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We have over 74 essays for "Psychosexual Theory"

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Personality Theories

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 61738554

Personality Theories

Psychologists have described personality as specific way of feeling, thinking and self-conduct (Mcleod, 2014) of an individual. Personality is the constantly changing system in the minds of individuals and made up of specific psychological traits that influence their specific self-conduct and thinking. Personality is the combination of behavior that distinguishes a person. The personality of a person is affected by genetic and biological factors as well as factors such as upbringing, environment etc.

Personality theories are broken down into two classes:

• Trait theories of personality that believe that personality depends more on biological factors

• State theories, which see upbringing and societal factors as the major determinants of personality

This paper will be exploring two personality theories: Hans Eysenck's Personality Theory and Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory.

Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory

This theory of personality believes that our differing personalities arise from the communication between what Sigmund Freud…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Boundless. (2016, August 17). Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory of Personality. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from Boundless Psychology: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/personality-16/psychodynamic-perspectives-on-personality-77/freudian-psychoanalytic-theory-of-personality-304-12839/

McLeod, S. (2014). Theories of Personality. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from Simply Psychology:  http://www.simplypsychology.org/personality-theories.html
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Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory of Personality

Words: 2499 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68113769

Personality Psych Analysis of Tony Soprano
Psychodynamic Theory
Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory of Personality
Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalytic theory of personality makes the argument that human behavior is resultant of the interrelations amongst three constituent parts of the mind including the id, ego, and superego (Petocz, 1999). This theory of personality lays substantial significance of the manner in which conflict, more often than not unconscious, amongst the areas of the mind end up shaping an individual’s behavior and personality. The Id deals with instantaneous satisfaction of basic physical needs and desires and it functions completely unconsciously. The Superego takes into account social rules and morals, and is largely referred to as a person’s conscience. The Superego develops as a child progressively learns what is deemed to be right or wrong. Lastly, the ego, unlike the instinctive Id and the ethical superego, the Ego is the sensible, realistic part of an individual’s personality…… [Read More]

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Theories of Human Development

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69465517

Piagetian, Ericksonian, And Freudian Stages of Development

Human beings progress gradually from childhood to adulthood, going through stages that are distinct, continuous, and improving. Developmental psychologists like Freud, Piaget, and Erickson came up with different theories concerning the stages that people often undergo as they grow from childhood. This study discusses the similarities and the differences between the three theories with examples of the stages mentioned by each given. The contrast and comparison will make people appreciate the importance of the three theories of human development

Similarities

Erickson's theory had the highest number of stages of development compared to the other two. His theory covered eight main stages from birth to death of an individual. According to Erickson, the successful completion of a stage marked a good beginning of the next stage. Failure to fully exhibit and live a stage exhaustively will recur in the future through habits that will…… [Read More]

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Psychology Theories in Psychology Personality Can Be

Words: 1438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67545435

Psychology Theories

In psychology, personality can be described as the "the patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion unique to an individual, and the ways they interact to help or hinder the adjustment of a person to other people and situations" ("personality," 2013). Psychologists may make use of idiographic or nomothetic techniques in order to study personality of an individual. Many characteristics of human behavior can be examined while studying one's personality. To put in simple words, personality theories are utilized for organizing what is known, stimulating new research, and specifying a view of personality in a formal way (Kasschau, 1985). Psychoanalytic theory, person-centered theory and existential theory are three such theories which have been developed in the precedent century and cover a lot of information regarding the pathology, health/wellness, treatment and the weight or significance of early life.

Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory

The Psychoanalytic Theory was put forwarded by Sigmund Freud…… [Read More]

References

Diem-Wille, G. (2011). The Early Years of Life: Psychoanalytical Development Theory According to Freud, Klein and Bion. London: Karnac.

Gurman, A.S., & Messer, S.B. (2003).Essential Psychotherapies: Theory and Practice. New York: Guilford Press.

Kasschau, R.A. (1985). Psychology: Exploring Behavior. New Jersey: Englewood Cliffs. Print.

Kitano, M.K., & LeVine, E.S. (1987). Existential theory: Guidelines for practice in child therapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 24(3), 404-413. doi:10.1037/h0085732
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Freud and His Complete Theory of Grief Bereavement

Words: 3008 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 50942874

Grief

Freud's theory of Grief and bereavement

Grade Course

Id, Ego and the Superego or the conscious and the unconscious mind are some of the terms which are well-known by almost every individual. These words not only point out to the field of Psychology but also to the man who coined them and proposed a new realm of theories behind each of it; Sigmund Freud. He is famous for being the father of psychoanalysis and the techniques of hypnosis, dream interpretation and free association which he has used to successfully treat his patients. Psychology is devoid without Freud. This is not only because of the theories which he proposed but also because of his followers and those who extended his basic concept with a new touch. Freud in all his theories talks about the past to be affecting the present. In other words, the unconscious mind which is the hidden…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Butler, J. (1997). The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Freud, S. (1914). On narcissism: An introduction. Standard Edition. 14:73 -- 102.

Freud, S. (1917). Mourning and melancholia. Standard Edition 14:243 -- 258

Freud, S. (1923). The ego and the id. Standard Edition 19:12 -- 66.
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How Counseling Services Benefit People-Based on Theories of Human Development

Words: 1332 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8557938

(Psychopedia, 2014, p. 1)

Psychosocial Theory

Psychosocial theory is reported to combine internal psychological factors and social factors that are external with each stage building on the others and focusing on a challenge that needs to be resolved during that specific stage so that the individual can move on to the next stage of development. (http://www3.niu.edu/acad/fcns280/THEORY/sld008.htm)

VI. enefits of Counseling and Development Theories

The benefits of counseling related to theories of human development include assisting individuals in understanding how they got to where they are today and assist them in understanding how they can personally make changes or adjustments in their own life to achieve their personal life goals. It is reported that "According to develop mentalists, relationships among cognitions, emotions, and behaviors are interdependent and rooted in transactions with the environment (locher, 1980); therefore, while all humans possess inherent natures and abilities to mature, certain conditions must be present…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Muro, L. (2007) The Effects of Human Developmental counseling Application Curriculum on Content Integration, Application, and Cognitive Complexity for Counselor Trainees. Retrieved from:  http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5138/m2/1/high_res_d/dissertation.pdf 

Counseling Psychology (2014) Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Educational Counseling. Retrieved from:  http://graduate.lclark.edu/departments/counseling_psychology/mental_health/about/ 

Psychosocial Theory (Erik Erikson) (2014) Retrieved from: http://www3.niu.edu/acad/fcns280/THEORY/sld008.htm

Learning Theory (2014) Princeton University. Retrieved from: https://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Learning_theory_(education).html
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Culture Freudian Theories Sigmund Freud

Words: 3527 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16801693



When one thinks about Freud's theory one has to presume Freud's conscious thoughts or his theory regarding an Oedipus complex represents not his real thoughts but his defensive condensations, displacements, reversals, omissions, and distortions of his real thoughts. If one wishes to look inside his real thoughts regarding an Oedipus complex, one has to analyze and interpret the manifest content of his thought with these defenses in mind. According to Freud, a person must use this method of analysis to overcome such defenses and resistances. The first rule of Freud's technique was to reject the manifest content or the apparent meaning of the dream, symptom, or activity as merely a distorted substitute for one's real thoughts (Freud's Theory Analyzed -- a eport on esearch n.d).

Freud thought that one's conscious thoughts would be unconsciously determined and distorted by what one had censored. One's conscious thoughts condensed, displaced, reversed, omitted, covertly…… [Read More]

Reference List

A Brief Outline of Psychoanalytic Theory, n.d., Available at:

http://homepage.newschool.edu/~quigleyt/vcs/psychoanalysis-intro.pdf

Bridle, S. And Edelstein, a., 2009, Was ist "das Ich"?, Available at:

http://www.enlightennext.org/magazine/j17/wasist.asp
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Rct Relational Cultural Theory as

Words: 2229 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 4486894

RCT believes that everyone desires growth and that growth is by necessity connective in relational and cultural links. Mutual empathy and mutual empowerment foster these relationships in positive ways. (Jordan, "The role of mutual")

Sigmund Freud and Erik Erickson may arguably be two of the most influential icons in the field of human development and psychology. Their fundamental concept that human's develop over a lifetime and not just in a few stages from birth to adolescence and then are frozen into psychological patterns, revolutionized thinking in the field of developmental psychology. The term Life Span Development came to the fore as Erickson devised his eight stages of psychosocial development ranging from birth to eighty years old. Later as he himself passed eighty he realized that there is yet another stage and the count became nine. (Erikson & Erikson, 1997) One can see the striking resemblance between Erickson and Freud's stages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Comstock, Dana L., et al. "Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Bridging Relational, Multicultural, and Social Justice Competencies." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 279-288.

