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How Millon's personality theory can be understood
Words: 2596 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95073083
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Personality theories and PTSD
Alternative Theoretical Positions and Applications
The idea of personality is broadly accepted as being fundamental in psychology, but its dynamics as well as the ways that it may be identified and assessed are questions in which psychologists have been in substantial disagreement. Millon had been focused on perpetually creating a systematic program to describe standard as well as abnormal personality functioning and also to determine various kinds of personality types and conditions according to deductive thinking. This varies with the rising inductive technique that identified proportions of personality functioning and realignment according to factor evaluation of the personality lexicon qualities. The present system consists of 13 personality designs or kinds according to groups generally observed in a number of communities to varying degrees. The primary personality designs established by Millon had been all variants from the Passive, Active along with Pleasure-Pain proportions. Over his years of…

Personality Disorder One of the
Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25770220
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These people have been seen to have rigidity towards people who are struggling in life and are going through a tougher time or with people who are already emotionally weak or vulnerable in case where they might be going through a tough relationship. It has been reported that if these people are asked for advice for better parenting with a troubled teen, the advice from an overtly controlling person would be to cast the teen away, leave him in a church or be hard on him in a physical manner. In the case of marital issues, the advice would be to make sure that the wife being a weaker person should be made to submit to the much stronger husband. If a depressed individual asks such controlling person for an advice, it would be repent on sins making sure that such sins are not committed again.

These individuals are overtly…

Works Cited

Bancroft, Lundy. Why does he do that?: inside the minds of angry and controlling men. Berkley Books, 2003.

Braiker, B. Harriet. Who's Pulling Your Strings?: How to Break the Cycle of Manipulation and Regain Control of Your Life. McGraw-Hill Professional, 2004.

Evans, Patricia. Controlling people: how to recognize, understand, and deal with people who try to control you. Edition 3. Adams Media, 2002.

Personality Disorder
Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70885683
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antisocial personality disorder (APD) as displayed by serial killer Belle Gunness. The essay discusses her behaviors with reference to the DSM IV criteria and reviews theoretical perspectives on APD.

Belle Gunness, who immigrated to the U.S. In 1881, was born Brynhild Paulsdatter Strseth in November 1859 in Selbu, Norway. Following her immigration, a series of suspicious fires and deaths resulting in insurance awards ensued. Shortly after marrying Mads Sorenson in 1884, the couple's store and home mysteriously burned down, with them claiming the insurance money for both. Sorenson died soon after of heart failure on the very day that his two life insurance policies overlapped, and Belle received about $8,000 from his life insurance. Even though his family demanded an inquiry, no charges were filed, nor were the couple's two children accounted for. They were believed to have been poisoned in infancy for the insurance money as well (A+E Networks,…

Works Cited

A+E Networks. (2011). Belle Gunness biography. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from:  http://www.biography.com/people/belle-gunness-235416 

BehaveNet. (2011). Antisocial personality disorder. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from:  http://www.behavenet.com/capsules/disorders/antisocialpd.htm 

Black, D. (2006). What Causes Antisocial Personality Disorder? Psych Central. Retrieved December 21, 2011, from:  http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/what-causes-antisocial-personality-disorder/ 

Gabbard, G.O. (2004, January 02). Antisocial personality disorder: When is it treatable? Psychiatric News, 39(1), 25. Retrieved December 21, 2011, from:  http://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/newsarticle.aspx?articleid=107089

Psychology Personality Disorder Borderline Personality
Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11696871
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The review assesses the book's strong points, and gives good information on personality disorder, but does not point out any weaknesses, which makes it seem a bit biased. In addition, the review does not include the reviewer's qualifications for writing the review, and that would have made the review stronger as well.

It is clear the reviewer understands personality disorder and agrees with the findings of the author of this book. The review is helpful if a student is looking for a definitive text on the issue of personality disorder, but the review does leave out some key points that could have made an even stronger argument for purchasing this book and learning more about personality disorder.

eferences

Baer, M. (2002). The personality disorder. Annals of the…

References

Baer, M. (2002). The personality disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 5(6), 27.

Avoidant Personality Disorder
Words: 4280 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14227618
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Avoidant Personality Disorder

As per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), a certain case of avoidant personality disorder (APD) is featured by the existent sign of social inhibition, feeling of being short of requirement, and hypersensitivity to negative valuation. (American Psychiatric Association, 1994, p.1) Even though personality disorders are not often discovered in persons below age 18, children who come within the condition of APD are recurrently portrayed as being aloof to the core, fearful in arising circumstances, and afraid of dissention and social boycott. The proportion of the signs and the inability is way behind the practice of inhibition that is prevalent in as much as 40% of the populace. Hence it is of great relevance of examining the disorder as it relates to professional counseling.

Exploration of disorder

Bearing a semblance to other personality disorders, the state of Avoidant Personality disorder turns out…

References

American Psychiatric Association: (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Beck, Aaron T; Freeman, M.D; Arthur, Ed.D. (1990). "Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders." New York: The Guilford Press.

Benjamin, Lorna Smith (1996) "An Interpersonal Theory of Personality Disorders," in Major Theories of Personality Disorder, Clarkin, John F. & Lenzenweger, Mark F (Eds.). New York: The Guilford Press

Craig, Robert J. (1995). "Interpersonal Psychotherapy and MCMI-III -- Based Assessment, Tactical Psychotherapy of the Personality Disorders An MCMI-III -- Based Approach." Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Histrionic Personality Disorder Personality Is the Unique
Words: 1372 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 32830031
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Histrionic Personality Disorder

Personality is the unique way in which every individual expresses their inner experience and outer behavior. People tend to react a given way every time they experience something and in return express personality traits that come to define who people are. But personalities are not set in stone. They can change according to any given experience, environment, or circumstance that one comes to encounter (Dobbert, 74). The ability to adjust our personalities according to a situation is what people with personality disorders lack. According to the DSM-IV (1994) a Personality Disorder is defined as "an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the individual's culture, is pervasive and inflexible, has an onset in adolescence or early adulthood, is stable over time, and leads to distress or impairment" (p. 629). These types of disorders are actually hard to self-recognize but can…

References:

O'Donohue, William T., Fowler, Katherine A., & Lilienfeld, Scott O Personality disorders: toward the DSM-V. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 2007. 203-232. Print.

Dobbert, Duane, L. Understanding Personality Disorders: An Introduction. Westport, CT: Praegoer Publishing, 2007. 73-86. Print.

Millon, Theodore, Millon, Carrie M., Meagher, Sarah, Grossman, Seth, & Ramnath, Rowena. Personality Disorders in Modern Life. John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, 2004. 292-329. Print.

Kring, Ann, Davison, Gerald, C., Neale, John M., & Johnson, Sheri. Abnormal Psychology. John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, 2007. 396. Print.

Histrionic Personality Disorder Hpd Is
Words: 1891 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90364721
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The research on HPD causes is clearly linked to personality theory, and can help to understand each theory. By first examining causation research, and then by locating personality theory which supports the research, it was easy to see the validity of personality theories, and how they can be used in real world research. The research also tied in to course material by again forcing real world situations to be applied to theoretical perspectives.

As research surrounding the causes of HPD is undertaken, more is learned about factors that affect those with HPD. If a definite cause, or a list of possible causes, can be discovered through such research, treatment options specifically designed to address those causes can be developed, resulting in a higher possibility of success. This type of research is vital if those with histrionic personality disorder are to ever be fully cured. Therapy without certain cause can reduce…

References

American Psychological Association. (2000). Desk reference to the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV-TR.

Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., pg. 293.

Aston-Jones, G.D. (2002). Chapter 4. In K.L. Davis (Ed.), Neuropsychopharmacology: The fifth generation of progress (pp. 133-167). Nashville, TN: American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Britton R. (2004, Sept). Narcissistic disorders in clinical practice. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 49(4), 477-490.

Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder
Words: 459 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58394795
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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a personality disorder connected with anxiety which is characterized by repeated thoughts and behavior. epeated thoughts, feelings compose the obsessive part of the disorder while actual drive to do those actions repeatedly falls under the compulsive category. A person suffering from this condition would succumb to the drive and engage repeatedly in those actions just to get rid of the feeling but it only helps him temporarily. Failure to engage in the actions can result in serious anxiety attack.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Like most personality disorders, the causes of OCD are unknown. Several theories have surfaced regarding the causes but none is universally accepted or agreed upon. Some studies have connected the disorder with brain abnormalities but only further research can confirm this. It is known that those who eventually display OCD usually start developing symptoms by the age of 30.…

References

1. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA. Personality and personality disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 39.

2. Feinstein RE, Connelly JV. Personality disorders. In: Rakel RE, ed. Textbook of Family Medicine. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2007:chap 60.

Avoidant Personality Disorder
Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25899608
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adults become susceptible to avoidant personality disorder.

Avoidant Personality Disorder

Avoidant Personality Disorder results in social constraint, feeling of insecurity and susceptibility towards criticism. Even if one want to socialize with others he is most often scared to. Being embarrassed in front of others horrifies individuals suffering from Avoidant Personality Disorders. As a result they usually withdraw themselves from social gatherings to avoid any sort of discomfort. John G. Gunderson in his article Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A etrospective Study outlines the risk factors and primordial exhibition of Avoidant Personality Disorders by investigating present perspective reports of social functioning and antagonistic childhood encountering.

Primitive social operative and pathological childhood experiences were investigated through a childhood experience questionnaire. It was shocking to find out that around 146 adults out of 376 patients suffered from Avoidant Personality Disorder.

Adults with AVPD reported poorer child and adolescent athletic performance, less involvement…

References

Gunderson J. Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A Retrospective

Study. 1 Sept. 2003.

Avoidant Personality Disorder WK 5 Disc -
Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 37800795
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Avoidant Personality Disorder

WK 5 DISC - AB

WK 5 DISC -- AB GO BY AND IMPOTANT ESOUCES

Personality disorder: Avoidant personality disorder

According to the DSM, an avoidant personality (Axis II) is characterized by extreme anxiety and an aversion to engaging in social activities due to an overly sensitized fear of rejection. The avoidant nature of this type's personality means he or she has trouble functioning normally both in work and personal contexts. For example, an avoidant personality "avoids occupational activities that involve significant interpersonal contact, because of fears of criticism, disapproval, or rejection" (Avoidant personality disorder, 2013, Mental Health). An avoidant personality may work at an occupation significantly beneath his or her level of intelligence and education, simply to avoid dealing with people.

On a personal level, the avoidant personality is extremely hyper-sensitive. This personality type avoids new situations, for fear of being rejected and minimizes social content…

References

Avoidant personality disorder. (2013). Mental Health. Retrieved:

Rettew, D. (2006).Avoidant personality disorder. Psychiatric Times, XXIII (8).

Retrieved:  http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/articles/avoidant-personality-disorder-boundaries-diagnosis

Analyzing Schizoid Personality Disorder Chart
Words: 782 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39028847
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Schizoid Personality Disorder Chart

SPD or Schizoid Personality Disorder is a Cluster A personality, which is a group consisting of peculiar and odd personality disorders. SPD is categorized by a prevalent social detachment pattern and a restricted amount of emotions. Due to this, the people affected by SPD are isolated socially and do not seek for relationships that get them close to a person.

Symptoms

Individuals suffering from SPD are mostly reserved and they organize their life so they can avoid social contact. A lot of individuals with SPD do not marry and even live with their parents their whole life. Some other commonly found characteristics of SPD are:

They seek solitary activities and jobs

They do not seek and enjoy relationships with a close bonding

They do not take pleasure in a lot of activities (group)

They do not have any close relatives

They find it difficult to relate…

References

Thomas, V., Melchert, T.P. & Banken, J.A. (1999). Substance dependence and personality disorders: comorbidity and treatment outcome in an inpatient population. J Stud Alcohol, 60:271-277.

WebMd, (2014). Schizoid Personality Disorder. Retrieved 11 June 2016 from  http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-schizoid-personality-disorder?page=3 

Mayo Clinic. (2013, July 27). Schizoid personality disorder. Retrieved 11 June 2016 from Mayo Clinic:  http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/schizoid-personality-disorder/basics/complications/con-20029184

Treatment for Paranoid Personality Disorder
Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 56992844
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patient C.W.:

Discuss the differential diagnoses and rationale for choosing the primary diagnoses

"There has been little systematic study of personality disorders in older people (65 years of age and above). However, with an ageing population worldwide we should expect to find increased numbers of people with Axis II disorders surviving into old age" (Mordekar & Spence 2007 ). Based upon the patient C.W.'s previous psychiatric history, his likely primary diagnosis would be that of a paranoid personality disorder. According to the definition provided by the ICD9 301 codes for this condition, paranoid personality disorder is distinct from full-blown schizophrenia. Unlike schizophrenics, the patient does not exhibit the hallucinations and delusions characteristic of individuals suffering this condition.

However, the patient does show a persistent pattern of mistrust that is damaging for his health. He has refused any type of medical intervention, including vaccinations as well as medications and therapy. He…

Reference

ICD-9 Code Lookup. (2015). Retrieved from:

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/staticpages/icd-9-code-lookup.aspx

Long, P. (2015). Paranoid personality disorder. Internet Mental Health. Retrieved from:

 http://www.mentalhealth.com/home/dx/paranoidpersonality.html

Diagnosing and Treating Borderline Personality Disorder
Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71303246
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Borderline Personality Disorder
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is defined as a condition wherein the patient suffers from a difficulty in regulating his or her emotions (NAMI, 2018). Individuals suffering from BPD can lack impulse control, have a poor self-image, and experience severe emotional responses when stressed. The inability to regulate the emotions can lead the individual to lash out at the self and engage in self-harm in some cases (NAMI, 2018). Though three-quarters of individuals diagnosed with BPD are women, some research indicates that an equal number of men may also suffer from the disorder and simply not be diagnosed.
Symptoms of BPD include: strong sense of abandonment by friends or family, real or imagined; very unstable relationships with others, consisting of wild swings between intense love and intense hate; distortion of a sense of one’s self that leads to depression or delusions of grandeur; poor impulse control; self-harm or…

Personality Theories Determinants of Behavior
Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12720253
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Personality and Behavior: Changing for the Better

Hundreds of thousands of years of instinctive programming influence the behavior of modern humans in ways they do not fully understand, and in many cases, people may not even be aware of these influences on their behavior. This is not to say, of course, that modern humans are incapable of thoughtful and purposeful action, but it is to say that such unconscious influences on behavior can cause problems if they are not recognized and dealt with in a meaningful fashion. To gain additional insights in this area, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature concerning personality and behavior, followed by a discussion concerning how behavior can be influenced by personality in ways that can cause individual problems such as risky behaviors that lead to substance abuse or unprotected premarital sex. Finally, an examination concerning how the interactionism view…

References

Aizen, I. (2005). Attitudes, personality and behavior. Maidenhead, England: Open University

Press.

Carver, C.S. & Sheier, M. (2004). Perspectives on personality, 6th ed.

Livesley, W.J. (2001). Handbook of personality disorders: Theory, research, and treatment.

Personality and Personalities Everyone Has a Personality
Words: 1179 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74287462
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personality" and personalities. Everyone has a personality, their own unique collection of traits and characteristics. The facets of a person's personality may be partly inherited and partly the result of the person's life experiences. In the personality disorder, the person has inflexible traits and patterns of behavior not typical of most people and that cause the person to function poorly in life. Up to 13% of people may have some kind of personality disorder.

