Solution Focused Therapy Essays (Examples)

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Solution Focused Brief Therapy

Words: 2659 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78160557

Solution-Focused Therapy

The author of this paper is about to offer a brief literature review of what has come to be known as solution-focused therapy. Included in that literature review will be several specific topics or examples that are within the solution-focused therapy paradigm. These include the history of the theory, the use of language to help create a solution-focused therapeutic environment, the role of family history when it comes to solution-focused therapy, the shift from a problems focus to a solutions focus in a way that benefits the client, the development of a short vignette that is based on a family situation, global goals of the treatment method using the language of theory, interventions that should be used at each stage of treatment (those being beginning, middle and end) and a succinct summary of all of the above. There are certainly other methodologies that can be used when treating…… [Read More]

References

Carr, S.M., Smith, I.C., & Simm, R. (2014). Solution-focused brief therapy from the perspective of clients with long-term physical health conditions. Psychology,

Health & Medicine, 19(4), 384-391. doi:10.1080/13548506.2013.824594

Cotton, J. (2010). Question Utilization in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Recursive

Frame Analysis of Insoo Kim Berg's Solution Talk. Qualitative Report, 15(1), 18-
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Solution Focused Brief Therapy Sfbt

Words: 1994 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14165036

Thus, giving the patient a 'bird's eye view' of his/her life gives him/her a chance to reconsider past actions committed and change these to improve his/her relations with a partner or family member. As in family brief therapies, reconstructing a family's life according to each member's interpretation and reflection helps the therapist identify the family member who adopts a constructive or destructive view of the 'reconstructed family life.' Through SFT, the therapist is able to create a therapeutic process that would be time-efficient and beneficial to patients.

itter and Nicoll (2004) elucidated effectively the effectiveness of brief therapy treatment for couples and families (64):

brief therapists seek to establish in their clients a renewed faith in self as well as optimism and hope for their immediate and long-term futures. It is caring, however, that guarantees the client support and a safe return in a future session, now matter how the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bury, D. (2000). "Constructivist paradigms in other therapies." Journal of Constructivist Psychology, Vol. 13, Issue 4.

Bitter, J. And W. Nicoll. (2000). "Adlerian brief therapy with individuals: process and practice." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 56, Issue 1.

____. (2004). "Relational strategies: two approaches to Adlerian brief therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 1.

Disque, J.G. And J. Bitter. (2004). "Emotion, experience, and early recollections: exploring restorative reorientation processes in Adlerian therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 2.
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Solution Focused Brief Therapy Today

Words: 2292 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64226686

For example, Jones and Charlton note that it is possible to develop appropriate problem-solving techniques in the following four major areas:

1. Identifying the goal which is appropriate and achievable;

2. Identifying exceptions to the usual pattern of problems;

3. Measuring the student's progress towards achieving the goal; and,

4. Providing useful and positive feedback.

Finally, SFBT can be used either as a "stand-alone" counseling approach or in tandem with other techniques. For example, Linton (2005) emphasizes that SFBT ". . . can operate as a stand alone approach or in conjunction with traditional models of treatment. Solution-focused mental health counselors do not view SFBT and traditional models of treatment as incompatible. Collaborating with clients to create counseling goals, be they directed towards abstinence, self-help group attendance, changes in thinking errors, or some other goal of the client's choosing, selves to enhance motivation to change" (p. 298). Likewise, Jones and…… [Read More]

References

de Shazer, S. (1979, Summer). Brief therapy with families. American Journal of Family

Therapy, 7(2).

de Shazer, S. (1986). An indirect approach to brief therapy (Family Therapy Collections, Vol.

19, pp 48-55, Aspen Systems). Milwaukee, WI: Brief Family Therapy Center.
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Counseling Therapy Theories Solution Focused Brief Therapy

Words: 1687 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97649973

Counseling Therapy Theories

Solution focused brief therapy (SFBT)

The solution focused brief therapy (SFBT) is a type of therapy that is used much in counseling and a lot of time referred to as talking therapy that is based on the social constructionist philosophy. This therapy focuses on the aim or goal of the customer rather than the problem that drove him to seek help. It does not focus on the past events but primarily pays attention to the future.