Crethar, Hugh C., Edil Torres Rivera, and Sara Nash. "In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 269-276

Erikson, E.H. & Erikson, J. M . The Life Cycle Completed / Extended Version. New York:

W.W. Norton. 1997
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How Have Psychologists Revisited Freud's Theory of Repression

Words: 2910 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90202356

Freud's Theory Of Repression

Freud is popularly known as the father of psychoanalysis and the idea of psychological repression of memories and urges, even though he was neither the first psychoanalyst or even the first to posit the existence of repression. His justifiable fame comes both from the way he popularized psychoanalysis, and from his further development of its theories. He is commonly attributed with creating the theory of the conscious and subconscious, of the many sexual complexes and drives which run our lives and our subconscious, and with the idea that things which are not socially acceptable will be hidden away within the subconscious. Freud called this process of burying the unacceptable aspects of life away into the subconscious regression, which he was to eventually succinctly defined thus: "the essence of repression lies simply in the function of rejecting and keeping something out of consciousness." (Rieff, 147) It is…… [Read More]

Bibliography." August 8, 2004.  http://www.usd.edu/~tgannon/jungbio.html 

Matson, Floyd. "Humanistic theory: the third revolution in psychology" The Humanist, March/April 1971. August 8,. 2004 http://web.isp.cz/jcrane/IB/Humcrit.html

Slater, Lauren. "Why Is Repression Possibly Better Than Your Therapist?" New York Times, 23 Feb 2003. August 8, 2004.  http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/23/magazine/23REPRESSION.htm 

Rieff, P. (Ed.) Freud: General Psychological Theory. New York: Collier, 1963

Webster, Richard. Excerpts from Why Freud was Wrong: Sin, Science and Psychoanalysis (1995). August 8, 2004.  http://www.richardwebster.com
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Psychology Psychoanalysis Is a Theory

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65468279

It also means that people don't have free will necessarily because behaviorism believes that feelings and thoughts don't cause people to behave in certain ways. Classical conditioning can be best understood by the example of Pavlov's dogs. Pavlov's dogs were discovered salivating by the mere sound of the people with food coming rather. In other words, they were reacting to a neutral stimulus. Operant conditioning, on the other hand, is more about reward and punishment (Donaldson 2008). Operant conditioning works because sometimes the subject is rewarded and sometimes not and this has found to be very successful (the most successful, in fact) in conditioning. For example, if one sometimes gives dogs food off their plate and sometimes not, the dog will be conditioned to wait always for the food because sometimes he gets it.

The term 'mental illness' is a culturally bound term. What is considered a mental illness in…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. (4th edition).

Donaldson, J. (2008). Oh, behave!: Dogs from Pavlov to Premack to Pinker. Dogwise Publishing.

Mitchell, S.A. & Black, M.J. (1996). Freud and beyond: A history of modern psychoanalytic thought. Basic Books.

Piaget, J. (2001). The psychology of intelligence. (2nd edition). Routledge.
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Sigmund Freud's Theories

Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 17587217



The major criticisms of Freud's Theory thought that it was difficult to test and there was too much emphasis on Biology.

Humanistic Theory- was developed by Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow and emphasizes the internal experiences such as feelings and thoughts and the individual's feelings of worth. It believes that humans are naturally good and have a positive drive towards their own self-fulfilment. Rogers was most interested in the interaction between mental health, self-concept and self-esteem. Maslow believed that every person has an in-born drive to develop all their talents and capacities and calls this self-actualization. The critics of this theory felt that it is naive to assume that all people are good and think it takes a narrow view of personality.

Social-Cognitive Theory- by Albert Bandura believes that personality comes from the person's history of interaction with the environment. He believes that self-efficacy comes from having a strong belief…… [Read More]

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2-Year-Old Case Study Two-Year-Old Child

Words: 3101 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 75905361

(Broderick & Blewitt).

Aside from the major issue, at least for the parents, of Jason's reserved social demeanor; there have been several other indicators of acting our behavior that he has presented. On several occasions Jason has complained of stomachaches and headaches prior to having to go to day care or even to any other playtimes where he knows his parents will not be attending. Also, if he has felt threatened by other children in outside settings he will also develop these symptoms in order to be sent home. Then, conversely, after he has been at day care he often does not want to return home and occasionally has a minor tantrum or crying fit. In instances such as these, with seemingly confusing and contradictory symptoms, one must remember that children often do not express anxieties in any direct fashion but often present with symptoms or strange ideologies that can…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P. The life span: Human Development for Helping

Professionals (2nd ed.). (2006) Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill Prentice Hall.

Burgess, Kim B., and Alastair J. Younger. "Self-Schemas, Anxiety Somatic and Depressive

Symptoms in Socially Withdrawn Children and Adolescents." Journal of Research in Childhood Education 20.3 (2006): 175+.
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Employees Training and Development Plan

Words: 2080 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 50702300

Freud and Erikson Theory

Compare and Contrast Freud and Erikson Theory

This essay begins by discussing Psychoanalytic Theory proposed by Sigmund Freud; the theory portrays that human behaviour is the result of conflict between the biological drives that develop slowly from childhood and play a significant part in determining a person's character. After a short review of the Psychoanalytic theory and evaluating it against modern psychoanalytic perspectives, the study will then cover a quite different theory i.e. Erikson's theory that reduces the significance of biological contributions. Erikson's Theory supposes that character/personality development is determined by not only biological factors but also by historical, ethnic, and cognitive factors. Erikson's theory explains challenges or issues that people face in the modern world. The fact that words such as "inner-space," "identity crisis" and "lifespan" have gained prominence in spoken and written language is testament to Erikson Theory's relevance. The Erikson's theory also has…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (n.d.). Freud vs. Erikson: How Do Their Theories Compare? Retrieved November 16, 2015, from http://psychology.about.com/od/theoriesofpersonality/ss/Freud-and-Erikson Compared.htm#step2

Difference Between Erikson and Freud (2011, April 5). Retrieved November 16, 2015, from  http://www.differencebetween.net/science/difference-between-erikson-and-freud/ 

Hayes, N. (1999). Access to Psychology. London, UK: Hodder & Stoughton Educational

Jarvis, M. & Chandler, E. (2001).Angles on Psychology. Cheltenham, Australia: Nelson Thornes Limited.
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Sigmund Freud & the Human condition

Words: 1849 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54462418

Sigmund Feud is popularly referred to as "the father of psychoanalysis." He lived between 1856 and 1939. His work and ideas have greatly influenced psychological imaginations and popularized notions such as Freudian sleep and dream symbolism, defense mechanism, unconsciousness, and many more. These notions have greatly contributed to films, literature, and theories such as feminism, psychology, philosophy and criticism.

Freud is also known for theories such as unconscious mind, specifically those revolving around repression mechanism. He redefined sexual desire as mobile and believed that it is directed towards a wide variety of objects. His therapeutic techniques improved the understanding of transference in therapeutic relationship. The technique presumed that human beings are able to gain insight into the unconscious desires through dreams.

Freud's psychoanalysis had an objective of bringing the repressed feelings and thoughts to consciousness. Freud's successors including his daughter Anna Freud postulated that the goal of the therapy was…… [Read More]

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Difficult to Formulate Precise Laws

Words: 1577 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71708416

This is because in America minority groups are determined by the differences in ethnic and racial characteristics that lead to unequal distribution of power, resources, prestige, and worth (Hunt & Colander, 2010). In this society, the unequal power of the majority group entails the possession of property, technology, education, and economic resources, setting this group above the rest. Blacks form part of the minority groups that receive unequal rights, but are lower than other minority groups due to historical inequality of rights as blacks were mainly in the slavery institution, causing their social isolation for an extraordinarily long period (Hunt & Colander, 2010). Moreover, Blacks are physically and culturally varied from others as they have darker complexions unlike other minority groups that are lighter and closer to the white majority group. Other minority groups arrived as workers and migrants setting their social class above that of blacks. The other reason…… [Read More]

Reference

Hunt, Elgin F., and Colander, David C. (2010). "Social Science an Introduction to the Study of Society." 14th Edition. Allyn and Bacon Publishers. ISBN-13: 978-0-205-70271-8.
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Psychoanalytic Model Object Relations

Words: 3548 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18922496

Psychoanalytic Model (Object elations)

In this paper, the object relations psychoanalytic model will be employed for solving a family issue; the family in question is taken from movie. The paper will further delineate key object relations concepts, the theory's assumptions, and its application to the aforementioned movie.

The chosen model

The object relations concept is a variant of the psychoanalytic theory, which deviates from the idea held by Sigmund Freud that mankind is driven by acts of aggression and that of sexual drives. Instead, psychoanalytic theory proposes the notion that man is primarily driven by a need to forge relationships with others (i.e. contact). Object relations therapists aim to aid clients in uncovering early mental pictures that can further any current problems in their associations with other people, and adapt them to improve interpersonal performance.

Basic Concepts in Object elations

The word 'object' in the object relations concept does not…… [Read More]

References

Balk, D. (1996). Models for understanding adolescent coping with bereavement. Death Studies, 20: 367-387.

___. (1990). The self-concepts of bereaved adolescents: Sibling death and its aftermath. Journal of Adolescent Research, 5(1): 112-132.

Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base: Parent-child attachment and healthy human development. New York: Basic Books.

