Patient Advocacy Essays (Examples)

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reasons for patient non compliance with their medications

Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28320145

Patient non-compliance with medication is a problem that can have adverse effects on patient outcomes. Non-compliance with medication can occur in the in-patient or out-patient setting. Leigh (2010) estimates as many as 50% of all prescriptions filled—between one and 1.5 billion—per year are not taken correctly (p. 1). Moreover, there are different types of non-compliance, including taking medications incorrectly, taking the wrong dose or at the wrong frequency, or not taking the medications at all. The causes of patient non-compliance with medication can be traced to miscommunication, requiring healthcare leaders to take a more active role in patient advocacy and education. Misunderstandings of how a medication should be taken, what the medication is for, and other issues related to patient education can be directly solved via direct intervention and improved communication. However, some of the causes of patient non-compliance with medication are due to structural issues including the costs of…… [Read More]

References

De Brincat, M. (2012). Medication adherence: patient education, communication, and behaviour. Journal of the Malta College of Pharmacy Practice 18(2002).
Hoesli, T.M. & Smith, K.M (2011). Effects of religious and personal beliefs on medication regimen design. Orthopedics 34(4): 292-295.
Leigh, E. (2010). Teaching patients about their medications. The Center for Healthcare Communication. Retrieved online:  http://www.communicatingwithpatients.com/articles/teaching_about_meds.html 
Weiner, S. (2001). I can’t afford that! Journal of General Internal Medicine 16(6): 412-418.
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Advocacy in Nursing

Words: 1483 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99797539

Nurse as Patient Advocate

Persons who choose nursing as a profession do so because they have a deep sense that they want to help others. Most do not do it because of pay incentives. Those who choose nursing for that reason are soon disillusioned by the long hours, physical and mental fatigue that go along with it. People choose nursing because they have a need to help those in need. hen they become nurses however, the role that they play is often defined by a large, bureaucratic system and they sometimes find that they must choose between their sense of doing what is right for the patient and conforming to the rules of the system.

Nurses traditionally served as helpers to the doctors, performing mundane tasks to free the doctor for other things.. Doctors make the decisions and give the orders. Nurses follow the orders that the doctor gives. Sometimes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brophy, Mary S. Sheeran (2001). Nurse Advocacy in the neonatal unit: Putting theory into Practice. Journal of Neonatal Nursing. Volume 7 (1). p. 10-12.

Hewitt, Jeanette (2002). A Critical Review of the Arguments Debating the Role of the Nurse Advocate. Journal of Advanced Nursing. Volume 37 (5). March 2002. p. 439-435.

Keffer, M. Jan. (1996). Nurse Advocate: Advocate for Whom? Nursing. Volume 5 (2) April 1996. p. 129-126.
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Advocacy Nursing

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93087419

Nurse Advocacy

After sixteen years of working as a nurse, I realized more fully the impact my profession and the people in it have on public health, public safety, social norms related to health, and public policy. This MSN program has effectively prepared me for the next stage of my career as a nurse advocate who actively participates in public policy development and public health initiatives. I have been strongly influenced by issues related to nurse advocacy throughout the course of my career. This program has highlighted areas in which nursing practice can be applied to helping members of my community empower themselves with knowledge, with the resources available to them to improve their health choices, and improve quality of life for all members of my community.

When I started the program, I was a nurse. I was an experienced nurse who was confident with my role in the hospital,…… [Read More]

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Advocacy Proposal How Advocacy Affects

Words: 1258 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56979893



Lewis, Cheek & Hendricks (2001) support developmental advocacy as a framework from which counselors can promote the health and well-being of patients in a dynamic forum. Kiselica & obinson (2001) point out the community outreach programs may be beneficial for clients but also the counseling profession. This notion is supported by other research including that of Myers, Sweeney & White (2002) who suggest that professional associations can create venues for counselors to share knowledge, training and standards, as well as provide advocacy advancement and help the profession remain credible (394).

Though advocacy programs in the past have focused primarily on the needs and abilities of school counselors and educational representatives, counselors must broaden their perspectives so advocacy may now include all branches of the counseling field. This may require additional training and resources, but will help strengthen the credibility and success of the profession. Advocacy efforts will also help raise…… [Read More]

References

Akos, P. & Galassi, J.P. (2004). "Developmental advocacy: Twenty-first century school counseling." Journal of Counseling and Development, 82(2): 164

Hart, P.J., & Jacobi, M. (1992). From gatekeeper to advocate: Transforming the role of the school counselor. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

House, R.M., & Martin, P.J. (1998). Advocating for better futures for all students: A new vision for school counselors. Education, 119, 284-291.

Kiselica, M.S., & Robinson, M. (2001). Bringing advocacy counseling to life: The history, issues, and human dramas of social justice work in counseling. Journal of Counseling & Development, 79, 387-397.
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Advocacy for Medicinal Marijuana Over Other Drugs

Words: 1341 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85858469

Advocacy for Medicinal Marijuana Over Other Drugs

For a considerable period of time, the reliance for the betterment of the health of an individual has depended on herbal remedies, and in many part of the world and in many households even, these continue to take a preference over the more advanced medical drugs that have come to define modern medicine.

Cannabis or Medical Marijuana is one such example of an herb that today is surrounded by controversy as regards to its usage and benefits. Besides the more negative connotations that seem to be attached to Marijuana, the medical benefits of it seem to surpass its disadvantageous. It will be the purpose of this paper, therefore, to establish a case for the use of Medical Marijuana based on its advantages as compared to Medical Drugs.

History of Cannabis:

Marijuana has come to be known by many names usually being a result…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Manila Bulletin. (2011, April 7th). AP IMPACT: Synthetic Drugs Send Thousands to ER.

Amar, M.B. (2006). Cannabinoids in Medicine: A review of their therapeutic potential . Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 1-25.

Barnes, R.E. (2000). Reefer Madness: Legal & Moral Issues surrounding the Medical Prescription of Marijuana. UK: Blackwell Publishers Ltd.

Drug Enforcement Administration. (n.d.). "Medical" Marijuana - The Facts. Retrieved December 9th, 2011, from United States Drug Enforcement Administration: http://www.justice.gov/dea/ongoing/marinol.html
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Advocacy Veterans of the United

Words: 551 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15670316

Most advocacy groups can help the families of veterans also understand their legal entitlements to support services.

Congressional representatives can occasionally come to the aid of their constituents who are veterans. Lawmakers listening to the concerns of their constituents can bring special cases to the attention of their fellow congressmen and women in Washington to help advocate on behalf of veterans and veterans affairs. Some congressional representatives may be willing to serve on special committees that advocate for veterans affairs in Washington.

Social workers have an obligation to learn about the large-scale organizations that serve the needs of veterans as well as smaller scale community organizations. Even social workers that do not specialize in veterans affairs should become familiar with the unique legal situation of their clients. For example, social workers should familiarize themselves with the specific medical, social, occupational, and psychiatric needs that veterans have, especially the veterans that…… [Read More]

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Nurse Patient Ratios

Words: 2236 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6147

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care

This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

More Nurses Make the Difference. (February 2012). The Lamp. 69 (1): Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com/au/documentSummary;dn=045435426132502;res=IELHEA

Safe Nurse Staffing: Looking Beyond the Numbers. (2009). Vantage Point, CNA. Retrieved from: https://www.nso.com/pdfs/db/newsletters/Safe_Nurse_Staffing_-_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_20094.pdf?fileName=Safe_Nurse_Staffing_ -_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_2009-pdf&folder=pdfs/db/newsletters

Aiken, L. (2001). The Hospital Nurse Workforce: Problems and Prospects."Draft

For the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Retrieved from:http://council.brandeis.edu/pubs/hospstruct / Council-Dec-14-2001-Aiken-paper.pdf
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Nurses as Patient Advocates Most

Words: 1003 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88406785

"[4] (Bernall, 1992, p. 19)

Though historically this role could have strained the nurses professional relationships with other health care professionals, and especially doctors the modern medical industry has afforded a new way of understanding the role, including an emphasis of such a nursing role in medical school. (Bernall 1992, p. 22)

As this belief has proven to be a long-standing one, it is therefore important to explore a greater understanding of the application of its use in patient care. The particular example of the mentally handicapped / epileptic patient is important as the complicated nature of these possibly debilitating diseases often leaves patients feeling helpless to contribute to their own general health and wellness. In one study the application of a nurse, for the specific role of advocacy was used to study it effects of the patients health and wellness outcomes.

A nurse functioning as patient advocate for 21…… [Read More]

References

Baribeault J.J. "Clinical advocacy for persons with epilepsy and mental retardation living in community-based programs." Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, Dec 1996 28/6 pp. 359-67.

Bernal E.W. "The nurse as patient advocate." The Hastings Center Report, July-August

1992. 22/4, pp. 18-23.

