Nursing Metaparadigm Essays (Examples)

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Nursing My Nursing Autobiography

Words: 2412 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8784518

Personal Nursing Philosophy

My Nursing Autobiography

I have dreamt of being a nurse all my life. My mother and older cousins tell me stories of how I loved to line up my dolls and animals, place bandages over them to nurse their 'injuries' and stick branches in their armpits to have a feel of their temperature. Well, I believe these stories because to this day, these are the very things that keep my life going; I derive so much satisfaction from just being able to help people when they are in no position to help themselves. I took an elective nursing course in high school, where I was supposed to report at the local facility at least once every week to assist in the administration of basic care to patients. This marked the beginning of my career in nursing, and since then, I have logged almost 15 years of experience…… [Read More]

References

Reed, P. (2012). A Treatise on Nursing Knowledge Development for the 21st Century: Beyond Postmodernism. In P. Reed & N. Shearer (Eds.), Perspectives of Nursing Theory (6th ed.) (pp. 37-46). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Reed, P. & Lawrence, L. (2008). A Paradigm for the Production of Practice-Based Knowledge. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(4), 422-432

Volker, D.L. & Limerick, M. (2007). What Constitutes a Dignified Death? The Voice of Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses. Clin Nurse Spec., 21(5), 241-247
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Nursing Theory and Practice

Words: 1856 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4159998

autobiography of the author of this report. The remainder of the report will mostly focus on the four meta-paradigms of nursing. Of course, those meta-paradigms are patient, nurse, health and environment. The author will also offer two practice-specific concepts from the scholarly literature that can be applied to the career and environment of the author of this report. Next up will be a list of propositions that will number five in total. As suggested and required by the assignment, the paper will integrate these discrete elements and in a way that connects to the concepts described. While analysis of the nursing professional can get a little silly and/or delve too much into a bit of navel-gazing, the profession is indeed noble and deep and is thus worthy of the proper full analysis.

Biography

The author of this report started as an electrocardiogram (EKG) technician and nursing assistant while the author…… [Read More]

References

Lee, R.C., & Fawcett, J. (2013). The Influence of the Metaparadigm of Nursing on Professional Identity Development Among RN-BSN Students. Nursing Science

Quarterly, 26(1), 96-98. doi:10.1177/0894318412466734

Schim, S.M., Benkert, R., Bell, S.E., Walker, D.S., & Danford, C.A. (2007). Social

Justice: Added Metaparadigm Concept for Urban Health Nursing. Public Health
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Nursing Is One of Those Professions That

Words: 786 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85517325

Nursing is one of those professions that provides the opportunity not only to further oneself on a professional level, but also on a personal level. It provides the individual with the opportunity to connect with others by providing a platform of health care, while also providing a helping hand that promotes not only short-term healing, but also long-term well-being. This makes nursing one of the most caring professions, as it provides the nurse with the opportunity to use his or her skills, and also to lend a hand above the duties of simple physical health care. In this way, nursing extends to caring for the whole person rather than the physical being alone. This is one of the major factors that has attracted me to the profession throughout my life.

According to Limon (2001), there are four central concepts that are central to the metaparadigm of nursing, including the person…… [Read More]

References

Kocisko, D. (2010, Jan 23). Counselor, patient advocate, researcher, teacher -- and nurse: A Nurse's Journal. Retrieved from:  http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2010/01/counselor_patient_advocate_res.html 

Limon, C. (2007). The Components of the Metaparadigm for Nursing. Nutrition and Health Hub. Retrieved from: http://smalldogs2.com/NutritionHealthHub/The_Components_of_the_Metaparadigm_for_Nursing.html
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Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77625252

Nurses may feel as if they do not have anyone who understands them: even their non-nursing partners may not seem to truly comprehend what they deal with on a regular basis, day in and day out at the hospital. Nurses may be isolated from one another in the hospital, too busy to 'talk shop' in a positive way with like-minded colleagues, or deal with doctors who are not sympathetic to the unique demands of nursing. Nurses may also find it difficult to have an appropriate work and life balance, as increasingly they are pressured to do more and more at work, to make up for declining numbers of caregivers at the facilities where they work. They may be called upon to perform many additional duties traditionally performed by doctors and physician's assistants that strain at the traditional definitions of nursing.

Nurses may feel as if their unique insights as nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnout: Warning signs. NurseWeek. 97.2.

Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.nurseweek.com/features/97-2/burn2.html

Gelinas, Lillee. (2003, October 1). Addressing nurse burnout - Changing culture is the cure

Staffing the Suite. Endonurse. Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.endonurse.com/articles/3a1staffing.html
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Nursing Philo

Words: 1623 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75384377

Nursing Philosophy

Concept Synthesis on Personal Nursing Philosophy

Nursing Autobiography

My interest in nursing peaked at an early age when I attended Clara Barton High School for health professions in Brooklyn NY and graduated in 1991. I first worked as a nurse's aide and home health aide for about two years and found this position to be quite rewarding. I subsequently moved to North Carolina where I took the CNA course in 1995 and began working as a CNA at various nursing homes and hospitals in the regional area. My experience as a CNA certainly helped me in my journey and provided the foundation for the later developments in my career.

Later I moved to Las Vegas in 1997 where I got married in 1998. After forming this union I went back to school for my BSN in 2002 while working as a CNA. I finished my BSN from Nevada…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Andrews, H., & Roy, C. (1991). The Adaptive Model. Norwalk: Appleton and Lange.

