Persian Gulf War Essays (Examples)

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Gulf War the War Without Victory

Words: 2154 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7510276

War Without Victory

Nominally, the United States achieved victory in the first Gulf War. However, the decades of fighting in the Middle East, punctuated by the second Gulf War demonstrate that the United States was not victorious in that war. However, equally clear is the fact that Iraq was not victorious. This paper examines the politics behind the Gulf War including deterrence, diplomacy, power struggles, and military and political implications to come to the conclusion that there was no victor in the Gulf War.

In August of 1990, Saddam Hussein, the leader of Iraq, ordered an invasion of Kuwait (A&E, 2013). This action alarmed other countries in the area, and these countries asked for intervention from other countries and from the United Nations. The United Nations Security Council responded by ordering Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. The United States, working with and through the United Nations, attempted to use deterrence…… [Read More]

Reference

A&E Television Networks. (2013). Persian Gulf War. Retrieved May 5, 2013 from History.com website: http://www.history.com/topics/persian-gulf-war

Morgan, P. (2012). The state of deterrence in international politics today. Retrieved May 5,

2013 from Contemporary Security Policy website: http://www.contemporarysecuritypolicy.org/assets/CSP-33-1%20Morgan.pdf

PBS. (2010). The Persian Gulf War. Retrieved May 5, 2013 from American Experience
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Gulf War Although Many People

Words: 2462 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82171209



What all of the above makes clear is that, while Navy pilots may have played a smaller role in one-on-one combat than pilots from other service branches, naval support was critical to the victory in Gulf War I.

Personal stories

While it is easier to view war as a collection of nameless, faceless soldiers, the reality is that a war is really a collection of personal stories. On January 22, 1991, a downed American Navy pilot was rescued by an Air Force team. It was "the first successful such mission over hostile territory in the war with Iraq."

The pilot "had ejected after being hit by Iraqi ground fire, and had parachuted into a bleak, empty stretch of the Iraqi desert."

The operation to rescue him took eight hours, four of them in Iraqi territory. To rescue the downed pilot, members of the rescue crew had to destroy an Iraqi…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, R. (1993). Crusade: the untold story of the Persian Gulf War: Chronology.

Retrieved October 3, 2009 from Frontline

Web site:  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/gulf/cron/ 

Marolda, E. (2001). The United States Navy and the Persian Gulf. Retrieved October 3, 2009
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U S Gulf War Over the

Words: 1417 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61375575

This is significant because it shows how a shift would occur in the way various events were dealt with in the future. As many nations would forge alliances to: solve various conflicts and would engage in consensus building (to increase support for a cause). This is different from the various unilateral actions that would take place in the events leading to: World War I, World War II and the Cold War. As a result, this is a political benefit, with it changing the way world leaders would interact with one another. Where, the process of building a coalition and working with international institutions would continue to increase. In many ways, one could argue that the tactics used by the United States, would serve as blue print in how to conduct various foreign policy initiatives. (Lee, 2010)

At the same time, the war would allow many of the lingering conflicts to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lee, R. (2010). The Persian Gulf War. History Guy. Retrieved from:  http://www.historyguy.com/GulfWar.html#gulfwarcauses 

Weiss, T. (2005). Northern Iraq. Military -- Civilian Interactions. (pp. 39 -- 54). Lantham: Oxford.
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War in Iraq How Has it Impacted

Words: 1340 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52330265

ar in Iraq

How Has it Impacted Basra?

Since the war in Iraq has begun, it has become almost impossible to turn on your radio or television without hearing about what has taken place in regard to Saddam Hussein or with our troops so many miles from home. Long before the official first shots were fired, the debate of whether the United States should pursue a war with Iraq has been hot and heavy. But, whether you are for or against the war, most of us can not help feeling a sense of anticipatory anxiety as we wonder what will happen next. But, as an Iraqi citizen, the anticipation must be very frightening to say the least. It is hard not to wonder what the long-term effects will be for the citizens of Iraq. Other than the city of Baghdad, the average American citizen probably knows very little about the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aparisim, Ghosh. "Basra: A City Braces For Battles As U.S. Troops Mass Across The Border." Time 10 Feb. 2003: 64.

Bandow, Doug. "The Iraqi Question." The Washington Times 18 Jan. 2002.

Barrett, Greg. "Basra is Wasteland of Wars, Sanction, Saddam's Neglect." Gannett News Service 06 Feb. 2003.

Editors, et al. "Persian Gulf II: A War Too Soon." St. Louis Dispatch 26 Jan. 2003: B2.
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History a Military War or Campaign

Words: 2600 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78971851

Military ar or Campaign

The world has existed amidst a set of wars and conflicts that have shaped political systems, governments, and humanitarian associations. Gulf ar is one of the universal and all time conflicts that rocked the world. ith equitable measures and categorical procedures, philosophies, missions, and visions of these wars, this piece of study exemplifies Gulf ar as one of America's participatory wars in the world. The article tries to establish the basement of Gulf ar together with its consequences and responses it received from the United States of America and the world as a whole.

and the Middle East have been on good terms for quite some time. Various wars between the U.S. And countries including Iraq have occurred. In such instances, military deployment by the U.S. government is intense supported by its foreign policies. This study focuses on the 1990/91 Gulf ar. The America's paradoxical love-hate…… [Read More]

Works cited

Boyne, Walter J. Gulf War: A Comprehensive Guide to People, Places & Weapons. New York: Signet, 1991. Print.

Bulloch, John, and Harvey Morris. The Gulf War: Its Origins, History, and Consequences.

London: Methuen London, 1989. Print.

Carlisle, Rodney, and John S. Bowman. Persian Gulf War. New York: Facts on File, 2003.
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Current War With Iraq

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60435926

Persian Gulf War of 1991 aimed to stop the invasion and occupation of Kuwait by Iraqi forces. Ordered by Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, the military action aimed to take control of the small country's immense oil reserves. y the time U.S. President George ush declared a cease-fire on February 28, 1991, Iraqi forces had already fallen. As part of the Gulf War treaties, the trade embargo on Iraq, sanctioned by the United Nations when Iraq first invaded Kuwait, was not lifted and a UN special commission was assigned to oversee the destruction of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction (WMD), including medium-range missiles and chemical and biological weapons as well as the facilities in which they were developed. Nevertheless, UN military forces were withdrawn from Iraq and Hussein was not pushed out of power. While the current war on Iraq has been called the "War for Iraqi Freedom," the events leading…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Banville, Lee. "U.S. - Iraq Relations After the Gulf War." PBS Online NewsHour. 25 Mar, 2003. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/middle_east/iraq/us_policy.html.

Key points of resolution on Iraq." BBC News World Edition. 25 Mar, 2003.  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2412837.stm .

Persian Gulf War." Encyclopedia Britannica 2003 Encyclopedia Britannica Online. 25 Mar, 2003 http://search.eb.com/eb/article?eu=60828.

Powell presents evidence to U.N. In the case against Iraq." PBS Online NewsHour Update. 25 Mar, 2003. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/powell_02-05-03.html.
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Aftermath of Iraq War the Effects of Iraq War

Words: 3180 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16392488

Iraq War - on Iraq and the U.S.

Personal Narrative

The drums of war once again echo in my ears. I am disgusted seeing Donald umsfeld on television defending the U.S. invasion of Iraq. CNN shows old footage of umsfeld shaking Saddam Hussein's hand, made in the late eighties when the U.S. was providing know-how for Saddam to build chemical weapons. I was five years old when we left the country, but I have one clear memory of the Iran-Iraq war in the 1987. I was at my grandmother's house in Esfahan, Iran.

My grandfather was listening to the radio report on our volunteer army, fighting the evil Saddam Hussein in the name of Islam. Grandfather turns the radio up; its' a bombing raid. "Let's go," Grandfather says; we go to the basement and I hear engines roaring. My mother presses me to her bosom. The roaring gets louder; they…… [Read More]

References

Al-Sudani, Zuhair. "Insecurity may delay Iraq Constitution." USA Today 4 Nov. 2003.

Bearden, Milt. "Iraqi Insurgents Take a Page from the Afghan 'Freedom Fighters'." The New York Times Nov. 2003:

 http://www.nytimes.com .

Economist Intelligence Unit Ltd. (2003). "Country Profile, Iran: a concise analysis
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Natural Resources as a Cause of War

Words: 1660 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42897272

Natural esourcs

War is one of the primordial human traditions. Man has always been enthusiastic about fighting, murdering and stealing from others. However, it doesn't derive us to the conclusion that interpersonal associations are dependent on war as a requisite or obligatory institution (Mises 10+).