The SFBT at times referred to as solution-focused or solution-building therapy was initiated and developed by Steve Shazer (1940-2005) in collaboration with Insoo Kim Berg (1934-2007) and their colleagues from the late 1970's in Wisconsin. This therapy is future focused, focuses on the goals and the solutions rather than on the problem (Institute for Solution-Focused Therapy, 2011).

Here, it is the duty of the counselor to invite the client to try…… [Read More]

References

Alan Car, (1998). Michael White's Narrative Theory, Contemporary Family Therapy. Human Sciences Press Inc. http://resources.metapress.com/pdf-preview.axd?code=j42386l16060v3q0&size=largest

Cynthia Good Mojab, (2006). Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. Retrieved September 6, 2011

from http://www.lifecirclecc.com/Solution.html

Freedman, J. & Combs, G. (1996). Shifting paradigms: From systems to stories. In Freedman, J. & Combs, G., Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities, chapter 1. New York: Norton.
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Approaching Depression Through the Solution Focused Brief Therapy Approach

Words: 2047 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45783980

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy on Mothers with a Disabled Child

This research paper will focus on the ability of the author to effectively provide therapy services to individuals and adopt an enabling role, coaching the client in exploring his/her own way of solving the problems experienced, thereby using his own competence to the greatest extent possible. By using the Solution Focused Therapy approach and the author's own views on letting the client become the expert, promoting self-esteem, and most importantly creating change through various techniques and interventions, it will allow client to see through a new 'lens' of self.

This researcher selects Janet as a case study. She is 25 years old and lives in with her boyfriend with whom she has two son. The older son, James, has a disability in his clef foot. This incurable disability, her husband's abusive attitude and the natural inner struggles of a growing woman…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bryman, A. (n.d.) Triangulation. Reference World. Retrieved on November 29, 2015 from http://www.referenceworld.com/sage/socialscience/triangulation.pdf

Cepeda, L. M. and Davenport, D. S. (2006). Person-centered therapy and solution-focused brief therapy: an integration of present and future awareness. Vol. 43 # 1,Psychotherapy: Pubmed.

Retrieved on November 26, 2015 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22121955/

Darlaston-Jones, D. (2007). Making connections: the relationship between epistemology and research methods. Vol 19 # 1, The Australian Community Psychology: University of Notre
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Solution-Focused and Narrative Therapy Techniques

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18735580

Postmodern Therapy

What Corey describes as "postmodern" therapy is, in reality, largely a series of evolutionary changes. Recalling how evolution works -- in which organisms change form ultimately as an adaptive mechanism -- might be useful here, insofar as many of these "postmodern" approaches seem adaptive in terms of the actual climate of opinion concerning psychotherapy and its medical utility. The chief example that I am thinking of here is "solution-focused brief therapy."

The notion of "solution-focused brief therapy" would have caused Sigmund Freud to spin in his grave, considering Freud devoted an entire book, entitled Analysis Terminable and Interminable, to the question of whether psychotherapy should ideally last forever. However the widespread cultural rejection of the Freudian paradigm is, perhaps, one reason why the notion of long-term Freudian analysis has come to be replaced with the fast food approach. But the chief reason appears to be adaptive: increasingly health…… [Read More]

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Sbt Solution-Focused Brief Therapy SFBT Radically Transforms

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59520436

SBT

Solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) radically transforms the therapeutic process and relationship. As the name suggests, solution-focused brief therapy is about "being brief and focusing on solutions, rather than on problems," ("About Solution-Focused Brief Therapy," n.d.). Instead of drawn-out and costly sessions with therapists, the client receives highly focused therapeutic intervals that do not delve into the past other than what is absolutely necessary. Only three to five sessions are generally warranted for solution-focused brief therapy (Iveson, 2002). The underlying principle of being solution-focused is that therapy should be proactive. The Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Association (n.d.) claims, "so much time and energy, as well as many resources, are spent on talking about problems, rather than thinking about what might help us to get to solutions that would bring on realistic, reasonable relief as quickly as possible." In fact, during the intake interview, the client might not even be asked about…… [Read More]