Denler, H., Wolters, C., & Benzon, M. (2013). Social Cognitive Theory. Retrieved from Education:  http://www.education.com/reference/article/social-cognitive-theory/ 

Farlex. (2011). The Medical Dictionary. Retrieved from Farlex:  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/adaptation+model 

Nursing Theory. (2011). Sister Callista Roy. Retrieved from Nursing Theory:  http://nursing-theory.org/nursing-theorists/Sister-Callista-Roy.php
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Nursing Theory Nursing Is a

Words: 883 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65138438



A person's health is an ever-changing state of being resulting from the interaction with the environment. Optimum health is the actualization of both innate and obtained human potential gained through rewarding relationships with others, obtaining goals and maintaining expert personal care. Adaptations can be made as required to maintain stability and structural integrity. A person's state of health can vary from wellness to illness, disease, or dysfunction. Professional nursing is founded on the need to promote wellness practices, the attentive treatment of persons who are acutely or chronically ill or dying, and restorative care of patients during convalescence and rehabilitation. It also includes the education and measurement of those who perform or are learning to perform nursing responsibilities, the support and communication of research to enhance knowledge and practice, and the management of nursing in healthcare delivery systems. Nursing practice centers on the application of a body of knowledge in…… [Read More]

Johnston, N., Rogers, M., Cross, N. And Sochan, a.(2007) Global and planetary health:

teaching as if the future matters. Nursing Education Perspectives 26(3), 152

Nyatanga, L. (2005) Nursing and the philosophy of science. Nurse Education Today 25(8), 670-675
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Nursing Knowledge Without a Doubt

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90605561

The nurse is often expected to act and react only with empirical information, however personal knowledge is considered equally as important by many nurse educators and researchers (Chinn & Kramer 2004). This also helps to explain why "health" and "environment" are considered distinct major components in the metastudy of nursing; both can be understood on highly subjective terms, with the concept of "good health" changing from patient to patient, or "person" to "person." Environment, too, has a major effect on the practice of nursing and the growth of the nursing body of knowledge.

3)

My personal philosophy of nursing centers on the belief that each individual person under my care deserves full attention and the unique application of my knowledge in addressing their immediate and long-term needs and concerns. That is, each person should benefit as much as possible from the full extent of my nursing knowledge, while still being…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2004). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Fawcett, J. (2006). "Commentary: Finding patterns of knowing in the work of Florence Nightingale." Nursing outlook 54(5), pp. 275-7.
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Nursing Concept Theoretical Background One of the

Words: 3582 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46011406

Nursing Concept

Theoretical Background

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. In many ways, too, modern technology has advanced further than societal wisdom, especially when confronting the issue of death. The modern nurse's role is to create a nurse-patient culture that encourages the individual to take responsibility for their healthcare and, in partnership with the nurse, to be involved in their recovery. The modern complexities of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Basford, L. And O. Slevin. (2003). Theory and Practice of Nursing: An Integrated Approach to Caring Practice. New York: Nelson Thomas.

Beckstead, J. And Beckstead, L. (2004). A multidimensional analysis of the epistemic origins of nursing theories, models and frameworks. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43

(1): 113-22.

Cohen, J. (1991). Two portraits of caring: a comparison of the artists - Leininger
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Nursing Leadership Theories Nursing Leadership Comparison and

Words: 1627 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51090014

Nursing Leadership Theories

NURSING LEADERSHIP: COMPARISON AND ANALYSIS OF CONCEPTS & THEORIES

The work of Cherie and Gebrekida (2005) report that there is both formal and informal leadership in that managers are formally "delegated authority, including the power to reward or punish. A manager is expected to perform functions such as planning, organizing, directing (leading) and controlling (evaluating)." On the other hand, informal leaders are "not always managers performing those functions required by the organization. Leaders often are not even part of the organization. Florence Nightingale, after leaving the Crimea, was not connected with an organization but was still a leader." (Cherie and Gebrekida, 2005)

Trait Theories

Early leadership theories included that of 'trait theories' which held a fundamental belief that "leaders are born, not made." Trait theory makes the assumption that an individual has "certain innate abilities, personality traits or other characteristics in order to be a leader." (Cherie…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Swansburg, C. Russel (2002). Introduction to Management and Leadership for Nurse.

Cherie, A. And Gebrekida. AB (2005) Nursing Leadership and Management. 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.cartercenter.org/resources/pdfs/health/ephti/library/lecture_notes/nursing_students/LN_nsg_ldrshp_final.pdf
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Role of Advanced Practice Nurse

Words: 3341 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91654659

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

Framework for Clinical Practice

Person/Client/Client System

Environment

Health

Nursing/APN (Factors Effecting APN's Practice and Implementation of the APN

Nursing Process)

Interrelationships of Client System, Environment, Health, and Nursing/APN

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

esearch shows that an advanced practice nurse (APN) is first of all a nurse that has been recognized as a person that has advanced education. This person is also known t knowledge and skills prepared at the masters or doctorate level. It advanced practice nurse have a broader scope of practice than egistered Nurses (N) often performing the same duties as those that are doctors. Their primary care duties involve things such as diagnosing and managing the treatment of chronic and acute illnesses. Advanced practice nurses are the ones that keep the emphasis on advanced practice nurse and health promotion, with a stress on wellness. Advanced practice nurses may choose to work…… [Read More]

References:

Castner, D. (2011). The "coming out" of the advanced practice nurse. Nephrology Nursing Journal,, 28(4), 474.