Daniel, V. (2007, October). Object Relations Theory. Retrieved from Sonoma State University:  https://www.sonoma.edu/users/d/daniels/objectrelations.html
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Psychoanalytic and Adlerian Therapies Analysis

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 53227913

It assumes a person is in control of their own fate and not a victim to it. Starting at an early age, a unique style of life is created by the person and that life-style stays relatively constant throughout the remainder of life. Working toward success, connectedness with others, and contributions to society are considered hallmarks of mental health, as well as being motivated by goals, dealing with the tasks faced in life, and social interest. Birth order is considered important in understanding a person's current personality, yet the therapy is future-minded, rather than retrospective. (Psyweb Pro, 2006)

In Adlerian therapy, the therapist will gather as much family history as possible. This data will be used to help set goals for the client and to get an idea of the clients' past performance. This will help ascertain whether the goal is too low or high, and if the client has…… [Read More]

References

Adlerian Psychology, Psyweb.com 2006,  http://psyweb.com/Mdisord/MdisordADV/AdvPsych.jsp  (Retrieved August 20, 2006)

Corey, Gerald (1991) Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy

Carlson, Neil R. (1995) Foundations of Physiological Psychology

CTA: Cognitive Therapy Associates,  http://www.cognitive-therapy-associates.com/therapy/adlerian-therapy.php
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Erikson's Perspective on the Personality of Landon Carter

Words: 5028 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30406685

Landon Carter's Character through

Erik Erikson's stages of development

Erik Erikson was an American developmental psychologist who was born in Germany and went to postulate eight stages of psychological development. He developed a model that talked about the eight stages every human passes through as he grows. These stages depict and analyze a person's life from when they are baby till they die. It mentions how in every stage a person is presented with problems and challenges. Every stage depicts a crisis which has to be resolved or else it will create problems in the next stage. Thus, for a person to attain a positive personality they need to attain positive goals of that stage and progress smoothly to the next one. (osenthal, Gurney, & Moore 2)

A Walk to emember is a popular romantic drama movie released in 2002. With the setting in North Carolina, the movie revolves around…… [Read More]

References

A Walk to Remember. Dir. Adam Shankman. Perf. Mandy Moore, Shane West, Peter Coyote. Warner Bros. Pictures, 2002. DVD.

Beaumont, Sherry L., & Zukanovic, Ray. "Identity Development in Men and Its Relation to Psychosocial Distress and Self-Worth." Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science. January (2005) Web.

Elkind, D. "Erik Erikson's Eight Ages of Man." New York Times. New York Times, 5 April 1970. Web. 15 November 2012.

Gross, Francis L. Introducing Erik Erikson: An invitation to his thinking. Lanham, MD: University Press of America. 1987.Print
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Asher Lev Just as One

Words: 4145 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12492046

Such relationships in childhood begin with the parents, and for Asher, these early relationships are also significant later, as might be expected.

However, as Potok shows in this novel, for someone like Asher, the importance of childhood bonds and of later intimate bonds are themselves stressed by cultural conflicts between the Hasidic community in its isolation and the larger American society surrounding it. For Asher, the conflict is between the more controlled religious environment of the community and the more liberal environment of the art world he joins. What Potok shows about this particular conflict might seem very different from what others experience, others who are not part of such a strict religious background and who are not artists. However, children always find a conflict between the circumscribed world of their immediate family and the world they join as they strike out on their own. This conflict is often portrayed…… [Read More]

References

Belkin, L. (2004). The Lessons of Classroom 506. New York Times Magazine, 40-53.

Bowlby, J. (1988). Developmental psychiatry comes of age. American Journal of Psychiatry, 145, 1-10.

Erikson, E.H. (1963) Childhood and Society. New York: Free Press.

Kim, W.J., Kim, L. & Rue, D.S. (1997). Korean-American Children. In G. Johnson-Powell & J. Yamamoto (Ed.) Transcultural Child Development: Psychological Assessment and Treatment (pp. 183-207). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Sexuality Can Be Discussed and Analyzed Through

Words: 1513 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 53328845

Sexuality can be discussed and analyzed through concepts made in other works of the author. These essays revolve around the idea of sexual perversions and why they develop in the first place. In the second essay, Freud talks about the various psychosocial stages of development. The third essay revolves around the genital stage and how a person is more included to sexuality when he or she begins puberty. Freud has stated that normal sexual activity between a man and a woman and is only limited to sexual intercourse. Anything apart from that is considered a perversion or a deviation from normal human sexual activity.

Conclusion derived from this the theory of sexuality and other Freudian concepts is that: Abnormal sexual perversions develop in a person due to psychosocial conflict in life and these perversions are a threat to stability of civilization. Freud insists on the notion that sexuality is a…… [Read More]

Works cited

Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and its discontents. New York: W.W. Norton, 1962. Print.

Freud, Sigmund. Three essays on the theory of sexuality. London: Imago Pub. Co., 1949. Print.

Freud, Sigmund. The ego and the id. New York: Norton, 1961. Print.

Freud, Sigmund. The major works of Sigmund Freud. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1955. Print.
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Erikson Those Who Are Unclear

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61710487

Erikson also states that the development of personality continued through the entire life cycle, rather than just during childhood as Freud has postulated. Finally, Erikson believed that each stage of development had both positive and negative elements.

Erikson's departure from the Freudian school was not readily accepted, even by those who were close to him and admired his work. In each of Erikson's developmental stages there is conflict with bipolar outcomes, as previously described. In Erikson's belief, each individual must experience both sides of the conflict in order to incorporate them into life and to synthesize these into a higher level of functioning. This differs from Freud's theory in that each stage has a name, rather than relation to pleasure from a body zone (oral, anal, etc.). According to Erikson, when the conflict is worked through in a constructive manner, this positive experience then becomes the more dominant part of…… [Read More]

Reference:

Chapman AJ, Foot HC, Smith JR. (1995) Friendship and Social Relations in Children. Transaction Publishers, New York.

Wallerstein, R.S. (1998). Erikson's Concept of Ego Identity Reconsidered. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 46:229-247

Leffert M. (2007) Postmodernism and its impact on psychoanalysis. Bull Menninger Clin. 71; 1:22-41.

Marzi a, Hautmann G, Maestro S. (2006) Critical reflections on intersubjectivity in psychoanalysis. Int J. Psychoanal 87; 1297-1314.
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Working for a Community Mental Health Agency

Words: 1218 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25326004

working for a community mental health agency that serves male adolescents aged 14-16 who have received a diagnosis of conduct disorder. You have been asked by your director of clinical training to answer the following questions (choose only one): a) What family treatment modes have been found to be effective (best practices, evidence-based) for treating this population?

Submit an annotated bibliography with an entry for each of your resources. Include the references in proper APA format. Write a brief summary highlighting the theory, treatment, intervention, and research methodology discussed in each resource.

Authors conducted thorough review of existent studies on psychosocial conduct disorder and interventions in regards to children and adolescents. They also investigated oppositional defiant disorder. 82 experimental studies were evaluated using certain criteria created by the Clinical Psychology Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. Authors concluded that the two most effective programs that met all…… [Read More]

Brestan, EV. & Eyberg, EM (1998) Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids Journ. Clin. Child Psyc. 27, 180-189

Burke, JD, Loeber, B., & Birmaher, R. (2002) Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: A Review of the Past 10 Years, Part II, J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 41, 1275-1293.

Kumpfer, K & Alvarado, R (2003). Family-Strengthening Approaches for the Prevention of Youth Problem Behaviors American Psychologist, 58, 457-465
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Psychoanalytic Approach to Personality the Three Major

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95257236

Psychoanalytic Approach to Personality

The three major psychoanalytic theories and approaches to personality could not be more different. Freud, who focuses on early childhood and sexual urges, differs from Jung who focuses on the unconscious, who differs from Adler who focuses on human motivation and superiority (Weiten, 2005). Of course, what they all have in common is trying to tease out an understanding of human personality. This paper will compare and contrast each of Freud's, Jung's, and Adler's psychoanalytic approaches, as well as two characteristics in which this author agrees or disagrees with the theories presented. Then the focus will mainly be on Freud and his structure to personality, and finally using real world examples for his defense mechanisms. Overall, this paper strives to present a well-rounded view of Freud's theory, and the theories of his time.

The structural model for Freud's psychoanalytic theory is based on three different levels…… [Read More]

References

Burger, J.M. (2008). Personality. (7th ed., pp. 40-107). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

Weiten, W. (2005). Psychology themes and variations. (6th ed., pp. 329-336). Belmont, CA:

Thomson Wadsworth.
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Childhood Abuse Effects of Childhood

Words: 2006 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 53809514

Another study conducted by Deblinger, et al. (2001) also investigated the efficacy of CBT based interventions and reported that compared to the participation-based model, repeated MANOVAs indicated that those mothers attending CBT sessions showed better results in context of improvements in intrusive thoughts and negative parenting. This should be however mentioned that sample size of virtually all the intervention programs was limited ranging from 10-80 that makes it difficult to opine whether or not such studies can be implemented successfully at a larger scale.

