Patient Advocacy Essays (Examples)

382+ documents containing “patient advocacy”.


Sort By:

Reset Filters

Analysis of Quality Improvement in Healthcare-Patient AdvocacyProblem Area and Current ProcessThe quality improvement project I am planning to implement will focus on patient advocacy. According to Nsiah et al. (2020), patient advocacy is the process by which nurses act on behalf of patients by becoming their voices so as to ensure that their rights are defended and their needs are met. Most nursing theorists agree that patient advocacy is essential in healthcare and it should be a priority in healthcare facilities. This is more so the case given that patient advocacy preserves and protects patients rights, empowers patients, and promotes positive health outcomes (Nsiah et al, 2019). To a large extent that lack of patient advocacy could lead to negative consequences in nursing practice. For instance, lack of patient advocacy leads to increased cases of hospital acquired infections. In addition, failure by nurses to advocate for patients could leads to….

Successful completion of a competency-based insulin pen administration checklist along with successful demonstration of a mock insulin injection would be required before a nurse could administer insulin to a patient using the insulin pen devices. During this training period, all pharmacists and pharmacy technicians would also need to be trained how to use, label, dispense, and store the insulin pens (Davis, Christensen, Nystrom, Foral and Destache, 2008).
Another option would be for hospitals to only use insulin pens that are equipped with a safety needle that provides a passive safety feature that automatically engages after an injection is administered. The safety feature helps to prevent accidental needle sticks and needle reuse and is locked into place throughout needle disposal. The safety needle complies with U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines and appears on OSHA's list of approved safety-engineered sharps devices (Davis, Christensen, Nystrom, Foral and….

Stand/Being a Patient Advocate
Description of the role as a moral agent or advocate for quality and patient safety

The present times are challenging for healthcare workers. Exceptional healthcare system alterations, in the form of financial pressures, regulatory mandates for improving patient safety and care quality, uncertainty of healthcare reforms' direction, technological advances, patient population change and emerging workforce deficiencies, are affecting care in every practice setting. These changes may prove be a challenge to decisions pertaining to resource allocation, and may negatively affect work environment in the health sector (Chiarella & McInnes, 2008).

This paper deals with being a nurse advocate for regulatory agency mandates aimed at improving patient safety and care quality. The nurse advocate's roles here include: presenting to patients the patient rights code of the hospital; handing out the patient rights manual to them; confirming patient understanding regarding who must be approached with concerns or queries; preventing complaints….

Patient non-compliance with medication is a problem that can have adverse effects on patient outcomes. Non-compliance with medication can occur in the in-patient or out-patient setting. Leigh (2010) estimates as many as 50% of all prescriptions filled—between one and 1.5 billion—per year are not taken correctly (p. 1). Moreover, there are different types of non-compliance, including taking medications incorrectly, taking the wrong dose or at the wrong frequency, or not taking the medications at all. The causes of patient non-compliance with medication can be traced to miscommunication, requiring healthcare leaders to take a more active role in patient advocacy and education. Misunderstandings of how a medication should be taken, what the medication is for, and other issues related to patient education can be directly solved via direct intervention and improved communication. However, some of the causes of patient non-compliance with medication are due to structural issues including the costs of….

The Leadership ole of DNPs Today1) Advocating for patients comes in many forms. As a DNP leader, you will be in a position to influence the advocacy process within an organization. How are some ways a nursing leader can advocate for patients through the policies (organizations or government)?Although every organizational and governmental situation is unique in some fashion and will require different strategies, DNP leaders can leverage their expertise and influence to advocate for patients through multiple policy reforms. For example, engaging with policymakers to educate them concerning evidence-based solutions that would enhance clinical outcomes and access from nurses\\\' frontline perspective are central to DNP patient advocacy. Likewise, DNP leaders can ensure that patient voices are taken into account during policy discussions while also pushing for inclusion of nursing viewpoints on advisory committees.In addition, motivating broader nurse advocacy through voting initiatives, activism, and policymaker outreach can also serve as useful….