Delametter, G.L. (2002). Advanced practice nursing and the role of the pediatric critical care nurse practitioner. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly,, 21(4), 16-21.

Swain, S.M. (2009). The role of clinical nurse educators in organ procurement organizations. . Progress in Transplantation, 284-7.

Villanueva, N.B.-R.-A. (2008). The role of the advanced practice nurse in neuroscience nursing: Results of the 2006 AANN membership survey. .Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 40(2), 119-24.
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Clinical Nurse Specialist's Practice-Specific Concepts

Words: 1769 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82480141

Practice-Specific Concepts

The nursing practice is a profession that is based on conceptual and theoretical models that help in guiding patient safety and quality initiatives. The use of conceptual and theoretical models is an important part in nursing practice that is applied across the various disciplines in this profession. As a clinical nurse specialist, nursing conceptual and theoretical models play a crucial role in achieving the specific goal of identifying, recognizing, treating, and monitoring illnesses or diseases. The process of using nursing conceptual and theoretical models involves developing practice-specific concepts relating to the specific professional practice and creating a personal philosophy and practice guideline. The practice-specific concepts should incorporate the four basic metaparadigms of nursing theory and be supported by research and concepts.

Overview of My Professional Practice and Four Metaparadigms

A clinical nurse specialist is a nurse professional or practitioner who provides a crucial link with regards to detecting,…… [Read More]

References

"Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice." (n.d.). American Nurses Association. Retrieved April

18, 2015, from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ Policy-Advocacy/Positions-and-Resolutions/ANAPositionStatements/Position-Statements-Alphabetically/prtetcldv14444.html

Lyon, B.L. & Davidson, S.B. (2004). Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education. Retrieved April 18, 2015, from  http://www.nacns.org/docs/NACNS-Statement.pdf 

Masters, K. (2014). Framework for Professional Nursing Practice. In Role development in professional nursing practice (3rd ed., Chapter 2, pp.47-87). Retrieved from  http://samples.jbpub.com/9781449691509/81982_CH02_Pass1.pdf
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Understanding Nursing Theory

Words: 1782 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65561219

Nursing Theory -- oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation Model is one of the most commonly cited and used options when it comes to nursing theories. It has been in existence since 1976, and has had a number of years to be adjusted and changed to work with the adjustments that have occurred in the field of nursing over time (Alligood, 2011). Being able to adapt and change is a very important part of nursing, because all patients are different. Additionally, treatments and medications change rapidly, and that can be difficult to keep up with if a nurse is not focused on adapting his or her style and beliefs to the changing nature of medicine. Here, the importance of nursing theory will be explored, along with the key points that are used in the oy Adaptation Model. The views and ideas that the model provides when it comes to nursing…… [Read More]

References

Alligood, M.R. (2011). The power of theoretical knowledge. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 304-305.

Polit, D.F., & Beck, C.T. (2013). Essentials of nursing research. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Roy, C. (2011). Extending the Roy adaptation model to meet changing global needs. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 345-351.

Roy, C. (2011). Research based on the Roy Adaptation Model last 25 years. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 312-320.
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Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Nursing Can Be

Words: 4161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25325887

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing:

Nursing can be described as a science and practice that enlarges adaptive capabilities and improves the transformation of an individual and the environment. This profession focuses on promoting health, improving the quality of life, and facilitating dying with dignity. The nursing profession has certain theoretical foundations that govern the nurses in promoting adaptation for individuals and groups. These theoretical foundations include theories, theory integration, reflection, research and practice, and assimilation.

Grand Nursing Theory:

There are several grand nursing theories that were developed by various theorists including the Science of Unitary Human Beings by Martha ogers, Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model, and Systems Model by Betty Neuman. Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model is based on the consideration of the human being as an open system. She argues that the system reacts to environmental stimuli via cognator and regulator coping techniques for individuals. On the other hand, the…… [Read More]

References:

American Sentinel (2012). 5 Steps for Nurses to Stay Updated with Health Care Changes.

Retrieved September 4, 2013, from http://www.nursetogether.com/5-steps-for-nurses-to-stay-updated-with-health-care-changes

Andershed, B. & Olsson, K. (2009). Review of Research Related to Kristen Swanson's Middle-range Theory of Caring. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23, 598-610.

"Application of Theory in Nursing Process." (2012, January 28). Nursing Theories: A
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Theoretical Foundations of Nursing First Half

Words: 2037 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10078501

diverse population nurses must attend to, the concept of 'transcultural' nursing is important to understand. Instead of viewing health as a universal concept, transcultural nursing attempts to understand the conceptual building blocks of the nursing profession as cultural products that are socially-constructed. It strives to understand the similarities and differences between different health attitudes and practices (Leininger 1991). First developed by Madeline Leininger, transcultural nursing is founded upon the idea that the "health care providers need to be flexible in the design of programs, policies, and services to meet the needs and concerns of the culturally diverse population, groups that are likely to be encountered" (Transcultural nursing, 2012, Current Nursing).

Nurses must be culturally astute and adapt their practices to patient's cultural needs as well as to physical needs. This concept has been somewhat controversial within the nursing profession given that Western medicine's emphasis on preserving life and optimizing treatment…… [Read More]

References

Adult obesity facts. (2013).CDC. Retrieved:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html 

Dorothea Orem's self-care deficit theory. (2012). Nursing Theories. Retrieved:

http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html

Milligan, F. (2008) Child obesity 2: recommended strategies and interventions. Nursing Times;
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Leadership -- Nursing Discover and or Create an

Words: 1853 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78008427

Leadership -- nursing

Discover and/or create an image, poem, quote, or selection of music that symbolizes, or speaks to you of, what it means to be a caring nurse in the organizational context. Describe why you have selected this symbol. Link your personal understanding gained by reflecting on your authentic "piece" to course literature to reveal resonance, differences and new insights.