Conclusion

The empirical knowledge in context of interventions in treating abused adolescents and children is still limited and needs much more research. There is a lack of follow-up programs for each intervention program being presented as both Ahmed, et al. (2007) and others compared the pre-test and post-test results within short span of implementing the program. This indicates that there is an increased need to assess…… [Read More]

References

Ahmad, A., Larsson, B., & Sundelin-Wahlsten, V. (2007). EMDR treatment for children with PTSD: Results of a randomized controlled trial. Nordic journal of psychiatry, 61(5), 349-354.

Chaffin, M., & Friedrich, B. (2004). Evidence-based treatments in child abuse and neglect. Children and youth services review, 26(11), 1097-1113.

Cohen J.A., Deblinger, E., Mannarino, A.P. & Steer, R.A. (2004), A multisite, randomized controlled trial for children with sexual abuse-related PTSD symptoms. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 43(4), 393-402.

Cohen, J.A., & Mannarino, A.P. (1996). A treatment outcome study for sexually abused preschool children: Initial findings. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 35(1), 42-50.
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Jacob A Case Study Jacob

Words: 1575 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 75454418

He has received little personal affirmation for 'who he is' in all of the social settings in which he finds himself. He has had more success in school, but the challenges of his ADHD have resulted in disciplinary problems at time.

The first step is to find some form of social intervention to result in a more stabilized situation at home, either offering Jacob's mother support if she is at risk of violence at the hands of her husband, or attempting to offer some conflict or anger management for the couple. In school, Jacob would benefit from additional resource room support to help him deal with his ADHD, along with academic enrichment to enhance his sense of self. Jacob may also be referred to a school therapist to help him engage in more effective social interactions with peers. The school nurse may wish to discuss with Jacob's parents different medications…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2013). Erikson's stages of psychosocial development. Retrieved at:

http://psychology.about.com/od/psychosocialtheories

Driscoll, M.P. (1994). Psychology of Learning for Instruction. Needham, MA: Allyn & Bacon

McLeod, Saul. (2007, August). Lev Vygotsky. Retrieved at:
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Personality Theorist Sigmund Freud's Period

Words: 3767 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74750464

"The work of civilization has become increasingly the business of men, it confronts them with ever more difficult tasks and compels them to carry out instinctual sublimations of which women are little capable" (Rosenfels 21).

When considering leaders and their followers, Freud believed that some people were meant to be controlled as a result of their laziness and of their instinctual abandonment. These individuals influence each-other in adopting an indifferent attitude with regard to their own fate. They are saved by people who are capable to set an example through their strength of will and who take on managerial positions in order to control the masses (Rosenfels 21).

One of the reasons for which Freud expressed dissatisfaction with his experience in the U.S. was the fact that he did not appreciate the attitude that American husbands had in regard to their wives. He believed that one had to control his…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Rosenfels, P. (1980). Freud and the scientific method. Ninth Street Center.

Paul Rosenfels discuses Freud's determination to consider that inequality governed the human society. In addition to expressing his opinion regarding the "men are superior to women" concept that was common at the time, he also related to a series of other relationships that he considered imbalanced. Freud practically considered that there was no relationship that did not involve an inequality rapport, as he typically focused on people's problems and tried to emphasize them in order for individuals to understand the reason for their inferiority while in a relationship. Rosenfels also speaks about how Freud used personal experience in producing theories regarding social inequalities.

Boeree, George. "Sigmund Freud." Retrieved October 16, 2011, from the Shippensburg University Website:  http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/freud.html 

Boeree describes some of the basic characteristics of Freud's personality theory and focuses on the importance of the unconscious in comparison to the conscious and the preconscious. The doctor also relates to how Freud came to consider that human behavior is determined by factors that are not immediately accessible. Boeree also relates to each trait of the personality theory in particular and explains the way that it functions in regard to people's activities. This source recounts Freud's determination to discuss a subject that people living contemporary to him generally considered to be unimportant, especially given that most individuals were inclined to favor easy explanations when trying to come up with a solution for some mental illnesses.
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Using Psychology at Work

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 99677992

Freud and Psychoanalytic Theory

The seminal theorist selected from Chapter 7 of the Morgan (2006) text is Sigmund Freud. Freud was one of the early pioneers of psychoanalytic theory, which is still prevalent today and is associated with a psychodynamic perspective and its presence in contemporary organizations. There is a distinctive way in which psychoanalytic theory -- and many of the concepts advanced by Freud -- can influence functional cultural identity. By extension, there are a number of different ways cultural identity can pertain to a leader's influence on the perception of cultural identity and on organizational (and individual) performance.

Perhaps the core notion of psychoanalytic theory is that a person's past plays a substantial role in his or her present. The clinician utilizing this theory attempts to identify key elements in a person's past that are contributing to myriad manifestations in his or her present life, and change them…… [Read More]

References

Garcia, J.L. (1995). Freud's Psychosexual stage conception: a developmental metaphor for counselors. Journal of Counseling & Development. 73(5), 498-502.

Morgan, G. (2006). Images of organization. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

https://quizlet.com/312787/counseling-theories-flash-cards/

Enron: The smartest guys in the room. (2005). Dir: Gibney, A. Feat: Lay, K., Skilling, J., Fastow, A.
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Freud Doris Lessing's Through the

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58960210

Jerry's "unfailing impulse of contrition -- a sort of chivalry" struggles against the boy's impulse to be accepted and viewed as a man (3). The lack of father figure in the story underscores Jerry's preoccupation with the group of boys.

The symbolism in "Through the Tunnel" offers a perfect opportunity to explore Freudian theory. In fact, the symbolism emerges like it would in dreams. The titular tunnel is the central image, being an overt representation of the vaginal canal. Moreover, Jerry contemplates the opening of the canal, its vulva, for a long time before entering it. References to the "promontory" of the beach, "strokes," and finally an "explosion" offer phallic imagery too. Jerry is driven to explore the tunnel by a group of boys that he longed for with "a craving that filled his whole body," (5). The longing also suggests homosexuality, which is tempered soon by Jerry's deeper desire…… [Read More]

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Psychological Treatment for Gender Dysphoria

Words: 3198 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 11557244

Clinical Psychology and Gender Dysphoria

Advancement of Clinical Psychology with Gender Dysphoria

Clinical psychology is recognized as a psychology branch that deals with the assessment and treatment of abnormal behavior, mental illness, and psychiatric problems (Brennan, 2003). Clinical psychology integrates the science of psychology with treatment of complicated human problems, which makes it a challenging and rewarding field. American psychologist Lightner Witmer introduced the term in 1907. Witmer defined clinical psychology as a field that studies individuals by experimentation or observation, with the intent of promoting change. A clinical psychologist will try to reduce any psychological distress suffered by a patient and enhance their psychological well-being. Previously clinical psychology focused on the psychological assessment of the patients, and there was little or no attention been paid to treatment. This scenario changed after World War II in the 1940s because there was increased demand for trained clinicians. A clinical psychologist will…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall.

Colomb, J., & Brembs, B. (2010). The biology of psychology:'Simple'conditioning? Communicative & integrative biology, 3(2), 142.

Eliason, M.J., Dibble, S.L., & Robertson, P.A. (2011). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) physicians' experiences in the workplace. Journal of homosexuality, 58(10), 1355-1371.

Leahey, T.H., Greer, S., Lefrancois, G.R., Reiner, T.W., Spencer, J.L., Wickramasekera, I.E., & Willmarth, E.K. (2014). History of Psychology. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education.
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Willa Cather's O Pioneer

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56036688

The psychological strength of Alexandra is clearly visible when her dying father entrusts her with the family's land. According to father, she is supposed to be take care of the family's estates when he dies. The father seems to have developed more confidence in Alexandra in comparison to her other brothers, Lou and Oscar. It is for this reason that he makes a will stating that the Alexandra would be the caretaker of the family's estates once he dies. Surprisingly, the father's trust in her seems to pay-off when she manages to preserve the land three years after his death during a famine (Freud 23-25). The great strength of the female character is demonstrated in this portion of the story when she manages to intellectually apply her abilities to preserve the family's estates. The crafting of this character by the author to exhibit great personality to earn the trust of…… [Read More]

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Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality Psychodynamic

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20697898

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches

Personality can be defined as the unique characteristics that various individuals possess. These characteristics differentiate individuals from others. In other words, personality can also be defined as a unique system of feelings, thoughts and behaviors that prevail over time and that is evident in various situations. Different psychologists have determined different approaches to study personality. Some psychologists try to examine various aspects of personality that an individual possesses, whereas, others try to understand why there are differences in the personalities of various individuals. (Morris et al., 2010)

Listed below are the two different approaches to personality;

Psychodynamic Approach

Psychodynamic theories establish the thought that our personality is an outcome of inner psychological forces which are not under the control of our conscious mind. Psychodynamic approach basically studies the energy of our unconscious mind and it also explores how this energy…… [Read More]

