Nursing Theorist Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
View Full Essay

Nursing Kidney Nursing Perceptions and

Words: 2121 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89660948

(2008). The study measures public opinion concerning two scenarios: one in which the kidney donor is given a fixed financial compensation; and one in which the donor is provided with health insurance coverage for life. According to the findings of the study, "although almost half of the respondents (46%) were reluctant towards introducing a system with fixed compensation to increase the number of living kidney donors, still 25% of the general public reacted positively." (Kranenburg, 1039) This study would conduct a similar comparative discussion, but would expand the number of available options discussed and would use a different sample population, as discussed in the subsequent section.

Subjects and Sampling Technique:

The subjects will be drawn from amongst nursing professionals working in randomly selected renal specialty facilities and wards. Initial contact will be made by phone with a Director of Nursing at selected facilities requesting participation. Those that agree will receive…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Conesa, C.; Rios, a.; Ramirez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Sanchez, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, L.; Ramos, F. & Parrilla, P. (2009). Attitude of Primary Care Nurses Toward Living Kidney Donation. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(9), 3626-3630.

Kranenburg, L.; Schram, a.; Zuidema, W.; Weimar, W.; Hilhorst, M.; Hessing, J. & Busschbach, J. (2008). Public Survey of Financial Incentives for Kidney Donation. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23(3), 1039-1042.

Neyhart, C. & Colaneri, J. (2004). Living Anonymous kidney donation: A solution to the organ donor shortage? Nephrology Nursing Journal. Online at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ICF/is_3_31/ai_n17207253/

Watson, J. (2007). Theory of Human Caring: Theory Evolution. University of Colorado at Denver. Online at http://www.nursing.ucdenver.edu/faculty/jw_evolution.htm
View Full Essay

Nursing Changes in Nursing Discuss

Words: 1076 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64168306



In what ways did the wave of the nursing shortage in the 1980's and in 2000 support or constrain theoretical thinking? Why? Are there ways to influence the cycle of shortage and theoretical thinking? Identify one nursing theorist that would support your discussion/views. Provide rationale for selection of theorist.

Nursing shortages have been a problem in this country for a long time. It has been found that because of these shortages there needed to be a better way to incorporate theoretical thinking into nursing education so that nurses are better prepared to be the best that they can be. The accomplishment of critical thinking abilities has been recognized as an essential product of undergraduate nursing teaching. It has been found that nursing scholars learn best by way of experiential education. Kolb's experiential learning theory is the basis for a practice incorporation technique intended to offer critical thinking skills in undergraduate…… [Read More]

References

Experiential Learning (Kolb). (2008). Retrieved September 30, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.learning-theories.com/experiential-learning-kolb.html 

Kim, Hesook Suzie. (2010). The Nature of Theoretical Thinking in Nursing. Retrieved September 29, 2010, from Web site:

http://www.springerpub.com/samples/9780826105875_chapter.pdf
View Full Essay

Nursing Philo

Words: 1623 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75384377

Nursing Philosophy

Concept Synthesis on Personal Nursing Philosophy

Nursing Autobiography

My interest in nursing peaked at an early age when I attended Clara Barton High School for health professions in Brooklyn NY and graduated in 1991. I first worked as a nurse's aide and home health aide for about two years and found this position to be quite rewarding. I subsequently moved to North Carolina where I took the CNA course in 1995 and began working as a CNA at various nursing homes and hospitals in the regional area. My experience as a CNA certainly helped me in my journey and provided the foundation for the later developments in my career.

Later I moved to Las Vegas in 1997 where I got married in 1998. After forming this union I went back to school for my BSN in 2002 while working as a CNA. I finished my BSN from Nevada…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Andrews, H., & Roy, C. (1991). The Adaptive Model. Norwalk: Appleton and Lange.

Denler, H., Wolters, C., & Benzon, M. (2013). Social Cognitive Theory. Retrieved from Education:  http://www.education.com/reference/article/social-cognitive-theory/ 

Farlex. (2011). The Medical Dictionary. Retrieved from Farlex:  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/adaptation+model 

Nursing Theory. (2011). Sister Callista Roy. Retrieved from Nursing Theory:  http://nursing-theory.org/nursing-theorists/Sister-Callista-Roy.php
View Full Essay

Nursing Concept Theoretical Background One of the

Words: 3582 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46011406

Nursing Concept

Theoretical Background

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. In many ways, too, modern technology has advanced further than societal wisdom, especially when confronting the issue of death. The modern nurse's role is to create a nurse-patient culture that encourages the individual to take responsibility for their healthcare and, in partnership with the nurse, to be involved in their recovery. The modern complexities of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Basford, L. And O. Slevin. (2003). Theory and Practice of Nursing: An Integrated Approach to Caring Practice. New York: Nelson Thomas.

Beckstead, J. And Beckstead, L. (2004). A multidimensional analysis of the epistemic origins of nursing theories, models and frameworks. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43

(1): 113-22.

Cohen, J. (1991). Two portraits of caring: a comparison of the artists - Leininger
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory in Nursing Decision-Making

Words: 826 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40721361



A nurse must weigh these variables, physical, mental, and spiritual, when advising a course of treatment and deciding how to approach a patient or patient's family. An adolescent who is an injured athlete envisioning a lucrative college scholarship might demand and be able to physically and mentally withstand a more aggressive form of treatment, due to psychological and developmental and goal-related visions (spiritual) factors than might a less motivated elderly patient.

A nurse who is training other nurses can instill consideration for all such variables in her various trainees -- and encourage nurses to engage in self-care as well as patient care on spiritual, preventative physical health care, and mental levels. Additionally, in a work environment with many diverse cultures, remind other nurses that Neuman's model has also been modified slightly to take into consideration culture as well as mind, body, and spirit -- although culture and spiritual values are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Neuman, B.M. (1990). The Neuman systems model: A theory for practice. In M.E. Parker (Ed.), Nursing theories in practice (pp. 241-261). New York: National League for Nursing.

Neuman, B.M. (Ed.). (1995). The Neuman systems model (3rd ed.). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.

Pierce, J.D., & Hutton, E. (1992). Applying the new concepts of the Neuman systems model. Nursing Forum, 27(1), 15-18.
View Full Essay

Nursing Evidence-Based Practice & Applied

Words: 3411 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29918686

This is one of the most common forms of research and, for some research questions is clearly a strong design (Ethics in Critical Care Nursing Research, 2005).

The research that was done in this article would be considered a non-experimental type. There were two types of observation that were conducted. The first type was that of focus groups and the second being the file audit, both of which are observational in nature. In this case this was the most appropriate type of research design to use. Since they were simply trying to see what was actually going on in this area and how that was affecting patients the only real way to tot this was by observation. From this article a nursing care issue that can be raised is that of how palliative care nurses manage family involvement with end of life issues. Are there any standard procedures that are…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Nursing Theory Application

Words: 748 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44487421

Nursing Theory Application

Case Study Overview from the viewpoint of a new EMT -- Patient was a 78-year-old mail presenting breathing difficulties. Patient had early stage cancer with a DRN bracelet and note. Patient's wife was aware of the DNR, but her natural reaction was to try to save her husband. The call, then, was more to assure the wife than the husband, who accepted the situation but was still distressed.

Nursing Theory Applied -- "Nursing as Caring" was developed by Boykin and Schoenhofer in the 1980s when looking at the dimensions of caring and how it applied to the overall patient/health care paradigm. In general, the theory is a framework that guides and acts as a tool box when dealing with common issues in modern health care. The central dimensions of the theory is that caring is what makes humans 'human,' that caring is a moment to moment and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cardinal Stritch University. (2010, June). Anne Boykin & Sarvina Schoenhoffer - Nursing as Caring. Retrieved from stritch.edu: http://www.stritch.edu/Library/Doing-Research/Research-by-Subject/Health-Sciences-Nursing-Theorists/Anne-Boykin-Sarvina-Schoenhofer-Nursing-as-Caring/

Kubler-Ross, E. (2007). On Grief and Grieving. New York: Scribner.