"Odd" Personality Disorders: are characterized by odd or eccentric behavior that can include a high degree of suspiciousness or social withdrawal.

Paranoid personality disorder: is characterized by high levels of distrust regarding other people. Believing that others have it in for them, they avoid close relationships. They find proof that their suspicions are justified in the actions of others, which they perceive as either threatening or putting them down in some way. They are highly critical…

Personality Theories Including Evolutionary and Dispositional
Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74900828
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Dispositional and Evolutionary Theories

What makes some people extraverted and others introverted? Why are some people mellow and calm, while others lose their tempers at the drop of a hat? Personality psychology tries to answer questions like these by performing a twofold role. The first role of personality psychology is to explain how clusters of traits work together to cause behavioral or cognitive effects, and the other role is to simply explain individual differences or classify people according to clusters of traits (American Psychological Association, 2015). There are several schools of personality psychology, including dispositional and evolutionary theories. Dispositional theory is quite common in popular psychology and has been a prevalent mode of thinking in the history of philosophies throughout different societies. According to dispositional theory, people have immutable traits and personality "types." Occasionally a person might act out of character, but generally people have strong, innate personalities that remain…

References

American Psychological Association (2015). Personality. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/topics/personality/

Cherry, K. (n.d.). The Big Five personality dimensions. About Education. Retrieved online:  http://psychology.about.com/od/personalitydevelopment/a/bigfive.htm 

"General Strengths and Limitations of Trait Perspectives," (n.d.). Retrieved online: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/personality-16/trait-perspectives-on-personality-79/general-strengths-and-limitations-of-trait-perspectives-312-12847/

McAdams, D.P. & Pals, J.L. (2006). A new Big Five. American Psychologist 61(3): 204-217.

Disordered Eating in College Students
Words: 5808 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39021106
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Relationships provide the key experience that connects children's personal and social worlds. It is within the dynamic interplay between these two worlds that minds form and personalities grow, behavior evolves and social competence begins." (1999) Howe relates that it is being acknowledged increasingly that "...psychologically, the individual cannot be understood independently of his or her social and cultural context. The infant dos not enter the world as a priori discrete psychological being. Rather, the self and personality form as the developing mind engages with the world in which it finds itself." (Howe, 1999) Therefore, Howe relates that there is: "...no 'hard boundary' between the mental condition of individuals and the social environments in which they find themselves. The interaction between individuals and their experiences creates personalities. This is the domain of the psychosocial." (Howe, 1999) the work of Howe additionally states that attachment behavior "...brings infants into close proximity to…

Bibliography

Ainsworth, M.D.S. (1989). Attachments beyond infancy. American Psychologist, 44, 709-716.

Allen, Jon G. (2001) a Model for Brief Assessment of Attachment and Its Application to Women in Inpatient Treatment for Trauma Related Psychiatric Disorders Journal of Personality Assessment 2001 Vol. 76. Abstract Online available at  http://www.leaonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/S15327752JPA7603_05?cookieSet=1&journalCode=jpa 

Armsden, G.C., & Greenberg, M.T. (1987). The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 16, 427-454.

Barrocas, Andrea L. (2006) Adolescent Attachment to Parents and Peers. The Emory Center for Myth and Ritual in American Life. Working Paper No. 50 Online available at  http://www.marial.emory.edu/pdfs/barrocas%20thesisfinal.doc

Personality Permanent It Has Been a Long
Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5870792
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Personality: Permanent?

It has been a long controversy about how nature and nurture imply to personality traits and human behavior. Nature means that genetic factor and the system of organs control the personality, while nurture means the personality is a result of conditioned circumstances where a person is brought up. It includes the personality of other people, like family, includes the teaching, and lessons a child gains during his/her mental development process.

Recent studies find more in human biological system that genes are related to people's behavior. McInerney (2001) shows, many researchers believe that genetics factors determine how someone will act and think in his or her life. Animal and human are born with specific character linked with the genetic information in the genes. It shapes each individual trait exclusively including the performance in social, interaction, intelligence, and adaptability to the surrounding community.

ehavior may change, he states, as a…

Bibliography

Azar, B. 1997. Nature, Nurture: Not Mutually Exclusive. APA Monitor. American Psychological Association.  http://www.snc.edu/psych/korshavn/natnur02.htm  (March28, 2002).

Cosgrove, C. May 30, 2000. Researchers Seek Explanations, Coping Strategies For Bad Childhood Behavior. CNN.com.  http://www.cnn.com /2000/HEALTH/children/05/30/born.bad.wmd/(March28, 2002).

Fujita, F. May 1, 1996. The Nature/Nurture Controversy. Sci.Psychology.Personality FAQ.  http://www.iusb.edu/~ffujita/Documents/nn.html  (March28, 2002).

Gendlin, E.T. A Theory of Personality Change. Chapter Four in Personality Change,

Realm of Psychological Disorder Through the Use
Words: 2202 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14333578
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realm of psychological disorder through the use of a character assessment. The character in question is fictional and the data used to evaluate the psychological profile derives from a movie. Melvin Udall, the main character in the movie "As Good as It Gets" serves as the character used in this assessment. Ultimately, I find and explore specific links to Melvin's condition in the movie to that of one suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In order to discuss the relationships previously mentioned, I needed to perform several steps in order to logically conclude that Melvin represents someone suffering from OCD symptoms. In order to accomplish this task, I first watched the film and examined many of the traits that Melvin demonstrated. Next, I used a set of ten questions which provided a baseline assessment formula. These questions are each answered separately within the body of this essay. This character assessment…

References

Atkins, L. (2009). A radical treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. The Guardian, 14 Dec 2009. Retrieved from  http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/obsessive-complusive-disorder - gamma-knife

Brooks, J.L. (1998) As Good As It Gets. Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear. Tristar Pictures.

Bouchard, C. Rheaume, J. Landouceru, R. (1998). Responsibility and perfectionism in OCD. Behavior Research Therapy 37 (1999). 239-248. Retrieved from  http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/Homepage/Class/Psy394Q/Research%20Design%20Clas  s/Assigned%20Readings/Experimental%20Psychopathology/Bouchard99.pdf

Eddy, M.F., & Walbroehl, G.S. (1998, April 1). Recognition and treatment of obsessive- compulsive disorder. American Family Physician, p. 1623-1632.  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1623.html

Assorts of Disorder Terms and Diagnose
Words: 969 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 54392348
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Autism is a developmental disorder, as can be seen in the fact that Peter was first diagnosed when he failed to develop speech at the rate of a normal child. Autism is also a spectrum disorder, meaning that individuals will manifest the condition in different ways and different aspects of normal speech, movement, and social interactions may be inhibited depending on the child and the condition's severity. There is no 'cure' for autism or universally-accepted treatment for the disorder although behavioral interventions such as ABA "encourages positive behaviors and discourages negative behaviors in order to improve a variety of skills" through methods such as "Discrete Trial Training (DTT) DTT is a style of teaching that uses a series of trials to teach each step of a desired behavior or response. Lessons are broken down into their simplest parts and positive reinforcement is used to reward correct answers and behaviors." (Treatment,…

References

Additional treatments for ADHD. (2013). Psych Central. Retrieved from:

 http://psychcentral.com/lib/additional-treatments-for-adhd/0001205 

Depression. (2013). NIMH. Retrieved from:

 http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

Whether Media Negatively Impacts Antisocial Disorder Development
Words: 2636 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18714224
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Media in the Development of Antisocial Personality Disorder vs. the Effect of Media in the Development of Prosocial Behavior

Some researchers contend that media has a negative impact on individuals and can be instrumental in the development of antisocial personality disorder (obertson, McAnally, Hancox, 2013), while other researchers contend that media can actually have a positive effect on individuals and support prosocial behavior (Greitemeyer, 2011; Greitemeyer, Oswald, 2011). This paper will discuss the two competing viewpoints regarding the effects of media on the mental disorder of antisocial personality disorder (APD) and then discuss why I support the view that media is inherently antisocial and thus has a negative effect on the development of APD. The paper will conclude with an experimental research idea containing a reason for the study and the issue that will be resolved by the experiment.