References

Morris, C. And Maisto, A. (2010). Understanding Psychology . Oxford: Orford University Press. pp.45-65. http://ftp.cleary.edu [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2008). Theoretical Perspectives on Human Behavior. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publishers. pp.53-65.  http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/36524_PE_Chapter2.pdf  [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2005). Personality. Thousand Oaks: Cluj-Napoca: University of Medicine and Pharmacy. pp.1-5. http://psychiatry-psychology.ro/file/Stiintele%20Comportamentului%20ENG/Lecture6_Personality.pdf [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].
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Woman Who Has the Qualities

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78667422

This meant that men held positions of power and authority in all the public spheres including economics/business, politics/the law, and the bearing of arms. Men also possessed social status that women did not have, enabling the perpetuation of a patriarchal society.

y applying Freudian psychoanalysis and feminist theory, I will analyze the personality of the independent, strong, risk taker, and smart Alexandra ergson in Willa Cather's O Pioneer! As Smith points out in Freud's Philosophy of the Unconscious, the psychoanalytic model lends insight into the underlying psychic forces promoting personal and collective change. With regards to a singular female like Alexandra ergson, psychoanalysis takes into account the protagonist's family background, tracing her ego development across the course of her lifetime starting with childhood. The significance of my research is that it studies the possibility of female's success in life under certain circumstances and refutes the outmoded opinion that suggests the…… [Read More]

By applying Freudian psychoanalysis and feminist theory, I will analyze the personality of the independent, strong, risk taker, and smart Alexandra Bergson in Willa Cather's O Pioneer! As Smith points out in Freud's Philosophy of the Unconscious, the psychoanalytic model lends insight into the underlying psychic forces promoting personal and collective change. With regards to a singular female like Alexandra Bergson, psychoanalysis takes into account the protagonist's family background, tracing her ego development across the course of her lifetime starting with childhood. The significance of my research is that it studies the possibility of female's success in life under certain circumstances and refutes the outmoded opinion that suggests the leadership is a male-specific quality. Cather creates an overtly political novel with O Pioneer! As her protagonist single-handedly proves that women can be completely self-determined and self-reliant. This would have been a revolutionary view when Cather first published her novel.

The 1913 novel O Pioneer! By Willa Cather, one of the greatest American women writers, is a good illustration for the frontier literature in general, regardless of its political views on gender. However, Cather differentiates herself from her contemporaries and other writers in the Wild West genre, by stressing the other half of the human race: the half that is typically excluded from histories and literature alike. Cather accomplishes what Robinson comments on in "Treason Our Text," a feminist challenge to the accepted and established literary canon. The established canon of literature propagated by mainstream academia is a decidedly and unapologetically patriarchal one; that is, until the second wave of feminism (Robinson). It is therefore important to appreciate Cather's novel within her own historical context, which makes O Pioneer! truly revolutionary. Cather, although certainly not the first or only female American novelist, expands the canon of American literature by addressing the social, political, and economic worldviews from a more global and inclusive perspective, one that takes into account the lives of half of humanity. Patriarchal literature limits itself to constructing women out of stereotypes and projections of feminine ideals and mystiques; Cather simply tells it like it is (Duby, Perrot and Pantel).

The novels heroine embodies all feminine characters who disregard the complex American West during the time the novel was written. The narratives reveals out the difficulties experienced by women
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Acculturation and Personality in Immigrant Children

Words: 2157 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59853281

Personality Development in Immigrant Children

Personality development is one of the most commonly researched areas of psychology. At first blush, the relation between personality and the cognitive development of immigrant children may appear somewhat nebulous. However, as contemporary research moves ever closer to an integrative approach, the fields of social and biological science -- once regarded as discrete disciplines -- are merging like the overlapping disks of a Venn diagram.

The cognitive development of children has historically been analyzed through the lens of nature-nurture theorists. The utility of this line of thought weakens under the brilliant new discoveries in the field of neuroscience, and cognitive psychologists have deepened and broadened their inquiries to encompass new findings that point to a greater integration of disciplines.

This discussion will touch on the influence that classic theories of personality development have on contemporary personality theory, referencing seminal work by pioneers in psychology and…… [Read More]

References

Almy, M. (1976). Review of 'Memory and intelligence; Understanding causality;' and' The origin of the idea of chance in children'. American Journal Of Orthopsychiatry, 46(1), 174-177. doi:10.1111/j.1939-0025.1976.tb01239.x

Baxter, G.D., & Rarick, C.A. (1987). Education for the moral development of managers: Kohlberg's stages of moral development and integrative education. Journal of Business Ethics, 6(3), 243. Retrieved  http://search.proquest.com/docview/198088703?accountid=25340 

Bandura, Albert (2001, February). Social cognitive theory: An agentic perspective. Annual Review of Psychology, 52 (1), 1 -- 26.

Berry, J.W., Phinney, J.S., Sam, D.L., & Vedder, P. (2006). Immigrant Youth: Acculturation, Identity, and Adaptation. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 55(3), 303-332. doi:10.1111/j.1464-0597.2006.00256.x
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Terminology the Primary Concept Discussed in This

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13050544

Terminology

The primary concept discussed in this particular scenario regarding Elizabeth and what has come to be her sexual frustration is an inability to orgasm. Within women, such an inability to do so is oftentimes referred to as frigidity. However, it is important to note that Elizabeth is able to achieve orgasm via masturbation, which involves clitoral stimulation. Therefore, the degree of frigidity she experiences is not of the primary variety, but of the secondary variety in which a woman has achieved orgasm before -- typically through clitoral stimulation -- yet has a persistence of being unable to achieve orgasm through conventional coitus.

Among psychological theorists on this subject that include the likes of Freud, Masters and Johnson, and Kinsey, the psychologist whose work is most associated with this phenomenon is Freud. He posited the notion that there was a relatively simple explanation for women such as Elizabeth who were…… [Read More]

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Nancy Is a Junior Majoring in Business

Words: 884 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22427721

Nancy is a junior majoring in business. During spring semester of her sophomore year, she began attending meetings of the local gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender student group, primarily because she was feeling lonely and wanted talk further about her sexual feelings. ince high school, she had been quite certain that she was a lesbian, but had been reluctant to come out or to talk with anyone else about it. he had dated boys in high school, thinking that maybe she would become more interested, but she did not. ince coming to college, she had avoided the social scene for the most part. At one of the meetings in the spring, she met a young woman from the community, and they talked alone a few times. They stayed in touch over the summer, and Nancy looked forward to pursuing the relationship when she returned in the fall. Nancy and Jill…… [Read More]

Sources

Frankowski BL (2004) American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Adolescence "Sexual orientation and adolescents." Pediatrics 113 (6): 1827 -- 32

"Kinsey's Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale." The Kinsey Institute.  http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/research/ak-hhscale.html 

Theories about the Construction of Gender Identity

http://www2.cnr.edu/home/bmcmanus/socialization.html
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Younger Brother's Development Since He Was Born

Words: 1550 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22242402

younger brother's development since he was born in 1985, I would not have been able to until the beginning of this century. Until the early 1900s, no one was studying the changes that occurred in individuals from childhood to adulthood.

Now psychologists and other social scientists recognize that children go through similar behavioral, intellectual and mental, and physical steps while growing up. By using these theoretical steps as a guide, I can keep track of the development of my brother and any other child. It should always be remembered, however, that the time frames presented are averages and some children may achieve various developmental milestones earlier or later than the average but still be within the normal range. This information is presented to help interested parties understand what to expect from a child.

The idea that specific development stages exist for adults as well as children began with the initial…… [Read More]

References

Healy, Jane. Your child's growing mind. Galena, IL: Main Street Books, 1994.

Murray, Thomas. Human development theories. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1999.

Singer, Dorothy. A Piaget primer: How a child thinks. New York: Plume, 1996.
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Psychology - Reproductive Choice Human

Words: 1267 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2601880



Environmental Influences, Domain Specificity, and Heterozygous Potential:

Environmental influences have also contributed profoundly to human sexual behavior, which becomes particularly evident when one examines certain statistical tendencies pertaining to both conscious and unconscious choices in female mate selection (Gerrig & Zimbardo 2005). As is the case with many sexually reproducing organisms, human females have evolved a marked preference for both physical and behavioral male traits consistent with the ability to provide physical protection and to garner both natural and social resources. Females of many species prefer male suitors who display characteristics such as large relative body size, robustness, good health, and those suggesting physical strength, aggressiveness, and leadership (Margulis & Sagan 1999).

Whereas some of those traits are observable externally (such as relative size), others are imperceptible on any conscious level. This is particularly true as regards heterozygous potential conducive to healthy offspring, such as the marked unconscious preference demonstrated…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, D. (1995) a Natural History of Love.

New York: Vintage

Barash, D.P., Lipton, J.E. (2001) the Myth of Monogamy.

New York: Henry Holt.
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Bambi the Movie Bambi Takes

Words: 1103 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50593538



In Erikson's "Stage Two" children are trying to become self-confident and do things themselves ("Autonomy vs. Doubt"), like tying their own shoes even if it takes hours. Parents should let them do things because, according to Erikson, "...failure to reinforce these efforts will lead the child to doubt themselves" and doubt a parents' trust in them. hen Bambi ventured out of his little sleeping spot into the snow for the first time, surely his mom knew he would slip and slide and even get banged up a little. But she stayed in the sleeping nest spot and let Bambi learn for himself, which he did by slipping on the ice over and over before he finally got his feet under him and learned about the reality of slippery ice.