Many believe that war is a natural necessity and man can only attain full human importance if he behaves aggressively and antagonistically (Mead 415). If the militarist theory is taken into consideration for the sake of argument, it can be accepted that man is gifted with an intrinsic natural feeling to struggle, battle and to cause destruction and damage. Nevertheless, man cannot be characterized with these instincts and primal inclinations to harm and destroy. Man is distinguished from other mortals on the basis of his intellect, rationales and imagination. It is the 'reason' and 'logic' that teaches and guides man to the right path. The…… [Read More]

References

Bannon, Ian, and Paul Collier. Natural Resources and Violent Conflict: Options and Actions. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2003. ix. Web. .

"Conflict & Natural Resources." Environmental Literacy Council. The Environmental Literacy Council, 26 August, 2008. Web. 23 Sep 2011. .

Gausset, Quentin, Michael A. Whyte, and Torben Birch Thomsen. Beyond Territory and Scarcity: Exploring Conflicts over Natural Resource Management. Uppsala: Nordic Africa Institute, 2005. 20. Web. .

Kaptur, Marcy. " Feb 15, 2007- Kaptur: No Troop Surge in Iraq." Marcy Kaptur Representing Ohio's 9th District. U.S. House of Representatives, n.d. Web. 23 Sep 2011. .
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Aerial Warfare History of American War

Words: 3291 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12304358

History Of American War: Aerial Warfare

Since time immemorial, warring sides in battles have sought ways of gaining strategic advantages over their enemies. Those who manage to get that one crucial advantage during war have an added advantage and, hence, a higher probability of winning the war. For a long time, militaries from across the world have sought to take to the air and advance their ability to not only launch attacks at enemy lines but also defend their positions. Prior to the first word war, flight was largely focused on the collection of field information, including sighting of enemies and guiding of troops. This was during the hot balloon era, where the said aerial devices could be used to gain bird's eye view of the battle field.

It is important to note that although the Unites States, the only remaining world superpower, boasts of a fully fledged Air Force…… [Read More]

References

Abeyratne, R. (2012). Aeronomics and Law: Fixing Anomalies. New York, NY: Springer Science.

Air Force Historical Research Agency -- AFHRA (2008). The Birth of the United States Air Force. Retrieved from  http://www.afhra.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=10944 

Callam, A. (2010). Drone Wars: Armed Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. International Affairs Review, 18(3).

Conlin, J. (2013). The American Past: A Survey of American History (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
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War on Pollution of the

Words: 2299 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97943031

.." For example, during the Vietnam War the United States "sprayed 3640 km2 of South Vietnam's cropland with herbicides, using a total estimated amount of 55 million kg. The stated rationale was to deny the enemy sources of food and means of cover. This widespread use of chemicals to destroy farmland, forest and water sources is unprecedented, and the environmental consequences are still relatively unexplored. International teams have been granted access for field assessments only in the last few years." (Learning, 2000)

The work of Lindon, Jernelov, and Egerup (2004) entitled: "The Environmental Impacts of the Gulf War 1991" relates that the oil fires in Kuwait" emitted pollutants that potentially could affect the health and well-being of the people in the region. Most of the substances emitted from the burning wells can potentially cause adverse effects, which vary according to concentration and duration of exposure." In fact the concentrations of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lessons from the Last Gulf War (2003) Greenpeace Briefing Feb. 2003. Online available at http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/international/press/reports/lessons-from-the-gulf-war-the.pdf

Learning, Jennifer (2000) Environment and Health: Impact of War. CMAJ • OCT. 31, 2000; 163 (9). Online available at http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/163/9/1157.pdf

Amirahmadi, Hoosang (1992) Iranian Recovery From Industrial Devastation During War with Iraq. United Nations. 1992. Online available at http://www.unu.edu/unupress/unupbooks/uu21le/uu21le0e.htm#environmental%20damage

Lindon, O., Jernelov, a., and Egerup, J. (2004) the Environmental Impacts of the Gulf War 1991. Interim Report. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis Schlossplatz 1
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War in Iraq

Words: 3714 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48792839

invasion and occupation of Iraq from three different perspectives. Firstly, the paper provides a historical background pertaining to the interest of energy-hungry countries such as France, America and Britain. The paper also provides a brief background of the relationship of Iraq with its neighbors and how oil has turned out to be a major source of attraction for the imperial powers. Secondly, the paper provides an in-depth perspective of the ongoing war in Iraq from an economic perspective. The paper briefly reveals the unstable relationship of Iraq with its neighbors. The paper also reveals the importance of the Iraqi oil reserves in the war waged on Iraq and how the American and European companies have lobbied with George Bush and Tony Blair to get contracts worth billions of dollars. Thirdly, the paper studies the political aspects of this war. The paper focuses on the impact that democracy and the recent…… [Read More]

References

(1) Abbas Alnasrawi. Oil, Sanctions Debt and the Future. Arab Studies Quarterly, Vol. 23, 2001.

(2) Ibid, 1.

(3) Dr. Ferruh Demirmen. Oil in Iraq: The Byzantine Beginnings. Global Policy Forum. April 25, 2003.

(4) Michael Dobbs. U.S. Had Key Role in Iraq Buildup. Washington Post. December 30, 2002.
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War for Resources Chris Hedges

Words: 3478 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90746667

Private armies and warlords support themselves with these crops -- an instance of exploiting (in fact, abusing) the environment to pay for war (Global esources, 2004).

Use of esources to Finance Conflict

Forest products are also often used to pay for conflicts. Timber requires little investment and can be converted to cash more cheaply than oil, which requires technology. Control over timber resources can shift the balance of power during a conflict and affect how long the conflict lasts. Underfunded armies, military, police, and rebel forces often finance themselves by cutting trees. Conflicts in Cambodia, Burma and Liberia have been funded with timber, and in each of those countries the wood produced more than 100 million dollars per year (Global esources, 2004).

Incompatible Uses Leading to Conflict

Use or misuse of resources can be very profitable on one hand but ruinous to another. For example, jurisdictional conflicts have heated up…… [Read More]

References

Breaking the habit (2004). The Nation (Feb 9), 178 (5), 11-14.

Brown, V.J. (2004). Battle scars: Global conflicts and environmental health. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112 (17), 994-1003.

Coles, C. (2004). Resources for peace. The Futurist (Jan/Feb), 38 (1) 6.

Conserving the Peace: Resources, Livelihoods, and Security (2002). IUCN/IISD E&S Task Force. Johannesburg: World Summit on Sustainable Development.
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Special Forces in Vietnam

Words: 5137 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85185862

War has undoubtedly shaped the course of human history. Conflicts, through sheer human nature often arise through disagreement. Occasionally these conflicts end with war as opposing sides believe so vehemently in their respective reasonings and doctrinal views. Oftentimes, these war's end with one "victor" and on defeated party, however, in war everyone losses.

The Vietnam War in particular is an example of how war is a zero sum game that only results in losses for all those involved. This paper examines how the conflict started, taking particular care to express both points-of-view regarding core issues followed by a discussion concerning Special Forces operations and their overall impact on the outcome of the war. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings about Special Forces in Vietnam in the conclusion.

Review and Analysis

Origins of the Vietnam War

The Vietnam War was a long, costly armed conflict that pitted the…… [Read More]

Dyhouse, Tim. (2002, March). Delta Force: Secret Wielders of Death. VFW Magazine 89(7), p. 16.

Beckwith, Charles (with Donald Knox) (1983). Delta Force. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 9780151246571.

Kelly, Francis J. Green Berets of Vietnam - The U.S. Army Special Forces 61-71 - the. S.l: Archive Media Publishing, 2013.
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Communications Media

Words: 1676 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56247823

War coverage-Media obsession

To argue about the role of media in our lives would be only redundant since we already know and acknowledge the influence of media over our perception of the world. How the various news media including newspapers, television, radio and more recently Internet affect our thinking and shape our perception requires some close analysis of the way these agencies gather and present news. There is an interesting process that works behind the seemingly simple task of news presentation. For one the media is almost always biased regardless of how they defend their impartiality. We must remember that journalists are capable of molding our perception because they have a certain hidden agenda and if they were unbiased in their opinion, they would have had little impact on our thinking. In an unbiased news piece, it is up to the viewer or reader to decide whom he would side…… [Read More]

References

Stuart Allan, News Culture. Open University Press: Buckingham 1999

William V. Kennedy, The Military and the Media: Why the Press Cannot Be Trusted to Cover a War.: Praeger Publishers. Westport, CT. 1993.

The Washington Times. Lynch, West and Common Sense. November 23, 2003. B05.

Christopher Hanson, American Idol: The Press Finds the War's True Meaning. Columbia Journalism Review. Volume: 42. Issue: 2. July-August 2003, 58+.
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U S Policy Concerning Iraq War

Words: 3455 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93404755

However, this change has been a progressive process and largely set on economic premises and cooperation between the Saudi state and western ones. Nonetheless, it represents an important example of progress in the Middle East.