The Hastings Center Report, July-August 1992 v22 n4 p18(6)
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nurse advocacy and patient autonomy

Words: 747 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41321337

.....nurse assigned to care for this patient, I would strongly advocate on behalf of the patient's autonomy. The clash between patient autonomy and the healthcare system and its representatives like nurses can only be resolved by being honest in this situation. The patient is under a high degree of stress, not only because of his health condition and the fear that brings out in him, but due to other stressful life events including his financial situation. He was also supposed to get married immediately before the bypass surgery was scheduled, and this is bound to add to his level of stress. The primary issue here is providing what the patient needs to keep him safe during the procedure, and if he insists on using his own pump, which he has successfully used for the thirty years he has lived with the disease of diabetes, then he should use his own…… [Read More]

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Role of Advocacy and Professional

Words: 2286 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29189032

133). This informal power is quite significant when it comes to patient decisions and as such doctors need to appreciate and understand this power nurses wield.

Due to the unique information nurses have about patients, nurses have considerable decision-making responsibilities concerning patients. For this reason, many medical schools have implemented programs, in their curriculum, to teach medical student how important it is to listen to the advice of their nurses. Innovative universities like the University of Kentucky Medical Center actually encouraged their residents to develop a collaborative partnerships with the nurses with which they worked. Paynton (2009) notes that outcomes of patient care improve when collaboration increases and the role of nurses is valued. However, regretfully, this collaboration does not always take place.

Although there is a shift in trends towards more collaboration between doctors and nurses, giving nurses more formal power in advocating for patients, the narratives collected by…… [Read More]

References

Goodman, B. (Nov 2003). Ms. B and legal competence: Examining the role of nurses in difficult ethico-legal decision-making. Nursing in Critical Care, 8(2). Retrieved April 22, 2009, from CINAHL Plus.

Keatley, V. (2008). Identifying and Articulating the Characteristics of Nursing Agency: BSN Students' Perspective. Self-Care, Dependent-Care & Nursing, 16(2). Retrieved April 22, 2009, from CINAHL Plus.

Lawson, L. (2008). Person-centered forensic nursing. Journal of Forensic Nursing, 4(3). Retrieved April 22, 2009, from CINAHL Plus.

McCarthy, V. & Freeman, L. (Fall-Winter 2008). A multidisciplinary concept analysis of empowerment: Implications for nursing. Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 12(2). Retrieved April 22, 2009, from CINAHL Plus.
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Patient - Centered Nursing Techniques

Words: 546 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88642088

Inter and Intraprofessional Communication

Patient-centered practice is designed to address issues that usually appear as a consequence of nurses having a limited understanding of their role and as a result of patients not being provided with the opportunity to learn more about the attitudes they need to take in order to make the experience less painful for all individuals involved. One of the principal ideas related to this type of thinking is the fact that there is always room for innovation and nurses thus need to be proactive in their line of work. Considering that conventional strategies are likely to be ineffective in certain situations, nurses need to be able to adapt to stressing conditions and to get actively involved in trying to provide patients with the best service possible.

Through concentrating on intraprofessional and interprofessional practices, nurses can contribute to their understanding of their line of work in general…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Norgaard, B. "Communication with patients and colleagues," Retrieved May 29, 2015, from  http://www.danmedj.dk/portal/pls/portal/!PORTAL.wwpob_page.show?_docname=8390873.PDF 

"Interprofessional Education, Team, Intraprofessional Communication" Committee," Retrieved May 29, 2015, from  http://symposium.medicine.dal.ca/documents/Team2ReportIPE_Team_IntraprofessionalCommunication.pdf
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Care Issler Is a Patient Who Recently

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36359617

Care:

Issler is a patient who recently moved with his daughter-in-law who is no longer married to his son. As part of her interest in helping to take care of Mr. Issler, she noticed that he was pale and diaphoretic after a two and a half hour flight. The daughter-in-law took him to an emergency room where he was attended to by a cardiologist and set a follow-up check up for an echo cardiogram next week. Mr. Issler has complained of congestive heart failure and a history of deep vein thrombosis. The cardiologist recommended that he seeks out a primary care provider and check up of his thyroid. As the primary care provider, the patient has also expressed his uncertainties on whether he has hyper of hypo thyroidism though he has been under thyroid medication for several years. In addition to being very pale, he has a large bag of…… [Read More]

References:

Bray, D.L. (n.d.). Thyroid Storm and the AACN Synergy Model. Journal of Nursing. Retrieved from  http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/thryoid-storm-and-the-aacn-synergy-model 

Drewes at. al. (2012, October). The Effectiveness of Chronic Care Management for Heart Failure: Meta-Regression Analyses to Explain the Heterogeneity in Outcomes. Health Services Research, 47(5), 1926-1959.

Hardin, S. & Hussey, L. (2003, February). AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care Case Study of a CHF Patient. Critical Care Nurse, 23(1), 73-76. Retrieved from  http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/23/1/73.full.pdf 

Kaplow, R. & Reed, K.D. (2008). The AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care: A Nursing
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Dealing With Difficult Patients Translation of Evidence and Best Practice

Words: 3786 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75591008

Difficult Patients

Mitigating isks from Dementia

Providing adequate care for an individual suffering from dementia presents many difficulties for nurses. Patients with dementia often have debilitating conditions such as Alzheimer's or similar neurologic diseases which are progressive, thereby making it challenging for them to remember, think lucidly, communicate effectively or complete activities of daily living. Furthermore, dementia can cause rapid variations in mood or even modify personality and behavior. With the tremendous number of elderly in society more and more nurses are required to care for patients with progressive dementias. It is imperative that a diagnosis be reached early in the course of the cognitive impairment and that the patient is closely monitored for coexisting morbidities. Nurses have a central role in assessment and management of individuals with progressive dementia. This essay provides some evidence-based practical strategies for managing the behavioral problems and communication difficulties often encountered in this population.…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aud, M.A., Oliver, D., Bostick, J. And Schwarz, B. 2011. Effectiveness of Social Model Care Units for Dementia. International Nursing Research Congress 2005.

Care, N.D. 2010. Teaching and Learning. Pulse. Winter Edition.

Fletcher, S. And Zimmerman, S. 2010. Trainee and trainer reactions to a scripted dementia care training program in residential care/assisted living settings and nursing homes. Alzheimer's Care. 11(1): 61-70.

Goodman, C. 2011. The organizational culture of nursing staff providing long-term dementia care is related to quality of care. Evidence-Based Nursing. 47:1274-1282.
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Nurse-Patient Ratios This Is a Legislator Information

Words: 987 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84907674

Nurse-Patient Ratios.

This is a legislator information sheet on nurse-patient ratios (as adapted from Aikan et al. 2010) for a busy legislator who will only have time to read bullet points:

The ratio of nurse patient is lower in California than in other states with nurses in CA having at least one patient less than nurses have in other states (as for instance in New Jersey and in Pennsylvania as mentioned in Aikman et al. (2010))

California nurses had lower nurse-patient ratio on medical and surgical units when compared to other states. The average amongst CA nurses was 2 patients less than those in other states.

The lower the nurse-patient ration, the lower the level of mortality amongst patients

When nurses' workloads paralleled those of workloads of Californian nurses, the following results occurred:

a. nurses' burnout decreased

b. nurses' job dissatisfaction decreased

c. nurses reported consistently better quality of care…… [Read More]

Sources

Abood, S. (2007). Influencing health care in the legislative arena. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 12(1), 12 pp.

 http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume122007/No1Jan07/tpc32_216091.aspx

Aikan, L.H., Sloane, D.M., Cimiotti, J.P., Clarke, S.P., Flynn, L., Seago, J.A., Spetz, J., & Smith, H. (2010, April 9). Implications of the California nurse staffing mandate for other states. Health Services Research. Retrieved from  http://www.nursing.upenn.edu/chopr/Documents/Aiken.2010.CaliforniaStaffingRatios.pdf
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Role of Nurse as Patient

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95621203

(Hummelvoll, 1996, p. 13)

The professional relationship that the client has with the nurse is often one of the most fundamental of all the relationships the client has in his or her life. The nurse can act as an advocate between the client and other health care professional as well as an advocate for the client with his or her own family. The holistic needs of the client are often met through this and other relationships, when they are strong, consistent and productive.

A an authentic caring relationship between clients and nurses. This relationship stimulates mutual empowerment and helps the client pass through the conglomerate of not easily accessible helping systems in the United States. The purpose of this reciprocal and chosen partnership is to increase the client's safety and quality of life. Here too, empowerment is a means to better health, with the nurse acting as the client's advocate,…… [Read More]

Resources

Hummelvoll, J.K. (1996) "The Nurse-Client Alliance Model." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 32/4, pp.12-17.

Vuckovich, P.K. (2000) "The Ethics of Involuntary Procedures." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 36 / 4. p.111.
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Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients Probing What

Words: 3532 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69380077

Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients

Probing what information is available about the current status of placement or accommodation and level of personal healthcare available to mentally impaired and emotionally disturbed individuals, it is clear that the analysis is as diverse as there are different mental illnesses. While statistics on managed care treatment for people with severe and disabling mental illnesses are sparse, it is evident that the financial responsibility to care for and house these patients is enormous.