Advocacy in Nursing
PAGES 4 WORDS 1483

Nurse as Patient Advocate
Persons who choose nursing as a profession do so because they have a deep sense that they want to help others. Most do not do it because of pay incentives. Those who choose nursing for that reason are soon disillusioned by the long hours, physical and mental fatigue that go along with it. People choose nursing because they have a need to help those in need. hen they become nurses however, the role that they play is often defined by a large, bureaucratic system and they sometimes find that they must choose between their sense of doing what is right for the patient and conforming to the rules of the system.

Nurses traditionally served as helpers to the doctors, performing mundane tasks to free the doctor for other things.. Doctors make the decisions and give the orders. Nurses follow the orders that the doctor gives. Sometimes the….

Advocacy Nursing
PAGES 2 WORDS 647

Nurse Advocacy
After sixteen years of working as a nurse, I realized more fully the impact my profession and the people in it have on public health, public safety, social norms related to health, and public policy. This MSN program has effectively prepared me for the next stage of my career as a nurse advocate who actively participates in public policy development and public health initiatives. I have been strongly influenced by issues related to nurse advocacy throughout the course of my career. This program has highlighted areas in which nursing practice can be applied to helping members of my community empower themselves with knowledge, with the resources available to them to improve their health choices, and improve quality of life for all members of my community.

When I started the program, I was a nurse. I was an experienced nurse who was confident with my role in the hospital, and as….

Developing a Personal Philosophy of NursingIntroductionThis paper focuses on the fundamental concepts within the field of nursing, particularly through the lens of the nursing metaparadigm which includes nursing, person, environment, and health. It begins by examining and elaborating on these key concepts, drawing upon definitions from renowned nursing theorists and literature. It then goes into how these concepts are mirrored in the philosophy, mission, and vision of a specific healthcare organization, Hackensack Meridian Health, highlighting the alignment between organizational values and nursing principles. The paper then transitions into a more personal interpretation of these concepts, with my own individualized definitions for nursing, person, environment, and health. Building upon this foundation, the paper culminates with my articulation of a personal philosophy of nursing. This philosophy integrates the previously defined concepts and is guided by values such as patient-centered care, ethical practice, and a commitment to continuous learning. It is informed and….

Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that leads patients affected to seek the help of medical professionals throughout various stages and time frames. From surgery to patient education to physical therapy, diabetes treatment can be a daunting task that may require complex, multi-faceted effort. Such effort can lead to sever disparities in treatment and in prevalence of the disease. For example, if patient education is at the forefront of chronic disease management and prevention, then it stands to ask if patient education or lack thereof, is creating the kinds of health disparities seen in diabetes. The patients receiving the information on diabetes and lifestyle choices to prevent diabetes, may reduce their chances of developing diabetes versus those that do not receive the information. What kinds of health disparities arise in diabetes as a result of lack of access to information?
Lack of access to information can occur for several reasons.….


Lewis, Cheek & Hendricks (2001) support developmental advocacy as a framework from which counselors can promote the health and well-being of patients in a dynamic forum. Kiselica & obinson (2001) point out the community outreach programs may be beneficial for clients but also the counseling profession. This notion is supported by other research including that of Myers, Sweeney & White (2002) who suggest that professional associations can create venues for counselors to share knowledge, training and standards, as well as provide advocacy advancement and help the profession remain credible (394).

Though advocacy programs in the past have focused primarily on the needs and abilities of school counselors and educational representatives, counselors must broaden their perspectives so advocacy may now include all branches of the counseling field. This may require additional training and resources, but will help strengthen the credibility and success of the profession. Advocacy efforts will also help raise community….

Patient Safety and Safety
PAGES 2 WORDS 827

Patient safety is a very important element with the overall healthcare system. egulations and new initiatives set forth by the Affordable Care Act have created much elevated culture of safety. As a result, facilities must now alter the manner in which they deliver and administer treatment to patients. A culture that once focused on transactions and bloated costs has now been replaced with one predicated on safety. Creating a culture of safety is no easy task however. In fact, it can be particularly difficult when older employee habits have been deeply engrained in the daily processes of work. To create a culture of safety, management must first communicate its expectations to all stakeholders involved. Communication is an integral aspect of patient safety. Communication is important because it sets the overall tone within the organization. Communication regarding expectations is particularly potent when top-level management is heavily involved. Consistent emphasis on quality….