Kubler-Ross, E. (2007, April). The Kubler-Ross Grief Cycle. Retrieved from Changing Minds:: http://changingminds.org/disciplines / change_management/kubler_ross/kubler_ros s.htm

Kubler-Ross, E. (2013, January). On Death and Dying. Retrieved from ELR Foundation:  http://www.ekrfoundation.org/
View Full Essay

Nursing Timeline Week 2 & 8226 Create a

Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23992783

Nursing Timeline Week 2 • Create a 700- 1,050-word timeline paper historical development nursing science, starting Florence Nightingale continuing present. • Format timeline, word count assignment requirements met

Historical development of nursing timeline

The foundation of modern nursing. Before, nursing was largely the profession of disreputable people and not exclusively female. Based on her experiences during the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale strove to make it a respectable profession with uniform, professional standards. Her approach reduced the death toll in hospitals by 2/3rds during the Crimean War (Florence Nightingale, 2012, Biography: 1). She established the Nightingale Training School and wrote her foundational Notes on Nursing (Florence Nightingale, 2012, Biography: 2-3). Nightingale's canons of nursing compromised everything from an emphasis on proper sanitation to how the nurse should socially interact with the patient.

1880: Famed Civil War nurse Clara Barton founds the American ed Cross.

1909. Hildegard Peplau is born. Heavily influenced…… [Read More]

References

Betty Neuman's Systems Theory, 2012, Current Nursing. Retrieved:

http://www.currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Neuman.html

Clara Barton. (2012). The Civil War. Retrieved:  http://www.civilwarhome.com/bartonbio.htm 

Doctor of Philosophy. (2012). School of Nursing. Retrieved:
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory Practice Setting Provide an Overview

Words: 1696 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85539740

nursing theory practice setting.

Provide an overview of the theory

Myra Estrin Levine is known as the most important Nursing theorist for developing "The Conservation Model." Levine got a diploma in 1944 and obtained her B.S in 1949 and finished M.S.N in 1962 from Wayne State College. She acted as a specialist to healthcare facilities and colleges of nursing. Furthermore, she offered a teaching format for the medical or surgical sector of nursing and developed "The 4 Conservation Fundamentals." "She clearly connected wellness to the procedure of conservation design and viewed wellness as one of its necessary elements" (Levine, 1991).

The 3 significant ideas of the Conservation Model are 1) wholeness, 2) adaption, and 3) conservation. "Whole, wellness, hale all are sourced from the Anglo-Saxon word hal" (Levine, 1973, p. 11). Myra Levine formulated her take of wholeness as an open system, which meant checking out the components of the…… [Read More]

References

Alligood, Martha Raile (2010). Nursing theory: Utilization and application. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.

Chinn, P.L., & Kramer, M.K. (2011). Integrated knowledge development in nursing (8th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.

Current Nursing (2010). Levine's four conservation principles. Retrieved from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Levin_four_conservation_principles.html.

Levine, M.E. (1973). Introduction to Clinical Nursing (2nd Ed.). Philadelphia F.A. Davis.
View Full Essay

Nursing Conceptual Model Overview of

Words: 1005 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99461133



According to Madeline Leiningers, three models or models of guiding judgments are made by nursing professionals. A number of facets that make them provide appropriate and beneficial nursing activities and services to the people guide the decisions and action made by nurses.

The guidelines are rudimentary to providing a multicultural state of nursing care to all the patients involved. In a broader sense, the theory advocates for the provision of a broader sense of health to all the people in the world. The theory advocates for a preservation and maintenance mode of providing health services. Through this, the theory perceives a capability and possibility of having a suitable ground that enables all the finest strands concerned to provide adequate health care to all the people. The theory advocates for an accommodative and negotiate approach of health provision. Through this mode, the nurses are able to make equitable decisions that are…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M.M., & Boyle, J.S. (2008). Transcultural concepts in nursing care. Philadelphia:

Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Leininger, M. (2005). Culture Care Diversity & Universality: A Theory of Nursing. Sudbury,

MA Jones & Bartlett
View Full Essay

Nursing Process Discipline

Words: 2337 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13617456

Ida Jean Orlando 1926- Theory of the Nursing Process Discipline

The Deliberative Nursing Process Theory was developed by Ida Jean Orlando and consists of the five stages of assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. The domain main concepts are: nursing, the process of care in an immediate experience, the goal of nursing, health, sense of environment, human being, nursing client, nursing problem, nursing process, nurse, nursing therapeutics, indirect function, nursing therapeutics, and automatic activities (thoughts, feelings, actions). Orlando believed that the goal of nursing was to respond to individuals who were experiencing a sense of helplessness. She believed the nursing process of care occurred to address immediate patient needs. Orlando described the nursing process as consisting of the interaction of the behavior of the patient and the reaction of the nurse. An assumption of Orlando's theory is that the nurse cannot know that his or her approach is correct or…… [Read More]

References

Alligood, M. R., (2014). Nursing theorists and their work. Maryland Heights, Mo: Mosby/Elsevier.

Bramley, L., & Matiti, M. (2014). How does it really feel to be in my shoes? Patients' experiences of compassion within nursing care and their perceptions of developing compassionate nurses. Journal of clinical nursing, 23(19-20), 2790-2799.

College of Registered Nurses of British Colombia. (2012). Boundaries in the Nurse-Client Relationship. Retrieved May 29, 2017, from  https://www.crnbc.ca/Standards/PracticeStandards/Pages/boundaries.aspx 

Smith, M. C., & Parker, M. E. (2015). Nursing theories & nursing practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
View Full Essay

Understanding the Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing by Orem

Words: 1971 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68106373

Nursing Theorist Grid Dorothea Oren Theory

Over the years, nursing theories have been used in defining the ways healthcare is delivered through the interaction of patients and nurses. This study presents a theoretical discussion of the self-care concept in relation to health care delivery among elderly patients. The self-care concept is popular as Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing by Orem. Orem's theory perceives individuals as self-care agents equipped with unique needs. The theory focuses on transactional analysis in enhancing rehabilitative roles of nursing and positively influencing self-care agency among individuals. This creates power component based on self-care behaviors. The theory was initially defined as the analysis of exchanges between people in their interactions and communications with one another. The focus also classifies, understands, predicts and alters human behavior among the well and sick individuals. The theory supports individuals treated as adults and has a higher likelihood of using Adult ego…… [Read More]

References

Butts, J.B., Rich, K. (2012). Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Finfgeld- Connet, D (2008). Qualitative Convergence Of Three Nursing Concepts: Art Of Nursing, Presence And Caring. Journal of Advanced Nursing 63(5): 527-534.

Ranheim, A., (2010). Caring And Its Ethical Aspects -- An Empirical, Philosophical Dialog On Caring. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well- being. 4(2) p 78-85.

Ranheim. A., Karner, A., Arman, M., Rehnsfeldt, A & Bertero, C. (2010). Embodied reflection in practice- 'Touching the core of Caring'. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 16. p 241-247.
View Full Essay

Evaluating Nursing Education Assessment Tools

Words: 2195 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47398683

Nursing Education Assessment Project

Coursework early in a nursing education program covers a broad range of topics and extensive amount of details must be committed to memory. Assessments that are directly tied to coursework are primarily formative assessments, which demonstrate the ongoing learning over the period of the course. Formative assessments generally take the form of quizzes and clinical demonstrations of a particular knowledge set recently covered in during a class or classes. ummative assessments are generally used at the end of a course to assess the overall learning that has taken place during the course; summative assessments include final exams or tests, practicum demonstrations, and capstone projects.

The focus of this assessment project is a formative criterion-referenced test of general, fundamental nursing education knowledge. The items used in the test are included in Appendix A -- Nursing Education -- Fundamental Concepts. Twelve individuals were approached to take the exam…… [Read More]

Self-knowledge

*Source:

Armstrong, P. (2015). Bloom's Taxonomy. Nashville, TN: Center for Learning, Vanderbilt University.
View Full Essay

Nurse-Patient Relations the Main Focus of This

Words: 2161 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77240679

Nurse-Patient Relations

The main focus of this essay is going to concern the nurse-patient relationship idea, and why it is important. This was chosen because the researcher desired to achieve a better accepting of how a helpful nurse-patient relationship can be advanced and even from different theorists who have discovered this idea. In this essay, the researcher sets out to demonstrate what they have learnt regarding the nurse-patient relation concept and how this connection can utilized in the clinical practice setting. T The nurse patient connection, according to a study done by Press Gamey Associates Inc., creates the quality of the care experience and generates an influential influence on patient gratification. Nurses will a lot of their time with patients. Patients see nurses' relations with people among the care team and make their own conclusions about the hospital founded on what they are observing. Furthermore, nurses' approaches toward their vocation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berdes, C. & . (2001). Race relations and caregiving relationships: A qualitative examination of perspectives from residents and nurses aides in three nursing homes. Research on Aging, 23(1), 109-126.