According to Bonnie Raingruber in "Meanings in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing" from the Jan-Mar 2004 edition of The Journal of Child and Adolescent Psycatric Nursing by familiarizing the nurse or patient reader and nurse and patient writer with new worlds of experience, poetry increases one's capacity to tolerate pain, understand oneself, and other people. Poetry is "dialogical: it seeks in the listener an ally whose empathy will take the form of sharing the survivor's anguish and struggle" (Kaminsky, 1998, p. 408). In light of this insight, poetry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kaminsky, M. (1998). "Voicing voicelessness: On the poetics of faith." American Journal of Psychoanalysis. 58, pp.405-416.

Neuman, B., & Fawcett, J. (Eds.) (2002). The Neuman Systems Model. Fourth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Raingruber, Bonnie. (Jan-Mar 2004) "Meanings in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing." The Journal of Child and Adolescent Psycatric Nursing.

Wendt, D.A., & Vale, D.J. (1999). "Managing quality and risk." In P.S. Yoder-Wise (Ed.), Leading and managing in nursing. Second Edition. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, pp. 173-189).
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Future Development of Nursing Needs to Address

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3222427

future development of nursing needs to address. However, it is possible to stratify these issues into ones which are the most pressing at this particular point in time -- to effectively coalesce some of the minor issues and align them with larger ones so that the most salient ones are addressed first. Perhaps the most eminent of these for quite some time is the shortage of nursing. This issue has only become exacerbated in the wake of the actualization of the Affordable Care Act, in which there is a shortage of all health care professionals. Another nursing issue that appears equally important is the facilitation of the environment in rendering the most effective care. This particular issue relates to the general shift going on in the health care model effected within the United States, in which it is advisable and more efficacious to utilize approaches that emphasize wellness in a…… [Read More]

References

ANA Code of Ethics (Read Over/Review): http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.pdf

Kleffel, D.(2006) The evolution of the environmental metaparadigm. In L.C. Andrist, P.K. Nicholas, K.A. Wolf (Eds.) A history of nursing ideas (pp. 97- 108). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Mason, D.J., Leavitt, J.K. And Chafee, M.W. (Eds.). (2012). Policy and politics in nursing and health care (6thed.) St. Louis: Saunders / Elsevier.
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Components Contemporary Nursing Knowledge The Article Include

Words: 987 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56065054

components contemporary nursing knowledge. The article include: • Concept triangulation • Metaparadigms • Philosophies • Conceptual models theory.

Nursing concept: The relational theory of nursing

According to the article "A theory of the relational work of nurses" by Daniela Terrizzi DeFrino from esearch and Theory for Nursing Practice, because nursing has always been conceptualized as a 'caring' profession in a demeaning fashion, quite often some nurses are apt to deemphasize this aspect of their work. This is particularly true in the modern, time and cost-conscious healthcare environment, where the relational aspects of healthcare treatment are discounted. "The relational work exists but is, as a general rule, taken for granted as 'nice' and not valued as the skillful and effective process that it is. It is valued neither by nurses explicitly nor by management in general" (DeFrino 2010: 294). This article asks an important question: in the new world of healthcare,…… [Read More]

Reference

DeFrino, Daniela Terrizzi "A theory of the relational work of nurses." Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, 23 (4): 294-311. Retrieved from FindArticles.com November 24, 2010 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_7724/is_200912/ai_n45881708/
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Range Theory Mid-Range Theory Middle Range Nursing

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82015649

ange Theory

Mid-range theory

Middle ange Nursing Theorist: ozzano Locsin

Biography/Education

Dr. ozzano Locsin attained a PhD in nursing at the University of the Philippines in 1988. He is currently a tenured Professor of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. Locsin has extensive experience in nursing research in a variety of nations: "Through the Fulbright Scholar Award, he developed the first Masters program in Nursing in Uganda while researching the phenomenon 'waiting-to-know' and the lived experiences of persons exposed to patients who died of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever" (ozzano Locsin, 2011, Pro-Libraries). His current research interests focus on themes of technology and caring in nursing and "life transitions in human health" (ozzano Locsin, 2011, Pro-Libraries). Locsin calls his mid-range theory the "technological competency as caring model."

Theory development: How the theorist came about to develop his/her theory

Locsin's theory arose because of the frustrations he perceived in nurses when they were coping…… [Read More]

References

Locsin, Rozzano C. (2005). Technological competency as caring in nursing.

Sigma Theta Tau International

Parker, Marilyn E & Marlaine C. Smith. (2010). Nursing theories & Nursing practice.