According to Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General (1999), approximately 20% of the U.S. adult population has a mental illness. He says, "These illnesses include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, anorexia nervosa, and severe cognitive impairment. More serious mental illnesses include ipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness accounts for 15% of overall burden of disease -- more than malignant cancer and respiratory diseases -- and as far back as 1996 the direct cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boulard, G. (2000, April). Forgotten Patients the Mentally Ill. State Legislatures, 26, 12. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Callahan, D. (1993, October) Minds and hearts: priorities in mental health services.

The Hastings Center Report.

Fox, M. & Kim, K. (2004, January) Evaluating a Medicaid Home and Community-based Physical Disability Waiver. Family and Community Health. Vol 27: 37.
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Rights of Patients Patients' Rights

Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66504084

" (South Australia, p. 8)

This demonstrates the balance which is necessary in protecting the rights of the patient and simultaneously ensuring that physicians have the freedom necessary to perform to the best of their abilities. In a respect, this underscores the nature of the strategies used for the protection of patients' rights. The intention is primarily to provide a basic forum for the constructive interaction of patient and physician with legal recourse serving as a failsafe. So is this implied by the LSCSA, which indicates that the demands of existing Patients' Rights standards are designed to make the physician actively accountable to the patient's interests. Therefore, the LSCSA indicates a strategy for preserving the right to consent, reporting that "although the first step usually should be to speak to the doctor or other health care provider who has treated the patient, if any doubts remain, a patient should not…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Legal Services Commission of South Australia (LSCSA). (2010). Patients' Rights. Law Handbook.sa.gov.au.

South Australia (1995). Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative Care Act 1995. Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002.

South Australia1 (2009) Mental Health Act 2009. Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002.
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Nursing Respect for Patient's Common

Words: 1136 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13111416

The modern nurse must then be willing to move beyond a simple catch-all of medical jargon and bureaucracy and become someone who is both supportive and critical of the system. This may seem dichotomous, but in reality is not. The system is designed with beneficence in mind -- to help the patient at all costs. It is thus up to the nurse advocate to ensure that that actually happens (Sheldon, 2009).

Undertake assessments which are sensitive to the needs of the patient- Assessment is one of the key factors in management of clinical medicine. The nurse is often at the forefront of that process simply due to the logistical nature of the situation -- taking vitals, preparing the patient for blood work, etc. However, it is in two particular areas that the nurse can be most effective when assessing the actual needs of the patient; culturally and when questions are…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Edwards, N., et.al. (2003). Aging, Heart Disease, and Its Management. Humana Press.

Lundy, K. And Janes, S. (2003). Essentials of Community-Based Nursing. Sudbury, MA:

Jones and Bartlett.

Miller, C. (2009). Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults. Philadelphia, PA:
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Medical Assessment Initial Patient Analysis Chief Complaint

Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71592150

Medical Assessment

Initial Patient Analysis

Chief Complaint

Discomfort in lower back.

HPI

Patient is a 78-year-old woman presented as disheveled, with bug bites throughout her body, and exuding a foul odor. Cognitively, she orients only to her name with a BMI of 30 and a minimal understanding of the English language. She is able to nod "yes" or "no" to questions, but calls the nurse "Mother." She is unsteady on her feet, and has a fine "pill-rolling "tremor in her left hand. He legs are quite cool to the touch, hairless, and toe capillary refill is greater than 2 seconds.

Past Medical History

Unknown, but patient appears to be in distress both physically and psychologically.

OBJECTIVE

General App.

Poor, disheveled, may not be receiving adequate care or living in an environment with enough food or warmth. BMI of 30 is technically obese, which also may indicate the patient is not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hypoglycemia. (2012). Web MD. Retrieved from:  http://symptoms.webmd.com/#./conditionView 

Michael, K. And Shaughnessy, M. (2006). Stroke Prevention and Management in Older

Adults. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 21 (55): 521-26.

Mohr, J., et al. (2004). Stroke: Pathopshyciology, Diagnosis and Management. New York: Churchill Livingstone.
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Healthcare Management for Eldercare Advocacy Organization

Words: 2580 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85588350

Planned change in the eldercare advocacy organization

In the coming years, many countries will experience a dramatic shift in healthcare infrastructure due to an expanding elderly population size. However, the changes may vary across countries depending on many factors such as the kind of social welfare available in each country, the political environment which determine policies, the level of healthcare available and individual expectations in each country. Due to this wide variance, the innovations within this space will also vary greatly. What this means to the healthcare manager is that managing innovations becomes very hard (Shlutz, Andre & Sjovold, 2015 p 42). This also impacts on performance management which is fast gaining popularity in the public sector as a means to improve on accountability. Unfortunately, it has been cumbered by a series of challenges in its implementation; this is in spite of the frameworks developed over the last couple of…… [Read More]

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Leadership and Advocacy Plan

Words: 4283 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15129254

Leadership Theories

There are a number of theories of leadership that can be applied to my own personal development plan in counselling. I first look to servant leadership as a unique approach to leadership, wherein it is emphasized that the effect leader is one who facilitates greatness in others. The concept of servant leadership was developed by obert Greenleaf in the 1970s, and emphasizes the leader doing whatever is needed in order to ensure that everybody else can be at his or her absolute best (Greenleaf, 1977). Servant leaders are always the ones who are searching, listening and watching, so that they can learn about their organizations, the environment in which their organizations exist, and the people within their organizations. The servant leader then can make a determination about what is needed for the organization to thrive in that environment, but recognizes that one leader cannot succeed on his or…… [Read More]

References

Alper, S., Schloss, P. & Schloss, C. (1995). Families of children with disabilities in elementary and middle school: Advocacy models and strategies. Exceptional Children Vol. 62 (3) 261-270.

Barling, J., Slater, F. & Kelloway, E. (2000). Transformational leadership and emotional intelligence: An exploratory study. Leadership & Organization Development Journal. Vol. 21 (3) 157-161.

Boyle, C., Beardsley, R. & Hayes, M. (2004). Effective leadership and advocacy: Amplifying professional citizenship. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. Vol. 68 (3) 1-5.

Fielder, C. (2000). Making a difference: Advocacy competencies for special education professionals. Allyn & Bacon: Needham Heights, MA
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Healthcare Advocacy Team & Technology

Words: 2602 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17378209

The healthcare industry has widely adopted IT solutions in the development and maintenance of information systems for this sector. These information system applications will go a long way in boosting medical care goals by reducing costs significantly, increasing efficiency in the process and achieving a zero error. With this, client satisfaction will be realized. At the core of this is the electronic medical records (EHR) which is representative of all the health information of an individual that is available in a database and can be shared across healthcare service providers (Rouse, 2016). Also integral to this system are two components; mobile health (mHealth) and telehealth (telemedicine). Though the two are interconnected, they have a slight difference. Telehealth includes home monitoring of health conditions through desktops, laptops and other online material (Terry, 2016), while mobile health is restricted to mobile devices.

Considering the impact of electronic medical records (EHR), it is…… [Read More]

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At Risk Youth Advocacy

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15175333

Foster Care and Adoptions

The Bronfenbrenner ecological model proposes that "individual human development occurs within interconnected and embedded ecological systems." (McWhirter, et al., Chapter 1). These are the macrosystem of societal norms, the exosystem of public policy, the microsystems such as family and schools, and the individual characteristics. Defects in one or more of these systems can put a child at risk.

An example of a child at risk is Doughboy, Ice Cube's character in Boyz in the Hood. A teenage black male in an impoverished area of Los Angeles, Doughboy faces a number of risk factors. His environment is characterized by poverty, but also by social norms and gender roles. The social norm in the area is that many young males join gangs, and he is specifically at risk because of the emphasis on aggression as part of one's self-worth among males in that area. Such cultural values among…… [Read More]

References

Child Welfare Policy.org (2013). State child welfare policy database. Child Welfare.org. Retrieved April 21, 2016 from http://www.childwelfarepolicy.org/tools/assets/files/Florida_Child-Maltreatment-Factsheet_2013.pdf

McWhirter, J., McWhirter, B., McWhirter, E. & McWhirter, R. (2013) At risk youth. Cengage Learning.
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Nursing Patient-Centric Communication There Are

Words: 1515 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33890580



ibliography

Mendes, IA, Trevizan, MA, Noqueira, MS, Mayashida, M. (2000) Humanistic Approach to Nursing Communication: The Case of hospitalized Adolescent Female.

Rev ras Enferm (2000) Jan-Mar, 53(1):7-13.

Williams, Carol A. & Gossett, Monette T. (2001) Nursing Communication: Advocacy for the Patient or Physician" Clinical Nursing Research Vol. 10 No. 3 332-340 (2001) Online available at http://cnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/3/332.

