)

A second aspect of this changing association (limited amounts of economic opportunity) highlights the choice that China will have to make at some point down the road. Where, the actions of Iran and the relationship that they have with the country could become a liability. This is problematic, because it more than likely will mean that China will have to make a choice between conducting business with the Western nations and working with Iran. Given the fact that the West has greater economic opportunity; means that this underlying relationship could change, if China was forced to choose between the two sides. This is significant, because it shows the overall vulnerability that China will face because of this association. As the West, could force them to choose between: being a member of the world community or supporting an isolated Islamic Republic. (Mousavin 141 -- 172)

A third…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bates, Gill. "Challenges for U.S. Policy." Rising Star. Washington D.C.: Brookings Institute, 2010. 150 -- 160. Print.

Garver, John. "Civilization and Power." China and Iran. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 2006. 3 -- 29. Print.

Gernet, Jaques. "Firearms." A History of Chinese Civilization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 111- 113. Print.

Mederios, Eric. "China's Nuclear Cooperation with Iran." Reluctant Restraint. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2007. 58 -- 97. Print.
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Future of Homeland Security Over

Words: 1081 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50239792

This is making it difficult for the world community to work together on issues such as nuclear proliferation. (Lewis) (Montgomery) (Zariff)

The main reason is because China has built several pipelines going from Iran into their country. This is providing them with the resources (i.e. oil and natural gas), which are helping to fuel continuing economic growth and the development of Chinese markets. At the same time, the increased amounts of military spending have meant that China has become increasingly hostile towards any kind of efforts to deal with these issues. (Lewis) (Montgomery) (Zariff)

As a result, other nations throughout the Middle East and Asia have begun their own nuclear weapons programs in response to these threats. In the coming decade, we need to redefine the war on terror away from: simply preventing terrorist attacks themselves to aggressively going after those nations that support these activities. This means directly confronting…… [Read More]

References

Lewis, Jeffrey. "North Korea -- Iran Nuclear Cooperation." CFR, 2010. Web. 9 Mar. 2012



Montgomery, Evan. "Understanding the Threat of Nuclear Terrorism." CSB Online, 2010. Web. 9 Mar. 2012

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Terrorism if a Significant Terrorist

Words: 3231 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52894549

Such a strategy, if fully developed, would successfully reduce the risk of a successful terrorist nuclear attack because the system itself would have nuclear-specific elements that could be coordinated with an assortment of other prevention and protection measures. More so, this system would work with the international community to develop similar multi-elemental, layered and cross-departmental approaches there and then coordinate the United States' measures with these international efforts, thus creating a global defense strategy capable of fully defending a way of life against the threat of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.

This new approach to defense would focus on coordinating improved capabilities of monitoring and controlling both nuclear weapons and nuclear material, thus being able to better evaluate where the risk is and what kind of risk it is. Further, such an internationally coordinated monitoring system would dissuade those in the planning stages of a nuclear attack could defeat…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bolt, Paul J., Coletta, Damon V., and Collins G. Shackleford. American Defense Policy. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2005.

De Becker, Gavin. Fear Less: Real Truth About Risk, Safety, and Security in a Time of Terrorism. New York: Little Brown & Co., 2005.

Burd, R. "Nuclear Detection to Prevent or Defeat Clandestine Nuclear Attack." Los Alamos Manuscript LA-UR-04-0629, submitted to IEEE Sensors Journal, Special Issue on Sensors for the Prevention of Terrorist Acts. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government, 2004.

Department of Defense. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Preventing and Defending Against Clandestine Nuclear Attack. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government, 2004.
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american national'security threats big

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39990481

2015, President Obama outlined a set of core national security objectives that included references to ISIL, climate change, and even social justice, all covered in the National Security Strategy. The direction the new administration takes is likely to shift some of the main national security objectives and strategies, while still addressing some of the aforementioned crucial issues. It is a futile attempt to narrow down the range of national security threats to one particular issue, as all present clear and present dangers. Some threats like terrorism and cybercrime are bound to remain ongoing and almost impossible to eliminate entirely; others like climate change, nuclear proliferation, and ISIL have the potential to be contained with the cooperation of global allies. However, one issue continues to boil beneath the surface of all other threats and only recently came to light with renewed media attention: the potential for nuclear war.