Biering, P. (2002). Caring for the involuntarily hospitalized adolescent: The issue of power in the nurse-patient relationship. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 16(2), 65-74.

Heijkenskjold, K.B. (2010). The patients dignity from the nurses perspective. Nursing Ethics, 6(3), 313-24.

LaSala, C.A.-B. (2007). The role of the clinical nurse specialist in promoting evidence-based practice and effecting positive patient outcomes. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 38(6), 262-70.
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory the Ethical Implications

Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15934456

(Newman, 1) Here, it can be evidenced that the empathy accorded by the theoretical framework will provide an ideological umbrella for how best to address one's condition while simultaneously abiding the regulatory medical requirements common to most forms of modern treatment.

This means possessing a degree of pertinent information where nursing theory is concerned that will allow for such pragmatism and a firm understanding of the practices pertinent to kidney donation as denoted in the annotated bibliography provided here below.

Cohen, E. & Pifer-Bixler, J. (2009). Surgeons Remove Health Kidney Through Donor's Vagina. CNN. Online at http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/03/kidney.vagina.surgery/index.html

The article here described a first-ever successful procedure in which a healthy kidney was removed through a donor's vagina rather than through traditionally employed and far more invasive surgical procedures. This is useful to our discussion because it reduces the strain and cosmetic impact of making a kidney donation. The article cites the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Cohen, E. & Pifer-Bixler, J. (2009). Surgeons Remove Health Kidney Through Donor's

Vagina. CNN. Online at  http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/03/kidney.vagina.surgery/index.html 

Griffin, D. & Fitzpatrick, D. (2009). Donor Says He Got Thousands For His Kidney. CNN. Online at  http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/meast/09/01/blackmarket.organs/index.html 

McKay, R. (2010). Kidney Donor Needed Own Transplant. Chicago Tribune. Online at http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-tc-nw-man-kidney-0104-0105jan05,0,2513301.story
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory Nursing Is a

Words: 883 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65138438



A person's health is an ever-changing state of being resulting from the interaction with the environment. Optimum health is the actualization of both innate and obtained human potential gained through rewarding relationships with others, obtaining goals and maintaining expert personal care. Adaptations can be made as required to maintain stability and structural integrity. A person's state of health can vary from wellness to illness, disease, or dysfunction. Professional nursing is founded on the need to promote wellness practices, the attentive treatment of persons who are acutely or chronically ill or dying, and restorative care of patients during convalescence and rehabilitation. It also includes the education and measurement of those who perform or are learning to perform nursing responsibilities, the support and communication of research to enhance knowledge and practice, and the management of nursing in healthcare delivery systems. Nursing practice centers on the application of a body of knowledge in…… [Read More]

Johnston, N., Rogers, M., Cross, N. And Sochan, a.(2007) Global and planetary health:

teaching as if the future matters. Nursing Education Perspectives 26(3), 152

Nyatanga, L. (2005) Nursing and the philosophy of science. Nurse Education Today 25(8), 670-675
View Full Essay

Nursing Law and Ethics Name

Words: 1913 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92225100



The death of a child is significant and in this case avoidable and a plaintiff has the right to seek compensatory damages as is allowed by law.

Case Study 1 Part B

At the end of the night shift, Nurse Brown took a verbal handover and then noticed the observation chart had not been filled in. To assist her friend, Nurse Harvey, whom she knew had a busy night, filled in the observation chart and fluid balance chart for the hours from 0200-0600 hrs.

Overcome by the events of the last 24 hrs, Nurse Harvey and Nurse Brown go to the local tavern for a few drinks before Nurse Harvey goes on duty. They discussed Mr. Spencer and his son. John, a friend of Mr. Spencer, overheard the conversation and joined them. He was also upset by the events of the day and was most keen to discuss the accident…… [Read More]

References

Hall, J. (1960). General Principles of Criminal Law (2nd ed.). Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill.

Markesinis, B.S., & Deakin, S.F. (1999). Tort Law (4th ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

ANCI Competency Standards for the Enrolled Nurse at  http://www.anmc.org.au/docs/Publications/Competency%20standards%20EN.pdf 

Scope of Nursing Practice Decision Making Framework, 2006 at http://www.nursingboardtas.org.au/nbtonline.nsf/attachment/SoPDMFFinal/$File/Scope%20of%20Nursing%20Practice%20Decision%20Making%20Framework.pdf
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory Comparison Human Becoming

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13445289

According to the research, it "is defined as a practice-based ethic that is patient centered, It is an individualistic ethic that unites the reason why a decision is made with the action itself and the foreseeable consequences of that action," (Brown, 2010). In this the theory also shares with Parse's theory the importance of individual decision making and choices. One of the main differences is the notion of how we relate to one another. We have a freedom from aggression, known as negative right, based on this relationship, where we are not scared of others acting out irrationally against us. As such, the health care professionals do not act to harm the patients, but the patients also have the strict role of being the patients, thus "to fulfill his responsibilities in the treatment plan and not to place any unreasonable demands on the healthcare professional" (Brown, 2010). This is different…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Barbara. (2010), A bioethical decision making guide: A synopsis of Symphonology. Health and Human Development. Penn State University. Web.  http://www.personal.psu.edu/dxm12/n458/symphonology.htm 

Parse, Rosemary Rizzo. (2011). Human becoming theory. Nursing Theories. Web.  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Rosemary_Pars_Human_Becoming_Theory.html
View Full Essay

Nursing Assessment Taking the History of a

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45591901

Nursing Assessment

Taking the history of a patient is a crucial aspect of patient assessment and treatment. A good history can mean the difference between a successful patient outcome and unsatisfactory outcomes. However, taking a complete and useful history is a skill that is developed by means of training and practice; it is not some talent that is innate (Bickley & Szilagyi, 2007; McKenna et al., 2011). According to Craig (2007) nurses are increasingly being asked to take patient histories. Given these growing responsibilities nurses need training and guidelines to taking an adequate patient history. The following is a summary and critique of Craig, L. H, (2007), A "Guide to Taking a Patient's History" in Nursing Standard, volume 22, issue 13, pages 42-48.

Craig (2007) takes a comprehensive approach to explaining the interview and history taking process. This approach is applicable for most any patient population; however, Craig does not…… [Read More]

References

Alarcon, R.D. (2009). Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: Review and projections. World Psychiatry, 8, 131 -- 139.

Bickley, L.S. & Szilagyi, P.G. (2007). Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History

Taking. 9th ed. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Craig, L.H. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), 42-48.
View Full Essay

Nursing Leadership Theories Nursing Leadership Comparison and

Words: 1627 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51090014

Nursing Leadership Theories

NURSING LEADERSHIP: COMPARISON AND ANALYSIS OF CONCEPTS & THEORIES

The work of Cherie and Gebrekida (2005) report that there is both formal and informal leadership in that managers are formally "delegated authority, including the power to reward or punish. A manager is expected to perform functions such as planning, organizing, directing (leading) and controlling (evaluating)." On the other hand, informal leaders are "not always managers performing those functions required by the organization. Leaders often are not even part of the organization. Florence Nightingale, after leaving the Crimea, was not connected with an organization but was still a leader." (Cherie and Gebrekida, 2005)

Trait Theories

Early leadership theories included that of 'trait theories' which held a fundamental belief that "leaders are born, not made." Trait theory makes the assumption that an individual has "certain innate abilities, personality traits or other characteristics in order to be a leader." (Cherie…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Swansburg, C. Russel (2002). Introduction to Management and Leadership for Nurse.

Cherie, A. And Gebrekida. AB (2005) Nursing Leadership and Management. 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.cartercenter.org/resources/pdfs/health/ephti/library/lecture_notes/nursing_students/LN_nsg_ldrshp_final.pdf
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory Framework

Words: 2702 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33960538

Nursing Theory Framework

Attachment Theory

ecognizing Addiction through Attachment Theory

Affect egulation and Addiction

Handling Addiction as an Attachment Disorder

The First Phase of Therapy

Concepts

Autonomy

Beneficence

Nonmaleficence

Nursing Theory Framework

The misappropriation of prescription drugs by teens in the United States is a growing public health issue. Using a nursing theory framework, the scope of the problem of prescription drug use among teens is reviewed. Equal in variety to manifestations of addiction are sundry psychological theories that attempt to explain and treat the problem. Hardy (2011) was able to look into four traditional models for recognizing alcoholism (social learning theory, tension reduction theory, personality theory, and interactional theory,) in addition to five theoretical models that were developing at the time of their writing.