Colon-Emeric, Cathleen (2006) Patterns of Medical and Nursing Staff Communication in Nursing Homes: Implications and Insights From Complexity Science. Qualitative Health Research Vol. 16 NO. 2, 1713-188 (2006)

Vaartio, H. et al. (2006)Nursing Advocacy: How is it Defined by Patients and Nurses, What does it Involve and How is it Experienced? Scand J. Caring Sci 2006 S. ept;20(3):282-92.

Tfouni, LV; de Carvalho, EC; Scochi, CG (1991) Discourse, institution, power: an analysis of the nurse patient interaction 0 Rev Gaucha Enferm 1991 Jan;12(1):20-5.

Jarrett, N. And Payne, S. (1995) A Selective Review of the Literature…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Mendes, IA, Trevizan, MA, Noqueira, MS, Mayashida, M. (2000) Humanistic Approach to Nursing Communication: The Case of hospitalized Adolescent Female.

Rev Bras Enferm (2000) Jan-Mar, 53(1):7-13.

Williams, Carol A. & Gossett, Monette T. (2001) Nursing Communication: Advocacy for the Patient or Physician" Clinical Nursing Research Vol. 10 No. 3 332-340 (2001) Online available at http://cnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/3/332.

Colon-Emeric, Cathleen (2006) Patterns of Medical and Nursing Staff Communication in Nursing Homes: Implications and Insights From Complexity Science. Qualitative Health Research Vol. 16 NO. 2, 1713-188 (2006)
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Stroke Advocacy for Women Strokes

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16328999

The general exception to that rule is that women are likely to see gynecologists/obstetricians. The fact that certain strains of HPV may be linked to stroke makes this connection an even more critical one, since ob/gyns are the doctors most likely to provide HPV screening and treatment. Moreover, women are likely to visit pediatricians for child healthcare. Therefore, the health initiative that should be instituted is that ob/gyns should be involved in stroke symptom screening and education with every patient at every visit. Furthermore, pediatricians should engage in screening and education for parents, because maternal health is a critical component of child health.

The desired sponsor for this advocacy program would be the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Offices on Women's Health. It could partner with national organizations such as the National Stroke Association, the American Heart Association, the Women's Heart Association, and even Planned Parenthood, since Planned…… [Read More]

References

National Stroke Association. (2012). Women and stroke. Retrieved from:

http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health. (2009, January 28).

Stroke fact sheet. Retrieved January 30, 2012 from Women's Health website:
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Reducing Readmission for Diabetes Patients

Words: 2695 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37664548

Quality Improvement Project

Diabetes -- Chronic Condition Background

Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

isk factors for type 1 diabetes

isk factors for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

isk factors for gestational diabetes

The ationale for Selection

The Target Population

Intervention Plans

Target Goals

It has been estimated that in New York there is roughly two million people, or over twelve percent of the population, that have diabetes; furthermore, of this population, over half a million people have the condition but are not aware that they have it (American Diabetes Association, N.d.). It is further estimated that nearly five and a half million people, or over a third of the population, have prediabetes. Diabetes and diabetes-associated cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death in the region accounting for roughly two-thirds of the deaths and the rates of diabetes has lead this trend to be referred to as the…… [Read More]

References

American Diabetes Association. (N.d.). Health Disparities. Retrieved from American Diabetes Association: http://www.diabetes.org/advocacy/advocacy-priorities/health-disparities.html

American Diabetes Association. (N.d.). New York, New York. Retrieved from American Diabetes Association: http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/local-offices/new-york-new-york/

CDC. (2013). Diagnosed Diabetes, Age Adjusted Rate (per 100) Adults - Total 2013. Retrieved from Center for Disease Control: http://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/diabetes/DiabetesAtlas.html

Department of Health. (N.d.). Diabetes. Retrieved from New York State: https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/conditions/diabetes/
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Employee's Rights to Health and Safety in

Words: 1870 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21555220

Employee's Rights to Health and Safety in the Workplace

The objective of this study is to analyze the rights of employees to health and safety in the workplace in regards to the scenario as follows:

DoRight has recently been hired as the President of the "Universal Human Care Hospital," where he oversees all departments with over 5,000 employees and over 20,000 patients at the medical facility. He has been provided with a broad set of duties and oversight of numerous departments, including business development, customer services, human resources, legal, patient advocacy, to name a few. He has managers in each department that he supervises and who work with him to address the needs of the various internal and external stakeholders of the hospital. Dr. DoRight discovers that some patients within the hospital have been dying as a result of a variety of illegal procedures by doctors and nurses, and negligent…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grush, Rick (nd) Introduction to some basic ethical orientations. Biomedical Ethics Readings. Retrieved from: http://mind.ucsd.edu/syllabi/03-04/1-Summer/readings/biomed-readings.pdf

Mossman, Douglas (2012) Physician Impairment: When Should You Report? Malpractice RX. Retrieved from: http://www.currentpsychiatry.com/pdf/1009/1009CP_Malpractice.pdf

Rabinowitz, Phil (2012) Identifying and Analyzing Stakeholders and Their Interests. Community Toolbox. Retrieved from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter7_section8_main.aspx

Alpers, Ann (2001) Key Legal Principles for Hospitalists. Retrieved from:  http://hospitalmedicine.ucsf.edu/improve/literature/discharge_committee_literature/handoff_communication_and_discharge/key_legal_principles_for_hospitalists_alpers_am_j_med.pdf
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Corporate Governance and Ethical Responsibility

Words: 2146 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44661235

However, those who have serious ethical and moral integrity will generally do what it takes to get a problem corrected, even if they have to lose out personally or professionally to protect the health and welfare of other people under their care. It does not appear that Dr. Doight did any of that. He determined that following procedure was enough to fulfill his duties, whether or not that procedure resulted in any resolution for the patients.

It would appear that Dr. Doight followed the deontological argument that one only has to follow the rules to be ethical. For many people, that is an acceptable choice. For others, the rules would not be important and would not have anything to do with whether something was considered to be ethical. With Dr. Doight, it is not just the possibility that he feels he has done what is ethical, but also possible that…… [Read More]

References

Becker, L.C., & Becker, C.B. (2002). Encyclopedia of Ethics, (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.

Fagothey, a. (2000). Right and Reason. Rockford, IL: Tan Books & Publishers.

Kamm, F.M. (2007). Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissible Harm. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Rachels, J. & Rachels, S. (2012). Chapters 7&8, the utilitarian approach & the debate of utilitarianism." The Elements of Moral Philosophy. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
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Hydration Campaign

Words: 2442 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37319147

Hydration Advocacy Campaign

Health Advocacy Campaign

Part 1 Developing a Health Advocacy Campaign

Health advocacy programs are mostly tailored to specific groups of people that are in need of special attention. While this approach can be useful, simple approaches are sometimes more effective and can address widespread problems more economically and efficiently. The importance and simplicity of water and its role within our health and well being represents an approach of basic health advocacy and may target many in need of such information. Health advocates must look out for their patients and subscribe to the most important issues of the day that may have a deep and profound impact on healing the individual and the healing processes that can evolve in and throughout the community.

The purpose of this health advocacy development plan is to argue that the issue of hydration, for all people, is one of the most significant…… [Read More]

References

Manz, F., & Wentz, A. (2005). The importance of good hydration for the prevention of chronic diseases. Nutrition reviews, 63(s1), S2-S5.

Schwartz, L. (2002). Is there an advocate in the house? The role of health care professionals in patient advocacy. Journal of medical ethics, 28(1), 37-40.

Shaner-McRae, H., McRae, G., & Jas, V. (2007). Environmentally Safe Health Care Agencies: Nursing's Responsibility, Nightingale's Legacy. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 12(2).

Stahl, A., Kroke, A., Bolzenius, K., & Manz, F. (2007). Relation between hydration status in children and their dietary profile -- results from the DONALD study. European journal of clinical nutrition, 61(12), 1386-1392.
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Nursing Concept Theoretical Background One of the

Words: 3582 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46011406

Nursing Concept

Theoretical Background

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. In many ways, too, modern technology has advanced further than societal wisdom, especially when confronting the issue of death. The modern nurse's role is to create a nurse-patient culture that encourages the individual to take responsibility for their healthcare and, in partnership with the nurse, to be involved in their recovery. The modern complexities of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Basford, L. And O. Slevin. (2003). Theory and Practice of Nursing: An Integrated Approach to Caring Practice. New York: Nelson Thomas.

Beckstead, J. And Beckstead, L. (2004). A multidimensional analysis of the epistemic origins of nursing theories, models and frameworks. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43

(1): 113-22.

Cohen, J. (1991). Two portraits of caring: a comparison of the artists - Leininger
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Nursing Leadership Regardless of the Field Most

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55481087

Nursing Leadership

egardless of the field, most research studies show that collaboration and teamwork are among the top examples of job satisfaction and performance. In the modern healthcare situation, this tends to move far beyond just the physician/nurse relationship, and into the manner in which interdisciplinary teams work together for more positive patient outcomes. Leadership in nursing has become an expected part of the job description, and over the past few decades, not only do nurses engender more and more clinical responsibility, patient advocacy, and patient and family communication, they are asked to be informal leaders within a group situation that may range from informal patient assessments, new product testing, or procedural and hiring committees (Chang, W., et al., 2009).