At the moment the opinions regarding the current situation in the Middle East are rather mixed. On the one hand, there are those who see the Iranian case as being eloquent for the despise and opposing attitude of the majority in the Middle East; on the other hand, there are those who take Saudi Arabia as reference point for the possible success of future strategies concerning the democratization process and the way in which a totally Muslim country can change and improve its standards. From this point-of-view, the situation in Saudi Arabia, the progress it made in areas such as social activities, political participation, education, and other levels at which the population can express itself…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennis, Phyllis et al. "U.S. Policy Toward Iraq: Policy Alternatives." Foreign Policy in Focus. N.d. 18 February 2008. http://www.fpif.org/pdf/iraqStmt.pdf

Carothers, Thomas. "Is gradualism possible? Choosing a strategy for promoting democracy in the Middle East." Middle East Studies. Democracy and Rule of Law Project. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. 2003

Cortright, David et al.. "Contested Case: Do the Facts Justify the Case for War in Iraq?" Policy Brief F8. Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. 2003.

Fisher-Thompson, Jim. "Mechanics Training for Iraqi Army Fuels Engine for Change." America. Gov website. 2008. 18 February 2008. http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english/2008/January/200801071712331EJrehsiF0.7347071.html
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President Bush's War on Iraq President Bush

Words: 1941 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13023442

President Bush's ar On Iraq

President Bush feels the United States should launch a preemptive strike on Iraq, rather than waiting for sanctions by the United Nations.

He has received support from some political groups while facing opposition from others. Each side presents valid arguments on why they believe the U.S. should or should not go to war with Iraq.

Sanctions

In 1990, the United Nations imposed sanctions on Iraq after it invaded Kuwait. The invasion eventually lead to the Gulf ar in 1991.

The U.N. agreed to lift the sanctions if Iraq would allow international inspectors to certify it had removed its weapons.

However, since 1998, Baghdad has refused to allow inspectors into the country until the sanctions are lifted, claiming the weapons no longer exist (Yacoub, 2002).

In May 2002, a new Security Council resolution dealing with U.N. sanctions was accepted by Iraq for a period of 6…… [Read More]

Works Cited

COVER EDITORIAL / Convince Us / 4 Questions Bush Must Answer Before Deciding to Invade Iraq. Newsday. (2002): 03 August. Pp.B01.

DON'T BLAME THEH SANCTIONS. Denver Rocky Mountain News. (2001):

03 December. Pp. 38A.

IRAQ CALLS FOR INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE TO IDENTIFY TERROR.
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Hidden War A Russian Journalist's Account of

Words: 1898 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50930074

Hidden War: A ussian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan" by Artem Borovik.

Book report on Hidden War by Artem Borovik

Title of book: "Hidden War: A ussian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan"

Author's purpose in writing the book: This book contains three documentary stories: "Vstertimsia u Zhuravlei," "Spriatannaia Voina," "Kak I Byl Soldatom Amerikanskoi Armii." The first two stories are about the Afghan war, while the third story is about how the Soviets destroyed the image of the American soldier as an enemy for decades. The theme of the book deals with military conflicts and the wars fought. The writer uses the current political and ideology style of writing.

Borovik was born into the Soviet elite and went to prestigious Moscow English School, then to New York, since his father, Genrikh, who worked as a correspondent for the Novosti press agency, was given a…… [Read More]

References

Guardian | Artem Borovik, available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/print/0,3858,3979635-103684,00.html, accessed on: April 14, 2004

Artem Borovik, The Hidden War: A Russian Journalists Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan, published: 10 May 2001
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World War II Also Marked

Words: 2272 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99236996

The demonstration in Tiananmen Square showed that there were alrge semgnets of the population that wanted change, but Deng's response was to crush the movement with violence and to assert the supremacy ofm centalzied rule once more..

These actions show some of the difficulties of independence and of developing a new political structure when many adhere to older political structures and ideas. One response is to try to wipe out the old with violence, but regimes tend to become reactionary about their own ideas as well and to crush any opposition, real of perceived.

9. Arab unity has not materialized for a number of historical reasons related to the different ways in which the countries of the region have developed so that the leaders of some of the states are wary of other leaders, because of differences in economic structures in the various countries, and because of different reactions to…… [Read More]

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Sudan and Its Civil War

Words: 2856 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58668813

S. government analysts report that the Sudanese have violated the border with the Central African Republic during various military expeditions (Sudan 2). Furthermore, although millions of Sudanese have been displaced by these civil wars, so too has it been forced to deal with large numbers of refugees from neighboring countries, primarily Ethiopia and Chad, seeking refuge from their respective conflicts as well (Sudan 3). According to these analysts, "Armed conflict, poor transport infrastructure, and lack of government support have chronically obstructed the provision of humanitarian assistance to affected populations" (Sudan 2).

The Aftermath of the Discovery of Oil.

In their book, Africa's Thirty Years ar: Libya, Chad, and the Sudan, 1963-1993, Burr and Collins (1999) report that on the on hand, the Sudan is blessed with abundant natural resources, but on the other hand, the nation has been unable to exploit these to their maximum advantage for a variety of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burr, J. Millard and Robert O. Collins. Africa's Thirty Years War: Libya, Chad, and the Sudan, 1963-1993. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1999.

Cypher, J.M. And J.L. Dietz. The Process of Economic Development. London: Routledge, 1997.

Dupraz, Emily. (2002). "The Oils of War: Conflict in the Sudan." Harvard International Review 24(1):10.

El-Tigani, Mahgoub. (2001). "Solving the Crisis of Sudan: The Right of Self-Determination vs. State Torture." Arab Studies Quarterly 23(2):41.
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Resource Wars

Words: 1058 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82908879

played a dominant role in other countries' local conflicts because of our interest in the petroleum resources of these countries. The U.S. has been at the center of heated internal political debates in Iran. For example, the U.S. sided with the Shah, and when the Shah was overthrown, there was a great backlash against us. In addition, the U.S. has been involved in conflicts in Mexico over oil. Currently, our country is involved in a resource war in Colombia, which is as much about oil as it is about drugs.

According to the Secretary of State for the U.S., Alexander Haig, the efforts by the Soviet Union to extend its influence in Africa were the beginning rounds of a "resource war" aimed at the United States and its industrial allies. Haig was particularly concerned about cobalt and manganese, for which the U.S. is 100% dependent on imports. Most comes from…… [Read More]

Bibliography

N. Choucri and R.S. North Nations in Conflict. Freeman, 1975.

White Paper: The Resource War and the U.S. Business Community. Washington, CENS.

Knight and Behr, "Strategic minerals acquire news prominence in U.S.." The Guardian, April, 1981.

Klare, Michael. Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict. Henry Holt, 2001.
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Iran Iraq War

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89083940

U.S. Intervention in Middle East Conflicts:

Iran-Iraq Conflicts:

The relations between Iran and Iraq were hugely affected by Islamic Revolution as Iraq's president was worried that the emerging Shi'a regime in Iran would provoke uprisings in Iraq. Actually, Iraq became increasingly worried that the Islamic Revolution that emerged in Iran could spread to the country and topple the existing regime while replacing it with a theocracy. As Iraq's president was concerned that the Algiers Accord would be dismantled and not followed or obeyed because of the new Islamic Republic, he regarded this as a serious threat to the country's borders and sovereignty. Iraq became a more populist country several years before the emergence of the Islamic Revolution as the doors to trade liberalization were opened in the country. A war against Iran was considered as a suitable option by Saddam Hussein, Iraq's president, to build nationalist sentiments and spirit and…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Becker, Brian, "U.S. Conspiracy to Initiate the War Against Iraq," The Commission of Inquiry

for the International War Crimes Tribunal, last modified May 11, 1991,  http://deoxy.org/wc/wc-consp.htm 

Jacek, Brian, "U.S. Role in the Iran-Iraq War and its Negative Implications on U.S.-Iran

Relations," Kulna: For All of Us, last modified March 23, 2011, http://kulna.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/us-role-in-the-iran-iraq-war-and-its-negative-implications-on-us-iran-relations/
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Evolution of the Saudi Arabian

Words: 542 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7418392

This situation, combined with the fact that countries from the former Soviet Union produced less oil, made the Western countries to consider Saudi Arabia their main oil supplier.

Saudi Arabia responded to the increased interest showed by the West by expanding its capacity plan for the oil industry. As a consequence, the largest Saudi Arabian companies in the industry increased their domestic crude oil capacity. These companies also invested in quality, not just in quantity. Although the country's economic relationships with the West significantly intensified, Saudi Arabia improved its regional trade sector by addressing markets like Iran, Central Asia, South Asia, and Kuwait.