Position

Media does have a negative impact on personality development that…

References

Collings, S., Niderkrotenthaler, T. (2012). Suicide prevention and emergent media:

surfing the opportunity. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 33: 1-4.

Davis, B. (2008). Defeating Diabetes: Lessons from the Marshall Islands. Today's

Dietitian, 10(8): 24.

Bipolar Psychiatric Disorder Bd -- Which Is
Words: 3047 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 67751574
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Bipolar psychiatric disorder (BD) -- which is characterized by "…cycles of depression and mania" -- is a "euphoric, high-energy state" that can produce remarkable bursts of creativity or, on the other hand, can produce erratic behavioral events that are risky and provocative (Gardner, 2011). About 2.4% of the world's population has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder (at one time or another in their lifetime) but the rate in the United States (4.4% of the population) is the highest of any nation (Gardner, p. 1). The lowest rate on record is in India, 0.1%. This paper reviews various aspects and ramifications of the effects of bipolar disorder through nine peer-reviewed research articles.

Bipolar disorder and cigarette smoking

In the journal Bipolar Disorders the authors point out that adults suffering from bipolar disorder are "…two to three times more likely" have begun a serious smoking habit, which is a "devastating addiction" and…

Works Cited

Calkin, Cynthia, and Alda, Martin. (2012). Beyond the Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder: Practical

Issues in Long-Term Treatment with Lithium. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 57(7), 437-

Gardner, Amanda. (2011). U.S. has highest bipolar rate in 11-nation study. CNN Health.

Retrieved March 27, 2013, from  http://www.cnn.com .

Bipolar and Borderline Disorders
Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50556672
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Bipolar and Personality Disorder
Introduction
Approximately 20% of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder are also found to suffer from borderline personality disorder (Zimmerman & Morgan, 2013). While some of the symptoms and characteristics of both disorders are similar, it is important, as Zimmerman and Morgan (2013) point out, to distinguish between the two, as each requires its own form of treatment in order to allow the patient to overcome the issues associated with each. This paper will discuss the treatment considerations for a person presenting with both bipolar disorder and personality disorder.
Comorbid Disorders
DSM-5 (2013) states that the diagnostic criteria for Bipolar 1 Disorder are: “For a diagnosis of bipolar 1 disorder, it is necessary to meet the following criteria for a manic episode. The manic episode may have been preceded by and may be followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes” (p. 123). Mania is described as a…

Processing Effects of Cognitive and Emotional Psychotherapy on Bipolar Disorder
Words: 6099 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 3470826
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BP Disorder

Bipolar disorder, originally called manic depressive disorder, is a severe mood disorder that vacillates between extreme "ups" (mania, hypomania) and "downs" (depression). The effects of having bipolar disorder can be observed across the patients social and occupational functioning. Often the patient is left isolated from work, friends, and family. Medications have become the first-line treatments for bipolar disorder; however, psychotherapy can offer additional benefits in the ongoing treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. This paper discusses the symptoms and treatment of bipolar disorder focusing on cognitive behavioral therapy and emotion focused therapy.

Bipolar Disorder

Description and differentiation

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders -- Fourth Edition -- Text evision (DSM-IV-T) one's mood is an all-encompassing and sustained feeling tone experienced internally by the person and influences the person's behavior and perception of the world. Affect is the external or outward expression of this inner…

References

Alloy, L.B., Abramson, L.Y., Walshaw, P.D., Keyser, J., & Gerstein, R.K. (2006). A cognitive vulnerability-stress perspective on bipolar spectrum disorders in a normative adolescence brain, cognitive, and emotional development context. Developmental Psychopathology, 18(4), 1057-1103.

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Beck, J.S. (1995). Cognitive therapy: Basics and beyond. New York: Guilford Press.

Butler, A.C., Chapman, J.E., Forman, E.M., & Beck, A.T. (2006). The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of meta-analyses. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 17-31

Female Substance Use Disorder Gender
Words: 2505 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21550261
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..in their view, rather than promoting wholeness and recovery, the experience recreated the secrecy of abuse and fed the stigma associated with each of the three issues."

In the hopes of a more well-organized approach to providing these key services to women, the WELL project instituted a mechanism for promoting strategy and collaboration changes at the state, regional, and local levels. The WELL project also recommended an open dialogue between agencies as to better systems to put in place, and suggested giving individuals within each area of service "freedom to make change at any given moment" when a better approach can be taken by a trained professional healthcare provider.

Predominantly Female Caseloads: Identifying Organizational Correlates in Private Substance Abuse Treatment Centers, a piece in the Journal of Behavioral Health Services & esearch (Tinney, et al., 2004), speaks to the issue of the need for healthcare providers to be meeting "distinctive…

References

Conrad, Patricia J., Pihl, Robert O., Stewart, Sherry H., & Dongier, Maurice. (2000). Validation

Of a System of Classifying Female Substance Abusers on the Basis of Personality and Motivational Risk Factors for Substance Abuse. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 14(3),

Markoff, Laurie S., Finkelstein, Norma, Kammerer, Nina, Kreiner, Peter, & Prost, Carol a.

2005). Relational Systems Change: Implementing a Model of Change in Integrating

Attention Deficit HyperactivITY Disorder ADHD
Words: 6369 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74077030
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Swanson, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, CA 92715

Gender:

Age: ____ Grade:

Ethnicity (circle one which best applies): African-American Asian Caucasian Hispanic

Other

Completed by:____ Type of Class:

Class size:

For each item, check the column which best describes this child:

Not at Just a Quite

Bit

Much

1. Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or tasks

2. Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities

3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly

4. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties

5. Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities

6. Often avoids, dislikes, or reluctantly engages in tasks requiring sustained mental effort

7. Often loses things necessary for activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, or books)

8. Often is distracted by extraneous stimuli

9. Often is forgetful in…

References

The Columbia World of Quotations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at  http://www.bartleby.com/66/3/33503.html 

Cloward, Janessa. "ADHD drugs pose heart risks, federal panel says," University Wire, February 15, 2006. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1118518952.html 

DeMarle, Daniel J.;Denk, Larry;Ernsthausen, Catherine S.. "Working with the family of a child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.(Family Matters)," Pediatric Nursing, July 1, 2003. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1107215868.html 

Edwards, Jason H.. "Evidenced-based treatment for child ADHD: "real-world" practice implications." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, April 1, 2002. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-87015306.html

Sotos Syndrome Is a Disorder
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For instance a patient suffering from hypotonia may receive physical therapy to assist them in gain more control over bodily movements. Likewise an individual with Sotos syndrome that has been diagnosed with ADD may be treated with behavioral counseling and medications. Behavioral therapies may also be needed to combat aggressiveness, develop social skills, combat tantrums and some personality disorders that may be present. The mental retardation that can occur as a result of Sotos may be treated with learning therapies and through special education. Also language delay may be treated with speech therapy.