A year prior…… [Read More]

References

Clapper, James R., 2016. Statement for the Record: Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community. Retrieved online:  https://www.intelligence.senate.gov/sites/default/files/wwt2016.pdf 

McCurry, Justin, 2017. "North Korea warns 'thermonuclear war could break out at any moment' The Guardian. Retrieved online:  https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/17/north-korea-war-break-out-any-moment-donald-trump-v 

President of the United States, 2016. National Security Strategy. Retrieved online:  http://nssarchive.us/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/2015.pdf
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Motivation for Applying to Phd

Words: 822 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24555841

Once this takes place, you have a situation that is similar to the time frame before World War I. Where, all of the different world powers assumed that they understood the rationale and actions of each other. At which point, a small regional conflict in Serbia would escalate in a major conflict that would engulf all of the major world powers. (Steward 2003, pp. 6 -- 20) This is significant, because it shows that when you have several major military powers around the globe, a balancing act must take place, as the chances for conflict have increased dramatically. Given the overall destructive nature of nuclear weapons, it is safe to assume that those nations that posses these devices, will more than likely view themselves in this light.

The ability that I have to analyze these kinds of situations, could be influential, in helping to bring a voice of reason to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Iran's Nuclear Program, 2010, New York Times. Available from:
Peng, L, 2009, 'A Japanese Perspective on the Rise of China and India,' The Rise of China and India, World Scientific, Hackensack, pg. 98.

Steward, R, 2003, 'Assassination at Sarajevo,' Causes and Consequences of the First World War, Evans, London, pp. 6- 20.

Harvard Formathttp://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/data/files2/49275/Harvard%20LibGuide%20-%20All%20Examples%20PDF.pdf
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Kennedy What if John F

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1248680

S., Great Britain and the Soviet Union. However, due to ennedy's assassination in Dallas on November 22, these negotiations stalled, especially when France and China refused to become parties to the new non-nuclear proliferation treaty. Thus, if ennedy had survived, it is clear that this treaty might have served as the foundation for a very early movement against nuclear proliferation and might have signaled the end of the "Cold War" some twenty-seven years before it finally did end in 1989 with the fall of the Soviet Union.

Second, in 1963, many American civil rights leaders, especially Martin Luther ing, Jr., wished to speed up the progress of desegregation in the U.S. which led to a number of important demonstrations. In June of 1963, President ennedy was convinced that the American public was demanding some type of action by Congress to end desegregation in America. As a result, ennedy sent to…… [Read More]

Kennedy, somewhat surprised by this move, quickly accepted Khrushchev's offer and negotiations began on August 5, 1963 which included representatives from the U.S., Great Britain and the Soviet Union. However, due to Kennedy's assassination in Dallas on November 22, these negotiations stalled, especially when France and China refused to become parties to the new non-nuclear proliferation treaty. Thus, if Kennedy had survived, it is clear that this treaty might have served as the foundation for a very early movement against nuclear proliferation and might have signaled the end of the "Cold War" some twenty-seven years before it finally did end in 1989 with the fall of the Soviet Union.

Second, in 1963, many American civil rights leaders, especially Martin Luther King, Jr., wished to speed up the progress of desegregation in the U.S. which led to a number of important demonstrations. In June of 1963, President Kennedy was convinced that the American public was demanding some type of action by Congress to end desegregation in America. As a result, Kennedy sent to Congress a civil rights bill that included provisions designed to expedite the registration of black voters, to guarantee equal access to all public accommodations, to allow the U.S. Attorney General (Robert Kennedy) to institute lawsuits to desegregate the schools and to withhold federal funds from state or local programs in which racial discrimination was evident.

Certainly, if Kennedy had survived, this civil rights bill, the first of its kind in the United States since the days of the Civil War in the 1860's, might have helped to stave off a number of violent protests in some major U.S. cities during the late 1960's. As previously pointed out, this bill was stalled in Congress at the time of Kennedy's assassination, but if he had survived and had been allowed to return to Washington to pressure Congress to pass the bill immediately, the history of the Civil Rights Movement in America might have turned out very different indeed.
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Dangerous Mismanagement

Words: 6133 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99577375

Intelligence Failures

In an ever increasingly complex governmental infrastructure, the importance of communication, mission and strategy are of the utmost importance. The Department of Defense (DOD) and all of its law enforcement agencies are in a pervasive struggle to attain both accurate and actionable intelligence in order to perform their duties to the best of their capabilities and intentions.