Most advocacy groups can help the families of veterans also understand their legal entitlements to support services.
Congressional representatives can occasionally come to the aid of their constituents who are veterans. Lawmakers listening to the concerns of their constituents can bring special cases to the attention of their fellow congressmen and women in Washington to help advocate on behalf of veterans and veterans affairs. Some congressional representatives may be willing to serve on special committees that advocate for veterans affairs in Washington.

Social workers have an obligation to learn about the large-scale organizations that serve the needs of veterans as well as smaller scale community organizations. Even social workers that do not specialize in veterans affairs should become familiar with the unique legal situation of their clients. For example, social workers should familiarize themselves with the specific medical, social, occupational, and psychiatric needs that veterans have, especially the veterans that live….

Nurse Patient Ratios
PAGES 8 WORDS 2236

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care
This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures vs. patient load;….

"[4] (Bernall, 1992, p. 19)
Though historically this role could have strained the nurses professional relationships with other health care professionals, and especially doctors the modern medical industry has afforded a new way of understanding the role, including an emphasis of such a nursing role in medical school. (Bernall 1992, p. 22)

As this belief has proven to be a long-standing one, it is therefore important to explore a greater understanding of the application of its use in patient care. The particular example of the mentally handicapped / epileptic patient is important as the complicated nature of these possibly debilitating diseases often leaves patients feeling helpless to contribute to their own general health and wellness. In one study the application of a nurse, for the specific role of advocacy was used to study it effects of the patients health and wellness outcomes.

A nurse functioning as patient advocate for 21 epileptic mentally handicapped….

.....nurse assigned to care for this patient, I would strongly advocate on behalf of the patient's autonomy. The clash between patient autonomy and the healthcare system and its representatives like nurses can only be resolved by being honest in this situation. The patient is under a high degree of stress, not only because of his health condition and the fear that brings out in him, but due to other stressful life events including his financial situation. He was also supposed to get married immediately before the bypass surgery was scheduled, and this is bound to add to his level of stress. The primary issue here is providing what the patient needs to keep him safe during the procedure, and if he insists on using his own pump, which he has successfully used for the thirty years he has lived with the disease of diabetes, then he should use his own….

1. The Impact of Crohn's Disease on Quality of Life

Explore the physical, emotional, and social challenges faced by individuals living with Crohn's disease.
Discuss the impact of symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss on daily life.
Examine the role of social stigma, isolation, and anxiety in reducing quality of life.

2. The Role of Diet and Nutrition in Managing Crohn's Disease

Describe the dietary and nutritional challenges faced by patients with Crohn's disease.
Discuss the efficacy of elimination diets, low-FODMAP diets, and specific nutrient supplementation in managing symptoms.
Explore the importance of individualized dietary plans and....

1. The impact of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) on access to healthcare in the United States
2. The effectiveness of Medicare and Medicaid in providing affordable healthcare to low-income and elderly populations
3. The future of universal healthcare in the United States
4. The role of pharmaceutical companies in rising healthcare costs
5. The importance of mental health coverage in healthcare policies
6. The debate over the privatization of healthcare services
7. The impact of electronic health records on patient care and privacy
8. The implications of genetic testing and personalized medicine on healthcare policy
9. The role of preventative care and public health initiatives in reducing....

I. Athletic Injuries and Rehabilitation

The Role of Sports Medicine in Preventing and Treating Athletic Injuries
Advancements in Surgical Techniques for Rotator Cuff Repair
Rehabilitation Protocols for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries
The Impact of Concussions on Long-Term Cognitive Function

II. Sports Nutrition and Performance

The Role of Macronutrients in Enhancing Athletic Performance
Supplements and Ergogenic Aids in Sports: Benefits and Risks
Hydration Strategies for Athletes in Extreme Environments
Nutritional Considerations for Female Athletes

III. Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics

The Effects of Interval Training on Cardiovascular Fitness
The Biomechanics of Running: Injuries and Performance Optimization
The Impact of Muscle Morphology on Athletic....