Individuals that develop tumors and cancer as a result of the disorder may be treated with surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. Likewise those with heart defects or kidney problems may need surgery or dialysis. Medical treatments may also be necessary as it relates to any skeletal malformations that may persist into adulthood as some researchers have reported that…

References

Finegan, J.K.,Cole, Trevor R.P.;Kingwell, E.,Smith, M. Lou;Smith, M.,;Sitarenios, G. (November 1994) Language and behavior in children with Sotos syndrome. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Hglund, P., Kurotaki N., Kytl S., Miyake N., Somer M., Matsumoto N. (2003)

Familial Sotos syndrome is caused by a novel 1 bp deletion of the NSD1 gene. J Med Genet 2003; 40:51-54

NINDS Cephalic Disorders Information Page. Retrieved August 11, 2007 from;

Autism & Asperger's Disorders Autism
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hile Dr. Asperger called the condition "autistic psychopathy" and described it as a personality disorder primarily marked by social isolation, today Asperger's Syndrome is identified as a brain, communication, or neurological disorder like autism, not a personality disorder like, for example, antisocial personality disorder ("Asperger's Syndrome fact sheet," 2008, NINDS).

Like autism, Asperger's Syndrome is characterized by repetitive routines, rituals, and movements, poor social skills, and odd ways of communicating that do not take into consideration the other person's feelings and needs. The distinguishing feature of Asperger's, in contrast to classical autism, is that the individuals all have normal IQ but show "limited interests or an unusual preoccupation with a particular subject to the exclusion of other activities" ("Asperger's Syndrome fact sheet," 2008, NINDS). Unlike autistic individuals who show little interest in others, Asperger children may seek out companionship, but may drive other people away because of their refusal to…

Works Cited

Autism." (11 Apr 2008). National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

NINDS). Retrieved 10 Apr 2008 at  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/autism/detail_autism.htm 

Autism spectrum disorders (Pervasive developmental disorders)." (3 Apr 2008).

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Retrieved 10 Apr 2008 at  http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/autism/complete-publication.shtml

Bipolar I Disorder
Words: 4472 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47788968
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Bipolar I disorder is an axis 1 clinical disorder in the DSM-IV and is a serious mental illness that can lead to suicidal ideation or action. The history of bipolar disorder research is a long one, and understanding of the disease has deepened considerably over the last several generations. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder 1 is complicated by its resemblance to other mood disorders, mainly major depression but also psychotic disorders like schizophrenia. esearch is revealing new treatment interventions that are targeted to the biological needs of bipolar patients, as antidepressants are often or usually contraindicated. A Christian worldview suggests that individualized treatment plans take into account the family history and patient's lifestyle when recommending a treatment plan.

History

Bipolar I disorder is a serious mental illness that affects between 1 and 2.5% of the general population in the United States (Ghaznavi & Deckersbach, 2012). The more conservative estimate, 1%, is…

References

"A Brief History of Bipolar Disorder," (2012). Today's Caregiver. Retrieved online:  http://www.caregiver.com/channels/bipolar/articles/brief_history.htm 

Angst, J. & Marneros, A. (2001). Bipolarity from ancient to modern times: Conception, birth, and rebirth. Journal of Affective Disorders 67(1-3): 3-19.

Angst, J. & Sellaro, R. (2000). Historical perspectives and natural history of bipolar disorder. Biological Psychiatry 48(6): 445-457.

Baethge, C. Salvatore, P. & Baldessarini, R.J. (2003). Cyclothymia, a circular mood disorder. Historical Psychiatry 2003/14: 377-399

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnosis in Children
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Attention Deficit HyperactivITY Disorder DIAGNOSIS IN CHILDEN

Historical ecords

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a diverse behavioral set of symptoms described by the hub indication of impulsivity, hyperactivity and inattention. Even as, these symptoms have a tendency to gather together, some individuals are for the most part hyperactive and impetuous, even as others are predominantly inattentive. This disease affects both toddlers and adults of all ages and should be taken seriously. When this disease is being diagnosed in children, doctors often make quick decisions to make a diagnosis and handing out prescriptions. This should not be the case as doctors are supposed to take enough time to well analyze the condition of the children before offering prescriptions.

About Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

There are two main diagnostic decisive factors that are currently in use. These are the International Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders uses the initials (ICD-10) and the…

References

Honos-Webb, L. (2010). The gift of ADHD: How to transform your child's problems into strengths. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Kushner, T.K. (2010). Surviving health care: A manual for patients and their families.

Cambridge England: Cambridge University Press.

Nass, R.D. & Leventhal, F.,. (2011). 100 questions & answers about your child's ADHD: From

Hitler's Personality and Rise to Power Adolph
Words: 2883 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4563154
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Hitler's Personality And Rise To Power

Adolph Hitler's rise to power over the course of the 1920s and 30s was due to a confluence of political and personal factors which served to make Hitler the ideal person to take control of Germany's failing fortunes. In many ways one may view Hitler's frightening success as a case of being the right person, in the right place, at the right time, because his peculiar personality was an almost perfect match for the disillusioned Germans suffering from the ignominy and economic disaster which followed their defeat in the first orld ar. Numerous researchers have attempted to diagnose Hitler's personality in psychological or psychiatric terms, and while these studies some useful insights, this study will focus more on Hitler's personality as it relates to his audience, because regardless of the specific neuroses Hitler exhibited, the image he cultivated in the minds of Germans and…

Works Cited

"Girls Who Danced before Hitler Praise His Personality." Los Angeles Times (1923-Current

File): A. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Los Angeles Times (1881-1987). Aug 03

1939.

In this almost tragically naive account of a 1939 performance for Hitler, this article gives some insight into the dominance of personality as the means by which Hitler was considered in the press.

Health Eating Disorders an Eating
Words: 1051 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 99758213
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Some doctors believe that genetic factors are the core cause of a lot of eating disorders. esearchers have found specific chromosomes that may be associated with bulimia and anorexia, specifically regions on chromosome 10 that have been linked to bulimia as well as obesity. There has been evidence that has shown that there is an association with genetic factors being responsible for serotonin, the brain chemical involved with both well-being and appetite. esearchers have also determined that certain proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are thought to influence a person's vulnerability to developing an eating disorder (Eating disorders -- Causes, 2010).

The advance of food in Western countries has become extremely problematic. The food that is produced in the U.S. every year is enough to supply 3,800 calories to everyone on a daily basis. This is far more than is needed for good nutrition. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic,…

References

Eating Disorders. (n.d.). Retrieved June 19, 2010, from National Mental Health Information

Center Web site: http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/ken98-

0047/default.asp

Eating Disorders. (2009). Retrieved June 19, 2010, from National Institute of Mental Health

Relationship of Eating Disorders Self-Esteem
Words: 6071 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 52017394
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These suppositions allow the researcher to view the world from a certain perspective while ignoring other perspectives. The researcher in this study assumes that his subjects are logical human beings who have a rationale point-of-view. Their thinking is valid and reasonable and their approach is more or less along the lines of scientific thinking. In addition, we assume that commonsense thinking and scientific thinking are more or less identical in nature. With these assumptions in mind, we take a post-positivism philosophical foundation; as in line with Trochim (2000) post-positivism is the outright denial of positivism (which argues that the laws of the nature are perfunctory and therefore deductive reasoning can be the only suitable approach to comprehend nature) and presupposes that day-to-day human and scientific reasoning are more or less the same and in order to understand reality, researchers have to use not only deductive but also inductive reasoning (Trochim,…

References:

Bailer UF, Frank GK, Henry SE et al. (2005). Altered brain serotonin 5-HT1A receptor binding after recovery from anorexia nervosa measured by positron emission tomography. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62, 1032-1041.

Bloks H, Hoek HW, Callewaert I et al. (2004). Stability of personality traits in patients who received intensive treatment for a severe eating disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 192, 129-138.

Bulik CM, Klump KL, Thornton L. et al. (2004). Alcohol use disorder comorbidity in eating disorders: a multicenter study. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 1000-1006.