The purpose of this research paper is to explore the failure of the intelligence process due to extraneous levels of bureaucratic organization. This essay will attempt to explain the many failures of the Department of Defense law enforcement entities as a result of this type of organization.

In order to understand this argument, this essay will first look at the problem itself and try to identify the root cause of these failures. Past failures of intelligence gathering will be examined to help contextualize the argument and give credence to the idea…… [Read More]

References

Chesney, R. (2011). Military-Intelligence Convergence and the Law of Title 10/Title 50 Debate. J. Nat'l Sec. L. & Pol'y, 5, 539.

Clapper, J. (2011). How 9/11 Transformed the Intelligence Community. The Wall Street Journal 7 Sep 2011. Retrieved from http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424053111904537404576554430822300352

Foust, J. (2013). Throwing the Intelligence Community Under the Bus. Beacon Journal 29 Oct 2013. Retrieved from http://www.beaconreader.com/joshua-foust/throwing-the-intelligence-community-under-the-bus

Gusterson, H. (2011). Atomic Escapism? American Scientist, Jan -- Feb 2011. Retrieved from  http://www.americanscientist.org/bookshelf/pub/atomic-escapism
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Nixon's Policy Toward the U S S R

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95615030

hen a progressive Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev came to power, the fall of the Soviet Union was immanent and inevitable.

After the fall of the Soviet Union under Reagan's watch, his Vice President Bush inherited the problem of dealing with a fragmented Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Bush Sr.'s foreign policy toward Moscow was largely passive, arguably much more passive than any of his predecessors were because the Cold ar was over and the threat of nuclear war temporarily set aside. Moreover, the dissolution of the Soviet Union was still taking place and Bush Sr. watched while new nation-states emerged out of the Soviet Bloc. However, Bush Sr. negotiated nuclear disarmament treaties with Gorbachev and his successor Boris Yeltsin and willingly recognized the independence of many formerly Soviet republics.

Relations with Russia again grew tense under President Clinton largely because of the conflicts that arose in the Balkans. The Soviet Union…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bill Clinton's War in Yugoslavia." Retrieved Feb 27, 2008 at  http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Yugoslavia/BillClintonsWar_Yugo.html 

George Bush Sr. On Foreign Policy." On the Issues. Retrieved Feb 27, 2008 at  http://www.ontheissues.org/Celeb/George_Bush_Sr__Foreign_Policy.htm
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Changing Paradigm in International Policing

Words: 8998 Length: 33 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87743756

The lack of action over Rwanda should be the defining scandal of the presidency ill Clinton. Yet in the slew of articles on the Clinton years that followed Clinton's departure from power, there was barely a mention of the genocide."

The UN, pressured by the ritish and the U.S., and others, refused to use the word "genocide" during the event, or afterward when it issued its official statement of condemnation of the genocide in Rwanda.

Since that time, ill Clinton has said that Rwanda is one of his regrets of his presidency, but that he lacked the information to "fully grasp what was going on in Rwanda."

Reports to the UN and its member states, as reported by William Ferroggiaro (1995), online at http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAE/NSAE119/index.htm, were based on reports via the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), said that there was a "probability" of certain individuals and groups being responsible for certain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, D.L. The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War. Columbia University Press, New York, 2002. p. 232.

Brahimi. L, Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations (2000), found at   http://www.un.org / peace/reports/peace_operations/, accessed on 09 May 2010.

Demaggio, a.R. Mass Media, Mass Propaganda: Examining American News in the "War on Terror. 2008, p. 236.