However, the country was significantly affected by the Persian Gulf War. As a result of the war, the country's government finances were reduced. Not even the substantial revenues from oil could sustain the cost of the war. The country was forced to borrow money from international organizations…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. The Economy (2010). U.S. Library of Congress. Retrieved January 21, 2011 from  http://countrystudies.us/saudi-arabia/34.htm .
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Bush vs Bush Iraq Redux

Words: 2512 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7590197

Primarily, both Bushes wanted to show the world that America is a powerful force with which to be reckoned -- even if not a single or sole superpower, a force that can at least militarily have its way in the world, especially with regard to rogue, weaker states.

Also, both Bushes believed in cut-and-dried reactions. Communism and Saddam Hussein are simply "bad" without complicating factors such as reasons or motivations for their actions. Going hand in hand with that assessment, communism and Saddam Hussein must be defeated thoroughly, recognizing that even small victories on the part of Iraq, for instance, could draw support to Hussein's ranks and erode America foreign policy world opinion.

However, that is where the similarities ended. For George Bush, the homeland in the United States was never under a serious threat. The most perilous years of the Cold War were behind America when Bush took the…… [Read More]

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Paul Wolfowitz Considered by Many

Words: 2317 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4377177

First of all, the U.S. should "actively deter nations from "aspiring to a larger regional or global role." Second of all, preemptive force should be used to prevent countries from developing weapons of mass destruction and, third of all, the United States should "act alone if necessary." Clearly, all of these correlated ideas have been implementing in Iraq. Further more, all of ideas would be laid out in the founding statement of principles for the Project of the New American Century.

Evaluating what exactly the neoconservatives that have are now in the highest positions of the U.S. administration is a difficult and dangers job. Consternating the need for an objective evaluation, it is best to present all points-of-view. The least radical of these seems to be the one referring to its goal to promote the United States towards global leadership.

On the other hand, less moderate approaches see the Project…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Shank, Duane. September 2003. The project for a New American Empire. On the Internet at http://www.sojo.net/index.cfm?action=magazine.article&issue=soj0309&article=030911

2. Paul Wolfowitz - Highlights and Quotes. On the Internet at http://rightweb.irc-online.org/ind/wolfowitz/wolfowitz.php

3. Project for the New American Century. On the Internet at http://rightweb.irc-online.org/org/pnac.php

4. Harnden, Toby. March 2003. America's Dream for a New Middle East. News Telegraph. On the Internet at http://www.expat.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/03/18/wiplan18.xml
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5th Fleet in Bahrain and the U S

Words: 3567 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14930296

5TH FLEET IN BAHAIN AND THE U.S. AND EU OIL EMBAGO IN IAN

OLE OF THE U.S. 5TH FLEET IN BAHAIN AND THE U.S. AND EU OIL EMBAGO IN IAN

ole of the U.S. 5th fleet" in Bahrain

ole of the U.S. 5th fleet" in Bahrain

foreign aid to Bahrain, where the U.S. Fifth Fleet is centered, constitutes directly to the U.S. Government's aims to maintain safety in the Persian Gulf. Bahrain is the only Arab state that has led one of the Coalition Task Forces that move around the Gulf, and has issued to move its flagship in support of the formation counter-piracy mission. As suggested by Edward & Marolda (1998) U.S. aids assists Bahrain, which have no oil wealth of its neighbors, get the training and equipment it requirement to operate alongside U.S. air and naval forces. U.S. military access to Bahrain also uplifts the operations in Iraq,…… [Read More]

References

1. Michael A. Palmer, On Course to Desert Storm: The U.S. Navy and the Persian Gulf (Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1992), 122.

2. OPLAN 1019 Arabian Gauntlet," GlobalSecurity.org. Available from http://www. globalsecurity.org/military/ops/arabian-gauntlet.htm (accessed November 1, 2009).

3. Edward J. Marolda and Robert J. Schneller Jr., Shield and Sword: The United States Navy and the Persian Gulf War (Washington, D.C.: Naval Institute Press, 1998), 33.

4. Edward J. Marolda and Robert J. Schneller Jr., Shield and Sword: The United States Navy and the Persian Gulf War (Washington, D.C.: Naval Institute Press, 1998), 32-35.
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Ethnic Strife and Historic Imperialism

Words: 1191 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70126554

The faith allows for stoning of people, torture of women and the suicide bombings that the world has grown accustomed to suffering (Hoagland, 2001).

Islamic fundamentalist believe that their faith instructs them to seek out and destroy Americans. They also believe that if they are suicide bombers they will be rewarded in heaven ten fold. As America continues to fight against the human rights violations that Persian Gulf nations continue to support, the fundamentalists believe it is their calling and duty to act against American interests. They want American interests out of their area and they will do what it takes to get it done including acts of terrorism.

As the world watched in wonder the Soviet Union collapsed. It dismantled its government, it started over and it began to rebuild as a democracy after many years of being in a cold war with the United States.

For some the…… [Read More]

References

Farrar, L.L., Jr.(2003) Aggression vs. apathy: the limits of nationalism during the Balkan wars, 1912-1913. East European Quarterly

Hoagland, Jim (2001) Mysteries in the Persian Gulf. The Washington Post

Novotny, Patrick (1999) the Post-Cold War Era, the Persian Gulf War, and the Peace and Justice Movement in the 1990s. Social Justice nuclear terrorism (Accessed 5-17-07)

http://www.ucsusa.org/global_security/nuclear_terrorism
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Hispanic Soldiers PTSD the American

Words: 3058 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84885304

Although the absolute magnitude of group differences on measures such as the BDI may appear moderate, the finding that 22% of troops deployed to the Persian Gulf reported at least mild levels of depression on the BDI compared to 9% of those who served stateside within the first year of such military duty is of clinical significance (p. 422)."

Amy B. Adler (1996), writing for Military Psychology, points out that soldiers experiencing the highest levels of combat stress were those exposed to dead troops and civilians, but exposure to their own fallen comrades, people with whom they had bonded, resulted in the highest levels of stress (p. 2).

The goals of the study were to identify the extent of PTS symptomatology following redeployment and to identify the relation between such symptoms and rank and type of traumatic exposure. It was hypothesized that soldiers who had been exposed to the most…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77520859

Adler, Amy B. "Combat Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology among U.S. Soldiers Deployed to the Gulf War." Military Psychology 8.1 (1996): 1-14. Questia. 7 Mar. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77520859.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27330336

Blea, Irene I. Toward a Chicano Social Science. New York: Praeger, 1988. Questia. 7 Mar. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27330336.
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Military the First Major Ground

Words: 320 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85421196



Many lessons can be learned from Khafji. First, the situation demonstrates effective coalition fighting; the Qatari and Saudi troops effectively squelched the Iraqi incursion not only in Khafji but also to the West, near the Kuwaiti border. Stratifying coalition forces into primary and secondary sectors ensures organized and effective responses to surprise attack like this one. The Saudi and Qatari forces not only drove back the Iraqis but prevented further problems. This allowed Marine forces to organize their reconnaissance mission and establish ground presence along the strategic Saudi-Kuwaiti border.

Second, Khafji proved a strategic stronghold, allowing American and coalition forces to amass troops only six miles from the Kuwaiti border: "occupying forward positions in anticipation of a future ground offensive." In contrast, Iraqi troops lay "entrenched behind layers of minefields, barbed wire and fortifications in occupied Kuwait."

eference

Murphy, C. & Gugliotta, G. (1991). "Saudi Town eclaimed." Washington Post. Feb…… [Read More]

Reference

Murphy, C. & Gugliotta, G. (1991). "Saudi Town Reclaimed." Washington Post. Feb 1, 1991. Retrieved Mr. 27, 2007 at  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/inatl/longterm/fogofwar/archive/post013191_2.htm
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American Foreign Policy Change From 1940 to

Words: 2017 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75317844

American foreign policy change from 1940 to the present?

Before the 20th century, the U.S. had a strong tradition of isolationism and non-interventionism. Beginning with American participation in World War I and continuing with its involvement in World War II after the invasion of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. increasingly began to conceive of itself as not only a player on the international stage, but also the ideological promoter and protector of democracy. When World War II ended with the U.S. bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it was clear that America had taken a position of power in the world, both militarily and politically.