F.A. Davis Company.
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Integration of Participatory Development and

Words: 3931 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28020840

" (Health Care System, Canada, 2007)

V. THEORETICAL ASIS of OREM'S SELF-CARE MODEL

Social Learning Theory was developed by andura (1987, 1986) who held that behavior results from the individual's personal and environmental factors. It was stated in findings of a study reported by Hyndman et al. (1993) that there is a need to change the individual's environment in order to encourage positive health behavior and that there is a need to correct misperceptions about health. Training and development of skills is necessary in creation of new behaviors and in approaching solutions as well as are role models and self-efficacy. In Orem's conceptualization of health "the concept of wholeness, soundness and well-being are closely integrated." (Health Care Canada, 2007) Orem's definition of health includes "...psychological, interpersonal and social aspects of living as well as the commonly emphasized physical aspects." (Health Care Canada, 2007) Well-being has been associated with health in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Goodwin, Marianne (1990) Is it Feasible for the Nursing Division at St. Vincent's Hospital to Adopt Dorothea Orem's Model of Nursing? Contents for the 1990 Nursing Monograph. Online available at http://www.ciap.health.nsw.gov.au/hospolic/stvincents/1990/a06.html

Hanucharurnkul, S. (2006) Nursing Knowledge Development: An Update. Online available at http://www.ra.mahidol.ac.th/rar/infor_research_rama/Annual%20Absrtract/MeetThai2006.pdf

Keeratiyutawong, P.; Hanucharurnkul, S.; Panpakdee, O.; and Melkus, G. (2006) a Self-Management Program for Improving Knowledge, Self-Care, Activities, Quality of Life, and Glycosylated HbA1c Among Thai Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Online available at http://www.ra.mahidol.ac.th/rar/infor_research_rama/Annual%20Absrtract/MeetThai2006.pdf

Zuyderduin, Johanna Regina (2004) the Buddy System of Care and Support for and by Women Living with HIV / AIDS in Botswana. University of South Africa. Online available at http://etd.unisa.ac.za/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-05/unrestricted/00thesis.pdf
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Teaching on the Cognitive Learning

Words: 9169 Length: 33 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78651518

The kidneys of someone that has chronic renal failure are generally smaller than average kidneys, with some notable and important exceptions (ogers, 2004). Two of these exceptions would be polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy (ogers, 2004). Another diagnostic tool that is used, that of the study of the serum creatinine levels, can not only diagnose chronic renal failure, but also help to distinguish it from acute renal failure, as the acute version would see a rapid and sudden spike in the serum creatinine levels over several days or several weeks, as opposed to a gradual rise that is seen over months or even over years (ogers, 2004).

Sometimes, the levels of serum creatinine have not been measured in the past, and therefore the patient is often first treated as having acute renal failure. Only when blood tests continue to show elevated serum creatinine levels and it is determined that…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Arszyla, D.M. & Gastelum, K. (2001). Coursework Document: Theorist Presentation. Retrieved at http://dana.ucc.nau.edu/~dma27/WebWizard/courseworkdoc0.html

Boston College. (2003). The Roy Adaptation Model. Retrieved at http://www2.bc.edu/~royca/

Coresh, J. & Greene, T. (2003). Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and decreased kidney function in the adult U.S. population: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Journal of Kidney Disease, 41, 1-12.
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Hildegard Peplau the Nightingale of

Words: 1812 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60714060

ut if they can manage to terminate the temporary relationship, they will become more emotionally balanced and mature persons (Young).

Why Choose the Peplau Model

oth its interpersonal theory and nursing process have a concrete sequence of use and focus on the therapeutic relationship (Current Nursing, 2012). oth utilize appropriate problem-solving techniques, which aim in common at filling the client's needs. oth use observation and communication as well as recording as basic tools, which are already used in nursing care. The four phases inter-relate and inter-weave the varying components of each phase. The Theory or model is applicable to endeavors, which follow the concepts of client, health, environment and nursing. It proceeds in a logical and systematic manner in viewing and processing nursing situations. Its generalizability rests in its simplicity in the logical progression of the partnership. It has produced testable hypotheses. It can be used in psychiatric patients. It…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Current Nursing (2012). Theory of interpersonal relation. Current: Current Nursing.

Retrieved on March 30, 2012 from http://www.currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/interpersonal_theory.html

Landry, a, (2009). Hildegard Peplau: interpersonal relations theorist. Suite 101:

Suite 101.net. Retrieved on March 30, 2012 from http://www.alicelandry.suite101.com/hildegard-peplau
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Fundamental Patterns of Knowing

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57872681

Patterns of Knowing

This nurse's experience does provide evidence of the fundamental patterns of knowing. There are overarching patterns in knowing: empiric (through the senses), ethics (obligation), personal, aesthetics (relating to the art of nursing), and emancipatory knowing (Chinn & Kramer, 2008). There are five dimensions to the knowledge process: critical questions, creative processes, formal practice of knowledge and knowing, integrative practice of knowledge and knowing, and authentication processes (Chinn & Kramer, 2008). To some degree, all of the overarching patterns in knowing and their related dimensions were in evidence in the nurse's story.

One element from the reading that seemed extremely relevant to the nurse's story was the idea that "as the scientific worldview gained dominance, so did the idea that human progress would be achieved by harnessing science to create technology for the achievement of human ends" (McEwen & Willis, 2007). The nurse in question wanted to go…… [Read More]

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Caring When Most People Are Asked 'What

Words: 1872 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18741051

Caring

When most people are asked 'what do nurses do," there is a strong likelihood that the word 'caring' will arise in the conversation. Many nurses, particularly new nurses, identify caring as one of the personal qualities that attracted them to the profession. However, caring can be a very nebulous concept, as even non-nurses give 'care' to others and non-nurses can be 'caring' people. Nursing, in an effort to create an empirical and academic basis for itself as a discipline has fought against the idea that nursing is just about caring. However, it cannot 'ignore' the idea of caring, given that one of the concepts that distinguishes nursing from other forms of medical care is its patient-centric and individualistic perspective.