Department of Peacekeeping Operations Department of Field Support, United Nations Peacekeeping Operations Principles and Guidelines (2010), found at http://www.peacekeepingbestpractices.unlb.org/Pbps/Library/Capstone_Doctrine_ENG.pdf, accessed on 09 May 2010.
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Reagan Foreign Policy Regan Foreign

Words: 2610 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18820949

S. has unilaterally imposed sanctions to punish ran for its support of these activities. To address the shortages from this embargo, the ranian government has been working on developing nuclear power. They claim that this will help to tackle the nation's current and future energy needs. (Khan, 2010, pp. 77 -- 110)

This has led to the UN imposing another embargo against the slamic Republic for their continuing incompliance with international law. At the heart of the issue, are concerns that ran is using their nuclear energy program as a cover for developing an atomic bomb. The fear is that the ranians will pass on nuclear related materials to terrorist groups or they will use these weapons to attack the U.S. To prevent this from happening, America is leading an international effort to further isolate ran. n response, ran has been defiantly working on their program. This has caused the…… [Read More]

In the case of Iran, they are at the far end of the spectrum by wanting to destroy the U.S. And everything that it stands for. This has increased the amount of covert actions that are taken against the Islamic Republic. At the same time, this helps the U.S. To push its trading partners to isolate Iran (which is causing their economic situation to become even worse). This is showing how America's approach can be used as way to reward or punish a country for their activities. (Sutter, 2012, pp. 37 -- 59)

In the case of China, the fact that they were willing to work with the U.S. And implement many of the economic reforms led to improved relations between both countries. This is when China received favored trading status and was provided with tremendous amounts of foreign direct investment capital (which helped to increase economic development). These changes were occurring despite China's terrible human rights record and lack of political changes. This is showing how efforts to implement at least some of the reforms led to more support in the future from the U.S. (Sutter, 2012, pp. 37 -- 59)

These different approaches are illustrating how the U.S. is rewarding those countries that are in support of international standards with various forms of economic and military aid. While nations that are unwilling to do this, will face the possibility of isolation. This is designed to put pressure on
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English System Order Out of

Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7212820

One example of this is the "famous egg box metaphor of international society (in which states were the eggs, and international society the box), one might see this unevenness as a pan of fried eggs. Although nearly all the states in the system belong to a thin, pluralist interstate society (the layer of egg-white), there are sub-global and/or regional clusters sitting on that common substrate that are both much more thickly developed than the global common, and up to a point developed separately and in different ways from each other (the yolks)" (Buzan and Gonzalez-Pelaez, 2005: 6).

For example the EU and North America, for example are "sub-global interstate societies that are more thickly developed within themselves. Lesser attempts to create thicker, liberal, regional interstate/international societies by cultivating joint economic development can be found in...various other regional economic cooperations," such as OPEC (Buzan and Gonzalez-Pelaez, 2005: 6). "Above some of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armstrong, David. (2007). Order and Justice in International Society. Retrieved 20 Aug 2007 at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/polis/englishschool/readarmstrong.doc

Bania-Dobyns, Sarah. (2005, Aug). The Contribution of the System Concept to the English School: Clarifying the System Concept by Means of Methodological

Pluralism. Paper for the Panel 'ES Theory Debates' WISC Conference Istanbul. Retrieved 20 Aug 2007 at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/polis/englishschool/papers.htm

Buzan, Barry & Ana Gonzalez-Pelaez. (2005, Aug). The Middle East Through English
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United States Engaged in a

Words: 3295 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89899979

urrently the United States consumes more than 19.6 million barrels of oil per day, which is more than 25% of the world's total oil consumption. Through its isolationist policy agenda, the U.S. government has been able to leverage its military and economic might to control most of oil production in South America. Instead of attempting to restructure the financial infrastructure of South American oil producers such as Panama, Ecuador and Peru, the United States has promoted a policy of singular reliance on U.S. aid. As a result, the United States receives the majority of advantages conferred by these country's vast oil supplies. Similarly, the United States has used its military might to create strong unilateral connections with OPE nations as well. Subtly, the United States has reached secret agreements with the Saud family of Saudi Arabia to maintain their current royal hierarchy with U.S. military protection as long as they…… [Read More]

Cole, Wayne S. (1981). "Gerald P. Nye and Agrarian Bases for the Rise and Fall of American Isolationism." In John N. Schacht (Ed.), Three Faces of Midwestern Isolationism: Gerald P. Nye, Robert P. Wood, John L. Lewis (pp. 1-10). Iowa City: The Center for the Study of the Recent History of the United States.