In the decade that followed World War II, American foreign policy pitted itself against Soviet Communism through the pursuit of "containment:" limiting the expansion of Soviet power and Communist ideology to other nations. This policy of containment was the primary driving force behind the "Cold War" and…… [Read More]

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Japanese American Internment

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47812012

orld ar II as a great triumph in American history. The United States forces were victorious in both the Pacific and European Theatres of war. Two military aggressive regimes were destroyed, and peace was restored, due in large part to America's involvement. hat many people do not realize is that some of the actions of the United States were just as morally corrupt as those of the Axis powers. Similar to the Nazi's imprisonment of Jews in Europe, the U.S. government imprisoned Japanese-Americans on the est Coast. orst of all, the internment of Japanese was more of an act of racism than actual perceived threat. The premise of this paper is to prove that the internment of Japanese in 1942 was a decision motivated by race rather than defensive strategy. I will chronicle the events leading up to the internment, the presence of racism before and after the bombing of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Daniels, Roger. Prisoners Without Trial. New York: Hill and Wang. 1993.
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U S Invaded Iraq in 2003 Why U S

Words: 7685 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97527826

U.S. INVADED IRAQ IN 2003

Why U.S. Invade Iaq 2003

invasion of Iaq has a numbe of foceful effects that elate to the influence of the 9/11 occuence in the county. The then U.S. pesident who happened to have been Pesident Bush pushed fo the U.S. invasion of Iaq amidst the actions that Saddam had done to the U.S. In most avenues of pefomance, it is clea that the U.S. attack on Iaq was bought unde an infuiated situation. The demand fo the U.S. To invade Iaq came fom the sensitive eactions and elations between Bush and the then Iaq pesident Hussein. Many nations in the wold have engaged in wa and not because of the ideological diffeences. Rathe, the invasions and conflicts that have been expeienced in many nations ae elated to the geneal balance of powe. Many of the nations that have been expeiencing the ugency to be…… [Read More]

references to the political, economic and ideological interests/purpose of the U.S., ignoring the reasons stated by the Bush administration and the Blair government. Mu-nchen, GRIN Verlag

GmbH. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:101:1-20100916742.

Radu, M., & Arnold, A. (1990). The New insurgencies: Anticommunist guerrillas in the Third

World. New Brunswick, N.J: Transaction Publishers.

Roberts, J.E., & Army War College (U.S.). (2007). Winning the battle of ideas in the War on Terrorism. Carlisle Barracks, Pa: U.S. Army War College.
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Cohesive Examination of Arms Sales

Words: 2358 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23102616

"

But evidence indicates the true motive for the increased arms sales since the dismantling of the former Soviet Union is not about peacekeeping at all but about the bottom dollar.

According to the annual assessment, the United States supplied $8.1 billion worth of weapons to developing countries in 2005 -- 45.8% of the total and far more than second-ranked ussia with 15% and Britain with a little more than 13% (Bender, 2006)."

Arms sales (agreements) ranked by Supplier, 1998-2005 (in constant 2005 million U.S. Dollars and percentage of world sales).

Supplier

Total Dollars

Percentage of total sales

Source:

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, http://www.globalissues.org/i/pdf.gif

eport for Congress, U.S. Congressional esearch Service, Library of Congress, October 23, 2006. (Dollar values are constant 2005 dollars)

Each country shown as follows:

developing countries industrialized countries

If you are viewing this table on another site, please see http://www.globalissues.org/Geopolitics/ArmsTrade/BigBusiness.aspfor further details and context.…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bender, Brian (2006) U.S. is top purveyor on weapons sales (Accessed 3-22-07) list http://www.boston.com/news/world/articles/2006/11/13/us_is_top_purveyor_on_weapons_sales_list/?page=2Shipments grow to unstable areas by Bryan Bender, Globe Staff

Lewis, James (2005) Arms Control Today. LOOKING BACK: Multilateral Arms Transfer Restraint: The Limits of Cooperation

Roberts, Tom (1999) New battles brew over defense spending, arms sales.

National Catholic Reporter
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Killer Angels

Words: 1643 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37811876

General Norman Schwarzkopf

General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr. was born in Trenton, New Jersey on August 22 in the year 1934. He was named after his father, who was a est Point graduate and a decorated veteran of the Armed Forces, much like the younger Schwarzkopf has now become. General Schwarzkopf himself graduated from est Point in 1956 and has become one of our generation's most brilliant military leaders. He retired in the fall of 1991, shortly after successfully leading the Allied Troops into the Persian Gulf ar earlier that year.

Growing up as the youngest of three children, Schwarzkopf was taught from an early age that women were to be protected, that men were to protect them and that "Duty, Honor Country" would become the creed of his life. hen his father was called overseas during the onset of orld ar II in August of 1942, he became the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Birnbaum, Jesse. THE GULF WAR: THE COMMANDER Stormin' Norman On Top. Time, 02-04-1991, pp.28

Duffy, Brian. A Desert Storm Accounting. U.S. News & World Report. 03-16-1992 pp.35-37

Fischer, Dean. THE GULF: The Desert Bear. Time, 10-15-1990, pp.52

Roberts, Tom. Viewpoint: Who Is Our Neighbor? National Catholic Reporter, 05-19-2000 pp.13
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Saddam Hussein & His Totalitarian

Words: 2601 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73694026

In the words of BBC Middle East analyst Gerald Butt (2001), "…his (Saddam's) opponents have not been able to nominate anyone else who might hold Iraq together -- with its Kurds in the north, Sunni Muslims in the centre [sic], and Shi'a in the south. What the outside world calls terror, Saddam calls expediency." Interestingly, Butt's analysis took into consideration the fact that despite the atrocities that Saddam had and has purportedly done to Iraqis and Iraq's neighbors, world leaders, particularly Western leaders like the U.S. And Britain, are still actually taking an active role in Saddam's political decision-making, albeit the latter has chosen to contain himself within Iraq's borders. Prior to 9/11, U.S. leadership continued to tolerate Saddam's regime, only until the point that it is able to find a 'suitable' replacement for the dictator (Dickey and Thomas, 2002).

In addition to "covert actions" taken to secure that Iraq…… [Read More]

References

Butt, G. (January 2001). "Saddam Hussein profile." BBC News World Edition website. Available at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1100529.stm 

Dickey, C. And E. Thomas. (September 2002). "How the U.S. helped create Saddam Hussein." Global Policy Forum website. Available at: http://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/167/34978.html

O'Reilly, B. (2004). "Document connects Saddam Hussein to 9/11 terrorists." Fort Worth Business Press.

Paz, M. And J. Aviles. (2009). "Demonizing the tyrant: Saddam Hussein's image in Spanish news programs during the Second Persian Gulf War." International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, Vol. 3, No. 1.
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Economics Finance MBA Level

Words: 13568 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39727750

disrupting America's economic system is a fundamental objective of terrorists

Even as the world continues to struggle with the terrible shock from the September 11 attacks in New York and Washington, one principle lesson has already become clear: disrupting our economic system is a fundamental objective of terrorists.

Prior to September 11, our economic environment was certainly not immune to terror, in comparison to many other nations; we lived relatively terror-free. Now, however, the aftermath of the terrorist attacks serves as a grim reminder that international relations and security developments can dramatically affect economic performance.

US History is replete with countless examples when macro fundamentals are overtaken by what economists refer to as, exogenous shocks -- surprise events that can profoundly and often unpredictably shift political and economic resources, and send even the most accurate forecasts astray. Commodity shocks, such as the two OPEC jolts in the 1970s, are classic…… [Read More]

References

Bagehot, Walter. 1927. Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market, John Murray, London.

Balbach, Anatol B. 1981. "How Controllable is Money Growth?" Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review, vol 63, no 4, April, p. 5.

Becker, Gary S, Steven N. Kaplan, Kevin M. Murphy and Edward A Snyder. (2002 / winter). "The Economic Effects of September 11," GSB Magazine, University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.

Bell, Stephanie. 2000. "Do Taxes and Bonds Finance Government Spending?." Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 603-620.
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American Politics

Words: 1636 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52770778

American Politics

Historically, the significance of the executive branch has increased during periods of war, crisis and economic turmoil, while the legislative branch has assumed greater responsibility during peaceful reprieves and ostensibly stable times. The relation between these two branches is complicated, but the increase of power and prestige of the president during crisis times must be approached in two ways: the president as a more efficient executive administrator of policy, and the president as symbolic leader.

The constitution provides the president with the certain powers that enhance his ability to perform in crisis situations, and, given the increased significance of the media in American politics of the last half-century, the president's role as a symbolic figure is more important than ever.

There is a generally perceived division between the executive and legislative branches: Congress is steeped in bureaucratic and intensely inefficient processes, while the president maintains the ability to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Herring, George. America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam 1950-1975. New York: McGraw Hill, 1995.

Sandel, Michael Democracy's Discontent: America in Search of a Public Policy. New York: Belknap, 1998.

Tulis, Jeffrey. The Rhetorical Presidency. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988.
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Flashback Episodes Experienced by Vietnam

Words: 1781 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69196632

It will also attempt to identify average time lengths between episodes. This study will be important not only to the treatment of Vietnam Veteran PTSD but to the treatment of all PTSD sufferers who have flashbacks.

eferences

Coming home from war: a literature review: in the last of three articles, Deidre Wild examines the stressors faced by health professionals returning from the Gulf. (clinical).