Modern healthcare and nursing are more complex than ever before. The nurse's role is far more than simply an assistant is, and requires the understanding and application of a large…… [Read More]

References

Borkowski, N. (2011). Organizational Behavior in Health Care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Chang, W., et al. (2009). Job Satisfaction and Perceptions of Quality of Patient Care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65(9), 1946-55.

Clark, C. (2009). Creating Nursing Leadership and Management. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Critical Thinking Company . (2013, June). Critical Thinking and Nursing. Retrieved from criticalthinking.org:  https://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/critical-thinking-and-nursing/834
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Policies and Evaluation

Words: 1324 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72120976

Policy Process: Evaluation, Analysis and evision

The National Nursing Shortage eform and Patient Advocacy Act was designed to address the public health workforce shortage that is seen, especially where nurses are concerned. It is no secret that nurses are leaving the profession in record numbers, and as they do that it is becoming more and more difficult to replace them with others who want to do the same type of work (Buerhaus & etchin, 2013; Iglehart, 2013). Because of all the nurses retiring, and so many of them experiencing burnout, the gap between the number of needed nurses and those who are available continues to widen (Negron & Cohen, 2013). The issue here is how that Act becomes a policy, so it can provide more help to a public health workforce that is struggling. In order for the Act to become a policy, it must first be evaluated. The Act…… [Read More]

References

Buerhaus, P.I., & Retchin, S.M. (2013). The dormant National Health Care Workforce Commission needs congressional funding to fulfill its promise. Health Affairs, 32(11), 2021-2024.

Iglehart, J.K. (2013). Expanding the role of advanced nurse practitioners - risks and rewards. New England Journal of Medicine, 368(20), 1935-1941.

Negron, B., & Cohen, E. (2013). Back to the future: A standardized approach to delivering effective nursing care. Nurse Leader, 11(2), 52-56.

S.739 (2014). Congress.gov. Retrieved from https://beta.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/senate-bill/739
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Corporate Governance and Ethical Responsibility Dr Doright

Words: 1798 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98361189

Corporate Governance and Ethical esponsibility

Dr. Doight recently hired President "Universal Human Care Hospital," oversees departments 5,000 employees 20,000 patients medical facility. He provided a broad set duties oversight numerous departments, including business development, customer services, human resources, legal, patient advocacy, a .

Corporate Governance and Ethical esponsibility

Duty of loyalty owed to internal and external stakeholders

According to Heath (2006)

, duty of loyalty entails good faith and honesty in best interests of a corporation's stake holders. The duty of loyalty involve the no-profit rule and no conflict rule Heath, 2006.

The duty of loyalty thus implies that, a person in-charge of overseeing the operations in an organization should not let his/her personal interest dictate performance of duty. It also governs actions which must be guided by honesty and good faith. A corporation's stake holders can be classified into two; internal and external Weaver, 2006()

Duty of Loyalty to…… [Read More]

References

Gilbert J.A. (2007). Strengthening Ethical Wisdom: Tools for Transforming Your Health Care Organization. . Chicago, IL: Health Forum, Inc.

Heath, J. (2006). Business Ethics without Stakeholders. Business Ethics Quarterly, 16(4), 533-557.

Joseph R.D., & McCall J.J. (2005). Contemporary issues in Business Ethics 5th edition Belmont, Calif: Wadsworth.

Khurana, R., & Nohria, N. (2008). It's Time to Make Management a True Profession. Harvard Business Review, 86(10), 1-8.
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United States Has the Most

Words: 6833 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34903730

al., 2010).

Nursing and the E

The Emergency oom is often one of the most visible parts of healthcare for political debate. It is also one of the most difficult environments for a modern nurse. It is interesting that one of the founders of modern nursing had emergency experience prior to developing her overall theories. Nightingale also looked at negatives and positives that are the conditions, which could help make people recover and reach their actual potential, as also noted by Maslow hierarchy of needs. She did not look or speak directly of the disease per se, but rather, looked at air, clean water, environment, and sanitation. She published her book in1860 with the title a "Notes on Nursing: What it Is and What it Is Not," connecting human beings and quality of human life, and comparing the stagnant sewage she saw in Scutari, as well as in London. She…… [Read More]

References

Americans at Risk. (March 2009). Families USA. Retrieved from:

http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/americans-at-risk.pdf

Patient Perceptions in the Emergency Department: Physicians, Physician Assistants,

Nurse Practitioners. (30 August 2010). Retrieved from: http://idiopathicmedicine.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/patient-perceptions-in-the-emergency-department-physicians-physician-assistants-nurse-practitioners/
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Nursing Is There a Limit to One's

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72521533

Nursing

Is there a limit to one's professional obligation to the patient? Is that the same as advocacy?

Advocacy can be construed as a professional obligation to the patient, especially when advocacy is framed as an ethical obligation. There are therefore few limits to a nurse's ethical responsibilities to the patients, even though some situations may seem morally ambiguous. Many nursing researchers promote the concept of patient advocacy as "an ethic of practice," one that is an immutable part of the professional responsibilities of the nurse. (Gaylord & Grace, 1995, p. 11).

Are the characteristics of caring relevant to 2010?

The characteristics of caring are more relevant in 2011 than they were in 2010 or have ever been before, in part because of increasing patient diversity. Knowledge of the different concepts of health, healing, illness, and the role of the doctor helps make nurses more accountable to patient needs. Viewing…… [Read More]

References

Beyea, S.C. (2005). Patient advocacy: nurses keeping patients safe. AORN Journal. On FindArticles. Retrieved online: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSL/is_5_81/ai_n13793213/

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics 2(1): 11-18.

Hanks, R.G. (2008). The lived experience of nursing advocacy. Nursing Ethics 15(4): 468-477

Vaartio, H., Leino-Kilpi, H., Salantera, S. And Suominen, T. (2006), Nursing advocacy: how is it defined by patients and nurses, what does it involve and how is it experienced?. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 20: 282 -- 292. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2006.00406.x
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Client Autonomy in Community Health and Nurse Safety in Community Practice

Words: 1788 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72864167

Client Autonomy in Community Health & Nurse Safety in Community Practice

Nurses involved in community nursing often face ethical and practical dilemmas, particularly with regard to the issue of patient autonomy. Community practice differs for nursing in more formal settings in that there are many complex variables that can intervene in nursing care.

they are made more complex because of the influence of the setting (isolation from nursing colleagues, role ambiguity, the shift in control, family dynamics, and the increased need to collaborate). Even something as simple as access to patients in the community cannot be assumed in the same way it can be in acute care.

(Ethical Awareness for Community Care Nurses)

Examples of this complexity are cases where access is refused by the client, even when the client is in need of urgent assistance. This presents an acute problem on an ethical level for the community nurse. As…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aulisio M. The Home Setting: Posing Ethical Challenges to Clients and Caregivers. Retrieved may 16, 2005 fropm Community Ethics. Web site:

http://www.pitt.edu/~cep/61homecarechallenges.html

Ellis. J. ( 2003) The Client's Right to Know Their Nurse and Question Care vs. The Nurse's Right to be Protected from Harm. Retrieved May 15, 2005 from RNABC. Web site: http://www.rnabc.bc.ca/registrants/nursing_practice/articles/Client_Right_to_Know.htm

Ethical Awareness for Community. Retrieved 15 May 2005 from Care Nurses. Volume 3, Issue 11 - January 2001 web site: http://www.phen.ab.ca/materials/intouch/vol3/intouch3-11.html
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Becoming a Nurse

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10384482

Nurse

The nursing career differs from the medical field in that nursing is solely focused on the care and advocacy of the patient. Nurses are the intermediaries between doctor-patient relationships; they are the bridges that enable patients to understand the situation regarding healthcare and healthcare practices. Nurses depend on the human responses and the human condition in order to better care for the patients. They are responsible for further interactions with patients as well as their families and communities (American Nurses Association). This is the broad scope that the American Nurses Association basically defines the nursing career (American Nurses Association). Nurses not only assist physicians and doctors when it comes to certain diagnoses and treatments, they also are taught to genuinely care for the patients that transcend the medicine.

Nurses have the ability to fill a myriad of fields, one of which includes being a caregiver or the one responsible…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, p. 7. 2004.

American Nurses Association. Nursing's Social Policy Statement. Second Ed, p. 6. 2003.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, Registered Nurses. Web. Retrieved on May 28, 2011. .