An approach to treating and understanding addiction that has created a huge amount of research in current decades, and which displays big promise for effective…… [Read More]

References

Caplan, J.P. (2012). Neuropsychiatric effects of prescription drug abuse. Neuropsychology Review, 17(3), 363-80.

Elkashef, A.M. (2012). Prevention and treatment of addiction. Psychiatric Times, 16-18.

Fischer, B.P. (n.d.). Assessing the prevalence of nonmedical prescription opioid use in the general canadian population: Methodological issues and questions. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(9), 606-9.

Flores, P.J. (2012). Group psychotherapy and neuro-plasticity: An attachment theory perspective. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 60(4), 546-70.
View Full Essay

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Nursing Can Be

Words: 4161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25325887

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing:

Nursing can be described as a science and practice that enlarges adaptive capabilities and improves the transformation of an individual and the environment. This profession focuses on promoting health, improving the quality of life, and facilitating dying with dignity. The nursing profession has certain theoretical foundations that govern the nurses in promoting adaptation for individuals and groups. These theoretical foundations include theories, theory integration, reflection, research and practice, and assimilation.

Grand Nursing Theory:

There are several grand nursing theories that were developed by various theorists including the Science of Unitary Human Beings by Martha ogers, Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model, and Systems Model by Betty Neuman. Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model is based on the consideration of the human being as an open system. She argues that the system reacts to environmental stimuli via cognator and regulator coping techniques for individuals. On the other hand, the…… [Read More]

References:

American Sentinel (2012). 5 Steps for Nurses to Stay Updated with Health Care Changes.

Retrieved September 4, 2013, from http://www.nursetogether.com/5-steps-for-nurses-to-stay-updated-with-health-care-changes

Andershed, B. & Olsson, K. (2009). Review of Research Related to Kristen Swanson's Middle-range Theory of Caring. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23, 598-610.

"Application of Theory in Nursing Process." (2012, January 28). Nursing Theories: A
View Full Essay

Function of Theory in Nursing

Words: 2840 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29582100

According to Newman, nurses practicing within this theory find their own lives are enhanced and transformed (Neill, 2002). Her beliefs and consciousness-centered approach were born from her early nursing experiences involving rehabilitation patients (Weingourt, 1998). She came to understand the altered connection between the concept of time for her patients and their limited mobility. For most of her patients, the day would seem to drag along despite the fact that their rehabilitation sessions were relatively short. Her conclusion was that these patients had an altered sense of reality. This eventually sparked her theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness (HEC).

Looking at the practice of nursing through a more metaphysical lens, the HEC posits that there is a universal and expanding consciousness in which all humans participate -- the healthy, the recuperating, and the incurably ill. Newman believed this was a natural law just as real as the law of gravity…… [Read More]

Margaret Newman and James Fowler both focus their attention on the larger, more spiritual context of human experience and the implication this has in one's healing. There are commonalities that exist between the philosophies of both theorists: human reasoning, the ability to adopt to another's perspective, social awareness, and human formation of a world-view. Newman offers the nurse-patient relationship can be enhanced if it is viewed as a caring partnership. HEC does not really pretend to be a quick fix or direct nursing intervention; instead, it presents an opportunity to assist the sick by recognizing patterns and using this intelligence to expand a patient's consciousness, self-care, and comfort (Awa & Yamashita, 2008).

Fowler concerns himself more with faith as a lens through which we see the world. His ideas about faith over the span of one's lifetime can be particularly beneficial when working with elderly populations. Older, Stage 5 and 6 adults may begin to reincorporate earlier religious beliefs and traditions that were previously discarded (Fowler, 2004). This could be due to physical limitations or also used as a self-healing mechanism to avoid feelings of helplessness or abandonment. A nurse who is attentive can acknowledge this mature spirituality as being helpful to a patient attempting to find meaning in his or her illness.

In sum, both theories/frameworks have implications for the practice of nursing. A theory, by definition, is a group of related concepts that propose action that guide practice. From Margaret Newman and even non-nursing theorist James Fowler we see how using a systematic view of inter-relationships between concepts of spirituality, higher consciousness, caring and empathy can be useful for describing, explaining, predicting, and prescribing nursing interventions that make a difference in the lives of patients. Both philosophies offer insight that can create better nurses.
View Full Essay

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing First Half

Words: 2037 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10078501

diverse population nurses must attend to, the concept of 'transcultural' nursing is important to understand. Instead of viewing health as a universal concept, transcultural nursing attempts to understand the conceptual building blocks of the nursing profession as cultural products that are socially-constructed. It strives to understand the similarities and differences between different health attitudes and practices (Leininger 1991). First developed by Madeline Leininger, transcultural nursing is founded upon the idea that the "health care providers need to be flexible in the design of programs, policies, and services to meet the needs and concerns of the culturally diverse population, groups that are likely to be encountered" (Transcultural nursing, 2012, Current Nursing).

Nurses must be culturally astute and adapt their practices to patient's cultural needs as well as to physical needs. This concept has been somewhat controversial within the nursing profession given that Western medicine's emphasis on preserving life and optimizing treatment…… [Read More]

References

Adult obesity facts. (2013).CDC. Retrieved:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html 

Dorothea Orem's self-care deficit theory. (2012). Nursing Theories. Retrieved:

http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html

Milligan, F. (2008) Child obesity 2: recommended strategies and interventions. Nursing Times;
View Full Essay

History of Nursing Science Nursing Has Existed

Words: 1117 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30135288

History Of Nursing Science

Nursing has existed in some for as long as humans have roamed the earth. The modern era of nursing began with the emergence of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War in the 1850's. The daughter of affluent parents, Nightingale greatly accelerated the development of nursing and is widely acknowledged as the most important person in the history of nursing. Nursing science translates to the profession itself in the form of best practices that have been formulated, debated, reviewed and analyzed so as to verify the validity of nursing theories before they are put into practice.

Nightingale Emerges

As is the case with many nurses and others who dedicate their lives to the care of others, Nightingale was driven largely by her spirituality and religious convictions. Many people perceive there to be an inherent conflict between religion and science but Nightingale did not believe this to be…… [Read More]

References

George, J.B. (2011). Nursing theories, the base for professional nursing practice. (6 ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

McKenna, H. (1998). Nursing theories and models. Taylor & Francis.

Parker, M.E., & Smith, M.C. (2010). Nursing theories and nursing practice. (3 ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Co.

Walker, L.O., & Avant, K.C. (2011). Strategies for theory construction in nursing. (5 ed.). New York, NY: Prentice Hall.
View Full Essay

Leadership -- Nursing Discover and or Create an

Words: 1853 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78008427

Leadership -- nursing

Discover and/or create an image, poem, quote, or selection of music that symbolizes, or speaks to you of, what it means to be a caring nurse in the organizational context. Describe why you have selected this symbol. Link your personal understanding gained by reflecting on your authentic "piece" to course literature to reveal resonance, differences and new insights.

According to Bonnie Raingruber in "Meanings in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing" from the Jan-Mar 2004 edition of The Journal of Child and Adolescent Psycatric Nursing by familiarizing the nurse or patient reader and nurse and patient writer with new worlds of experience, poetry increases one's capacity to tolerate pain, understand oneself, and other people. Poetry is "dialogical: it seeks in the listener an ally whose empathy will take the form of sharing the survivor's anguish and struggle" (Kaminsky, 1998, p. 408). In light of this insight, poetry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kaminsky, M. (1998). "Voicing voicelessness: On the poetics of faith." American Journal of Psychoanalysis. 58, pp.405-416.

Neuman, B., & Fawcett, J. (Eds.) (2002). The Neuman Systems Model. Fourth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Raingruber, Bonnie. (Jan-Mar 2004) "Meanings in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing." The Journal of Child and Adolescent Psycatric Nursing.