From: Emergency Nurse | Date: May 1, 2003 | Author: Wild, Deidre | More results for: viet nam ptsd http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/13/1/101

Dissociative Flashbacks After ight Frontal Injury in a Vietnam Veteran With Combat-elated Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Marcelo L. Berthier, M.D., Angel Posada, M.D. And Carmen Puentes, M.D.

eceived March 3, 2000; June 27, 2000; accepted July 7, 2000. From the Department of Medicine and Dermatology, University of Malaga, Spain, and the Service of Nuclear Medicine. Department of adiology, Carlos Haya University Hospital, Malaga, Spain. Address correspondence to…… [Read More]

References

Coming home from war: a literature review: in the last of three articles, Deidre Wild examines the stressors faced by health professionals returning from the Gulf. (clinical).

From: Emergency Nurse | Date: May 1, 2003 | Author: Wild, Deidre | More results for: viet nam ptsd http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/13/1/101

Dissociative Flashbacks After Right Frontal Injury in a Vietnam Veteran With Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Marcelo L. Berthier, M.D., Angel Posada, M.D. And Carmen Puentes, M.D.
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Why Did the US-Led Coalition Invade Iraq in 2003

Words: 3425 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29133185

U.S. Invasion of Iraq- easons

US Invasion of Iraq: easons

The epublic of Iraq is located in South West Asia. Baghdad is its capital and Kuwait, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the Persian Gulf, Iran and Turkey are its neighboring countries. More than 95% of the population in Iraq is Muslim. The members of Shiites sect are the main inhabitants of the country (The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition 2009).

Saddam Hussein Takriti came in power after the resignation of President Bakr in 1979. It was immediately after his presumptuous control that a fight with Iran began which continued for eight years. The war ended in 1988 with a cessation of hostilities by the United Nations. Although Iraq was supported by the United States in Iran-Iraq war but it strongly criticized Hussein's tyrannical strategies and unrelenting arms increase. In 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. International trade sanctions were established on Iraq by the…… [Read More]

References

The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth ed., s.v. "Iraq." New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117025268 (accessed June 25, 2011).

Deaver, Michael V. . Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2001. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106841608 (accessed June 25, 2011)

Zunes, Stephen. "The U.S. Invasion of Iraq: The Military Side of Globalization?." Common Dreams. www.commondreams.org/views04/1020-28.htm (accessed June 25, 2011).

Enemark, Christian, and Christopher Michaelsen. " Just War Doctrine and the Invasion of Iraq." The Australian Journal Of Politics and History 51, no. 4 (2005): 545+. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5018854191 (accessed June 25, 2011).
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy CBT Techniques for Combat Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PTSD

Words: 5327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85865281

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Combat Veterans With Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Although not limited to veterans, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be the single most significant mental health risk to veterans, particularly to those veterans that have seen combat. PTSD is an anxiety disorder, which occurs after a person has seen or experienced a traumatic event including, but not limited to: assault, domestic abuse, prison stay, rape, terrorism, war, or natural disaster (Vorvick et al., 2011). In fact, PTSD is unique among psychiatric diagnosis in that it "requires a specific type of event to occur from which the person affected does not recover" (esick et al., 2008). Veterans are at high risk of PTSD because they experience war, but they also experience many of the other traumatic events that can trigger PTSD in the course of the war. PTSD can have serious lifelong effects for veterans. It can impair…… [Read More]

References

Byers, M.G., Allison, K.M., Wendel, C.S., & Lee, J.K. (2010). Pra-zosin vs. quetiapine for nighttime posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in veterans: An assessment of long-term comparative effectiveness and safety. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 30, 225-229.

Chard, K., Schumm, J., Owens, G., & Cottingham, S. (2010). A comparison of OEF and OIF

veterans and Vietnam veterans receiving cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 23(1), 25-32.

Hassija, C.M., & Gray, M.J. (2010). Are cognitive techniques and interventions necessary? A
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Mcveigh Oklahoma City Bomber Terms Acts Violence

Words: 1291 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35490763

McVeigh (Oklahoma City bomber) terms acts violence, childhood background, situational factors,

Timothy McVeigh will long be remembered as the Oklahoma City bomber and as the principle culprit of the bombing of that city's Murrah Federal Building the morning of April 19, 1995. The mass media was quick to vilify the then 26-year-old as an aberration -- someone who was driven by an unprovoked pathology to commit this act that resulted in 168 dead (including approximately 20 children in an on-site day care center) and which was inexplicable. However, a prolonged analysis into the background of McVeigh from his childhood through his days in the Armed Forces to the erratic behavior he exhibited prior to the bombing of the federal building demonstrates that from a psychological perspective, there are certainly explanations for McVeigh's actions. This document attempts to examine the myriad facets of McVeigh's life through the five axes of the…… [Read More]

References

Brown, B.L. (1999). "Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale (DSM - IV Axis V)." www.facstaff.gpc.edu / Retrieved from http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~bbrown/psyc2621/ch3/gaf.htm

No author. (2001). "Timothy McVeigh: convicted Oklahoma City bomber." CNN. Retrieved from http://archives.cnn.com/2001/U.S./03/29/profile.mcveigh/index.html

Linder, D.O. (2006). "The Oklahoma City Bombing & The Trial of Timothy McVeigh." www.law2umkc.edu. Retrieved from  http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/mcveigh/mcveighaccount.html 

Walsh, D. (2001). "Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh: the making of a mass murderer." International Committee of the Fourth International. Retrieved from  http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2001/04/mcve-a19.html
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Arms Sales to the Third

Words: 1297 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46952975

S.S.R.'s collapse have left America as the only global Super Power, but burdened with a $4/5 trillion deficit, declining economic- military resources and uncertain leadership. America's internationalism will increasingly rely on closer cooperation with the United Nations and the West to foster international stability and stronger Western solidarity (2).

Chinese arms sales to the Middle East became controversial, particularly in the United States, because of China's willingness to export tactical and strategic missiles, regardless of the consequences to regional stability. In response, the United States began to pressure and to restrain its ballistic-missile exports. Chinese leaders maintained that their country had adopted a prudent and responsible policy on arms sales, selling only a limited quantity of weapons. Nevertheless, China's attempts to use the international security framework to its own advantage were contradictory. China's withdrawal from the Perm Five arms-transfer talks, sale of M-11 missile components to Pakistan, undercut the credibility…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Keller, William W. & Nolan, Janne E., the Arms Trade: Business as Usual?. Vol. 109, Foreign Policy, 12-01-1997

Rimanelli, Marco, East-West arms control and the fall of the U.S.S.R., 1967-1994: radical change or expedient accommodation?. Vol. 29, East European Quarterly, 06-22-1995pp 237(37).

Sismanidis, Roxane D.V., China and the Post-Soviet security structure.. Vol. 21, Asian Affairs: An American Review, 04-01-1994 pp 39.

Author not available, arms trade., the Hutchinson Dictionary of World History, 01-01-1998
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International Affairs Military Studies

Words: 1131 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6303427

Iraq invaded Kuwait. The invasion lasted a few days and on August 8th Iraq announced that Kuwait was its nineteenth province. The same day the invasion began, the United Nations denounced the attack and passed Resolution 660, which condemned the Iraqi invasion and called for immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Kuwait. The United States began mobilizing its military on August 7th.

y the time the UN deadline arrived in January of 1991, The United States had amassed hundreds of thousands of troops in the Persian Gulf Region. The war began on January 17th with bombing sorties. Over the next month, 67,000 sorties would be flown over Iraq. Operation Desert Storm was launched on February 24th, and Coalition ground forces entered the fight. The war was won in less than four days. The cease-fire began on 8am, February 28th. Iraq was defeated and Kuwait was liberated.

In a strategic sense, Operation…… [Read More]

Bibliography

April Glaspie Transcript." What Really Happened. 1996. What Really Happened. 9 Mar 2004 http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/ARTICLE5/april.html

Chronology of the Kuwait Crisis." The Kuwait Information Office. 2004. The Kuwait

Information Office. 9 Mar 2004 http://www.kuwait-info.org

Final Report to Congress: Conduct of the Persian Gulf War." Apr 1992. The National Security Archive 11 Feb 2004. George Washington University. 9 Mar 2004 http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/the_archive.html
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Noaa Stands for National Oceanic

Words: 3867 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59858055



Legislation on liability and compensation is needed.

The United States should ratify the International Maritime Organization (IMO) 1984 Protocols.

Federal planning for oil spills must be improved.

Studies of the long-term environmental and health effects must be undertaken expeditiously and carefully.

How NOAA responds to spills?