References

"About Solution-Focused Brief Therapy," (n.d.). Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Association. Retrieved online:  http://www.sfbta.org/about_sfbt.html 

Iveson, C. (2002). Solution-focused brief therapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment 8. 149-156.
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How Berg Uses the Miracle Question in Therapy

Words: 1623 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54082392

Solution-Focused Therapy: AIDS and Dying Well

Pattern of Questioning

The pattern of questioning that Berg uses in "Dying Well" begins with effective questioning technique. Berg asks Tanya what she hopes or wants to accomplish before death. It is Tanya's response that she wants to confront her past -- so that she can go home and say goodbye to her mother. Her goal is to "get rid of" the past issues that are keeping her from going home -- namely, the abuse she suffered at the hands of her brothers and father (Berg, 2012). She feels that by confronting this issue she can avoid having a bad encounter with her family if she goes home.

Berg asks Tanya, "What difference will it make?" if she confronts this issue and "gets rid of" the problem she is having about her feelings of hate for her brothers and father. Tanya talks through this…… [Read More]

References

Berg, I. K. (2012, October 4). Dying well. Milwaukee, WI [Video File].

 http://www.viddler.com/v/c5249886?secret=64169979 

Gerhart, D. R.(2014) Mastering competencies in family therapy Belmont, CA: Brooks-

Cole, Cengage Learning.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Solution

Words: 1140 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14881754

It also relaxes them and helps build rapport, and it can give you ideas to use for treatment...Everybody has natural resources that can be utilised. These might be events...or talk about friends or family...The idea behind accessing resources is that it gives you something to work with that you can use to help the client to achieve their goal...Even negative beliefs and opinions can be utilised as resources. (p. 451)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy also works with negative aspects of the client's life as a way to increase the positive aspects of his or her life. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a more established therapy than in solution-based therapy, although the two are conceptually twinned. The major goal of cognitive behavioral therapy is to solve difficulties that arise in the client's life as the result of the presence of behaviors and cognitions (that is, thoughts) along with emotions that are dysfunctional (Albano…… [Read More]

References

Jones, D. (2008). Becoming a brief therapist: Special edition. London: Lulu Enterprises.

McCullough, J.P. (2003). Treatment for chronic depression: Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy. London: Guilford Press.

Miller, S.D., Hubble, M.A., Duncan, B.L. (1996). Handbook of solution-focused brief therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

O'Connell, B. (1998). Solution focused therapy. Los Angeles: Sage.
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Brief Therapies

Words: 3406 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66683955

Therapy

Constructivist Perspective of Brief Therapy

Understanding the basis of theories and therapy is a necessary element of the therapist's trade. Without some knowledge of why certain therapies are practiced, or where they came from, it is difficult to develop a personal theory and a personal view of how to conduct therapy. Since one of the basic concepts presently is that of brief therapy, it is necessary to see how that concept was formulated by other concepts. Thus, this paper examines how constructivist perspectives underlie brief therapy. This paper also gives the author the opportunity to voice a personal statement about how these findings coincide with personal constructions of therapy.

Definitions

It is first necessary to understand the terms that are to be discussed. The two primary phrases to be discussed are constructivism and brief therapy. However, it is also necessary to grasp what brief therapies exist.

Constructivism

The definition…… [Read More]

References

Fritscher, L. (2009). Brief therapy. Retrieved from http://phobias.about.com/od/glossary/g/brieftherapydef.htm

Levenson, H., Speed, J., & Budman, S.H. (1995). Therapists' experience, training and skill in brief therapy: A bicoastal survey. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 49(1), 95-106.

Maturana, H.R. & Varela, F, J. (1998). The tree of knowledge: The biological roots of human understanding (Revised Edition). boston: Shambhala

Presbury, J.H., Echterling, L. G, & McKee, J.E. (2008). Beyond brief counseling and therapy: An integrative approach (2nd Ed.). New Jersey: Pearson/Merill Prentice-Hall.
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Postmodern Therapy Strengths and Weaknesses

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39232831

Collaborative language systems focuses on the collaborative dialogue between therapist and client, where the two analyze and change the client's use of language about his or her problems to formulate a workable solution (Postmodern therapy, 2009, Depression Guide).