Jean Piaget put forward a theory for very young children, that he called "heteronomous moral orientation." He theorized that in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Disney, Walt. (2005). Bambi: 2-Disc Special Edition. Buena Vista Home Entertainment.

Burbank, California. J4756.

Levine, Melvin D. (1999). Developmental Variation and Learning Disorders: Second Edition.

Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service, Inc.
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Psychoanalytical Reading of the Turn

Words: 1503 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88086911



James does imply in the prologue of the Turn of the Screw that there is a deeper meaning to the governess' narrative than merely a straightforward ghost story. So it is unlikely that, as some critics claim, it was merely meant to be a simple ghost story with no deeper meaning or symbolism. However interpretation of the tale has sometimes been taken to the opposite extreme as well, with critics reading far too much in certain dialogue, passages and references than the author likely ever intended. Ultimately, Sigmund Freud would probably have a field day interpreting the sexual repression of the critics who have analyzed this novella so intently.

orks Cited

Cefalu, Paul a. "Rethinking the Discourse of Colonialism in Economic Terms: Shakespeare's the Tempest, Captain John Smith's Virginia Narratives, and the English Response to Vagrancy." Shakespeare Studies. 28 (2000): 85-119.

James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw: And Other…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cefalu, Paul a. "Rethinking the Discourse of Colonialism in Economic Terms: Shakespeare's the Tempest, Captain John Smith's Virginia Narratives, and the English Response to Vagrancy." Shakespeare Studies. 28 (2000): 85-119.

James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw: And Other Short Novels. New York: New American Library. 1962.

Liddell, Robert. A Treatise on the Novel. London: J.Cape, 1947.

McCormack, Peggy. Questioning the Master: Gender and Sexuality in Henry James's Writings. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press. 2000.
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Criminal Justice - Juvenile Delinquency

Words: 866 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61146822

While the subject's rationale for blaming his most recent victim for dressing provocatively may reflect "normal" (Macionis 2002) social conditioning (particularly among adolescent males), his complete lack of empathy (as distinct from responsibility or fault) is more consistent with pathological indifference and lack of empathy often observed in serial rapists and other sociopaths who display a clinical indifference to their victims (Gerrig & Zimbardo 2005).

Subsequent analysis will distinguish whether the subject's relative immature statements about the connection between video game violence and the real world are the result of low intelligence and delayed cognitive skills in the area of logical reasoning and responsibility or functions of repressed rage directed at all females.

Intervention Strategy:

viable intervention strategy must emphasize intensive psychological counseling to address the subject's past sexual victimization, the rage associated with it, and the direction of his anger at all females. Behavioral psychotherapy will be necessary to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Gerrig, R., Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life 17th Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon

Innes, B. (2007) Serial Killers: The Stories of History's Most Evil Murderers. London: Quercas

Macionis, J.J. (2002) Sociology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall

Packer, Herbert, L. (1968) the Limits of the Criminal Sanction. Stanford University Press.
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Son of Sam David Berkowitz

Words: 3527 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74275578

summer of 1976 to the end of summer 1977, a reign of murderous terror gripped New York City - it was the year of the Son of Sam. David Berkowitz would eventually be arrested, tried, and convicted for the series of gun-attacks that left six people dead, seven wounded, and an entire city in fear. When caught, while there existed a potential for his being determined to be insane, Berkowitz pled guilty to the six murders and, under the sentencing rules of the time, was given twenty-five years to life. David Berkowitz comes up for parole next year.

The Son of Sam, while in jail, turned his crimes into profit by writing and authorizing books to be written about him.

Outrage against this led to the "Son of Sam Law" which now disallows criminals in jail from profiting from their crimes while behind bars.

Berkowitz has become an icon in…… [Read More]

Referenced

Chesler, A. & Robb. A. (1996). Criminal Quotes. New York: Visible Ink Press.

Glaeser, E.L., Sacerdote, B. & Scheinkman, J.A. (May, 1996). Crime and Social Interactions. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 111. n2. p507(42).

Hollin, C.R. (Winter, 1994). Multiple Murder: A Review. British Journal of Criminology, 34. n1. p1(14).

2002). Michael J. Codd, New York City police commissioner Announces arrest of Son of Sam suspect. www.HistoryChannel.com.Online. Internet. Avail: www.historychannel.com/speeches/archive/speech_341.html. Info Acc: Nov 26, 2002. n pag.
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Interview With Homosexual Person

Words: 4037 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19566830

Homosexual Interview

The subject of this interview is a twenty-nine-year-old homosexual male of African-American descent, originally from Miami, Florida. He has been employed as a Certified Personal Fitness Trainer since his 1997 graduation from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he majored in Kinesthesiology and Movement Science

and minored in Broadcast Communications.

The subject seemed ideal for this interview because he is openly homosexual himself, but acutely irritated by the common homosexual "affect" that he characterizes as a learned or emulated set of effeminate mannerisms and speech patterns that many people have come to associate with (or even expect from) male homosexuals. The subject has repeatedly expressed his disgust with homosexuals whom he describes as "flames" or even "faggots," because as a comfortably assimilated homosexual male, he believes that he (and all homosexual males) suffer from stereotyping and the homophobia that he believes it inspires. Specifically, the subject…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

1. Breedlove, Marc, S. Sexual Differentiation of the Human Nervous System.

Annual Review of Psychology (Jan 1994) Accessed April 26, 2004, at:  http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?DOCID=1G1:14857116& ; num=5& ctrlInfo=Round1a%3AProd%3ASR%3AResult

2. Branden, Nathaniel. The Disowned Self. (1989)

New York: Bantam
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Good County People by Flannery

Words: 1377 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3200523



Feminist critics have taken a more positive view of Hulga and a more deflationary view of O'Connor's central meaning. "Nothing in O'Connor quite so flagrantly bears out the feminist theologian Mary Daly's assertion that '[t]he myths and symbols of Christianity are essentially sexist' - which is to say "rapist."(1)…it is the author's strategy in… 'Good Country People' to knock these proud female characters down a notch" (Havird 1). David Havird calls the loss of Hulga's leg and, symbolically her intellect, a kind of rape. Given the way that O'Connor frames the tale, O'Connor views it as a kind of deserved 'rape.' Manley Pointer's name supports this reading -- his manliness and taking away of Hulga's symbolic phallus or male 'member' (her leg) suggests that O'Connor views Hulga as insufficiently humble as a woman should be before God. Hulga's disdain of affection, her coldness to being kissed, and her disgust at…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Havird, David. "The saving rape: Flannery O'Connor and patriarchal religion." The Mississippi

Quarterly. Winter 1993. FindArticles.com. January 14, 2011.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3524/is_n1_v47/ai_n28633529/ 

Lake, Christina Bieber. "Flannery O'Connor's beatific vision." Christianity and Literature.

Autumn 2010. FindArticles.com. January 14, 2011.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb049/is_1_60/ai_n56366241/
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About Buddhism View

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21306132

Buddhist Psychology in the Poetry of Philip Larkin

Philip Larkin is not ordinarily thought of as a Buddhist. Larkin was -- in the opinion of many literary critics -- the quintessential English poet of the latter half of the twentieth century, and the world (and worldview) captured in his poems is largely one that reflects Britain in its new post-war and post-imperial identity. To some extent this made Larkin's poetry a clear-eyed examination of a society in the process of making do with less -- this is, I think, the meaning behind Larkin's often-quoted caustic comment, regarding the sources of his poetic inspiration, that "deprivation is for me what daffodils are for Wordsworth." But the simple fact is that Larkin is basically a pessimist, and it seems that in many cases -- most famously Schopenhauer, in addition to the long list of European writers who were directly influenced by Schopenhauerian…… [Read More]

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Gender Identity Is an Individual's

Words: 1482 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2758573



As previously mentioned, Crisp is openly homosexual and his exhibitionist impulses and self-destructive behavior motivates the struggle within his life vs. unoriginal heroic desire. Similarly to Dil who lives his life, at times showing self-destruction as she guns down Jude and ties up Fergus, by her own rules, choosing to be a woman amidst a time when being transgendered was severely frowned upon. The journey for both Crisp and Dil though hard, ultimately led to a strong sense of gender identity and an awakening of both sexuality and eroticism as they found their way through gender and sex.

The journey for Crisp began after leaving his parent's home and venturing off into various jobs like a tap dance instructor and commercial artist. Although he met some initial success in these jobs, he ends up one of the few places that allows openly gay men. And even with constant ridicule from…… [Read More]

Isabelle and Therese from the 1968 movie Therese and Isabelle is a story about two lesbian women who defy convention by having a love affair in their boarding school. Their love is very intimate with scenes of conformity as Therese has sexual intercourse with a boy as an attempt to normafy herself as Goffman states on page 12 of his book, Stigma. Scenes in the beginning of Therese's mother preparing her for marriage put pressure on the young woman to adhere to the gender identity and sexuality society predetermined for her. The scenes are sweet and innocent laced with a tinge of fear as they are become fearful of someone coming into the room to find them making love. A scene in Isabelle's room gets interrupted by a noise the couple hear from outside the hallway. Their relationship ends much like that of Maurice and Clive.