Glicksman, Allen, Joan Klein and Irene Warner Maron. Caregiver Nursing Protocol: Integrating Nursing Intervention With Social Work Services. Philadelphia Corporation for Aging. 2005. Web. 28 May 2011. .
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Nursing Organizations One of the

Words: 1129 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12699302



The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists - The NACNS was founded in 1995, specifically to enhance and promote the unique and high-value contributions that clinical nurses make to the health and well-being of individuals, families, groups, and communities in their particular branch of healthcare. They also have a foundation, scholarship programs, a journal and discussion portal, various levels of conferences, scholarship programs, honors and awards, and the ability for advanced certification. A Clinical Nurse Specialist is a licensed N who has graduate preparation (MA or PhD) in nursing specifically as a Clinical Nurse Specialist. This field of healthcare goes beyond the duties of an LPN or N, or even charge nurse, and deals with either advanced levels of clinical specialization, or broader, community and national health concerns. The field requires a rather significant academic bent, and the association is designed to support and enhance that paradigm focus (CNS -…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

About ENA. (2010, January). Retrieved October 2010, from Emergency Nurses Association: http://www.ena.org/about/Pages/Default.aspx

About the ACNM. (2010, February). Retrieved from American College of Nurse-Midwives: http://www.midwife.org/members.cfm

CNS - Who We Are and What We Do. (2010, January). Retrieved October 2010, from National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists: http://www.nacns.org/AboutNACNS/MissionStatement/tabid/57/Default.aspx

Kozier, B., Erb, G. & Blais, K. (1997), Professional nursing practice (3rd edition),
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social work mental health issues

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77088972

National Association of Social Workers (NASW, 2017), the majority -- 60% -- of mental health services in the United States is provided by social workers. Psychologists provide only 23% of the country's mental health services (NASW, 2017). Social workers have the greatest responsibilities for patient advocacy in mental health and have the ability to influence mental health public policy. The best way to advocate on behalf of clients in the social work sector is to improve personal and professional competencies by staying aware of the emerging issues in both social work and mental health care. Current emerging issues including working with an increasingly diverse client base, not just in terms of ethnicity but also in terms of needs diversity, gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation diversity, diversity of socio-economic status, and other issues that require a personalized plan of care (Marsella, 2011). Another emerging issue globally is recognition of the…… [Read More]

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Ethics to Practice Analysis of 'End of

Words: 2858 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41901193

Ethics to Practice: Analysis of 'end of life' decision making

The foregoing discussion is an incursion into nursing ethics. Implication(s) to 'omission' of information as a customary practice within our healthcare institution is reviewed in relation to best practices pertaining to 'informed consent,' and hospital policy is not definitive. Directed at the evolution of ethical decision making, the general query to the study focuses on the parameters of informed consent where individual practice is concerned.

In the nation of Canada where I am a nurse the number of situations where patient informed consent decisions might be subject to our national code of nursing ethics is many. e face critical ethical dilemmas every day, as emergency procedures and critical care interventions are standard practice. Complexity in decision making is furthered in the conduct and approaches made by international colleagues on contract in our institution by way of exchange.

The primacy of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bullough, B. ed. The Law and the expanding nursing role. New York, NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1980.

Callahan, Joan, ed. Ethical Issues in Profesional Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Canadian Medical Protection Association (CMPA), 2010. Web.

Finlay and Fernandez. Failure to report and provide commentary on research ethics board approval and informed consent in medical journals is discussed Journal of Medical Ethics, 34.10 (2008), 761-764. doi:10.1136/jme.2007.023325.
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Health Literacy the Nurse Plays

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35885390

Therefore, I would tell the patient that their symptoms should not be considered in isolation of their whole person. Websites that address symptoms only are not taking into account the wealth of factors that can influence the diagnosis of a specific disease.

At the same time, patients have the right to know about alternative solutions other than those provided or suggested by the physician or health care organization. Sometimes insurance constraints prevent nurses and doctors from mentioning interventions, diagnoses, and cures. The insurance provisions should not come in the way of the patient seeking second opinions or investigating such things as alternative and complementary medicine.

The strategies for assisting patients in becoming informed consumers of online health information include creating brochures and pamphlets, as well as websites. These materials can offer patients helpful links to the CDC (2013) and similar credible resources related to health literacy. The nurse can also…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2013). Health literacy. Retrieved online:  http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/ 

Speros, C.I. (2011). Promoting health literacy: A nursing imperative. Nurs Clin North Am. 2011 Sep;46(3):321-33, vi-vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2011.05.007
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Impact Evaluation and Accountability

Words: 1523 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29602305

Health Care -- Impact Evaluation and Accountability

Accountability to stakeholders should be an integral aspect of any health-related government program. This is achieved by systematic and objective assessment of how a program's effectiveness, evaluation normally involves measuring and documenting a program's effectiveness; calculating a program's outcomes; documenting a program's execution and cost effectiveness; strengthening a program's impact. In the case of health-related government programs, the stakeholders to whom accountability is owed typically are those served by the program, those conducting the program, and those who will use evaluation findings to make decisions about the program. The importance of evaluations for accountability is underscored by the resources provided by state and federal governments for ongoing evaluations to ensure ongoing accountability to all stakeholders. Evaluation for the purpose of accountability can assist stakeholders and specifically those in charge of the programs in a number of ways, all of which in program continuation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chatterji, M. (2008, Jan/Feb). Synthesizing evidence from impact evaluations in education to inform action. Retrieved on December 2, 2012 from search.proquest.com Web site:  http://search.proquest.com/docview/216902584/13AC6E704D753569CAD/1?accountid=28844 

MacDonald, G., Starr, G., Schooley, M., Yee, S.L., Klimowski, K., & Turner, K. (2001, November). Introduction to program evaluation for comprehensive tobacco control programs. Retrieved on December 2, 2012 from www.cdc.gov Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/tobacco_control_programs/surveillance_evaluation/evaluation_manual/pdfs/evaluation.pdf

Main State Legislature. (2009, January 2). OPEGA Home. Retrieved on December 2, 2012 from www.main.gov Web site: http://www.maine.gov/legis/opega/index.htm

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2011, November 10). Program Evaluation - DASH - Resources/HealthyYouth. Retrieved on December 2, 2012 from www.cdc.gov Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/evaluation/resources.htm
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Models to Promote Health Behavior and Proposed Project Plan

Words: 2184 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74682590

Health Promotion for End-Stage Dementia

End-Stage Dementia Care

Health Promotion Plan for End-Stage Dementia

Health Promotion Plan for End-Stage Dementia

Globally, an estimated 35.6 million adults are living with dementia, a number expected to double by 2030 and triple by 2050 (World Health Organization, 2014). Most patients with dementia in the United States will die in a nursing home (reviewed by Goodman et al., 2010), which means that these patients sometimes live for years within these institutions. The level of dementia care required can sometimes be quite high as the ability for self-care and effective communication is lost (Puurveen, n.d.). These facts and statistics explain why an estimated $157 to $215 billion is spent each year on dementia care in the U.S. And why there is a need for cost effective and humane dementia care globally; however, some care professionals have questioned the efficacy of the traditional medical model and…… [Read More]

References

Brownie, S. & Nancarrow, S. (2013). Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: A systematic review. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 8, 1-10.

Barbosa, A., Sousa, L., Nolan, M., & Figueiredo, D. (2014). Effects of person-centered care approaches to dementia care on staff: A systematic review. American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias, published online ahead of print 20 Jan. 2014, doi: 10.1177/1533317513520213.

Department of Health, Australian Government. (n.d.). About the Community Health Action Pack. Retrieved 13 Feb. 2014 from http://livelonger.health.gov.au/about-the-community-health-action-pack/.

Goodman, C., Evans, C., Wilcock, J., Froggatt, K., Drennan, V., Sampson, E., Blanchard, M., Bissett, M., & Iliffe, S. (2010). End of life care for the community dwelling older people with dementia: An integrated review. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25, 329-37.
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Nurses During Emergency During the Tackling of

Words: 2039 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66044613

Nurses during Emergency

During the tackling of disasters, teams from varied fields, experiences expertise and education come together; these group present broad spectrums of capabilities and qualification; essential for assistance in situations of public health emergency. This article looks at the regulations, ethical practice, limitations and guidelines for regulating of nursing practices in cases of public health emergencies (Couig, Johnson & ick, 2011). The regulations in the legal authority of action by nurses are done through education, licensure, and discipline which define the scope of practice for nurses practicing during health emergencies. Limitations to preparedness in the nursing practice brought about by burnout, depression, self-esteem, personal accomplishment, and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization problems. The environment in, which nurses practice, determines their preparedness in tackling of emergencies. Promoting the emotional well-being of nurses then becomes a beneficial aspect for the carrying out of nursing practice. It is important to provide nurses…… [Read More]

References

Couig, M., Johnson, K.A., & Rick, S. (2011). Nursing Scope of Practice Issues in Public Health

Emergencies. Journal Of Nursing Regulation, 2(3), 13.

EDDINS, E.E., JIE, H., & HUAPING, L. (2011). Baccalaureate Nursing Education in CHINA:

Issues and Challenges. Nursing Education Perspectives, 32(1), 30-33.
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Ethics in Global Health Lena

Words: 757 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28751912

She must be careful that her counseling does not fall in the line of coercion.