Another type of postmodern therapies is narrative therapy, which tries to help clients see how cultural narratives have shaped the subject's way of being in the world. By seeing their life narratives as constructed, clients are free to rewrite those narratives in a more positive fashion. Similarly, solution-focused therapy focuses on "the construction of solutions to problems" and building new connections: the focusing past is not meaningful, because the past is always interpreted through the lens of the present, so what is more important is creating a fruitful approach to living today (Postmodern therapy, 2009, Depression Guide). The therapist acts as a facilitator, and since there are no universal truths, the goal…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Notes: Postmodern therapy. (2009). Retrieved August 23, 2009 at http://www.hsu.edu/uploadedFiles/Faculty/williaw/O-H%20Notes%2013%20Postmodern%281%29.pdf

Postmodern therapy. (2009). Depression Guide. Retrieved August 23, 2009 at  http://www.depression-guide.com/postmodern-therapy.htm
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Analyzing and Understanding Concepts of Group Therapy

Words: 3010 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20603516

Group Therapy

Self-cutting

Factors that augment risks of self-cutting

Treatment of Self-Cutting

Group Therapy

Aims of Group Therapy

Aspects of Group Therapy

The aim of this research is to investigate and identify opinions regarding vital elements for successful group therapy and to suggest the distinguished elements as guiding principles for future group counselling guidelines, theoretical as well as program development. Therapists are to recognize the essential factors of group therapy, which contribute to positive therapeutic results. The important elements of group therapy established by the board of professionals shall be suggested as guiding principles for future group therapy, theoretical and program development (Edwards, 2001).

Introduction

Group therapy is a type of psychotherapy whereby one or more therapists attend to a tiny group of patients together as a group. It entails one or more psychologists that head a group of approximately five to fifteen clients. In the same milieu, group counselling…… [Read More]

References

Conyne, R. K. (Ed.). (2011). The Oxford handbook of group counselling. Oxford University Press.

Edwards, S. A. (2001). The essential elements of multi-family group therapy: A Delphi study.

Fehr, S. S. (Ed.). (2012). 101 interventions in group therapy. Routledge.

Glass, S. D. (2010). The practical handbook of group counselling. Bloomington, Ind.: Trafford Publishing
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Use of Strategic Family Therapy

Words: 2356 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77118289

Dana is a young and beautiful woman with family members that seem to constantly put her down whenever they get together. They appear to be self-centered and attention seeking. The mother has set expectations she places on her family and seems angry whenever they do not meet those expectations. For example, the mother suggested Dana get breast enlargement surgery to appease her boyfriend Matt. Her sister, Joanie also commented on Dana's appearance, making sure to let Dana know she appeared overweight or had a large rear end. These comments can and do affect people's self-esteem especially when the source of such comments are from people that person loves or is supposed to trust.

Dana takes everything and says nothing, agreeing with the remarks and feeling like she truly is overweight even if objectively people see her as very attractive. She also cannot say how she feels even around her boyfriend.…… [Read More]

References

Arendt, K., Thastum, M., & Hougaard, E. (2015). Homework Adherence and Cognitive Behaviour Treatment Outcome for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders. Behavioural And Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44(02), 225-235. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1352465815000429

Gingerich, W. & Peterson, L. (2013). Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Controlled Outcome Studies. Research On Social Work Practice, 23(3), 266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731512470859

Hayes, S., Levin, M., Plumb-Vilardaga, J., Villatte, J., & Pistorello, J. (2013). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Contextual Behavioral Science: Examining the Progress of a Distinctive Model of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. Behavior Therapy, 44(2), 180-198. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.08.002

Hofmann, S., Asnaani, A., Vonk, I., Sawyer, A., & Fang, A. (2012). The Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Review of Meta-analyses. Cognitive Therapy And Research, 36(5), 427-440. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-012-9476-1
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Looking Into the Therapy Process