Schacht, John N. (Ed.). (1981). Three Faces of Midwestern Isolationism: Gerald P. Nye, Robert P. Wood, John L. Lewis. Iowa City: The Center for the Study of the Recent History of the United States.

Hanks, Richard K. "Hamilton Fish and the American Isolationism, 1920-1944." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Riverside, 1971.
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How Was the Cold War Represented in Cinema

Words: 5793 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9347766

Cold War and Film

Generally speaking, the Cold War has been depicted as an era of spy games and paranoia in popular films from the 1960s to the present day, but the reality of the era was much more complex. The Cold War was a period of military and political tension from 1947 to 1991, or from the end of WW2 to the collapse of the Soviet Union, in which the "politics of war" masked the business and social agendas of multinationals and ideologues. The era was marked by myriad issues: East-West mistrust, proxy wars, espionage, the threat of nuclear war, domestic and foreign propaganda, the rise of the military-industrial complex and multinational corporations, assassinations, detente, de-colonization, new nationalism, neo-colonialism, the vying for control of resources, alliances (NATO, Warsaw Pact), and an inculcation of the "deep state." [footnoteRef:1] It can be divided into five basic periods: 1947-53, 1953-62, 1962-79, 1979-85,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dominik, Andrew, dir. Killing Them Softly. NY: Weinstein Company, 2012. Film.

Eliot, T.S. "Burnt Norton." The Four Quartets. Web. 10 May 2015.



Frankenheimer, John, dir. Seven Days in May DVD Commentary. LA: Warner Home
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International Law in the Modern

Words: 1388 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80001707



This is an important issue and a number of commentators and critics have decried this loss of respect for international law. One commentator refers to the words of the politician and sociologist, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who said that, "...there is nothing quite to compare with the falling from the American mind of the idea of the law of nations" (Kinsley). He also stated that,

At the beginning of Gulf ar II, we forgot... international law. e forgot international law once again. hen the U.N. Security Council would not play ball, we declared that our own invasion of Iraq was justified as a sovereign act of long-term self-defense against potential weapons of mass destruction, by the human rights situation within Iraq,

Kinsley).

Therefore, this is a cardinal area of international law that is in danger in the present age.

On the other hand, there are areas of international law that have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Horton, Scott. A Decent Respect: What does international law mean to us today

January 20, 2008. http://www.harpers.org/archive/2007/04/horton-20070428vgjt

Kinsley M. Today We Obey. Invoking international law -- when it suits us.2003.

January 20, 2008 http://www.slate.com/id/2080777/
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Human Security in Asia

Words: 3327 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43222906

Threats to security are seen to come not only from external military aggression but also from a myriad of internal challenges -- separatist movements, social unrest, or the collapse of the political system." -- Anwar 2003,

With the international attention given to "military aggression," especially external military aggression, in recent years, it is easy to allow one's idea of was security means to become clouded with Hobbesian and Machiavellian notions of armed conflict, with "war on terror" images of military and intelligence operations hunting down terrorists, and with the debate on nuclear proliferation in developing (or underdeveloped) nations like Iran and North Korea. What these definitions of security lack, however, is a full understanding of the term; military operations and protection from terrorist attacks are most certainly important factors in a nation's security, however, they are far from being the total measure of peace and stability in a society.

Anwar's…… [Read More]

Stockholm Initiative on Global Security and Governance, 1991. Common Responsibility in the 1990s. Stockholm: Prime Minister's Office.

Timothy, K., 2004. "Human Security Discourse at the United Nations," in Peace Review, 16(1), pp. 19-24.

United Nations Development Program, Human Development Report, 1994. http://hrd.undp.org/reports/global/1994/en/.
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Semantics A Tool for Shaping

Words: 3085 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89126084

They're discussing them, talking to people from around the glove where the events unfolded, and then creating chat forums to engage in intellectual debate and sharing of ideas. They are talking about what the news media is reporting, whether or not it is slanted toward a political ideology, and assessing the information. Everyone, it seems, has faster access to broader sources of news and ideas, and they are using that information to form ideas and conclusions about political leaders and how those leaders respond to local, national, and world situations, people, and events.