NOAA is a 24/7 service that monitors and waits for a help if there is a spill. They help protect and conserve the natural resources. As soon as they got call they go to the scene as fast as possible. They inspect the vessel, and study the spill, damage and spread in the affected area. We determine the success of their operation through the response of NOAA. NOAA Office of Response and Restoration has a mission based on the online source, http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2004/s2353.htm:

OR& R. is currently assisting with trajectory modeling, oil fate forecasting, weather, and information management and participating in over flights and resource…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

"Clean-Up Techniques" [Online] Available at:

"Containment and Recovery of Floating Oil" [Online] Available at:



Etkin, D.S. 1997. Oil Spills from Vessels (1960-1995): An International Historical Perspective.
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United States Military and Environmental Law

Words: 6165 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54567760

U.S. MILITAY AND ENVIONMENTAL LAW

Military & Environmental Law

Environmental Analysis and Impact of the United States Military

Military activity affects the environment in direct and indirect ways. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of military training and readiness activities and the impact of armed conflict and war on the environment. Most environmental impact that results from armed conflict and war occurs in foreign and not domestic environments. However, military training and readiness activities have the potential to impact both domestic and international environments. Different standards apply to the regulation of military activity based on the geographic, national, and political arenas in which military activity occurs. Another dimension that affects the environmental impact standards to which the military is held accountable is based on the perceptions and attitudes of lawmakers, citizens, and warriors toward peacetime and readiness operations vs. armed conflict and war. This paper will…… [Read More]

References

Bearden, D.M. (2007). Exemptions from Environmental Law for the Department of Defense: Background and Issues for Congress, CRS Report for Congress. Retrieved http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RS22149.pdf

Boelaert-Suominen, S. AJ. (XXXX) The Effect of Marine Safety and Pollution Conventions During International Armed Conflict, International Environmental Law and Naval War, Defense Institute of International Legal Studies. Retrieved http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/navy/np15_envir_law_naval.pdf

Currents Magazine, (2010, Fall). Navy Air Systems Command, Environmental Issues. Retrieved http://www.enviro-navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?pg=currents

Customary International Humanitarian Law. (2010). ICRC, Customary IHL Database, International Committee of the Red Cross, Retrieved http://www.icrc.org/customary-ihl/eng/docs/v1_rul_rule44
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U S Became Involved in Desert

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44335641

This alliance brought an end to the illusion that the war in the Gulf was for humanitarian purposes and the restoration of democracy, since Assad, who killed 20,000 of his own citizens to quell an uprising in Hama, Syria, was comparatively more dictatorial than Saddam himself."(Fingrut, 1993)

In close connection with the geopolitical positioning of the kingdom of Kuwait and the regional alliances lay Western interests for oil. Head and Tilford noted in this sense that "the United States also feared a reduction in the flow of oil from Kuwait, especially for its Allies in Europe." (Head and Tilford 17) Indeed, it had become common knowledge that the Iraqi leadership had established the new foreign policy guidelines in terms of acquiring and controlling Kuwait's oil reserves. This attitude was determined by the acute economic crisis Saddam had led his country into, after the eight-year war with Iran. Therefore, his extensive…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Calvocoressi, Peter. World politics since 1945. (Budapest: Open Society Institute, 1996)

Fingrut, David. Operation Desert Storm. Out right disinformation scheme. SEED Alternative School. Toronto, 1993. 23 March 2007. http://www.chss.montclair.edu/english/furr/Vietnam/gulf-war-fingrut.html#Bush

Head, William, and Earl H. Tilford, eds. The Eagle in the Desert Looking Back on U.S. Involvement in the Persian Gulf War. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996.

IR Theory in Practice Case Study: The Gulf War, 1990-1991. (n.d) 23 March 2007. http://www.gulfweb.org/
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Terrorism Is Defined by Some

Words: 1797 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57764387

As we know from the evolution of modern history, the Soviet Union and the countries of the Eastern block generally backed up the Arab countries, mainly because their actions were directed towards the Untied States and Israel, natural enemies for the Soviets.

However, strangely enough, international politics meant that the United States often found themselves backing Iraq, at least during the 80s and the war with Iran. This happened because of U.S.'s relations with Iran, after Khomeini had gained power here, in 1979. So, somewhat in an absurd manner, we find both superpowers, the U.S. And the Soviet Union, tacitly backing Iraq, at least in part of its actions.

This is not the case after the Persian Gulf War, in 1990. The impact from now on is mostly economically driven. Indeed, under international pressure and economic embargo, the Iraqi government and Saddam Hussein's regime is forced to abide by many…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Wikipedia. On the Internet at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_terrorism#Cuba

Wikipedia. On the Internet at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_terrorism#Cuba
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Should Women Be Allowed to Serve in Combat Positions in the Military

Words: 963 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39336138

omen in Combat

The participation of women in the war against Iraq has once again focused attention on the question of women in the military.

Many have argued that because of biology and psychology, women are inherently unsuited for military life in general and to combat in particular. However, this argument ignores how women's participation in the military has steadily increased since the Korean ar. Today, women can now attend public military schools and are eligible for promotion to the highest ranks. This paper argues that as women's role in society continues to evolve, then so must the role of women in the military. This includes allowing women to serve in combat positions during times of war.

Those opposed to women in the military base their arguments on the assumption that biological differences between men and women make women unable to fulfill combat duties. Syndicated columnist Mona Charen, for example,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Charon, Mona. "Eight Good Reasons to Oppose Women in the Military." In Current Issues and Enduring Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Argument with Readings. 6th ed. Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau, eds. New York: Bedford St. Martins Press, 2004.

Eskind, Amy. "A Post-Gulf Memorial Day" Arms and the Woman." The Washington Post, May 26, 1991. ProQuest Database.

Norwood, Vivian. "Eight Reasons Why Women Should Be in the Military." In Current Issues and Enduring Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Argument with Readings. 6th ed. Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau, eds. New York: Bedford St. Martins Press, 2004.
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Benefits of Integration in the Ci Humint Community

Words: 20134 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72535211

Integration in the CI/HUMINT Community

An Analysis of the Benefits of Integration in the CI/HUMINT Community and Strategies for Effective Implementation

Shea Larson

The success of any counterinsurgency operation depends largely on the effectiveness and appropriateness of intelligence gathered. Human subjects are a crucial source of intelligence for counterinsurgency operations. Several years back, the U.S. Armed Forces opened up opportunities for women to occupy specific positions in counterintelligence/human intelligence (CI/HUMINT) discipline. However, women still remain underrepresented in the same, and researchers remain largely divided on whether their participation in the same ought to be increased. esearchers have raised concern that the decision to integrate women into HUMINT units could cost the country dearly in the long-term as it is likely to ruin unit cohesion and impede on overall effectiveness. Proponents of the whole idea of integration have, however, argued that the inclusion of women in HUMINT units will actually enhance…… [Read More]

References

Alderman, M. I. (1993). Women in Direct Combat: What is the Price for Equality? School for Advanced Military Studies Monograph, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Al-Ali, N. & Pratt, N. (2009). What Kind of Liberation: Women and the Occupation of Iraq. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Bartone, P.T. Johnsen, B.H. Eid, J. Brun, W. & Laberg, J.C. (2002). Factors Influencing Small-Unit Cohesion in Norwegian Navy Officer Cadets. Military Psychology, 14(1), 1-22.

Beal, D.J. Cohen, R.R. Burke, M.J. & McLendon, C.L. (2003). Cohesion and Performance in Groups: A Meta-Analytic Clarification of Construct Relations. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88 (6), 989-1004.
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Cyprus Problem Ancient History Establishment of the

Words: 15734 Length: 55 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74494950

Cyprus Problem

Ancient History

Establishment of the epublic of Cyprus

Intercommunal Conflict

Establishment of the UNFICYP

Turkey Bombs Cyprus

Turkey ejects UN s Mediator on Solution of Cyprus Problem

New ound of Intercommunal Talks

Military Junta Takes Over in Greece

Kofinou Crisis

einforced Talks with Constitutional Experts

Formation of the EOKA B. And Civil Strife

Junta Coup d'Etat and Turkish Invasion

The Aftermath

estoration of Communal Order

Great Britain

Greece

Turkey

Greek Cypriots

Turkish Cypriots

Sovereignty

EU and the Cypress Problem

Struggle for Justice and Compromise

Where Should the Solution Line be Drawn?

POLICY IMPLICATIONS

CONCLUSIONS

EFEENCES

SUMMAY

Cyprus is an island in the Mediterranean which has been at the heart of a dispute since 1963. In 1960, the island was given freedom from British control, but since then there has been very little time that has not been plagued by some form of unrest. Since there are two distinct…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Attalides, M.A. (1979). Cyprus, nationalism and international politics. New York: St. Martin's Press.

Australian Hellenic Council. (2009). Cyprus. Retrieved from http://www.helleniccouncil.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&i'd=99&Itemid=81

Ayres, R. (1996). European integration: The case of Cyprus. Cyprus Review, 8(1), 39- 62.