I have chosen caring as the concept I will focus on in this paper, with a specific focus on Jean Watson's Theory of Caring, given that it is one of…… [Read More]

References

Cara, Chantal. (2011).A pragmatic view of Jean Watson's caring theory.

Universite de Montreal. Retrieved www.humancaring.org/conted/Pragmatic%20View.doc

Giguere, Barbara. (2002). Assessing and measuring caring in nursing and health science. Nursing Education Perspectives. Retrieved http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3317/is_6_23/ai_n28962844/

Gross, Terry. (2011). Grant Achatz: The chef who lost his sense of taste. Fresh Air. NPR.
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Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficit

Words: 3089 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90083470

In reaction, diabetes research looks into pharmacological options and changes in lifestyle to contain the trend. Recent findings point to the need for healthcare professionals to empower diabetes sufferers to take recourse in self-management as the best option at the moment (Kumar).

The purposefulness of a plan and its implementation in assisting a client with diabetes helped fill in her self-care deficit (Kumar 2007). The interpersonal relationship between a nurse and her client minimizes the stress experienced by the latter and her family. This enables the client or patient and her family to act more responsibly in health matters. An assessment and plan of care may use Orem's client-related concepts -- of self-care, self-care agency, therapeutic self-care demand and self-care deficit --, the concepts of nursing agency and nursing system and the basic conditioning factors. Integrating these concepts into other theories on health promotion and family systems may guide effective…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aldridge, V. (2005). Self-monitoring of blood, glucose invaluable in managing diabetes. 3 pages. Journal of Diabetes Nursing: SB Communications. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOMDR/is_10_9/ai_n27865119?tag=content;col1

Aliha, J.M., et al. (2006). Relation between self-care behavior and self-care needs in patients with heart failure.2 pages. Southern African Journal of Critical Care: South African Medical Association. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at http://findarticles.com/p/article/mi_6870/is_1_23/ai_n28450856?tag=content;col1

Bruce, E., et al. (2008). Dorothea Orem's theory of self-care. 38 pages. SlideShare, Inc. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at  http://www.slideshare.net/jben501/dorothea-orem-theory 

Cook, a., et al. (2006). Self-care needs of caregivers dealing with stroke. 9 pages.
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Newman's Theory of Hec the Main Purpose

Words: 2412 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6395962

Newman's theory of HEC

The main purpose of nursing theories is to improve the nursing practice, hence improving the health as well as quality of life of people, families or the community at large (Parker & Smith, 2010). Nursing theories usually provide logical methods of approaching and viewing the care of people in their own environment. Through the use of the theoretical model in care organization, the nursing focus on quality care strengthens significantly (Parker & Smith, 2010). In addition, there is consistency in communication as well as related activities in the nursing care. The development of nursing theories together with theory-guided practice models significantly improves the discipline and the professional practice of nursing (Parker & Smith, 2010).

One of the most key issues facing the nursing discipline is the artificial isolation of nursing theory and practice (Parker & Smith, 2010). Practicing nurses have the responsibility of studying and valuing…… [Read More]

References

Basavanthappa, B.T. (2007). Nursing theories. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers.

Brown. J. (2011). Health as Expanding Consciousness: A Nursing Perspective for Grounded Theory ResearchNurs Sci Q. July 2011 24: 197-201.

Dorothy A. (2006). Newman's Health as Expanding Consciousness. Nurs Sci Q. October 2006 19: 330-332.

Kathleen M. & Paula N. (2011). Health as Expanding Consciousness: Implications for Health Policy as Praxis.Nurs Sci Q. July 2011 24: 279-286.
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Grand or Mid Range Theory

Words: 3055 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90388700

ange Theory

MID ANGE THEOY OF SPIITUAL WELL BEING

Middle ange Theory of Spiritual Well Being in Illness

Nurse meta-theorists have recently been very much concerned about the different seasons of the patient's life, which has supported and promoted the development of middle range theories in the field of nursing. This is due to the reason that these theories focus on the specific health and illness issues instead of discussing the general issues. These specific health and illness issues focused in the mid range theories are extremely important for the practicing nurses as they spotlight on the particular problem and its solution.

History of Theory Development in Nursing

The practicing nurses started incorporating the nursing theories into their research and practically applying them to real situations during 1970s and 1980s. Majority of the early nursing theories fall in the category of grand theories of nursing because the concepts that described…… [Read More]

References

Barss, K. (2012). T.R.U.S.T: An affirming model for inclusive spiritual care. Journal of Holistic

Nursing. 30(1). 23-35.

Burkhart, L and Hogan, N. (2008). An Experiential Theory of Spiritual Care in Nursing Practice.

Qualitative Health Research, 18 (7), 929-940.
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Unitary Human Beings an Examination

Words: 2710 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76639135

The holistic view of the human being (i.e. The patient) and the environment is in some ways an echo of the holistic nature of the theory itself, which quite consciously and explicitly attempted to develop a theory appropriate to all aspects and situations of nursing. Because the Science of Unitary Human Beings was developed essentially from the ground up in such a conscious and comprehensive manner, it would be practically impossible for internal inconsistencies to exist.

Theoretical Significance

Just as the scope of ogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings is difficult to overstate, it is equally difficult to overestimate the impact that this theory has had on the field of nursing. Its contributions to both nursing practice and scholarship have been enormous, and as the theory continues to evolve and develop under the guidance of new scholars and practitioners its significance only grows (Butcher 2008). ogers was not the first…… [Read More]

References

Butcher, H. (2008). "Progress in the explanatory power of the science of unitary human beings." Visions, 15(2), pp. 23-36.