1. The Transformative Role of Leadership in Nursing: Inspiring Excellence and Patient-Centered Care

2. Leadership in Nursing: A Compass Guiding Innovation, Empowerment, and Patient Advocacy

3. The Essence of Nursing Leadership: Balancing Patient Care, Collaboration, and Organizational Success

4. Empowering Nurses Through Effective Leadership: A Key to Enhancing Patient Outcomes and Professional Satisfaction

5. The Vital Role of Leadership in Shaping the Future of Nursing Practice: Meeting the Challenges of a Transforming Healthcare Landscape

6. Leadership in Nursing: A Catalyst for Change and Continuous Improvement

7. The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Nursing Teams: Fostering a Culture of Excellence and Patient-Centeredness

8. The Qualities and Competencies of....

image
10 Pages
Term Paper

Nursing

Patient Advocacy Efforts in Healthcare

Words: 3091
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Analysis of Quality Improvement in Healthcare-Patient AdvocacyProblem Area and Current ProcessThe quality improvement project I am planning to implement will focus on patient advocacy. According to Nsiah et al.…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
6 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Nursing Patient Advocacy Even Though

Words: 2149
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

Successful completion of a competency-based insulin pen administration checklist along with successful demonstration of a mock insulin injection would be required before a nurse could administer insulin to…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Taking a Stand on Patient Advocacy

Words: 1307
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Stand/Being a Patient Advocate Description of the role as a moral agent or advocate for quality and patient safety The present times are challenging for healthcare workers. Exceptional healthcare system…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Essay

Nursing

reasons for patient non compliance with their medications

Words: 646
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Patient non-compliance with medication is a problem that can have adverse effects on patient outcomes. Non-compliance with medication can occur in the in-patient or out-patient setting. Leigh (2010) estimates…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
4 Pages
Essay

Nursing

The Role of Nursing Leaders in Patient Advocacy

Words: 1275
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

The Leadership ole of DNPs Today1) Advocating for patients comes in many forms. As a DNP leader, you will be in a position to influence the advocacy process within…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
4 Pages
Term Paper

Health - Nursing

Advocacy in Nursing

Words: 1483
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Nurse as Patient Advocate Persons who choose nursing as a profession do so because they have a deep sense that they want to help others. Most do not do…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Creative Writing

Health - Nursing

Advocacy Nursing

Words: 647
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Creative Writing

Nurse Advocacy After sixteen years of working as a nurse, I realized more fully the impact my profession and the people in it have on public health, public safety, social…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
7 Pages
Essay

Nursing

Patient Centered Care in the Art of Nursing

Words: 2218
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Essay

Developing a Personal Philosophy of NursingIntroductionThis paper focuses on the fundamental concepts within the field of nursing, particularly through the lens of the nursing metaparadigm which includes nursing, person,…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Research Paper

Nursing

Patient Education and Diabetes

Words: 1110
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that leads patients affected to seek the help of medical professionals throughout various stages and time frames. From surgery to patient education…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
4 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Advocacy Proposal How Advocacy Affects

Words: 1258
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Lewis, Cheek & Hendricks (2001) support developmental advocacy as a framework from which counselors can promote the health and well-being of patients in a dynamic forum. Kiselica & obinson…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages

Health

Patient Safety and Safety

Words: 827
Length: 2 Pages
Type:

Patient safety is a very important element with the overall healthcare system. egulations and new initiatives set forth by the Affordable Care Act have created much elevated culture of…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Essay

Government

Advocacy Veterans of the United

Words: 551
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Most advocacy groups can help the families of veterans also understand their legal entitlements to support services. Congressional representatives can occasionally come to the aid of their constituents who…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
8 Pages
Dissertation or Thesis complete

Healthcare

Nurse Patient Ratios

Words: 2236
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Term Paper

Healthcare

Nurses as Patient Advocates Most

Words: 1003
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

"[4] (Bernall, 1992, p. 19) Though historically this role could have strained the nurses professional relationships with other health care professionals, and especially doctors the modern medical industry has afforded…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Essay

Nursing

nurse advocacy and patient autonomy

Words: 747
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

.....nurse assigned to care for this patient, I would strongly advocate on behalf of the patient's autonomy. The clash between patient autonomy and the healthcare system and its representatives…

Read Full Paper  ❯