Justice

Fairness and equity in allocation of all healthcare services; social values are not part of the decision as to who receives care.

Lena's opinion of the situation is not relevant; Mr. X's individual rights take predominance, as does the quality of his care.

Beneficence

The primary goal of medicine, help -- or do no harm. What is the best healthcare decision for a person in their particular circumstances?

To do no harm Lena has a moral obligation to protect her sister from infection; knowing that she may be doing emotional harm; however, since HIV is incurable, the choice is moot.

Non-Maleficence

Never harm intentionally and perform one's obligation to use any and all appropriate treatments to cure or prevent illness.

Lena's obligation is to prevent or cure illness; prevention is the key here. She…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

ANA Code of Ethics.(2010). Cited in:

 http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx

Grace, P. (2008). Nursing Ethics Through the Lifespan. Prentice Hall.

McHale, J. And a. Galagher. (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Tschudin, V. (2003). Ethics in Nursing: The Caring Relationship. Butterworth
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Prescription Errors the Whole Point

Words: 1092 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4408826

In a study by Shah, Aslam and Avery (2001) of approximately 38,000 prescriptions by 23 doctors, there were a number of errors including: 715 or 25% no directions; 510 or 18% prescribed item not mentioned (usually on repeat prescription); 321 or 11%, directions incomplete, illegible or written "as directed"; 306 or 11%, more than one month's supply given on separate repeat prescriptions without patients request; 260 or 9%, strength missing where a product existed in various strengths, and no guidance available in the BNF; 8% or 229, the prescribed quantity was not clearly written, missing or too large; and 5% or 132, prescriber's signature missing. Another 100 errors were due to prescribing medicines no longer available, incorrect medicine because handwriting, no date or wrong strength.

Given that this is the digital age, it seems that prescriptions can be easily "written" by computer or some form of electronics, and indeed that…… [Read More]

References

Preece, J.F,. Ashford, J.R and Hunt, R.G. Writing all prescriptions by computer (1984). The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners. 34: 654-657

Romano, M. (2002) Patient-safety awards abound, but do they represent real progress in the fight against medical errors, or are they just for show? Modern Healthcare

 http://www.modernhealthcare.com/ 

Rovner, J. (2007) Congress Looks to Require Electronic Prescriptions. NPR
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Boston Children's Hospital This Goal of This

Words: 959 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41519340

Boston Children's Hospital

This goal of this case is to demonstrate the importance of a community health nursing, or public health nursing strategy. The concepts addressed in the case study include forming strategic partnerships or alliances with related health care institutions, universities, and insurers. Concepts also include the ways non-profit organizations function and how strategic alliances are especially important to maintain. Also, the case study addresses the concept of community health nursing in general. Students should understand this case focuses on the multifaceted roles of the health care organization in the community. Students should also acknowledge the complex interaction between various external forces like economic constraint, legislation, and policy and the functioning of the organization. Students should also understand the complex interaction between internal forces like human resources management and cost accounting on the functioning of the organization. Students should recognize the key success factors for a non-profit health care…… [Read More]

References

Boston Children's Hospital Website:  http://www.childrenshospital.org/ 

"The Health Care Law and You." Retrieved online: http://www.healthcare.gov/law/

US News and World Report (2013). U.S. News Best Children's Hospitals 2012-13
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Speaking Truth to Power Nurses as Advocates

Words: 671 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76307971

Speaking Truth Concept

Discuss the concept of speaking truth to power. Are you better prepared to advocate for patients, nurses and nursing after taking this class?

During a time when there is a nationwide shortage of nurses (Glazer, 2009), identifying opportunities to improve their working conditions and status has assumed new importance and relevance and the concept of speaking truth to power can help achieve this outcome. According to Greear (2015), the concept of "speaking truth to power" was coined by the Quakers during the 1950s and has come to mean "taking a stand and mobilizing society around change" (para. 2). An important point made by Greear (2015) is that mere humans are only capable of knowing some of the truth at any given point in their lives but it is essential to act on what truth is known by taking action to effect meaningful change where it is needed.…… [Read More]

References

Glazer, G. (2009, January). Legislative: The nursing shortage: A public health issue for all. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 14(1), 37.

Greear, J. (2015, December 2). Speaking truth to power. The Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jade-greear/speaking-truth-to-power_2_b_8824094.html.

Paynton, S. T. (2009, January). The informal power of nurses for promoting patient care. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 14(1), 21.
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Legal Environment in Healthcare and Administrative Responsibility

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2327677

Healthcare -- Administration and Legal

Many vectors -- science, research funding, social acceptance or rejection -- influence how and whether medical technology is eventually adopted into medical praxis (Hogle, et al., 2012). Undergirding the choices and changes is a shared body of ethical standards and law, the establishment of which is often not consensual or efficacious. Any emerging technology can encounter unanticipated social resistance and ethical concerns that can change the course of how medical science research progresses (Hogle, et al., 2012). Medical technology often poses questions about access to expensive innovations and considerations about race, gender, and social justice that are inseparable from the socio-economic levels of patients (Hogle, et al., 2012). In contemporary society, there are the inevitable considerations about patent issues, clinical practice, and the commercialization of medical innovations (Hogle, et al., 2012). The recent court decision finding in favor of Myriad Genetics, Inc. provides a good…… [Read More]

References

Cho, M. (2010, November 1). Patently unpatentable: implications of the Myriad court decision on genetic diagnostics. Trends in Biotechnology, 28(11), 548-551. Retrieved http://www.cell.com/trends/biotechnology//retrieve / pii/S0167779910001411?_returnURL= http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167779910001411?showall=true 

Hogle, L., Tobin, S., Gaba, D. And Yock, P. (2012). Web-Based Research Integrity Training for Biomedical Engineers and Medical Device Researchers (Public Health Service). Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford School of Medicine. Retreived http://bioethics.stanford.edu/research / programs/science_and_society.html

Morrison, E. (2011). Ethics in health administration: A practical approach for decision makers. (2nd ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Stempel, J., Steenhuysen, J., Wallace, J., Grebler, D. And Orr, B. (2012, August 16). Myriad wins gene patent ruling from U.S. appeals court. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved http://www.reuters.com/assets/
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Environmental Theory and Emancipatory Knowledge

Words: 5800 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66395592

Nightingale met a friend Richard Monckton Miles in 1842. Then in 1844, Nightingale asked Dr. Howe if she could do a charitable job in a hospital like the catholic nuns, and refused her marriage to her cousin, Henry Nicholson. By 1845, Nightingale started training herself in the nearby Salisbury Hospital, but her parents were not happy about it, seeing nursing as an inappropriate job for a well to do woman like their daughter. In the next year, Nightingale began teaching herself from the government blue books. In the meantime, Monckton Miles wanted to marry her, but soon she travelled to Rome, Italy with friends to avoid him. Britain unlimited, 2009). Finally, after she attended the Herbert's Charmouth convalescent home, her knowledge was recognized. In 1849, after refusing finally to Miles proposal, she decided to go to Egypt while accompanying her friends, the Bracebridges. They then travelled through Europe, and ended…… [Read More]

(Source: Cody, 2006, p. 259).

Differences Between Nightingale's Theory and Emancipatory Knowing -- When Nightingale thought about the benefits of a well-ventilated room, she was not basing her view on previous knowledge. Emancipatory progress is now evident in the way world healthcare approaches a patient's room -- typically well-ventilated and clean (Beck, 2005, pg. 140). Nightingale was born in an era were by women has very little voice most of the work done by women were in-house work so most of Nightingale's major innovation was providing place for women to work with and for women (Selanders, 2005, pg., 83). Today with Emancipatory knowledge we see a more educated workforce of both men and women in nursing. Although in the late 19th century there were still arguments regarding Nightingale's visions, today's theorists use her broad-based knowledge as a best -- practice template for modern conceptions (Attewell, 2005).

The Legacy of Nightingale Part 1 -- Nursing Ethics -- Most modern ethical theorist are based on traditions dating back as far as Ancient Greece. However, medical, and in particular nursing, ethics are clearly a post-Nightingale logical evolution (never a conclusion). The philosophical combination of advocacy and ethics, while still remaining true to the realities of budgets and the need for a medical institution to
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Nursing Is a Rewarding but

Words: 2016 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67198611



he Neuman Model is appropriate for senior care.

Studies necessary with other models.

Penrod, et.al.; Reframing Person Centered Care for Persons with Dementia

Research and heory for Nursing Practice

2007

Lit. Review, discussion

Lit. Review

Research shows individual personhood approach has positive effects on care.

Biomedical and psychological models must be merged for persons with dementia.

Integration models

Further study using different integration modeling.

Rajapaksa and Rothstein; Factors hat Influence the Decisions of Men and Women Nurses to Leave Nursing.