Farren, a. (2009). "An oncology case study demonstrating the use of Roger's science of the unitary human being and standardized nursing language." International journal of nursing terminologies and classifications 20(1), pp. 34-9.

Kim, T. (2008). "Science of unitary human beings: An update on research." Nursing science quarterly21(4), pp. 294-99.

Malinski, V. (2008). "Research diversity from the perspective of the science of unitary human beings." Nursing science quarterly21(4), pp. 291-3.
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Sister Callista Roy

Words: 3204 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41068432

oy Adaptation Theory

Callista oy: Adaptation Theory

Not every idea is perfect and neither is any person, so the propagation of theoretical stances proliferate. In the field of nursing it makes sense that there would be theories which were designed to advance the fields of care, patient psychology and of medicine's effect on the body, but care, the essence of nursing seems the most crucial. Care theories have been advanced providing guidance for every facet of the practice, and the concept of the oy adaptive model is just one of the many. This essay will examine the oy adaptive theory from every angle in an attempt to recognize its place in nursing.

The Theorist

"Sister Callista oy was born in 1939 in Los Angeles, CA" (Masters, 2011). This seems to be where all of the discussions of Ms. oy begin, and it tells the researcher three crucial items about the…… [Read More]

References

Basavanthappa, B.T. (2007). Nursing theories. New Delhi: Japee Brothers Publishing.

Butts, J.B., & rich, K.L. (2010). Philosophies and theories for advanced nursing practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chesnay, M.D. (2007). Caring for the vulnerable: Perspectives in nursing theory, practice, and research. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Current Nursing. (2010). Roy's adaptation model. Retrieved from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Roy_adaptation_model.html
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Sister Callista Roy Theory at the Age

Words: 2329 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42469924

Sister Callista oy Theory

At the age of 14 years old, Callista oy had already started working in large general hospital where she moved from being a pantry, to maid to the nurse's maid. After considerations, Callista decided to join the Sisters of Saint Joseph Carondelet where she became a member for more that 40 years of her entire life. She joined college and pursued liberal arts program where she successfully completed a program in Bachelor of Arts majoring in nursing at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles (The Trustees of Boston College, 2013).

She further pursed successfully her masters in Sociology and a doctorate in sociology as well both at University of California (Jones & Barlett, 2013). It was at this point that oy wanted to fuse both sociological approach and nursing approach to the nursing care of the patients. She is accredited for coming up with and…… [Read More]

References

Current Nursing, (2012). Application of Roy's Adaptation Model (RAM). Retrieved September 11, 2013 from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/application_Roy%27s_adaptation_model.html

Gonzalo, (2011). Theoretical Foundations of Nursing. Retrieved September 11, 2013 from  http://nursingtheories.weebly.com/sister-callista-roy.html 

Jones & Barlett, (2013). Nursing Theories: A Framework for Professional Practice. Retrieved September 11, 2013 from  http://samples.jbpub.com/9781449626013/72376_CH10_Masters.pdf 

The Trustees of Boston College, (2013). Sr. Callista Roy, Ph.D., RN, FAAN Retrieved September 11, 2013 from  http://www.bc.edu/schools/son/faculty/featured/theorist.html
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Madeleine Leineger

Words: 1733 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52985189

Madeleine Leineger

Madeleine Leininger's place of birth was Sutton, Nebraska. She earned her Ph.D. in social and cultural anthropology in 1965, from Washington University, Seattle. In her initial years of working, she was a nurse. This was where she gained insight on how important it is to care. Frequent appreciative statements from care patients inspired her to center her attention on care; she realized that 'caring' is a fundamental part of nursing. In the 50s, she worked in a guidance home for children. Madeline discovered that the recurrent habits among children seemed to have been inspired by culture. She stated that nurses had no knowledge about care and culture, and this led to their ignorance on the numerous components needed in caring for patients to support healing, wellness and compliance. This knowledge led to the introduction of transcultural nursing; a phenomenon and construct based on nursing care, in the 50s.…… [Read More]

References

Gil Wayne. (2014). Madeleine Leininger's Transcultural Nursing Theory. Nurseslabs.

Kathleen Sitzman MS, & Dr. Lisa Wright Eichelberger. (n.d.). Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care: Diversity and Universality Theory. In Kathleen Sitzman MS, & Dr. Lisa Wright Eichelberger;, Understanding the work of Nurse THeorists (pp. 93-102). Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Melanie Mcewen, & Evelyn M. Wills. (2011). Theoretical Basis for Nursing. Wolters Kluwer.
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Fill Blanks Document PDF File Submitted

Words: 534 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16540090

Mixed Method, Systematic Reviews, Integrated Reviews, Review of the Literature, Expert Opinions, Informative Articles are not appropriate for this assignment.)

Record your responses in the space provided. he boxes will expand as you type.

Your responses should be your own words and written in complete sentences. No "yes" or "no" answers. You should provide an explanation/rationale for each response.

Did the authors specifically indicate that the human rights of the subjects were protected? Did they specifically identify Institutional Review Board approval/Ethics Committee approval for this study? Did they indicate that they obtained informed consent for the study from the sample/participants? State what page numbers this information was found.

he participants gave informed consents and the procedures were performed in accordance with standards from the Committee of Human Experimentation of the University Institutional Review Board (Pieper, B., et al., 2010, p. 19).

15b: Does the study indicate that the subjects/participants received…… [Read More]

The study was identified as a quantitative study based on the research questions. Most of the answers were easily identifiable in the study and the textbook. Identifying the strengths for reliability was difficult in determining the viability of the study.