Words: 2132 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53263088

Contextual and Larger System Factors

Role of Collaboration

Steve de Shazer, Insoo Kim erg, and coworkers came up with the original version of the SFT (Solution-Focused rief Therapy) in the year 1982 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin's rief Family Therapy Center. At first, they employed the approach of problem resolution, which they had become acquainted with at Palo Alto, California's Mental Research Institute during their work with psychotherapist, John Weakland. ut upon listening to clients/patients explaining their problems' fine points, they started noticing that clients revealed exceptions as well -- i.e., times when their problem proved to be minimal or even sometimes absent. At this juncture, therapy shifted its emphasis from problem description to two exceptions' specifics. This change of focus ensured migration of therapy to development of a solution, from resolution of the issue. With redefinition of the therapy's focus, a shift was observed in clients' and therapists' individual role expectations,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Greenberg, G., Granshorn, K., & Danilkewich, A. (2001). Solution-focused therapy: Counseling model for busy family physicians. Can Fam Physician, 2289-2295.

Hertlein, K., Shute, J. L., & Benson, K. (2004). Postmodern Influence in Family Therapy Research:Reflections of Graduate Students . The Qualitative Report, 538-561.

Hepworth, DH, Rooney, R. H., Rooney, G. D., Gottfried, K. S., & Larsen, J. (2006). Direct social work practice: Theory and skills (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.

France, M., Rodriguez, M., Hett, G., (2012). Diversity, Culture and Counselling: A Canadian Perspective, 2e. Brush Education: UK.
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Therapies Alternative Theoretical Approaches to

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94944450

The benefits of including family in therapy sessions extend far beyond addressing the parents' concerns in this situation, however, and can help to identify underlying problems that led to osa's drug abuse and potentially provide more highly effective long-term solutions to these issues.

Adolescent females were the subject of one study that specifically examined the efficacy of family systems therapy interventions in cases of anorexia nervosa, and the efficacy of this approach compared quite favorable to other therapy techniques (Eisler et al. 2005). Especially noticeable in this study was an increased expression of emotion by all family members, leading to greater openness and a greater ability and willingness to share problems and support each other (Eisler et al. 2005). This effect would likely be highly beneficial to osa and her family as well, as there is almost certainly an underlying stressor that led to osa's drug abuse and overall decline…… [Read More]

References

Cornelius-Whit, J. (2007). "Learner-Centered Teacher-Student Relationships Are Effective: A Meta-Analysis." Review of educational research 77(1), pp. 113-43.

Eisler, I.; Dare, C.; Hodes, M.; Russel, G.; Dodge, E. & LeGrange, D. (2005). "Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: The Results of a Controlled Comparison of Two Family Interventions." Focus 3, pp. 629-40.

Frelberg, H. & Lamb, S. (2009). "Dimensions of Person-Centered Classroom Management." Theory into practice 48(2), pp. 99-105.

Ready, D.; Gerardi, R.; Backscheider, A.; Mascaro, N. & Rothbaum, B. (2010). "Comparing Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy to Present-Centered Therapy with 11 U.S. Vietnam Veterans with PTSD." Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 13(1), pp. 49-54.
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Glbt Substance Abuse Therapies the

Words: 3295 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76452211

Indeed, the lack of "recognition and protection" by schools in general contributes to the "critically high level of suicide" among this community of minority students (146).

Surely alert, competent, contemporarily up-to-date school counselors understand that they have the "daunting but imperative obligation to become social activists for gay, lesbian, and bisexual students" since these students are the most "stigmatized members of school environs," Stone continues. There is no doubt that certain legal and ethical issues come in the way of school counselors' being free to help LGBT adolescents with their difficult decisions.

It is a "complex landscape" for counselors indeed, and they need to use caution in discussing birth control, abortion, drug abuse and more with straight and gay / lesbian students; moreover, since parents have the ultimate authority when it comes to counseling their children on important matters (the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed that fact in several cases),…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cabaj, Robert Paul, and Smith, Mickey. (2008). Overview of Treatment Approaches, Modalities,

and Issues of Accessibility in the Continuum of Care. Center for Substance Abuse

Treatment. Retrieved August 27, 2011, from  http://www.samhsa.gov .