How the Public Interprets Political Semantics and Use the Internet to Impact Policy and Government

One of the most significant examples of how the internet has facilitated the public's access to information, and how people world-wide have analyzed political semantics and used the information to shape policy and government is the second term of America's former President…… [Read More]

Reference List

Fisher, F., Miller, G., and Sidney, M. (2007). Handbook of Public Policy Analysis:

Theory, Politics, and Method,

Feldman, O. And Landtsheer, C. (Eds) (1998). Politically Speaking: A Worldwide

Examination of Language Used in the Public Sphere, Praeger Publishers,
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Bergson and Kubrick How I

Words: 3234 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88954084

And Sellers plays the repressed social engineer Strangelove, the timid Merkin Muffley, and the persevering Mandrake -- all with mechanical precision. Kubrick's unflinching camera acts as a character, too, slyly observing the exposition of humanity in all its grimly humorous glory.

This film belongs to a culture that has rejected the status quo -- the quaint picturesque comedies of the 1940s and 1950s; it belongs to a culture that is bordering on nihilism, anarchy, revolution -- anything that will help it to get away from the culture that has brought us the faceless, nameless idiots running the ar Room in Dr. Strangelove. The film offers no solutions -- it only asks us to present ourselves to world with fresh eyes, a pure soul able and willing to laugh at its human foibles and failings, and begin to meditate upon a new direction, a new solution perhaps to the problem of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle. Poetics. Sacred-texts. 13 May 2013. Web. < http://www.sacred-

texts.com/cla/ari/poe/poe06.htm>

Bergson, Henri. Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic. NY: MacMillan,

1914. Print.
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60's in America

Words: 2162 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88077308

Sixties in America

60s in America

Debating the easons for the U.S. Entry into the Vietnam War

From 1960s to late 1970s, American army experienced the Vietnam War, which was not well understood irrespective of lasting for many years. There were no clear consensus to its purpose, and it divided the country at a time when it most needed to be unified. The war left scars to many Americans that will take long to heal. There are no clear information regarding the reasons behind the war but historical records indicate that the war started with the sending of American advisors to train the South Vietnam army. The intentions were to assist the South Vietnamese army resist aggression from the north. The roles later changed, and it turned out to be an American led and financed war. From the late 1960s, the American government realized the war would be endless and…… [Read More]

References

Porta, G. Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to war in Vietnam. London:

University of California Press, 2006. Print

Weist, A.A. The Vietnam War. New York: Rosen Publishing Group Inc., 2009. Print

Christopher, R. The Vietnam War / the American War: Images and Representation in Euro-
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Why the U S Government Should Focus Domestically

Words: 1841 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59884669

Foreign Policy

Strategy that has always been used in regard to foreign policy has somehow left the United State not to be in a position to implement the domestic policy effectively and this has made the citizen feel the effect of this wrong strategy towards foreign policy. Economically, in terms of security, and our relation with other countries have deteriorated because of this. Different scholars and some politician have already voiced their concerns on how the rise of China is slowly shipping away at the United States' preponderance of power, the budget crisis, and involvement into the two long wars that have left the U.S. military as well as the public be exhausted. Hence they have seen the need for United State to minimize its global military presence, shed the security ties it has overseas, and minimize its effort of leading the liberal international order and just concentrate more domestically.…… [Read More]

References

Barry R. Posen., "The Case for a Less Activist Foreign Policy" Pull Back | Foreign Affairs. (2013). http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/138466/barry-r-posen/pull-back

Paul Richter, "Obama's Nuanced Foreign Policy Evident in Libya vs. Syria,"

LA Times, April 1, 2011.  http://articles.latimes.com/2011/apr/01/world/la-fg-us-syria-20110401 

Peter Trubowitz, "Regional Shifts and U.S. Foreign Policy," in Michael Cox
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The Relationship Between Politics and Films in the U S

Words: 2677 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68295495

Cinema and American Politics

The modern politics of the U.S. and their imperialistic manifestations within the global political economy (GPE) have often been reflected in the mainstream Hollywood films of the era yet simultaneously criticized and satirized by auteur and/or independent filmmakers, such as Kubrick with his 1964 Dr. Strangelove or Oliver Stone's JFK. While political science is a field in which the dynamics of political discourse may be examined more directly, an analysis of the cinematic representation of American politics as depicted in film can provide an alternative assessment of the life of U.S. political forces, how they are perceived to operate in popular film, and how popular political beliefs are shaped and communicated to citizens as a result. For instance, Spielberg's Lincoln and his recent ridge of Spies are two films that celebrate some aspect of the American political ideal (such as freedom, unity, integrity, and democracy). Yet…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benoit, William; Nill, Dawn. "Oliver Stone's Defense of JFK." Communication

Quarterly, vol. 46, no. 2 (1998): 127-143.