Wendt, D.A., & Vale, D.J. (1999). "Managing quality and risk." In P.S. Yoder-Wise (Ed.), Leading and managing in nursing. Second Edition. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, pp. 173-189).
View Full Essay

Role of Advanced Practice Nurse

Words: 3341 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91654659

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

Framework for Clinical Practice

Person/Client/Client System

Environment

Health

Nursing/APN (Factors Effecting APN's Practice and Implementation of the APN

Nursing Process)

Interrelationships of Client System, Environment, Health, and Nursing/APN

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

esearch shows that an advanced practice nurse (APN) is first of all a nurse that has been recognized as a person that has advanced education. This person is also known t knowledge and skills prepared at the masters or doctorate level. It advanced practice nurse have a broader scope of practice than egistered Nurses (N) often performing the same duties as those that are doctors. Their primary care duties involve things such as diagnosing and managing the treatment of chronic and acute illnesses. Advanced practice nurses are the ones that keep the emphasis on advanced practice nurse and health promotion, with a stress on wellness. Advanced practice nurses may choose to work…… [Read More]

References:

Castner, D. (2011). The "coming out" of the advanced practice nurse. Nephrology Nursing Journal,, 28(4), 474.

Delametter, G.L. (2002). Advanced practice nursing and the role of the pediatric critical care nurse practitioner. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly,, 21(4), 16-21.

Swain, S.M. (2009). The role of clinical nurse educators in organ procurement organizations. . Progress in Transplantation, 284-7.

Villanueva, N.B.-R.-A. (2008). The role of the advanced practice nurse in neuroscience nursing: Results of the 2006 AANN membership survey. .Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 40(2), 119-24.
View Full Essay

Art of Nursing According to Virginia Henderson

Words: 1537 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39459880

Art of Nursing According to Virginia Henderson

Virginia Henderson has tremendously helped to bring a new perspective of the art of nursing. For this reason, her biographical sketch together with educational and professional details earned her the name the Modern-day Mother of nursing and the Nightingale of modern nursing. Virginia Henderson's theory was a major stride in the field of nursing and in the art of nursing. The theory has also been used by the theorist to come up with another definition of nursing. The art of nursing according to Virginia Henderson has had major implication on nursing and is of relevance to the current nursing practices. This paper will give a biographical sketch of Virginia Henderson. In addition to this her educational and professional overview will be analyzed also. Henderson's theory and its applications will then be reviewed where the four major concepts constituting it will be looked at.…… [Read More]

Reference

Henderson, V. (1955). Harmer and Henderson's Textbook of the principles and practice of nursing. New York: Macmillan

Henderson, V. (1956). Research in nursing practice: when? Nursing research, 4 (3), 99

Henderson, V. (1960). International council of nurses basic principles of nursing care ICN,

Geneva
View Full Essay

Range Theory Mid-Range Theory Middle Range Nursing

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82015649

ange Theory

Mid-range theory

Middle ange Nursing Theorist: ozzano Locsin

Biography/Education

Dr. ozzano Locsin attained a PhD in nursing at the University of the Philippines in 1988. He is currently a tenured Professor of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. Locsin has extensive experience in nursing research in a variety of nations: "Through the Fulbright Scholar Award, he developed the first Masters program in Nursing in Uganda while researching the phenomenon 'waiting-to-know' and the lived experiences of persons exposed to patients who died of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever" (ozzano Locsin, 2011, Pro-Libraries). His current research interests focus on themes of technology and caring in nursing and "life transitions in human health" (ozzano Locsin, 2011, Pro-Libraries). Locsin calls his mid-range theory the "technological competency as caring model."

Theory development: How the theorist came about to develop his/her theory

Locsin's theory arose because of the frustrations he perceived in nurses when they were coping…… [Read More]

References

Locsin, Rozzano C. (2005). Technological competency as caring in nursing.

Sigma Theta Tau International

Parker, Marilyn E & Marlaine C. Smith. (2010). Nursing theories & Nursing practice.

F.A. Davis Company.
View Full Essay

Personal Nursing Philosophy Conceptual Background

Words: 1524 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87424621

Likewise, Callista oy's Adaptation Model of Nursing provides a contextual bridge between the internal physiological determinants of patient health and the crucial aspects of external environment that typically influence patient health and (especially) patient perceptions and attitudes about health and medical or nursing interventions. Together, application of the principles promoted by Watson's Caring Model and by oy's Adaptation Model of nursing complement my clinical training in a manner that I believe enables me to contribute the most to my patients, to my profession, and to myself as a nurse.

eferences

Dobratz, M.C. "Moving nursing science forward within the framework of the oy

Adaptation Model." Nursing Science Quarterly, Vol. 21; (2008): 255-259.

Fawcett, J. (2005). Analysis and Evaluation of Conceptual Models of Nursing, St. Louis,

MO: Mosby.

Pipe, T.B., Kelly, a., LeBrun, G.; Schmidt, D., Atherton, P., and obinson, C. "A

prospective descriptive study exploring hope, spiritual well-being, and quality of…… [Read More]

References

Dobratz, M.C. "Moving nursing science forward within the framework of the Roy

Adaptation Model." Nursing Science Quarterly, Vol. 21; (2008): 255-259.

Fawcett, J. (2005). Analysis and Evaluation of Conceptual Models of Nursing, St. Louis,

MO: Mosby.
View Full Essay

Autonomy and Nursing One of

Words: 931 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2432245

This caring paradigm goes far beyond any one individual nurse and produces acts of caring that transcend any one theory and become associated with a greater good -- holism and non-judgmental care (Watson, 1989, 32).

Ethics- the power of Watson is that she does not see humans in a vacuum, but as the compilation of many different experiences that work to enrich and enliven their lives, but that cannot ever be known by the nurse unless the nurse is open to non-verbal communication. Too, transpersonal caring is the idea that the patient takes responsibility for their own health and works in conjunction with the nurse to achieve the best health outcome possible. (Watson, 1989, 70). This is a very Zen way of looking at healthcare -- the harmony between mind, body and soul -- with disease as disharmony -- but with a very real desire to change that experience into…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Galadher, M. (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Stoneham, MA: Butterworth.

Rai, G. (2009). Medical Ethics and the Elderly. Abington, UK: Radcliffe Publishers.

Watson, J. (1989). Nursing: Human Science and Human Care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Watson, J. (1997). The Theory of Human Caring. Nursing Science Quarterly, 10(1), 49-52.
View Full Essay

Myra Levine Nursing Reasons Why the Myra

Words: 1487 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77993211

Myra Levine Nursing

easons why the MYA LEVINE NUSE theorist developed the theory

Myra Levine an influential figure in the nursing vocation set up new methods which were effective for educating the nursing degrees students with fundamental concepts and caring, of the patients (Parse 2009). Her objective was to present individualized and reactive care of the patients which concentrated less on medical procedures and maximized on individual contexts of the patients. With this, it led to nursery theory's creation and patient care approach. The theory implies criteria which help in evaluating the nurses and what to do.

It offers concepts which are skilled in sustaining research which are useful to the nurses. Hence, it creates knowledge which is exclusive to the nurses. By that, it enhances the nurse's status as a better profession. In promoting the research, the nurses' theory endorses the education of the nurse (Allan 2011). With that,…… [Read More]

Reference

Allan, H.T., Smith, P., & O'Driscoll, M.. "Experiences of supernumerary status and the hidden curriculum in nursing: a new twist in the theory-practice gap?"Journal Of Clinical

Nursing, 2011 p850.

Melat, Z. "Theory -- Directed Nursing Practices" Wolterskluwer.2005. p. 270

Reimer, A.P., & Moore, S.M.. "Flight nursing expertise: towards a middle-range theory."
View Full Essay

Conception of 'Caring' in Nursing

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31005699

There is a clear divide between the real care nurses must give -- and do give, every day -- and the layperson's perceptions of nursing (Scher 2003).

References

Scher, Betty. (2003). Second opinion. Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Journal.

1(1). Retrieved http://www.son.jhmi.edu/JHNmagazine/archive/spring2003/pages/second_opinion.htm

Question 2

In my work as a nurse on the med/surg floor of an urban hospital, I encountered many individuals with lifestyle-related issues. Heart disease, diabetes, and strokes may present themselves as acute situations, but often the real precipitating cause is related to choices about diet and exercise the individual has made over the course of a lifetime. A recent sociological theory that can help address this issue is the concept of 'social contagion:' individuals tend to norm their health behaviors to the lifestyle choices of their friends. If their friends make good choices regarding food, exercise, and preventative care, they are likely to do so as…… [Read More]

Forman-Hoffman, Valerie L. & Cassie L. Cunningham, Cassie L. (2008). Geographical

clustering of eating disordered behaviors in U.S. high school students.