In the novel, Maurice, Maurice and Clive are two college friends who engage in a homosexual relationship. Unlike with Isabelle and Therese, they are not as intimate and the relationship lasts longer, for two years. Similarly however, Clive like Therese wishes to conform and be normal and decides to marry leaving Maurice alone. The story however continues and Maurice finds solace and connection in Alec. However Alec blackmails him and in his attempt to cure what Dr. Larken terms, "congenital homosexuality" tries hypnosis. Eventually his desire to rebel against society's norms and be with Alec lead him and Alec to relinquish leading closeted gay lives for a happy life with each other.

Overall movies and films tend to show the world a different or unique perspective. The characters of Crisp, Dil, Isabelle, Therese, Clive, and Maurice offer a rare look into the life of a homosexual and in the case of Dil, a transgender/transsexual. These people like any other people struggle to conform, to meet the expectations of society, but also lead their own lives and fulfill their gender identity and sexual orientation. After all, sexuality is a large part of a person.
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Psychological Counseling Session for Wile

Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 81127921

Likewise, it seems that the patient may also have sublimated repressed his anger at and maybe a perpetual rivalry with at his father by dedicating his entire life to achieving the one accomplishment that his neither his father nor any of his siblings ever achieved: catching a road runner.

Furthermore, it would seem that the patient is mainly driven by ego-based issues; specifically, he has devoted his life to fulfilling the definitions established by his father and family of origin of personal worth. Consequently, he has over-valued the goal of catching the road runner far beyond its actual worth as a meal. The fact that much of the ridicule to which he was exposed during his psychosocial developmental stages occurred during the anal phase is consistent with his rigid focus and his obsession with perfection in the form of the achievement of a hunting goal.

The patient has also apparently…… [Read More]

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Biological Psychology

Words: 2139 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36635259

Behavioral Psychology

The main link between the brain and the mind is through the nervous system. It processes information from various regions in the body and transmits it via electrical and chemical signals. The study of the relationship that the brain has on the mind, consciousness and behavior is called behavioral psychology. Decades ago, scientists would use electrodes to stimulate various regions of the brain to understand how it affected the body. Today psychologists use modern radiological techniques to understand mental processes and behaviorism in diseases ranging from Huntington to Epilepsy. (Nobus, 2000)

Although many interesting stories and interpretations have led to the evolution of biological psychology, a great contribution to this field was made by the famous psychologist, Signmund Freud.

Sigmund Freud was born in 1856 and spent most of his life in Vienna. From early on in life, Freud had a strong inclination towards human concerns, and even…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Ablon JS., & Jones EE. (1999). Psychotherapy process in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program. J Consult Clin Psychol, 67:64 -- 75.

Cameron, P. (1967). Confirmation of the freudian psychosexual stages utilizing sexual symbolism.Psychological Reports, 21(1), 33-39. doi: 10.2466/pr0.1967.21.1.33

Sigmund, F. (1925). An autobiographical study . Retrieved from http://www2.winchester.ac.uk/edstudies/courses/level two sem two/freudautopdf.pdf

Westen, D., & Gabbard, G. (2002). Developments in cognitive neuroscience: I. conflict, compromise, and connectionism. J Am Psychoanal Assoc, 50(1), 53-98.
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Social Context of Hysteria in Freud's Time

Words: 1947 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69384582

Psychology of Hysteria During Sigmund Freud's Era

For a man who dedicated his life's work to furthering humanity's understanding of its own psychological processes, the revolutionary pioneer of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud remained woefully misunderstood during his own era, and has so ever since. Although Freud published a voluminous body of innovative research during his professional career as a neuropathic researcher, studying a wide array of cognitive disorders from addiction to aphasia, it is the Austrian's radical reimagining of the human mind's very structure that has made Freud a household name for multiple generations. By conceiving of the mind as being similar to an iceberg floating in the sea -- with only a small portion of the entire entity ever visible -- Freud's conceptualization of the human psyche as a behavioral balancing act between the id, the superego, and the ego, with thought occurring at both the conscious and subconscious levels,…… [Read More]

References

Bornstein, R.F. (2003). Psychodynamic models of personality. Handbook of psychology.

Freud, S. (1896). "The Aetiology of Hysteria." The Standard Edition of the Complete

Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. Trans. James Strachey, 24, 1953-1974.

Freud, S., & Breuer, J. (1895). "Studies in Hysteria." The Standard Edition of the Complete
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psychoanalysis and the different types of research

Words: 578 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22948503

1. Freud’s five stages of psychosocial development include the oral, anal, phallic, latency, and genital. Although Freud did not test his theories empirically, on a conceptual level, these five stages do make some sense. Progression through the five stages is impeded when a person becomes fixated, their libido or drive directed towards self-fulfillment. Tension between what the id wants (especially instant gratification of any desire), and what the superego believes it should have creates neuroses, according to Freud. The ego is positioned like a mediator between the id’s desires and the superego’s restrictions and rules, creating a sense of self based on how one chooses to act upon or suppress desire.

While I believe all of these stages have relevance to all people, some people are impacted by the stages differently. Common lore in psychoanalysis is that oral fixations can lead to oral habits in adults, such as overeating or…… [Read More]

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The Electra Complex Freud

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 74569399

Sigmund Freud believed humans early on in development had a sexual need. This was seen through his perspective of desire and emotion within the unconscious part of the human mind. To Freud, sexuality is a key component to human personality and thus plays an important role in a child's development. This is evidenced in Mary Williamson's article, "The importance of fathers in relation to their daughters' psychosexual development". Essentially, daughters develop their sexuality based on their interactions with their father. By having formed a sexual attraction in a metaphorical sense to the father, without the mother's intervention, a daughter can properly develop a satisfactory gender or psychosexual identity.

The beginning of the article is a rather lengthy introduction explaining how the information provided came to be. Williamson attempts to explain her intentions within the lens of various psychoanalytic approaches covering the father-daughter relationship. She also states that the formation of…… [Read More]

References

Shoaib, M. (2014). Electra Complex in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. Lapis Lazuli -An International Literary Journal, 4(1), 169-173.

Smart, J. (2012). Disability across the developmental life span: For the rehabilitation counselor. New York, NY: Springer.

Williamson, M. (2004). The importance of fathers in relation to their daughters' psychosexual development. Psychodynamic Practice, 10(2), 207-219. doi:10.1080/14753630410001699885
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Nursing and Erikson

Words: 534 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2096487

Nursing and Erickson Psychosocial Developmental Theory

The objective of this study is to examine Erikson's psychosocial Developmental theory and to discuss how one might apply the theory to their selected nursing practice including a brief description of the theory, framework or philosophy.

The stages of psychosocial development proposed in the work of Erikson include personality stages, psychosexual modes, psychosocial modality and accompanying virtue. These are shown in the following chart labeled Figure 1 in this study.

Erikson's Psychosocial Development Theory Stages, Modes, Modality and Virtues

Personality Stage

Psychosexual Mode

Psychosocial Modality

"Virtue"

Trust vs. Mistrust

incorporative1

incorporative2

getting taking

Hope

Autonomy vs. Shame, Doubt

retentive eliminative holding on letting go

Willpower

Inititative vs. Guilt intrusive making

Purpose

Industry vs. Inferiority

Competence

Identity vs. ole Confusion

Fidelity

Intimacy vs. Isolation

Love

Generativity vs. Stagnation

Care

Integrity vs.Despair

Wisdom

Source: Davis (1995, p. 1)

I. Use of This Theory in the Nursing…… [Read More]

References

Current Nursing (2014) Theory of Psychosocial Development. Erik H. Erikson. Retrieved from:  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/theory_of_psychosocial_development.html 

Davis, D. (1995) Psychosocial Theory: Erikson. Haverford. Retrieved from:  http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/p109g/erikson.stages.html 

Erikson's Development Theory and Its Impact on Nursing (2011) Current Nursing. Retrieved from:  http://emfrondren.blogspot.com/
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parents'sexuality and the psychoanalysis or psychodynamic

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27707475

1. As people progress through the stages of psychosocial development, they may get fixated due to suppressed desires. As all desires is driven by libido, according to Freud, any fixation can become a sexual fixation. Thus, being fixated at the oral stage would theoretically predispose one to have some type of oral fetish. Abnormal sexual behavior can be traced to fixation or stagnation, a neurosis that is due to a previous difficulty at one of the stages of development.

Freud’s theory is interesting, certainly, and has its own internal logic. However, Freud’s model is not at all scientific. Freud also focused almost exclusively on male libido, being personally perplexed by female sexual desire and by women in general (“Modules on Freud: On Psychosexual Development,” n.d.). Without any substantial research to back up his theories, Freud’s work remains theoretical. Therefore, I do not necessarily agree with the details of the theory.…… [Read More]

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Rules for Perpetuating Gender-Based Sexual

Words: 1492 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75683487

Instead of liberating women from the unjustified and prejudicial sexual double standard, the suggestions offered in connection with securing marriage proposals actually do the exact opposite by encouraging women to play into preconceived stereotypes and attitudes that ensure their continued social and sexual inequality.