Cole, David. Republican Party Animal. WA: Feral House, 2014.

Elliott, William; Schenck-Hamlin, William. "Film, Politics and the Press: The Influence
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History and War

Words: 1504 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62669133

great wars of the twentieth century can be classified as "total wars" not because of their far-reaching effects, although many of them have been global wars. Rather, the term "total war" refers more to the all-encompassing effect of war on the cultures involved. Total wars alter civilian mentality and ideology in a way traditional wars do not. Patriotism and nationalism are by no means new concepts; nor is taking civilian casualties a new practice. But since World War One, total wars have taken on new meanings and transformed political ideologies.

The term "total war" seems to have originated during World War One, when the idea of a "People's War" gained popularity. As burgeoning nationalism changed the face of European geographical boundaries, national identities fostered a fresh sense of patriotism. The 19th century saw the unification of Germany following a series of battles that incidentally led up to the First World…… [Read More]

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Cassandra Written by Christa Wolf

Words: 1455 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56943618

However, she is no bloodless female, absent of sexuality, despite her resistance of Apollo. In this respect, Wolf does update her story -- rather than a virgin or a sexless prophetess, Cassandra does have a relationship with Aeneas. She loves this hero with the ardor of a young woman, calling him the soul of Troy. But because he is a man, unlike Cassandra, Aeneas can master history and triumph. The admiration of Aeneas indicates the verisimilitude Wolf brings to her tale -- Cassandra has emotions and feelings, rather than simply spouts words, as in Agamemnon.

Wolf also interjects anecdotes into the story to make it more clearly told with Trojan eyes such as the Trojan's allegation that Helen was abducted because Priam's sister Hesione's eloped with a Spartan. Again, this underlines Wolf's theme of women as pawns and spoils of war -- it does not matter what Helen or Hesione…… [Read More]

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Peaceful Place Than it Was

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31596284

Those three activities were: educational and cultural exchange, humanitarian relief, and peace (Lyrie, 2002, 55). Of course, during that time the level, affordability and speed of modern communications was not what it is today. The early efforts in the three categories that actually serve as the basis for the global peace initiative today involved participants of the sciences, political, economic and sociological communities in problem identifying and solving conferences, meetings, and summits held around the world. Today, these same kinds of communications are being held amongst average citizens from nearly every country around the world who are finding that we all have so much in common and that our different cultures and traditions are more interesting than threatening.

It would be fantastical not to acknowledge the forces opposing world peace and the celebration of cultural exchange and traditions. Today, those forces are represented by the acts of terrorism that is…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105855595

Iriye, Akira. Global Community: The Role of International Organizations in the Making of the Contemporary World. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002. Questia. 8 May 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105855597.

A www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5011706096

Last, Jonathan V. "God on the Internet." First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life Dec. 2005: 34+. Questia. 8 May 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5011706096.
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Ronald Reagan Contemporary Role Model

Words: 1316 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62936477

Ronald Reagan with his positive and authentic leadership led America to victory in what was known as "The Cold War." Emulation of this type of leader means that one possesses the ability to see the issues across-the-board and with a strong focus on positive attributes or the organization or administration and in the case of Ronald Reagan, upon the strength of the American people one has the characteristics necessary to lead a mass change that stretches all across the political landscape as well as changing the reality for all involved.

IV. Greatest Communicator the White House Ever Had

In the C News article entitled: "Reagan's Mixed White House Legacy" it is stated that during the eight years that Ronald Reagan was president "he left his mark on the lives of millions of Americans, and his presidency came to define an era." (C News, 2004) Related as well is that the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Robinson, Peter M. (2004) Morning Again in America. Hoover Digest. 2004 No. 3. Online available at http://www.hoover.org/publications/digest/3020276.html

Hubbell, Larry (1991) Ronald Reagan as Presidential Symbol Maker: The Federal Bureaucrat as Loafer, Incompetent Buffoon, Good Ole Boy, and Tyrant. The American Review of Public Administration, Vol. 21, No. 3 (1991) SAGE Publications.