International Journal of Eating Disorders, 41 (3): 209-214.
View Full Essay

Student Nurse

Words: 364 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16681849

Philosophy statement of the Olympic College Practical Nursing Program, according to the Olympic College's official website, is that this one-year program resolves to prepare graduates to provide safe, direct patient care as licensed practical nurses in a variety acute care, long-term care, home health, and ambulatory care settings. Olympic College stresses the importance of critical thinking as well as compassion in the development of the nurse as a medical practitioner.

The nursing theorist Jean atson stated that she essentially believed that nursing was an "inter-subjective" human process and placed a high value on the caring relationship between the nurse and the recipient of care. (Souriel, 1996) In contrast, according to the ashington State Legislature, the nursing process is defined as a "systematic problem solving approach" to medical care that "has the goal of facilitating an optimal level of functioning and health for the client, recognizing diversity. Effective nursing, states the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Olympic College Practical Nursing Program. (2005) Official website. Retrieved 21 Feb 2005 at http://www.oc.ctc.edu/index.html

Souriel, S. (24 Aug 1196)"An Analysis and evaluation of Watson's theory of human care." Advanced Nursing. 2:400-4.

Washington State Legislature. (2005) "Nursing Laws." Official website. Retrieved 21

http://www.leg.wa.gov/WAC/index.cfm?section=246-840-700& fuseaction=section
View Full Essay

Doctorate of Nurse Practitioner

Words: 419 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85951405

DNP

eleis, A.I., & Dracup, K. (2005). The case against the DNP: History, timing, substance, and marginalization. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 10(3), 1-8.

Ever since the establishment of nursing as a distinct profession, nurses have worked hard and long to make a case that they are healthcare professionals who have a unique contribution to make to the field of medicine. Nurses are not merely the helpmates of doctors -- they offer their own distinct brand of caritas to patients. One component of the effort in garnering respect for nurses has been the effort to institutionalize nursing theory at an advanced level in academia. To expand the potential for nurses to gain advanced certification, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is currently offered at many academic institutions. However, according to eleis & Dracup (2005), nursing is ultimately about performing in the field, and it can be detrimental to…… [Read More]

Meleis, A.I., & Dracup, K. (2005). The case against the DNP: History, timing, substance, and marginalization. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 10(3), 1-8.

Ever since the establishment of nursing as a distinct profession, nurses have worked hard and long to make a case that they are healthcare professionals who have a unique contribution to make to the field of medicine. Nurses are not merely the helpmates of doctors -- they offer their own distinct brand of caritas to patients. One component of the effort in garnering respect for nurses has been the effort to institutionalize nursing theory at an advanced level in academia. To expand the potential for nurses to gain advanced certification, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is currently offered at many academic institutions. However, according to Meleis & Dracup (2005), nursing is ultimately about performing in the field, and it can be detrimental to separate nursing theory from nursing practice. In fact, the authors argue that the creation of the DNP actually conspires against the goal for nurses to gain respect within the academy, and feel that the current, doctoral-level degrees as more appropriate venues to do so. There are already a number of advanced degrees that fulfill the goals of enabling nurses to conduct academic research about their profession: Doctor of Nursing Science (DNS or DNSc) degree, the Doctor of Science in Nursing (DSN) degree, the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree, and the Nursing Doctorate (ND). Having a professional degree other than the PhD merely confuses how to evaluate nurses' current credentials. These degrees also strive to marry theory to practice, while the DNP strives to create a division between the two, by focusing on practice.

The authors also feel that there are more important debates within the profession other than the need to generate new degrees, and a candidate should either elect to get a master's degree or advanced to the PhD track, rather than linger in some nebulous 'in-between' zone. The authors are persuasive in their statement that although initially there may not seem to be any harm in getting a degree for a degree's sake, given the finite resources that exist on a university level (and in terms of prospective candidate's time and financial resources), the case for the additional value of the degree must be made to justify its existence. The DNP also seems to suggest, contrary to what is taught by most nursing theorists, that there is a divide between work in the field and work in the academy.
View Full Essay

Slumdog and Transcultural Nursing an Analysis of

Words: 2234 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34648266

Slumdog and Transcultural Nursing

An Analysis of Slumdog Millionaire and Transcultural Nursing

A number of themes are introduced within the first few minutes of Danny Boyle's 2008 Slumdog Millionaire thanks in due part to his quick-cut method of editing. What the viewer sees is an Indian culture permeated by and in conflict with both itself and Western ideals. The first contrast the film illustrates is between the distinctly American game show "Who Wants to be a Millionaire," here hosted by a flamboyant north-Indian with fair features particularly suited to India's television market, and the behind-the-scenes activity of Mumbai police, who suspect the contestant of the show, Jamal Malik, of cheating his way to a 20 million rupee grand prize. The police operate in violation of Western ideals of human rights (they torture Jamal in hopes of gaining a confession) but in an apparently acceptable procedure on a local or native…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ebert, R. (2008). Slumdog Millionaire. Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved from http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081111/REVIEWS/811110297

Farah, J., McColl, M.A. (2008). Exploring prayer as a spiritual modality. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy 75(1): 5-13.

Mast, G. (2006). A Short History of the Movies. NY: Pearson Longman.

Sengupta, M. (2010). A million dollar exit from the anarchic slum-world: Slumdog
View Full Essay

Importance of Transcultural Nursing

Words: 3387 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14996595

Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Provider Inventory -- Patient Form (T-CSHCPI-PF) is simply an inventory for the culturally diverse patients to assess provider cultural sensitivity in the health care procedure. The T-CSHCPI-PF is like a narrative in the sense that it evaluates provider cultural sensitivity like described by the culturally diverse patients.

In health care, cultural competence refers to the set of behaviors, outlook, and guidelines, which produces as well as illustrates the comprehension, acknowledgement, and respect for cultural similarities and distinctions within, and amidst various groups. Cultural sensitivity refers to the services which are significant to the requirements and anticipations of a particular patient. Herman et al. gives a detailed discussion on the distinctions and applications of these phrases. It has been maintained that cultural sensitivity and competence of providers are positively related to patient contentment, health results, and treatment adherence. The scarcity of empirical proof of these relations is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

AmericanCollegeofPhysicians. (2004). Racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Ann Intern Med, 226-232. Retrieved from: http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=717703

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2011). Delivering Patient-Centered Care in the Midst of a Cultural Conflict: The Role of Cultural Competence. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursng. Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-16-2011/No2-May-2011/Delivering-Patient-Centered-Care-in-the-Midst-of-a-Cultural-Conflict.html

Douglas, M., Pierce, J., Rosenkoetter, M., Pacquiao, D., Callister, L., Pollara, M., . . . Purnell, L. (2011). Standards of Practice for Culturally Competent Nursing Care. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 317. Retrieved from: http://www.nursing.pitt.edu/academics/ce/docs/powerpoint/nursing_now/Rich_reading.pdf

Global Health. (n.d.). Retrieved from Healthypeople.gov: http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/global-health
View Full Essay

Nursing -- Caring Empathy and Ethics The

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21631061

nursing -- caring, empathy and ethics. The author (Lachman, 2012) uses numerous examples, each of which show the positive impacts of caring. Along with examples of ethical decisions that must be made, and with theories on caring and empathy put forward by scholars, the paper examines morality, competence, and the "reciprocal" relationships between nurses and their patients. That is, caring for a patient is reciprocal because if the needs of the patient are met, there is reciprocity -- the giving of care and the receiving and acknowledgement of that care giving.

Summary of Key Points

On page 113 Lachman references several leading theorists and scholars that have provided important research and results on nursing ethics and the caring concepts alluded to in the Introduction. Dr. Jean atson has a caring theory (112) that has three main components: a) carative factors; b) the "transpersonal caring relationship"; and c) the "caring occasion/caring…… [Read More]

Works Cited

French, Peter. (1999). The development of evidence-based nursing. Journal of Advanced

Nursing, 29(1), 72-78.