Baier-Allen, S. (1999). Looking into the future of Cyprus: EU relations. Baden-Baden: Nomos.
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U S Foreign Policy in the

Words: 3807 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40345638

eapons of mass destruction are just an excuse. But is known that
"President George Bush and Vice-President Dick Cheney were both oil
company executives before entering politics, as was half the present US
administration," which means that not only do you have friends in the oil
business but that they dictate your policy (Vesely 2002). Having such
deceptive and underhanded policies and engaging an entire nation in a war
that not only kills Amerians, but also people of other countries and
encourages anti-American sentiment among even our allies is a horrible
foreign policy when all we receive in return is natural resources and
riches for a few Americans. Alternatives must be sought. No longer can
weapons of mass destruction be an excuse to involve the United States in
such costly polices.
And yet even more so now weapons of mass destruction are being hinted
at as an excuse to go…… [Read More]

Works Cited
Buckley Jr., William. "Looking Ahead-Oil." National Review (2005). 17 Apr.
2007
333457>.

"Imperialism Definition." Dictionary.Com. 17 Apr. 2007
.
Lewis, Bernard. "Did You Say 'American Imperialism'? : Power, Weakness, and
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Palestinian and Israeli Conflict in

Words: 3918 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95383822

These settlements make sure that the state of fragmentation and insecurity of the Palestinians continues and thereby hinders the economic, social and political development of the Palestinians. The total number of such settlements in the West bank, Jerusalem and the Gaza strip are 205, with the vast majority of them in West bank and Jerusalem. "These settlements have led to the more than 403,249 settlers in the West bank and Jerusalem itself." (Israeli Settlements on Occupied Palestinian Territories) Israel continues to expand the number of these settlements from time to time as well as the bypass roads connecting them. These new bypass roads as well as the expansions to the existing bypass roads add to the disruption of the Palestine economy, autonomy and society.

The Israeli settlements also have a negative impact on the access of the Palestinians to natural resources like water and arable land. This problem is likely…… [Read More]

References

Definition of Zionism." Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved at  http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Zionism/zionism.html . Accessed on February 16, 2005

Boling, J. Gail. (January 2001) "Palestinian Refugees and the Right of Return: An International Law Analysis" Retrieved at http://www.badil.org/Publications/Briefs/Brief-No-08.htm Accessed on February 17, 2005

Israeli Settlements on Occupied Palestinian Territories." The Palestine Monitor.

Retrieved at http://www.palestinemonitor.org/factsheet/settlement.html. Accessed on Isseroff, Ami. "Israel and Palestine: A Brief History." MidEastWeb. Retrieved at  http://www.mideastweb.org/briefhistory.htm . Accessed on February 16, 2005
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Colin Powell General Colin L

Words: 2231 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71228625

Powell was unanimously approved by the Senate and became the first African-American to hold that position. His service as Secretary of State is a clear example of his reticence, yet readiness, for war. hile Powell is known for "the so-called Powell doctrine -- that U.S. military power only be used in overwhelming strength to achieve well-defined strategic national interests," (answers.com 3) he made a famous speech to the United Nations in which he voiced support for the war in Iraq. Although he clashed with the often "hawkish" members of the Bush hite House such as Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, "one of Powell's best known moments as secretary of state was his speech last year [2003] to the U.N. Security Council in which he made a case for invading Iraq" (King 3). The initial invasion of Iraq was billed as necessary by the Bush hite House because of the threat…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Academy of Achievement. "Colin Powell Biography." January 11, 2006.  http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/pow0bio-1 

America's Promise. "General Powell's Message to America." 2006. http://www.americaspromise.org/WhyHere.aspx?id=124

Answers.com. "Colin Powell." 2006.  http://www.answers.com/topic/colin-powell 

King, John; Koppel, Andrea; Malveaux, Suzanne; Labotte, Elise. "Powell resigns with three other Cabinet secretaries."  http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/11/15/powell/
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Effect of Deployment on Military Families

Words: 4773 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 398306

military deployment affects military families. The writer explores the many differences between deployed and non-deployed families and examines some of the things being done to ease the stress and problems that deployment presents. There were 10 sources used to complete this paper.

Americans are waiting with anxious anticipation as the federal government attempts to convince the United Nations that a war with Iraq is in order. President Bush as well as Colin Powell have spent days addressing the issue and presenting evidence of the need to forcibly disarm Iraq. As the world watches the events unfold, nations are lining up on one side or the other of the issue. France, Germany and ussia are asking the United States to hold off on an attack and see if a more peaceful solution can be hammered out. Britain, Canada and several others have pledged if a war erupts, they will send troops…… [Read More]

References

Peterson, Karen S.(2001).Peterson, Long deployments stress military families., USA Today, pp 08D.

2001). INDSTRY GROUP 91, AIR FORCE SPOUSE ADDRESSES QUALITY-OF-LIFE ISSUES BEFORE CONGRESS FEDERAL DOCUMENT CLEARING HOUSE, INC.., Regulatory Intelligence Data.

Author not available (2001). U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DAVID HOBSON (R-OH) CHAIRMAN U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DAVID HOBSON (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON MILITARY QUALITY OF LIFE., Washington Transcript Service.

____(1999). INDSTRY GROUP 91, DOD STUDIES MISSION, FAMILY NEEDS., Regulatory Intelligence Data.
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Turkey Economy in the 1970s and 1990s

Words: 1297 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28180687

Turkey:

Economy in the 1970s and 1990s

Turkey is a unique country that lies partially in Asia and partly in Europe. The Asian and the European part of the country are separated by the Bosporus, which is the water link between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. Although the areas constituting Turkey have a very ancient history, the modern day Turkey became a epublic in 1923 under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk) after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. Turkey's economy is a mixture of modern industry and ancient agriculture that has undergone many ups and down throughout its history. In this paper we will focus on the economy of Turkey in the 1970s & 1990s, and discuss the major economy-related events that occurred during this period.

The 1970s

The decade of 1970s was a period of serious economic crisis in Turkey, which was accompanied by political and social…… [Read More]

References

Turkey." (2001). Article in The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001.

TURKEY - A Country Study." (1995). Federal Research Division. Library of Congress. Edited by Helen Chapin Metz. [Available Online]. Retrieved on May 5, 2002 at (http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r-frd/cstdy:@field (DOCID+tr0029)

Turkey" Article from The Columbia Encyclopedia, 2001

TURKEY - A Country Study." 1995. Federal Research Division. Library of Congress
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Building a Secure Workflow Management

Words: 11534 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30861705

Each onion router removes a layer of encryption to uncover routing instructions, and sends the message to the next router where this is repeated. This prevents these intermediary nodes from knowing the origin, destination, and contents of the message.

1.4.

Lecture Survey.

The predicted solution of the problems related to e-government administration depends on answering the following questions as brainstorming ideas to solve the problem and the features provided by the system or application.

1. An important step for processing of e-Government.

2. To ensure the confidentiality of information such as contracts for military weapons and other by Providing a high level of security as it is based on singing the data by combining multiple key values like user id, date stamp and transaction id which produce an encrypted key utilized and used only internally by the system for authentication and validation of user privileges. This procedure would make it…… [Read More]

References

Averyt, William. (2005). E-Government Reconsidered: Renewal of Governance for the Knowledge Age. American Review of Canadian Studies 35(4): 769-770.

Chaffee, a. (2000-08-17). "What is a web application (or "webapp")?"

Cohen, JE. (2000). Examined Lives: Informational Privacy and the Subject as Object. Stanford Law Review 52(5): 1373.

Bourquard, J.A. (2003, March). What's Up with E-Government? Digital Government Isn't a Silver Bullet, but as Part of a Long-Term Plan it May Provide a Means to Reduce State
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Leadership How Battles Are Won

Words: 2883 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57626554

He explained that it was not popularity and looking good to others that should constitute success. It was what one struggled over and kept him thinking all night. He specifically spoke about President Truman's difficult decision to use nuclear weapons and his own military decision to risk lives (Roberts). According to him, the first rule about leadership is to take charge when in command (Saint 2001). The second rule is to always do what is right. He said that the challenge of leadership is to inspire others or followers to perform what they normally would not do. He described great leaders are "ordinary people in extraordinary times." According to him, great leaders are in history books because they responded adequately to the demand of extra ordinary times. He also said that leaders must take the time to train future leaders coming up through the ranks (Saint).

Schwarzkopf's adept leadership in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blumenson, M. (2004). Patton legend. 6 pages. Army: Association of the United States Army

Campbell, a (2007). Biography of General George S. Patton, Jr. 5 pages. Cape May County Herald. Retrieved on May 26, 2008 at http://www.generalpatton.com/biography.htm;

Carter, J.C. And Finer, M.S. (2004). A survey of leadership. 8 pages. Infantry Magazine: U.S. Army Infantry School

Fisher, K. And M. (2000). H. Normal Schwarzkopf. 4 pages. CarpeNoctem. Retrieved on May 27, 2008 at http://www.carpenoctem.tv.military/schwarzhopf.htm