Kengor, Paul (2000) Reagan among the Professors: His Surprising Reputation. Policy Review, 98, Dec 1999/Jan 2000.

Reagan's Mixed White House Legacy (2004) BBC News Sunday 6 June, 2004. Online available at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/213195.stm.
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The Importance of International Relations

Words: 966 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29031266

human being is a fickle creature, yet marvelous as well. Many have said in recent times that the human race will die within the next half century. Not of plagues or illness, not from an asteroid hitting the planet. No, rather, people surmise the human race will meet it's end due to international relations and foreign policy. In this world today, thousands of nuclear weapons and bombs exist. More nations have attempted to acquire them. Terrorists have become armed with suicide bombing jackets and vests and thousands end up meeting their fate, appearing on the tragic side of the news.

Along with the terrorist attacks are the bevy of problems experienced by man due to lack of resources and extreme poverty. There are people living in mansions while countless others have no access to clean water. The way the international system works, operates is flawed. In order to potentially fix…… [Read More]

References

Brocklehurst, M. (2006). Why international relations is the key to all our futures.The Independent. Retrieved 27 November 2015, from http://www.independent.co.uk/student/magazines/why-international-relations-is-the-key-to-all-our-futures-409792.html

Forsythe, D. (2000). Human rights in international relations. Cambridge [England]: Cambridge University Press.

List25.com,. (2015). Retrieved 28 November 2015, from http://list25.com/the-25-most-polluted-places-on-earth/5/
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International Conflict Between U S and

Words: 2046 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60891914

It is necessary to underscore this importance given the current fragility of the international trading system amid a global resurgence of protectionist pressures due to the deepening economic crisis (Bown, 2009).

In 2006, and in response to increased political pressure by the U.S. Congress, Washington initiated the current U.S. strategy of using the judicial forum of the WTO to manage bilateral trade frictions with Beijing. In March 2006, Canada and the European Community (EC) joined the United States in the first dispute by challenging China's discriminatory treatment of imported automobile parts. In 2007, the United States and Mexico disputed China's system of subsidizing domestic industries. Also in 2007, the United States initiated two complementary disputes over China's treatment of imported movies, music, and books, both Beijing's failure to enforce American intellectual property rights protection and its creation of regulatory hurdles that impede Hollywood film studios and other media and publishing…… [Read More]

References

Bown, Chad P. (2009). U.S. -- China Trade Conflicts and the Future of the WTO. Retrieved April

0, 2010 from Web site: http://fletcher.tufts.edu/forum/archives/pdfs/33-1pdfs/Bown.pdf

Gross, Daniel. (2009). Chicken Feet and Chump Change. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from Newsweek Web site: http://www.newsweek.com/id/216754

Lum, Thomas and Nanto, Dick K. (2007). China's Trade with the United States and the World.
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Perceptions How the Membership of

Words: 2132 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4978235

Where, Russia feels that the altic States are having an input on what kind of policy will be used, and how it is applied to the country. This is problematic, because it gives Russia a sense as if they are losing influence.

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats

The different strengths of this relationship are: it allows the EU to be able to use their economic, political and military power collectively. For the Russia, their biggest strength is the natural resources they produce and the fact that they are in between Asia / Europe. As far as the altic States is concerned, their strength would be the ability to embrace the ideas of the West and to become productive members of the EU.

The various weaknesses for the EU are: pushing Russia to embrace changes to fast and not being flexible, in how their policies are applied. In the case of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Antonenko, C. (2005). Estonian Russian Relations. Russia and the European Union. (pp. 211 -- 212). New York, NY: Routledge.

Buhbe, M. (2005). Russia, the EU and the Baltic States. (pp. 5 -- 27).

Chebakova, A. (2010). Rethinking a Problematic Relationship. University of Victoria.

Melvin, N. (2008). The EU Strategy for Central Asia. EU Central Asia Monitoring. 1.