Lachman, Vicki D. (2012). Applying the Ethics of Care to Your Nursing Practice. Ethics, Law,

and Policy, 21(2), 112-115.
View Full Essay

Nursing Knowledge A Controversy the Scope of

Words: 1742 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26357332

Nursing Knowledge: A Controversy

The scope of the nursing profession has increased dramatically over the last thirty years. The demarcation between medical and nursing tasks is quickly dissolving as the nursing profession is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and complex. In 1996, nurse practitioners were mandated to obtain master's degrees to address their changing role in medical care (Nicoteri & Andrews, 2003). In this multidisciplinary and evolving healthcare environment, adaptation is paramount to providing effective patient care. Currently, there is a controversy in nursing regarding the direction that the development of nursing knowledge should take. There are many critics who believe that developing new nursing theories is an effective way to promote this development. However, theories are often abstract and not adaptable to specific healthcare settings. The belief that the knowledge base for nursing should evolve entirely from theory has important implications for nursing as an academic discipline and by extension the…… [Read More]

References

Attree, M. (2001). Patients' and relatives' experiences and perspectives of 'good' and 'not so good' quality care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 33, 456 -- 466.

Burman, M.E., Hart, A.M., Conley, V., Brown, J., Sherard, P., Clarke, P.N. (2009). Reconceptualizing the core of nurse practitioner education and practice. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 21, 11-17.

Hart, A.M., Macnee, C. (2007). How well are NPs prepared for practice: Results from a 2004 survey. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 19, 35 -- 42.

Mantzoukas, S., Jasper, M. (2008). Types of nursing knowledge used to guide care of hospitalized patients. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 62, 3, 318-326.
View Full Essay

Nurse-Manager for a Hospital Floor and Focuses

Words: 2455 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46695608

nurse-manager for a hospital floor and focuses on a proposed change to that floor: the addition of a certified wound care nurse. It begins by describing the benefits of a specialized wound care nurse, the existing conditions on the hospital floor, and how each of the stakeholders would be impacted by such a change. It utilizes Lippitt's phases of change theory to describe how those changes would be implemented on the floor, outlining each of the phases in implementing such a change.

Wound care nurses play a special role in the hospital environment, and hospitals without those specialized nurses may not be able to offer the level of care as hospitals that have these specialized professionals. "Wound care nurses, sometimes referred to as wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses, specialize in wound management, the monitoring and treatment of wounds due to injury, disease or medical treatments. Their work promotes the…… [Read More]

References

Kritsonis, A. (2004-2005). Comparison of change theories. International Journal of Scholarly

Academic Intellectual Diversity, 8(1), 1-7.

McIsaac, C. (2007). Outcome measurement and EB wound care practice in home care:

Translating evidence into action: Evidence-based practice, education, and knowledge transfer. Retrieved January 16, 2012 from Medscape website: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/569492_2
View Full Essay

Nursing What Are the Core Concept Definitions

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45837270

Nursing

What are the core concept definitions of each nursing model? Are there commonalities between the models? If so, what are they? What are the differences, if any?

The core concepts of each nursing model is of course care for the patient as well as improvement of nurse.

Evidence-Based nursing for instance tries to better the nurse by placing review and analysis of research material and critical thinking as base.

Jane Watson's model too, calls for greater motivation and vigor in nurse's practice by using a spiritual approach where nurses see patients as per a holistic whole. Neuman (1995) used systems theories in arguing that people are a system that strives for stability whilst the most influential model in the UK based on Roper at al (1990) describes the person as functioning along an independence/dependence continuum throughout his lifespan

At base, all the nursing models have the following commonalities:

A…… [Read More]

Sources

Fawcett J (1995) Analysis and Evaluation of Conceptual Models of Nursing. Philadelphia, PA: FA Davis Co.
View Full Essay

Nursing Reflective Practice as Applied

Words: 3953 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76506011

In the previous section, Estabrooks raised the question of the ability of the EP framework to provide the "best evidence" in nursing practice and the danger of excluding nurses in decision-making tasks as a result of EP prevalence and dominance.

Rolfe, while he analyzed the empirical foundations of EP, also looked at it from a practical perspective, or how EP is applied in the current practice of nursing. Identifying the problem of EP as the question of its "technical rationality," Rolfe uncovered an important issue that best describes also Estabrooks' contentions in her article: the "theory-practice" gap in nursing practice.

In thoroughly discussing this phenomenon in nursing, Rolfe illustrated how theory-practice gap occurs in the practice scenario (39):

First, that nurses rarely read research reports; second, that when they do read them, they rarely understand them; and third, even when they do read and understand research reports, they are reluctant…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Avis, M. (Oct 2006). "Evidence for practice, epistemology, and critical reflection." Nursing Philosophy, Vol. 7, Issue 4.

Estabrooks, C. (1998). "Will evidence-based nursing practice make practice perfect?" Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 30, No. 1.

McCormack, B. (2006). "Evidence-based practice and the potential for transformation." Journal of Research in Nursing, Vol. 11, No. 2.

Rolfe, G. (Jan 2006). "Nursing praxis and the science of the unique." Nursing Science, Vol. 19, No. 1.
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory and How it

Words: 964 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46473902

Cody uses a lot of fancy words and makes mention of philosophy and nursing as a study and a science but it gets a little too sweet and sugary to the point of almost being self-serving or sycophantic, with the only real question whether Cody is trying to make himself look good, nursing as an industry/career/educational pursuit look good or a combination of the two. First, he makes mention of nursing possibly dying off as a science and that is simply specious. The form and function of nursing shall certainly change as the years change but it's NEVE going to go away. It may be called something else someday just like PTSD used to be called shell shock. However, the root nature of the job and the role is not going to change in its basic function, to ease pain and treat the sick.

Another dimension of the treatise mentioned…… [Read More]

Reference

Cody, W. (2003). Nursing Theory as a Guide to Practice. Nursing Science Quarterly, 16, 225-231.
View Full Essay

Nursing Theory and Theorist Dynamic Nurse Patient Relationship Ida Jean Orlando

Words: 1571 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16641702

Ido Jean Orlando and analyzes how her contribution has impacted the nursing profession. It has 3 sources.

The field of nursing requires the utmost care on the part of nurses if they are to understand their patients. Nurses are an integral part of the medical care provision because they provide patients both physical and emotional care. Even doctors cannot succeed in reaching the level of emotional contact that nurses can achieve with their patients. According to Ida Jean Orlando, this kind of close relationship is dependent on the communication that nurses establish with the patients. This communication, whether verbal or non-verbal, plays a vital role in dealing out the most appropriate treatment as quickly as possible. Ida Jean Orlando's The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship: Function, Process, and Principles, is a book that has had an immense impact on the field of nursing, popularizing Orlando's theory.

The Theorist:

Ida Jean Orlando was…… [Read More]

Sources:

Lego, S. (1999) One-to-One Nurse-Patient Relationship. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Ida Jean Orlando Theorist (Accessed on 3-11-2003) http://www.uri.edu/nursing/schmieding/orlando/

Ida Jean Orlando Biography (2003)  http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_midrange_theories_ida_orlando.htm
View Full Essay

Theorist in the Field of Nursing There

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98478957

Theorist

In the field of Nursing there are those individuals who had a major impact upon the way care is provided. One such person is Dorthea Orem. She developed a critical care theory that redefined the industry. To fully understand these ideas requires studying Orem's Self-Care Theory / Theoretical Framework and analyzing the different components of this approach. Together, these elements will offer specific insights about how these principals can be utilized in a modern health care environment.

Development of Orem's Self-Care Theory and Theoretical Framework

The development of Orem's Self-Care Theory was based upon experiences that Dorthea Orem would have in the real world. What happened was her positions in government gave her the ability to see the potential impact of nursing and the challenges of many individuals in the field. This took place between 1949 and 1980. During this time is when Orem was serving on the Indiana…… [Read More]

References

Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory. (2011). Nursing Theory. Retrieved from:  http://nursing-theory.org/theories-and-models/orem-self-care-deficit-theory.php 

Hartweg, D. (1991). Self-Care Deficit Theory. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.
View Full Essay

Nursing Leadership One of the

Words: 3316 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83478971



As noted above, one of the most prominent leadership theories that has been applied to the nursing profession is transformational leadership. Properly applied and managed, transformation leadership can also be used to facilitate creativity in the workplace. For instance, according to Vesterinen, Isola and Paasivaara (2009, p. 504), transformational leadership can create changes and, by definition, is capable of transformed individuals and the organization in which they work. By providing the leadership needed to motivate employees to bigger and better aspirations, transformational leaders can therefore encourage the creative spark among their followers in ways that might not otherwise be possible (Vesterinen et al. 2009). Indeed, Vesterinen et al. (2009, p. 504) specifically state that, "A transformational leader motivates inspirationally, stimulates intellectually and considers employees individually." Taken together, these positive outcomes are valuable in any organizational setting, but they can be particularly important in health care settings.