Nursing Forum

2009

Case Study

Qualitative, some quantitative analysis

For men, compensation largest barrier to remaining in nursing; for women dissatisfaction with career goals

Barriers to entry in profession for men and still social stigma

It is possible for hospitals and care centers to develop program to retain more nurses

Needs more demographic and psychographic variation.

Gillespie and Peterson; Helping Novice Nurses Make Effective Clinical Decisions

Nursing Education

2009

Case…… [Read More]

Their Experiences With a Refugee Population." Journal of Nursing Education.

46(8):380.

Watson, J. (2008). "Social Justice and Human Caring." Creative Nursing. 14 (2): 54+.
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obesity and nursing rates of care community

Words: 3859 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32760816

OBESITY 1
OBESITY 15








Obesity
Name
Date












Introduction
Obesity is a global epidemic affecting almost all population cohorts. Rates of obesity are rising worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 2013), the obesity epidemic “is not restricted to industrialized societies,” with millions of obesity-related cases burgeoning in developing countries (p. 1). With billions of cases worldwide, obesity has therefore been described as the “major health hazard of the 21st century,” (Zhang, Liu, Yao, et al., 2014, p. 5153). Given the global nature of the disease, clinical guidelines have become increasingly standardized, but it is still necessary to tailor interventions to specific populations to create age appropriate, culturally appropriate, and gender appropriate treatment interventions. After a brief discussion of obesity pathophysiology, this paper will evaluate standard practices at local, state, national, and international levels. Access to care and treatment options also determine disease outcomes. Therefore, this paper will also address…… [Read More]

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Healthcare the Impacts of Case

Words: 4123 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44424148

"Studies of the relationship between managed care penetration in the health care market and expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service enrollees have demonstrated the existence of these types of spill over effects" (Bundorf et al., 2004).

Managed care organizations generate these types of spillover effects by increasing competition in the health care market, altering the arrangement of the health care delivery system, and altering physician practice patterns. Studies have found that higher levels of managed care infiltration are linked with lower rates of hospital cost inflation and lower physician fees are consistent with competitive effects. "Other studies demonstrate the impact of managed care on delivery system structure including hospital capacity, hospital admission patterns, the size and composition of the physician workforce and the adoption and use of medical equipment and technologies. More recent evidence has linked market-level managed care activity to the process, but not the outcomes of care" (Bundorf et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Altman, D.E. And L. Levin. (2005). The Sad History of Health Care Cost Containment as

Told by One Client. Health Affairs, 24(1).

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and rising health care costs. part 1: Seeking an explanation.

Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(10), 847-54.
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Health System Management and the Use of New Grad Program for Reducing Turnover

Words: 2457 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39644169

Reducing Turnover in New Graduate Residence Program

Introduction- The process of recruiting and training, particularly in high-impact fields like healthcare, has become increasingly complex and expensive. Turnover is the rate at which an organization gains or loses employees. High turnover means that more employees are leaving more rapidly, which can be harmful to productivity and finances. Real costs of hiring including recruitment time, opportunity costs, and investment in both the new employee and the staff in Human Resources. Indirect costs include training, loss of production, reduction of performance levels, overtime due to inexperience, etc. In fact, this issue is so important that in for-profit organizations, the cost of employee turnover is estimated to be about 150% of the total payroll and benefit package (Rothwell, 2012). One needs to also understand the high costs of post-employment; drug-screening, physical exams, orientation, learning curve, coaching from others, etc. Staff time is difficult to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nurses' job satisfaction well below average. (2012, March 5). Retrieved from Medical Express:  http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-nurses-job-satisfaction-average.html 

The Real Costs of High Turnover. (2012, October). HRNNewsdaily. Retrieved from:

http://hrnewsdaily.com/the-real-costs-of-high-turnover/

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2013, January). Researcha dn Data. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: http://www.ahrq.gov/
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Clinical Experience

Words: 3002 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46049801

Clinical Experience

Sunrise Clinical System Version 6.1

The Emergency Room: Hybrid System

Meetings and Collaborative Care Councils

orkflow of the EMR

The KBC ( Knowledge Bas Charting) 3.4 Upgrade 6

The Role of the Nurse Informaticist

Comprehensive Analysis of my Clinical Experience

After completing 100 hours of practicum in informatics, the following will show the time at the site with my preceptor. The practicum took place at Franklin Hospital - North Shore Long Island. North Shore-LIJ which is an award-winning health system that consist of world-class tertiary hospitals, a nationally well-known children's hospital, a notorious mental facility and an assortment of community hospitals, in addition to a range of wellness and health programs. North Shore-LIJ Health System consist of 16 award-winning hospitals and approximately 400 physician practice locations all through New York, as well as Long Island, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. North Shore-LIJ Proudly serving an area of seven…… [Read More]

Works Cited

North Shore-LIJ Health System. (2014, April 29). Retrieved from North Shore LLJ: http://www.northshorelij.com/hospitals/services-and-programs/bariatric-surgery

Russell, C.L. (2010). A clinical nurse specialist -- led intervention to enhance medication adherence using the plan-do-check-act cycle for continuous self-improvement. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 24(2), 69-75. doi:10.1097/NUR.0b013e3181cf554d

Seidl, K. L. And Newhouse, R.P. (2012). The Intersection of evidence-based practice with 5 quality improvement methodologies. JONA, 42(6), 299-304. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e31824ccdc9

Smith, K., Tremblay, M.L., Richer, M.C., and Lanctot, S. (2010). Exploring nurses perceptions of organizational factors of collaborative relationships. The Health Care Manager, 29(3), 271-278. Doi:10.1097/HCM.0b013e3181e9351a
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Healthcare as an Institution Is of Course

Words: 1070 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34774822

healthcare as an institution is, of course, the need to care for the sick and the injured. However, in the contemporary model of healthcare, effective communication during a crisis is not only important, but also vital. Communication by healthcare professionals takes the concern and worry out of the situation; offers a quicker resolution, makes better control of information possible, earns the trust of the public and individual families; and keeps the flow of information consistent and accurate, thus averting potential external problems. Based on my current experience in the nursing field, I realize that to advance my professional goals, as well as contribute soundly to the profession, I must expand my educational experience and am therefore seeking entrance into the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing.

I believe I am well-qualified and motivated to undergo this program. Currently, I am a master's prepared Neonatal Nurse Practitioner…… [Read More]

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Nursing Leadership and Management Situational

Words: 2278 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61206188

The caregiver role includes those activities that assist the client physically, mentally, and emotionally, while still preserving the client's dignity. In order for one to be an effective caregiver, the patient must be treated in a holistic manner. Proper communication and advocacy is another role that the modern caregiver assumes when providing quality care (Carroll).

It is in the role of patient advocacy and cost-cutting that most nursing leaders are directly involved with hospital policy. Technology has increased the ease and ability for adequate communication -- there are more translators, access to databases, etc. within the field, and certainly there is more information about healthcare available for the layperson. However, the manner in which modern medicine works -- the reality that it is the nurse as opposed to the doctor who tends to follow the patient throughout their care, lends greater credibility to the use of the modern nurse as…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Carroll, T. (2005). Leadership Skills and Attributes of Women and Nurse Executives -Challenges for the 21st Century. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29(2), 146-54.

Gershenson, Moravick, Sellman and Somerville. (n.d.). Expert to Novice: A Nuse Leader's Evolution. Nursing Management, 49-52.

Kouzes and Posner. (1994). An extension of the leadership practices inventory management systema dn individual contributors. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 54(4), 959-66.

Vesterinen, Isola and Paasivvra. (2009). Leadship Styles of Finnish Nurse Managers and Factors Influencing it. Journal of Nursing Management, 17(2), 503-9.
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Lobbyists of Nurses in the Federal and State Capital

Words: 1603 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36296070

legislators on health care issues and nursing, specifically?

To make healthcare inexpensive through tackling the fast increasing cost of healthcare

Patients ought to have a better access to information about the cost and quality of services offered so that they can make cost-effective and informed decisions about their healthcare. Healthcare providers should make available costs publicly available, particularly for the most sought after procedures. Medicaid, Medicare and other kinds of data should be provided to other independent entities that have the expertise to give superior quality assessments than the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services.

Several reforms are needed in healthcare to help bring down the costs. These include: enabling more pooling schemes and the sale of insurance across state borders; both of these measures will help bring down the cost of premiums. Moreover, making the tax field level for both individual and employer markets would assist people to buy…… [Read More]

References

Email provided by Catherine White: -- .

(n.d.). Texas Nurses Association. Advocacy: Top Issues - Texas Nurses Association. Retrieved May 20, 2015, from http://www.texasnurses.org/?page=TopIssues

Willmann, J.H. (2013). Nursing Legislative Agenda for Texas 83rd Legislative Session. Nursing Voice.

Hinson, K. (2015, April 28). Texas Nurses Association. TNA Opposes Legislation Lessening Whistleblower Protections - Texas Nurses Association. Retrieved May 21, 2015, from http://www.texasnurses.org/news/228914/TNA-Opposes-Legislation-Lessening-Whistleblower-Protections.htm