Byrne, B. (2000) Relationships between Anxiety, Fear Self-Esteem, and Coping Strategies in Adolescence. Adolescence. 35. 137.

Antisocial Behavior in Females With Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD and Conduct Disorder
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Antisocial ehavior in Females with Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD

Detention centers and residential treatment facilities are replete with male and female youth that have been in and out of the juvenile justice system for many years. Although the majority of the populations in these facilities are male, the number of female juvenile offenders is continually increasing. Many of the children in these facilities have a history of behavioral difficulties that may or may not have been diagnosed during much of their childhood.

Antisocial behaviors are acts that violate social rules and the basic rights of others. They include conduct intended to injure people or damage property, illegal behavior, and defiance of generally accepted rules and authority, such as truancy from school. "These antisocial behaviors exist along a severity continuum (Clark, et al., 2002). When childhood antisocial behaviors exceed certain defined thresholds -- the diagnostic criteria specified in the Diagnostic and…

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Disgnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington DC APA.

Clark, Duncan. Vanyukov, Michael. Cornelius, Jack. (November, 2002). Childhood Antisocial Behavior and Adolescent Alcohol Use Disorders. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: 66, 136-138.

Crawford, Nicole. (February, 2003). ADHD: a women's issue. Monitor on Psychology, APA: Volume 34, No. 2, p. 28.

Hinshaw, S.P. (2003). Preadolescent girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: I. Background characteristics, comorbidity, cognitive and social functioning, and parenting practices. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Research on Attention Deficient Hyperactivity Disorder
Words: 2145 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 58591927
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Attention-Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

According to the American Psychiatric Association Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD) is now referred to as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. However, most lay people and some professionals will still refer to the condition as ADD, which are the names given to the condition in 1980. ADHD has been around for a longer period than most people actually recall or realize. Hippocrates, who lived from 460 to 370 BC, described a condition similar to ADHD. ADHD is a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder where there are substantial problems with executive functions that cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, or impulsiveness, which is inappropriate for the person's age. In order for a diagnosis to be made for the condition, the symptoms of ADHD must persist for six months or more. According to (McGoey et al., 2014), they define ADHD as a condition that causes a person to have trouble focusing…

References

Antshel, K. M., Faraone, S. V., & Gordon, M. (2012). Cognitive behavioral treatment outcomes in adolescent ADHD. FOCUS.

Fabiano, G. A., Pelham, W. E., Coles, E. K., Gnagy, E. M., Chronis-Tuscano, A., & O'Connor, B. C. (2009). A meta-analysis of behavioral treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Clinical psychology review, 29(2), 129-140.

Gudjonsson, G. H., Sigurdsson, J. F., Sigfusdottir, I. D., & Young, S. (2012). An epidemiological study of ADHD symptoms among young persons and the relationship with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 53(3), 304-312.

Harold, G. T., Leve, L. D., Barrett, D., Elam, K., Neiderhiser, J. M., Natsuaki, M. N., . . . Thapar, A. (2013). Biological and rearing mother influences on child ADHD symptoms: revisiting the developmental interface between nature and nurture. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 54(10), 1038-1046.

Predicting Patient Investment Into Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy Investment

Prediction Patient Investment in Psychotherapy

Predicting Patient Investment into Psychotherapy

The factors that cause an individual to terminate psychotherapy have been of interest since this form of therapy was developed. Some researchers and theorists have argued that the need to relieve personal isolation and habits of dependency may motivate patients to remain in psychotherapy (reviewed by Ackerman, Hilsenroth, Clemence, Weatherill, and Fowler, 2000, p. 387). This does not imply that patients who remain in psychotherapy are docile though. Quite the contrary, studies have shown that these patients are often aggressive, contrary, have turbulent negative emotions, and high levels of interpersonal distress.

The research data that produced the above findings were based primarily on orschach examinations. Whether these findings would be validated by non-orschach instruments is unknown. Towards this goal, Ackerman and colleagues (2000) examined the utility of the Westen's Social Cognition and Object…

References

Ackerman, Steven J., Hilsenroth, Mark J., Clemence, Amanda J., Weatherill, Robin., and Fowler, J. Christopher. (2000). The effects of social cognition and object representation on psychotherapy continuation. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 64, 386-408.

Clinical Staging of Psychiatric Disorders
Words: 1272 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74939890
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DSM diagnostic criteria have long been a source of criticism. McGorry, Hickie, Yung, Pantelis, and Jackson (2006) point out some basic deficiencies of the DSM diagnostic system. First the authors state that the function of a diagnosis is to state what treatment should be applied or predict the prognosis of the condition. These are certainly functions of a diagnosis, but a diagnosis has broader implications. First and foremost the idea of having a diagnosis is to take a series of related signs and symptoms that hang together consistently and label them so as to facilitate communication between health care professionals. A diagnosis alone is useless unless it allows professionals to communicate about the same entity. Then descriptions of course, treatment, and prognosis can follow.

McGorry et al. charge that in the DSM system the clinical features that occur early in the course of the disorder are not distinguished from those…

References

Fava G.A. & Kellner, R. (1993). Staging: a neglected dimension in psychiatric classification. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 87, 555-558.

Fava, G.A. & Tossani, E. (2007). Prodromal stage of major depression. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 1, 9-18.

Hetrick, S.E., Parker, A.G., Hickie, I.B., Purcell, R., Yung, A.R., & McGorry, P.D. (2008).

Early identification and intervention in depressive disorders: Towards a clinical staging model. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 77, 263-270.

Assessing a Patient With Bipolar 1 Disorder
Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71657240
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Danny's case, we do not have enough information thus far to make an accurate diagnosis. The information that he has provided is helpful as a starting point, but Danny has indicated that he is somewhat uncooperative at this point (he says he is not here for you to diagnose him with depression and that his arrival at your office is mandated by the school as part of his probation -- otherwise he would not be there). So, in order to properly diagnose Danny, more time will be needed and more information. Nonetheless, there are signs, just from the little that we have to go on, that could point us in the right direction. The history provided by the parents and the comments made my by Danny himself do suggest that Danny may be showing symptoms of bi-polar disorder…but more work must be done before this diagnosis can be made.

In…

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). DSM-V. DC: APA.

Personality Is a Branch of Psychology That
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71883399
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personality is a branch of psychology that deals with personality and variations among individuals. Personality is an organized and dynamic set of characteristics possessed uniquely by individual, and influenced by emotion, cognitions, motivation, and environment. In other words, the personality is referred as pattern of feelings, thoughts; social adjustments as well as behaviors exhibited by individual that strongly influence one's self-perceptions, expectations, attitudes and values. (Vink, Nawijn, Boomsma, & Willemsen, 2007).

Humanistic Theory

The paper uses the Humanistic theory to explain the concept personality. The humanistic theory argues that people generally possess freewill that determines the way they behave. The reason for chosen humanistic theory to explain personality concept is that the theory focuses on individual subjective experiences and definitive factors that determine human behaviors. The basic idea of humanistic theory is that it focuses on the present rather than the future. The goal of humanistic theory is to assist…

On other hand, the cognitive theory believes that depression is often caused by the self-deprecating thoughts and cognitive approach try to change people negative thinking by assisting them to change the way they view themselves and the world. Social and behavioral learning approach points out that depression can be learnt through an interaction with social world and environment. These include thing people observe, and the depression can be overcome by learning the cause of depression from others. Trait approach suggests that depression is caused from an individual's character. (McCrae, 2001).

Dunlop et al. (2013) suggests different methods of overcoming depression. The authors suggest not all depressions can be treated using a medication. For example, a person suffering from bipolar disorder should consult a psychiatrist for treatment, and a medication such as mood stabilizer should be avoided in a bipolar disorder case. OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) is a type of depression in which its treatment may be challenging. In this case, antidepressants doses are necessary to overcome the OCD.