Why understanding organisational culture…… [Read More]

References

Fourie, WJ & Keogh, JJ 2011, October, 'The Need for Continuous Education in the Prevention

of Needlestick Injuries,' Contemporary Nurse: a Journal for the Australian Nursing

Profession, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 194-201.

Hutin, Y, Hauri, A, Chiarello, L, Catlin, M, Stilwell, B, Ghebrehiwet, T & Garner, J 2003, July,
View Full Essay

Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at: http://www.advisory.com.

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
View Full Essay

Historical Development of Nursing Timeline

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74258664

Nursing

The Beginning: Nightingale

Although nursing care has been around since the first cave man got a cut, the formal, organized discipline of nursing can be traced to the work of Florence Nightingale. Around the time Nightingale began her research and studies in earnest, a number of medical breakthroughs were being made that impacted the history of nursing. One was the advancement of anesthetics, which greatly enhanced the ability of nurses and doctors to care for their patients and perform surgeries. Anesthesia became especially critical on the battlefield.

US Civil War to WWII

Wartime became a primary arena for nurses to carry out their practice, as the numbers of wounded required attention. Florence Nightingale was a nurse during the Crimean War. Like Nightingale, Dorethea Lynde Dix was one of the profession's first nurse leaders and managers. Dix led teams of nurses during the Civil War in the United States. Along…… [Read More]

References

Penn Nursing Science (2012). History of nursing timeline. Retrieved online:  http://www.nursing.upenn.edu/nhhc/Pages/timeline_1700-1869.aspx?slider1=1#chrome
View Full Essay

Understanding Nursing Theory

Words: 1782 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65561219

Nursing Theory -- oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation Model is one of the most commonly cited and used options when it comes to nursing theories. It has been in existence since 1976, and has had a number of years to be adjusted and changed to work with the adjustments that have occurred in the field of nursing over time (Alligood, 2011). Being able to adapt and change is a very important part of nursing, because all patients are different. Additionally, treatments and medications change rapidly, and that can be difficult to keep up with if a nurse is not focused on adapting his or her style and beliefs to the changing nature of medicine. Here, the importance of nursing theory will be explored, along with the key points that are used in the oy Adaptation Model. The views and ideas that the model provides when it comes to nursing…… [Read More]

References

Alligood, M.R. (2011). The power of theoretical knowledge. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 304-305.

Polit, D.F., & Beck, C.T. (2013). Essentials of nursing research. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Roy, C. (2011). Extending the Roy adaptation model to meet changing global needs. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 345-351.

Roy, C. (2011). Research based on the Roy Adaptation Model last 25 years. Nursing science quarterly, 24(4), 312-320.
View Full Essay

Maslow's Hierarchy

Words: 2108 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48609101

Nursing

In the pantheon of nursing theories, borrowed theories are those that derive from other disciplines and have been adapted to the nursing context. Many such borrowed theories come from the different social sciences, such as psychology or sociology, because they directly reflect critical issues in care such as human nature and the role of human interactions in well-being. One could apply religious theories to care for religious people, and it is possible even to consider things like motivational theories as well, if the nurse is trying to motivate the patient (for example, to change behavior as a means of changing health outcomes). Borrowed theories have perhaps received less study than either grand theories or mid-level theories, but they are nevertheless an important source of insight for the nursing educator, and it is important to understand the theory, where it comes from, and how it has been adapted to apply…… [Read More]

Villarruel, A., Bishop, T., Simpson, E., Jemmott, L. & Fawcett, J. (2001). Borrowed theories, shared theories and the advancement of nursing knowledge. Nursing Science Quarterly. Vol. 14 (2) 158-163.

Zalenski, R. & Raspa, R. (2006). Maslow's hierarchy of needs: A framework for achieving human potential in hospice. Journal of Palliative Medicine. Vol. 9 (5) 1120-1127.

Zhan, L. (2000). Cognitive adaptation and self-consistency in hearing-impaired older persons: Testing Roy's adaptation model. Nursing Science Quarterly. Vol. 13 (2) 158-165.
View Full Essay

Historical Development of Nursing Science

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42702084

TIMELINE

Historical Development Of Nursing Science

Timeline: History of nursing

Florence Nightingale publishes her Notes on Nursing, which includes her thirteen canons of nursing. This book was the first book to establish nursing as a unique profession that required specific skills and attributes. Nightingale drew upon her experiences as a nurse during the Crimean War and called for more intensive education of future nurses (Theory of Florence Nightingale, 2012, Nursing Theories).

The American Civil War was a bloody, prolonged conflict. Nurses such as Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, Clara Barton, and Dorothea Dix distinguished themselves serving on the battlefield. As a result of the Battle of Bull un, Barton and Dix created a nursing corps to deal with the need to treat the fallen in a systematized fashion. There were few hospitals in existence at the time. Also, at the time the profession was largely made up of men (Stein…… [Read More]

References

Betty Neuman. (2012). Theories of Nursing. Retrieved:

http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Neuman.html

Development of nursing theories. (2012). Nursing Theories. Retrieved:

 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/development_of_nursing_theories.html
View Full Essay

LR Explor The Nurse Leader Role

Words: 8934 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96826619

(Feldman & Geenbeg, 2005, p. 67) Staffing coodinatos, often nuse leades must seek to give pioity to educational needs as a eason fo adjusting and/o making schedules fo staff, including offeing incentives to staff not cuently seeking educational goals fo assisting in this pioity egadless of the implementation of a tuition eimbusement pogam. (Feldman & Geenbeg, 2005, p. 233)

Nuse Leades as Academic Theoists

The fact that many nuse leades seve as the fundamental souces fo new and emeging nusing paadigms and theoies cannot be ignoed in this eview. The theoies associated with nusing ae as divese as nuses themselves and seve seveal puposes. With egad to nuse ecuitment and the ole that nusing theoy and paadigm plays in it, nuse leades seve to espouse theoy though mentoship and taining that helps individuals see thei futue intinsic ole in nusing. To explain this ole a bief discussion of nusing theoy…… [Read More]

references and Affirmative Action in Making Admissions Decisions at a Predominantly White University. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 31(4), 269.

Burgener, S.C., & Moore S.J. (May-June, 2002) The role of advanced practice nurses in community settings. Nursing Economics 20 (3) 102-108.

Cimini, M.H., & Muhl, C.J. (1995). Twin Cities Nurses Reach Accord. Monthly Labor Review, 118(8), 74.

Cleary, B. & Rice, R. (Eds.). (2005). Nursing Workforce Development: Strategic State Initiatives. New York: Springer.

Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D., Lambert., V.A., & Lambert, C.E. (Eds.). (2005). Professional Nursing: Concepts, Issues, and Challenges. New York: Springer.
View Full Essay

Personal Definition of Nursing Theory Like Most

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53568977

Personal Definition of Nursing

Nursing Theory

Like most facilities, my institution stresses that it cares for its patients. Its belief in the value of caring and the place of caring at the center of nursing practice has caused it to make Jean Watson's Human Caring Theory the core of its philosophy. Watson's theory states that caring is an interpersonal science and a "caring environment is one that offers the development of potential while allowing the person to choose the best action for himself or herself at a given point in time" (Jean Watson's theory of nursing, 2012, Current Nursing). One critical assumption that I see implemented in my practice is the idea that "caring is more 'healthogenic' than is curing. A science of caring is complementary to the science of curing" (Jean Watson's theory of nursing, 2012, Current Nursing). Nursing may be a science, but nurses must always remember that…… [Read More]

References

Jean Watson's theory of nursing. (2012). Current Nursing. Retrieved:

http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Watson.html

Nursing models of care. (2013). Highland Hospital. Retrieved:

http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/highland/departments-centers/nursing/nursing-philosophy/model-of-care.aspx