Conversely, according to contemporary psychologists with formal training in human relations and psychosexual development, redressing the social and sexual inequality still faced by women in modern society requires a diametrically opposite approach to understanding the fundamental basis of moral judgment. Specifically, it requires recognizing the illusory, illogical, and unfair assumptions that are responsible for generating completely different sets of rules and behavioral expectations based on gender

(Branden, 1999; 91, 98, 111). Instead of encouraging women to continue conforming their behavior to traditional expectations imposed by invalid presumptions of "acceptable" female social and sexual conduct, the more sound advice would be to critically evaluate the worth of…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, Diane. A Natural History of Love. New York: Vintage (1995).

Baker, Robert, and Elliston, Frederick. Philosophy & Sex. Buffalo: Prometheus (1998).

Branden, Nathaniel. The Psychology of Romantic Love. New York: Bantam (1999).

Fein, Ellen, and Schneider, Sherrie. All the Rules: Time Tested Secrets for Capturing the Heart of Mr. Right. New York: Grand Central Publishing (2007).
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Foundations and Components of Psychoanalysis

Words: 2004 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99947087

Psychoanalytic Model

Discusses the foundations and components of psychoanalysis

People today are familiar with psychoanalysis after its wide rejection as well as adulation for years. Paradoxically, the success realized in the 5th decade, particularly in Europe, divorced it from its core principles. It spread widely but not because of the attention drawn for its therapy methods. It can be said that therapy was duly overshadowed due to its application in other fields. Psychoanalysis is used in sociology, literature, anthropology, mythology, religion and ethnology. Psychoanalysis is applied jointly in three areas: as a way of investigating the mind, particularly the unconscious mind; a neurosis therapy that is inspired by the method above; as an independent discipline which is based on knowledge gotten from the application of investigative methods as well as clinical experiences. Psychoanalytical science is highlighted by Freud in his study Totem and Taboo where he dives into anthropological and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abend, S.M. (1979), Unconscious fantasy and theories of cure. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 27:579-596.

Arlow, J.A. (198 1), Theories of pathogenesis. Psychoanal. Quart., 50:488-514.

Grossman, W.I. (1986). Freud and Horney: A Study of Psychoanalytic Models via the Analysis of a Controversy[. The Analytic Press. Retrieved from:  http://internationalpsychoanalysis.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/FreudHorney1.pdf 

(2008). Psychoanalysis in Theory and Practice. Retrieved from:  http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/23240_Chapter_5.pdf
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Analyzing Week 3 Review Worksheet

Words: 1486 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 39593622

ABC/23 Version X

Week 3 Review Worksheet

PSY/203 Version

Week 3 Review Worksheet

Multiple Choice

Highlight the correct answer.

Angelica wants to win the beauty contest because she wants the trophy and the recognition. She is extrinsically motivated.

intrinsically avoidance extrinsically situationally

Maslow believed that all human beings strive to become self-actualized great people self-actualized goal oriented achievement oriented

James-Lange theory postulates that bodily reactions occur before the emotions and Cannon-Bard theory postulates that both the bodily reactions and emotions occur at the same time.

Cannon -- Bard theory; James -- Lange theory

James -- Lange theory; Two factor theory

James -- Lange theory; Cannon -- Bard theory

Emotional intelligence; Dual Pathway Model of Fear

Emotional intelligence is the ability to manage emotions effectively in a variety of situations.

Emotional intelligence

Emotional resilience

Emotional stability

. Mental toughness

. Erik Erickson believed that the process in which we handle specific…… [Read More]

1. Vygotsky's Sociocultural Theory -- the process of development takes place in the course of social interaction. Cultural assimilation occurs in a person through interactions with others.

Copyright © XXXX by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2015 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.
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Child Called it Understanding Development

Words: 2894 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 28438013

This developmental theory provides one possible explanation for why Pelzer continued to defend and protect his mother for so long, and felt such a duty to do so; as the object of his repressed desires and his attempts to exhibit protective and masculine behavior, this would have been his essential task (Heffner 2003).

The age of six is somewhat on the cusp of Piaget's stages of preoperational and concrete operational. Many of the author's observations, such as that he "could determine what kind of day [he] was going to have by the way [his mother] dressed," suggest that he was already in the concrete operational stage, where future events could be abstracted from current information in a cause-and-effect manner (Pelzer 1995; pp. 30). Becoming stuck in this developmental phase due to a lack of stimulation and motivation was almost certainly a factor in the author's perspective throughout much of his…… [Read More]

References

Fraser, C.; Burchell, B. & Hay, D. (2001). Introducing social psychology. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Heffner. (2003). "Freud's Stages of Psychosexual Development." Accessed 12 October 2009.  http://allpsych.com/psychology101/sexual_development.html 

Pelzer, D. (1995). A Child Called it. Omaha: Omaha Press.

Springhouse. (1990). "Piaget's Cognitive Stages.'  http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/piaget.htm
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Histrionic Personality Disorder Hpd Is

Words: 1891 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90364721



The research on HPD causes is clearly linked to personality theory, and can help to understand each theory. By first examining causation research, and then by locating personality theory which supports the research, it was easy to see the validity of personality theories, and how they can be used in real world research. The research also tied in to course material by again forcing real world situations to be applied to theoretical perspectives.

As research surrounding the causes of HPD is undertaken, more is learned about factors that affect those with HPD. If a definite cause, or a list of possible causes, can be discovered through such research, treatment options specifically designed to address those causes can be developed, resulting in a higher possibility of success. This type of research is vital if those with histrionic personality disorder are to ever be fully cured. Therapy without certain cause can reduce…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2000). Desk reference to the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV-TR.

Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., pg. 293.

Aston-Jones, G.D. (2002). Chapter 4. In K.L. Davis (Ed.), Neuropsychopharmacology: The fifth generation of progress (pp. 133-167). Nashville, TN: American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Britton R. (2004, Sept). Narcissistic disorders in clinical practice. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 49(4), 477-490.
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Personality Is a Branch of Psychology That

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71883399

personality is a branch of psychology that deals with personality and variations among individuals. Personality is an organized and dynamic set of characteristics possessed uniquely by individual, and influenced by emotion, cognitions, motivation, and environment. In other words, the personality is referred as pattern of feelings, thoughts; social adjustments as well as behaviors exhibited by individual that strongly influence one's self-perceptions, expectations, attitudes and values. (Vink, Nawijn, Boomsma, & Willemsen, 2007).

Humanistic Theory

The paper uses the Humanistic theory to explain the concept personality. The humanistic theory argues that people generally possess freewill that determines the way they behave. The reason for chosen humanistic theory to explain personality concept is that the theory focuses on individual subjective experiences and definitive factors that determine human behaviors. The basic idea of humanistic theory is that it focuses on the present rather than the future. The goal of humanistic theory is to assist…… [Read More]

On other hand, the cognitive theory believes that depression is often caused by the self-deprecating thoughts and cognitive approach try to change people negative thinking by assisting them to change the way they view themselves and the world. Social and behavioral learning approach points out that depression can be learnt through an interaction with social world and environment. These include thing people observe, and the depression can be overcome by learning the cause of depression from others. Trait approach suggests that depression is caused from an individual's character. (McCrae, 2001).

Dunlop et al. (2013) suggests different methods of overcoming depression. The authors suggest not all depressions can be treated using a medication. For example, a person suffering from bipolar disorder should consult a psychiatrist for treatment, and a medication such as mood stabilizer should be avoided in a bipolar disorder case. OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) is a type of depression in which its treatment may be challenging. In this case, antidepressants doses are necessary to overcome the OCD.

On the other hand, a patient suffering from psychotic disorders should consult a
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Counseling the Environment Can Have

Words: 2423 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 503442

This is accomplished by using a number of different tactics in conjunction with each other to include: examining their lifestyle, developing client insights, establishing a strong relationship with the patient and creating a change in behavior. When interacting with children, these views are used to comprehend how: their connections with friends and family members are influencing their desire to be accepted. ("Theories of Counseling," 2010) (, Tice, personal communication, October 25, 2012)

The Freudian approach is looking at how the child is developing base upon their relationship with others and the way they are dealing with the different stages in their lives. These include: studying the unconscious mind, analyzing dreams, examining the effects on the id / ego / superego and psychosexual development. The combination of these factors are designed to provide the therapist with a complete picture of what events are impacting the social, mental and emotional development of…… [Read More]

References

School Counseling. (2012). All About Counseling. Retrieved from:  http://www.allaboutcounseling.com/library/school-counseling/ 

School Counselors. (2012). Kids Health. Retrieved from:  http://kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/school/school_counselors.html 

Theories of Counseling. (2010). UNLV. Retrieved from: http://blogs.education.unlv.edu/csi/files/2010/02/nce-study-guide-theories-and-helping-relationships.pdf

Efford, B. (2012). Assessment for Counselors. Belmont, CA: Brooks / Cole.