On the other hand, a patient suffering from psychotic disorders should consult a

Personalities and Motivations of Murderers
Words: 3011 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38966076
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Nonetheless, Bill never hurts other people simply because he thinks that it is irrational to hurt others. He thinks that any rational person would be like him and not hurt other people. Does Bill really understand that hurting others is morally wrong? (Nichols, 2002, p. 285)."

This presents some interesting directions of thought. However, it is time to go into the relationship between serial murderers and forensic psychology as it applies to the crime scene. Ted Bundy seemed very much aware that he was committing crimes against society, certainly crimes against his victims. Berkowitz, it was argued, was more psychotic, and for that reason perhaps less aware of his actions as crimes against society or individuals. Berkowitz was known to have started more than a thousand fires, and had a history of cruelty to animals; both manifestations of deeper emotional problems (Schlesinger, 2004, p. 328). This does not make any…

References

 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107452894 

Horley, J. (2003). Personal Construct Perspectives on Forensic Psychology. Hove, England: Brunner-Routledge. Retrieved December 10, 2007, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107452916   http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020572304 

Inside the Mind of the Mind Hunter: An Interview with Legendary FBI Agent John Douglas Criminal Profiler John Douglas Will Share His Understanding of the Criminal Mind at September's APA Conference. (2007). Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 10(1), 8+. Retrieved December 10, 2007, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020572304   http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002475027 

Nichols, S. (2002). How Psychopaths Threaten Moral Rationalism: Is it Irrational to Be Amoral *?. The Monist, 85(2), 285+. Retrieved December 10, 2007, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002475027   http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99956702

Disorder of Emotional Behavioral
Words: 1935 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74349818
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Persons with Emotional Behavior Disorder

Importance of assessment of emotional and behavioral disorders in schools

Identifying and assessing emotional and behavioral disorders in schools (EBD) helps identify and address a number of risky behaviors among youths in good time. Students suffering from EBD experience difficulties when learning, have challenging social relationships, experience depression and anxious moments as well as exhibit inappropriate behaviors. School, administrators usually know these students, as they need a lot of support and different resources to be able to survive in a school environment (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters, 2011).

Early identification of these problem behaviors help school administrators provide the necessary support students need before the situation gets out of hand or becomes impossible to manage. Even though students at risk of EBD have less severe characteristics and frequency than those already diagnosed, early identification is crucial in improving educational outcomes (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters,…

References

Angold, A., & Costello, E. (2000). A review of issues relevant to the creation of a measure of disability in children based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning and Disability (ICIDH-2). https://devepi.duhs.duke.edu/pubs/who.pdf.

BASC,.BASC-2 Summary - Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://basc-2.szapkiw.com/basc-summary/ 

Connecticut State Department of Education,. (2012). Guidelines for Identifying and Educating Students with Emotional Disturbance. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/publications/edguide/ed_guidelines.pdf 

Davis, S., Young, E., Hardman, S., & Winters, R. (2011). Screening for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Nassp.org. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=Screening_for_Emotional_and_Behavioral_Disorders

Application of Personality Theories to Counseling and Therapy
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Personality Therapy

Personality is very complex. Individuals can differ considerably from one another, because of the wide variety of traits possible. In addition, a person can act a certain way in one situation and completely different in another, or have internal processes that manifest themselves through very different external actions and behaviors. Because of this diversity and complexity, psychologists have developed a number of theories to explain personality phenomena, as well as suggest yet unknown possibilities. This report, based on the book Perspectives on Personality by Charles Carver will discuss these theories and how they can be applied for behavioral change through therapy.

Two theories fall under the dispositional perspectives category, which emphasize that people display consistency or continuity in their actions, thoughts and feelings: The "trait and type" theory and the "needs and motives" theory. The first concludes that people can be divided into different types or categories. Nomothetic…

Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory of Personality
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Personality Psych Analysis of Tony Soprano
Psychodynamic Theory
Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory of Personality
Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalytic theory of personality makes the argument that human behavior is resultant of the interrelations amongst three constituent parts of the mind including the id, ego, and superego (Petocz, 1999). This theory of personality lays substantial significance of the manner in which conflict, more often than not unconscious, amongst the areas of the mind end up shaping an individual’s behavior and personality. The Id deals with instantaneous satisfaction of basic physical needs and desires and it functions completely unconsciously. The Superego takes into account social rules and morals, and is largely referred to as a person’s conscience. The Superego develops as a child progressively learns what is deemed to be right or wrong. Lastly, the ego, unlike the instinctive Id and the ethical superego, the Ego is the sensible, realistic part of an individual’s personality…

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Disorder
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This may consist of arising and seating in chairs securely. Following the progressive characteristics of this illness, all people gradually lose their capability simply to move and will need to advance and use a wheelchair.

eferences

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, . (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. eceived: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2008). Gaze Control and Foot Kinematics During Stair Climbing: Characteristics Leading to Fall isk in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.…

References

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, R. (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, R., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. Received: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.

Eating Disorder Is an Issue
Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12820447
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The youngsters and children who suffer from Anorexia Nervosa in early age suffer from low body development, lack of growth of good mental health and particularly with the low growth of sex hormones that make them weaker sexually. You can see many people who have poor body structure and lack of bone density due to their improper nutrition so these children usually have weak bones and there is fear that they may face with bone fracture in their life.

While besides physical body disturbance and weakness it put effect on the brain of human being and person who is diagnose with Anorexia Nervosa have weak structure of their brain and have physiological impact on those people including poor personality, shattered body image.

There are many ways that can be used to cure this disease but first of all you need to find out that you are also suffering from this…

Reference:

Cohen, Juliet. "Identifying Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms." EzineArticles 13 September 2007. 01 October 2007  http://ezinearticles.com/?Identifying-Anorexia-Nervosa-Symptoms&id=730487 .

Birmingham CL, Goldner EM, Bakan R. Controlled trial of zinc supplementation in anorexia nervosa. Int J. Eating Disord. 1994;15:251-255.

Thomsen, S.R., Weber, M.M., & Brown, L.B. (2002). The relationship between reading beauty and fashion magazines and the use of pathogenic dieting methods among adolescent females. Adolescence, 37, 1-19

Crisp AH, Lacey JH, Crutchfield M. Clomipramine and 'drive' in people with anorexia nervosa: an inpatient study. Br J. Psychiatry. 1987;150:355-358

Panic Disorder Counseling Panic Disorder
Words: 4240 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27767876
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Apparent health can be generally positive or negative; in spite of how it links with the real health; it may be significant to comprehend its function in certain kinds of psychopathology. Negatively apparent health has been anticipated to symbolize a cognitive risk factor for panic disorder (PD), detached from elevated anxiety feeling. As a result, PD may be more likely to take place on a background of negative perceptions of one's health. A negatively perceived health may also have predictive implications for PD patients, bearing in mind that negatively perceived health has been found to be a considerable predictor of mortality in general and that individuals with panic-like anxiety indications, panic attacks, and PD have elevated mortality rates, mostly due to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular illnesses (Starcevick, Berle, Fenech, Milicevic, Lamplugh and Hannan, 2009).

Psychological

Studies have suggested that panic attacks (PA) are widespread and connected with an augmented occurrence of…

References

Carrera, M.; Herran, a.; Ramirez, M.L.; Ayestaran, a.; Sierra-Biddle, D.; Hoyuela, F.;

Rodriguez-Cabo, B.; Vazquez-Barquero, J.L..(2006). Personality traits in early phases of panic disorder: implications on the presence of agoraphobia, clinical severity and short-

term outcome. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 114(6), p.417-425.