Bib1iography

Pieper, B., et al., (2010), The Impact of Vascular Leg Disorders on Physical Activity in Methadone-Maintained Adults, Res Nursing Health, 33:426-440, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Myra's Case Is Just One Instance of

Words: 1739 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1249250

Myra's case is just one instance of many that a mental health nurse encounters on a regular schedule.

Nursing is best practiced when it follows the intentions of its founder Florence Nightingale who urged that nursing should be a practice that should literally provide for and care for the patient. Nursing, in other words, should be purely patient-centered. This caring extends to all aspects not just to the illness so that one treats the patient in a holistic way, considering all components of the patient such as the family, his or her social needs, hobbies, desires, spiritual inclinations and so forth. When done in this way, nursing extends itself from an automatic, robotic procedure to something that can motivate the nurse and uplift the patient (Watson, 1998). 'Nursing', in other words, extends to caring for the patient as a whole.

An effective nurse will strive to accomplish her best in…… [Read More]

Sources

Sansoni, J et al. (2004) Anxiety and depression in community-dwelling, Italian Alzheimer's disease caregivers, retrieved from International Journal of Nursing Practice: 10: 93-100.

Hayslip, B et al. (2008) Predictors of Alzheimer's disease caregiver depression and burden: what noncaregiving adults can learn from active caregivers. Educational Gerontology, 34: 945-969,

Broe, K et al. (2007) A Higher Dose of Vitamin D Reduces the Risk of Falls in Nursing

Home Residents: A Randomized, Multiple-Dose Study JAGS 55:234 -- 239
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Understanding the Theory of Comfort

Words: 1966 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37167652

KATHAINE KOLCABA'S COMFOT THEOY

Evaluation of K. Kolcaba's Comfort Theory

Structure

Are the concepts in the theory explicitly and/or implicitly described in the theory?

(including the four concepts of the metaparadigm of nursing; nurse/nursing; person/patient; health; environment)? The descriptions of the theoretical concepts of comfort theory are provided below:

Nurse/nursing: According to Kolcaba (2003), "The term [nursing] can mean the discipline (noun) or what nursing does (the verb)" (p. 68);

Person/patient: Likewise, Kolcaba (2003) notes that "the concept [person] has been utilized as client, patient, family, community, region, or nation" (p. 68).

Health: "Health Care Needs" include those identified by the patient/family in a particular practice setting (Kolcaba, 2016, para. 3);

Environment: Generally, Kolcaba (2003) describes this concept as "where ever nurses practice" (p. 68).

b. Are the relationships of the theory concept relationships explicitly and/or implicitly described in the theory? According to Kolaba (2003), her definition characterizes comfort "as…… [Read More]

References

Goodwin, M. & Candela, L. (2012). Outcomes of newly practicing nurses who applied principles of holistic comfort theory during the transition from school to practice: A qualitative study. Nurse Education Today, 33(6), 614-619.

Kolcaba, K. Y. (1991). A taxonomic structure for the concept comfort. Image, 23(4), 237-240.

Kolcaba, K. (1994). A theory of holistic comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19, 1178-1189.

Kolcaba, K. (2003). Comfort theory and practice: A vision for holistic health care and research. New York: Springer Publishing Company.
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Pender the Founder of the

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35605773

(Pender, 2003, "Biographical Sketch") hus Pender's early nursing concerns, reflected in her HPM, have become more and more relevant to such contemporary health concerns.

Identification of the central focus and major principal of theory

Pender's Health Promotion Model incorporates nursing and behavioral science perspectives. ("Assumptions and heoretical Propositions of the Health Promotion Model (HPM)" 2003, Source: Pender, 2002) it assumes a positive view of humanity, and states that while individuals attempt to achieve a personally acceptable balance between change and stability, persons also seek to create new conditions for healthy living through which they can express their unique potential. Patients are seen as being self-aware and in charge of their own health, and are capable of actively regulating their own behavior, and transforming their own environment as well as being capable of transformation themselves. Health professionals are responsible for exerting a positive influence to facilitate these changes. ("Assumptions and heoretical…… [Read More]

The theoretical propositions of the HPM are based in the idea that prior behaviors, along with inherited and acquired characteristics all conspire to influence current health-promoting beliefs and actions. However, persons can commit to engaging in new behaviors that they perceive to be beneficial, although perceived barriers can constrain commitments to action. Perceived competence or self-efficacy to execute a given behavior increases the likelihood of commitment to action and actual performance of a positive behavior. By increasing the patient's sense of self-efficacy, there are also fewer perceived barriers to achieving a desirable health behavior, effect, and achieving the positive emotions that result from such behaviors. Such a change must come from changes in the family and lifestyle; the individual must not assume the entire burden of change. The situational environment, families, peers, and health care providers are all sources of interpersonal influence that can increase or decrease commitment to and engagement in health-promoting behavior. ("Assumptions and Theoretical Propositions of the Health Promotion Model (HPM)" 2003, Source: Pender, 2002)

Application of the theory to nursing practice, education and research

It is not very hard to anticipate the use of this model in nursing practice. Imagine a woman coming to a clinic for advice from a nurse practitioner. The woman is overweight and having difficulty coping with her child's health problems. The child is also overweight and has been recently diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. The mother says she cannot do anything to improve her health, everyone in her family is big, and she works late and can't exercise. Plus, much of family togetherness revolves around consuming the high-fat, high-sugar foods