Craske, Michelle G., Kircanski, Katharina, Phil., C., Epstein, Alyssa, Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich,

Depression and Eating Disorders the Eating Disorder
Words: 2168 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29615540
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Depression and Eating Disorders

The eating disorder category in the DSM-IV includes Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and the Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified categories. Peck and Lightsey (2008) note that while the DSM classification symptom is currently the most used system, there has been some debate in the about how to classify people with eating disordered behavior. A viable alternative to the discrete categories used in the DSM is notion of viewing eating disorders along a continuum from having no such behaviors to the severe eating disordered behaviors. In an effort to combine the two methods the self-report Questionnaire for Eating Disorders Diagnosis (QEDD) was developed. The QEDD distinguishes nonsymptomatic individuals (no symptoms) to symptomatic individuals (those that have some symptoms, but do not qualify for a diagnosis to anyone qualifying for an eating disorder diagnosis). Previous research has provided support for this conceptualization by comparing the QEDD with scores…

References

Hudson, J.I., Hiripi, E., Pope, H.G., Jr., & Kessler, R.C. (2007). The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Biological Psychiatry, 61, 348 -- 358.

Depressive Disorder Is it Caused
Words: 1701 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52021775
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orks Cited

Carney, Robert M.; Kenneth E .Freedland. (2009). Treatment-resistant depression and mortality after acute coronary syndrome. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(4), 410-7.

Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library database. (Document ID: 1671559601).

Major depressive episode. (2009). DSM IV. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://www.mental-health-today.com/dep/dsm.htm

Franklin, Donald. (2003). Major depression. Psychology Info. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/major.htm

Khaled, Salma M.; Andrew Bulloch, Derek V. Exner, Scott B. Patten. (2009). Cigarette

smoking, stages of change, and major depression in the Canadian population. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 54(3), 204-8. Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical

Library database. (Document ID: 1673587981).

Levinson, Douglas. (2005). The genetics of depression: a review. Biol Psychiatry.

Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://depressiongenetics.med.upenn.edu/DLResearch/Levinson_GeneticsDepression.pdf

Marrie, A.; R. Horwitz, G. Cutter, T .Tyry, D. Campagnolo, & T. Vollmer. (2009). The burden of mental comorbidity in multiple sclerosis: frequent, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Multiple Sclerosis, 15(3), 385-92.…

Works Cited

Carney, Robert M.; Kenneth E .Freedland. (2009). Treatment-resistant depression and mortality after acute coronary syndrome. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(4), 410-7.

Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library database. (Document ID: 1671559601).

Major depressive episode. (2009). DSM IV. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at  http://www.mental-health-today.com/dep/dsm.htm 

Franklin, Donald. (2003). Major depression. Psychology Info. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at  http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/major.htm

How Divorce Affects the Personality of Latino Children
Words: 2670 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92412466
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divorce affects the personality of Latino children

Family normally indicates to a group of persons directly associated with kinship, wherein the adult members are liable for the care of their children. The kinship involves genetic ties or ties coming out of marriage. Marriage is considered to be a sexual union between two adults, socially recognized and approved. Marriage and therefore the family in western societies are related to monogamy. A major change has emerged in the common structure of family life during the post-war periods. A high proportion of women participated in the paid labor force, which has a direct impact on growth of divorce and considerable numbers of children are forced to reside either in single parent households or with stepfamilies. Cohabitation has progressively become normal in many of the industrial nations. Many other forms of social and sexual relationship are about to flourish in the future. Still marriage…

REFERENCES

"Chapter 15: the Family and Intimate Relationships" Retrieved from  http://www.wwnorton.com/giddens4/chapters/chapter15/welcome.htm 

Accessed 8 November, 2005

"Child Psychology Lesson 1. Issues in Child Development" Retrieved from http://www.kuce.org/isc/previews/psyc/psyc333_lesson.html

'Children in the Middle" Retrieved from http://modelprograms.samhsa.gov/print.cfm?pkProgramid=207

Gender Identity Disorder the Objective
Words: 1507 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56207859
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ibliography

Mouffak, Faycal; Gallarda, Thierry; aup, Nicolas; Olie, Jean-Pierre; and Krebs, Marie-Odile (2007) Gender Identity Disorders and ipolar Disorder Associated With the Ring Y Chromosome. American Journal Psychiatry 164:1122-1123 July 2007. Online available at http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/164/7/1122#R1647CHDJECID

Childhood Gender-Identity Disorder Diagnosis Under Attack (2007) National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality. NARTH. Leadership U. Online available at http://www.leaderu.com/orgs/narth/childhood.html

Osborne, Duncan (2003) Voices - Identity Crisis. OUT magazine. Los Angeles, April 2003. Liberation Publications, Inc. Online available at http://www.antijen.org/Out.html

Hepp U, Kraemer , Schnyder U, Miller N, Delsignore a: Psychiatric comorbidity in gender identity disorder. J Psychosom Res 2005; 58:259-261

Habermeyer E, Kamps I, Kawohl W: A case of bipolar psychosis and transsexualism. Psychopathology 2003; 36:168-170

Diagnosing and Treating Gender Identity in Women (1997) Medscape Psychiatry & Mental Health eJournal. 1997 Online available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/430853_4

Zucker, K.J. (1985) Cross-gender-identified children. Chapter 4 in .W. Steiner (ED.) Gender Dysphoria: Development, Research, Management, New…

Bibliography

Mouffak, Faycal; Gallarda, Thierry; Baup, Nicolas; Olie, Jean-Pierre; and Krebs, Marie-Odile (2007) Gender Identity Disorders and Bipolar Disorder Associated With the Ring Y Chromosome. American Journal Psychiatry 164:1122-1123 July 2007. Online available at  http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/164/7/1122#R1647CHDJECID 

Childhood Gender-Identity Disorder Diagnosis Under Attack (2007) National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality. NARTH. Leadership U. Online available at http://www.leaderu.com/orgs/narth/childhood.html

Osborne, Duncan (2003) Voices - Identity Crisis. OUT magazine. Los Angeles, April 2003. Liberation Publications, Inc. Online available at http://www.antijen.org/Out.html

Hepp U, Kraemer B, Schnyder U, Miller N, Delsignore a: Psychiatric comorbidity in gender identity disorder. J Psychosom Res 2005; 58:259-261

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Words: 2469 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18384016
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder is a behavioral disorder that is mostly found in children. According to one research almost 7.5% of school-aged children are suffering from some kind of ADHD related behavioral problem in the United States. In some cases, untreated symptoms can persist in the adulthood too, which can create numerous problems in the patient's social and emotional life. ADHD is rarely found in isolation as the child may also develop some other behavioral problems. The existence of more than one behavioral disorder is known as co-morbidity, which usually complicates the case because the child cannot be treated for one specific condition. It was once believed that ADHD patients outgrow the symptoms with age but this theory is no longer supported by latest research, which indicates that without treatment, ADHD's symptoms can easily persist in one's adult life. A newspaper article, which appeared in St. Louis Post-Dispatch (1994), author…

References:

1) CLAUDIA WALLIS, With Hannah Bloch/New York, Wendy Cole/Chicago and James Willwerth/Irvine, LIFE IN OVERDRIVE Doctors say huge numbers of kids and adults have attention deficit disorder. Is it for real?, Time, 07-18-1994, pp 42

2) Robin Seaton Jefferson; MODERN STRESSES WORSEN ATTENTION DEFICIT PROBLEMS, DOCTOR SAYS., St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 06-19-2002, pp 2.

3) Arthur Allen, The Trouble With ADHD; As growing numbers of children are being medicated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, some doctors and parents wonder whether the drugs have become a too-convenient w., The Washington Post, 03-18-2001, pp W08

4) Marianne Szegedy-Maszak;; Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, The Mind Maze., U.S. News & World Report, 05-06-2002, pp 52.