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (2008). A Provider's Introduction to Substance Abuse
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the origins and types of behavioral therapy

Words: 938 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32631060

Behavioral therapy has its roots in basic behaviorism, the principle that human behavior can be modified through systematic training or interventions. Since B.F. Skinner first laid the foundations for behaviorism through experimentation, the methods used in behavioral therapy have changed dramatically. Behavioral therapy, or behavior therapy, is not one but a variety of approaches that psychological counselors use to help clients change their behaviors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017) advocates the use of behavior therapy as an “effective treatment for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD),” (p. 1).

Behavior therapies are designed not just to change target behaviors but also to change the ways people feel about themselves and the world, which is why behavior therapy can improve self-esteem (Herkov, 2016). Some of the most common approaches to behavioral therapy fall under the rubric of cognitive-behavioral therapy, which is used in a variety of clinical settings. In fact, Craske…… [Read More]

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Solutions to Dealing With Alcohol Abuse

Words: 1718 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69871526

Alcohol Abuse

This topic will be alcohol abuse. The dimensions that will be covered are, in order, a brief history, current trends or issues, societal concerns or issues related to the topic, the significance or relevance of the topic to the counseling profession and any future implications that exist when it comes to the subject. While alcohol is usually legal and illicit/prescription drugs are very much dominating the discussion about drug abuse today, alcohol has been and remains a major concern and deserves its own focus, interventions and sociological discussion.

Alcohol has been around for a very long time and it has created its share of questions and issues in American society during pretty much all of its existence. In terms of history, the major even surrounding alcohol was the temporary prohibition of alcohol across the land. However, this ban was indeed temporary and was eventually lifted. Even with that,…… [Read More]

References

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically III Patients: Identification, Assessment, and Management. (2016). Critical Care Nurse, 36(1), 28-39 12p. doi:10.4037/ccn2016420

Columbia University. (2010). Behind Bars II: Substance Abuse and America's Prison Population. National Center On Addiction & Substance Abuse at Columbia University,

Gebara, C. P., Ferri, C. P., LourenAo, L. M., Vieira, M. T., Bhona, F. C., & Noto, A. R. (2015). Patterns of domestic violence and alcohol consumption among women and the effectiveness of a brief intervention in a household setting: a protocol study. BMC Women's Health, 15(1), 1-8 8p. doi:10.1186/s12905-015-0236-8

Kiernan, C., Ni Fhearail, A., & Coyne, I. (2012). Nurses' role in managing alcohol misuse among adolescents. British Journal of Nursing, 21(8), 474-478 5p.
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What Is Superior for Clients in Crisis

Words: 1581 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13146634

Narrative Therapy vs. Solution-Focused Therapy

What is Superior for Clients in Crisis?

This paper will explore two similar approaches to therapy for clients in crisis: that of narrative therapy and solution-focused therapy. Both therapeutic techniques evolved as a way of helping clients deal with problems in a proactive manner, versus focusing on delving into the individual's past history or attempting to reform the individual's character. However, although they share many similarities, solution-focused therapy has increasingly found favor with both therapists and clients as a way of developing positive cognitive approaches to deal with difficulties. This paper will explore possible reasons why this is so and if solution-focused therapy is indeed superior to narrative therapy. It will conclude with a discussion of another therapy that has also been offered as an alternative to narrative-based therapy -- reality therapy -- which similarly offers a grounded way for clients to perceive their problems…… [Read More]

References

Narrative therapy. (2010). AIPC. Retrieved from:

http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/narrative-therapy/

Narrative therapy. (2015). Good Therapy. Retrieved from:

http://www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/types/narrative-therapy
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Postmodern and Family System Theory Approach

Words: 2262 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18147981

Counselling Theories

Postmodern and Family System Theory Approach

There have been significant interest in research on the problems of addiction; hence, the many scientific studies on the issue. Many of the studies in this area end up with the same conclusions; the concept of addiction is complicated. The complexity partly arises from the effect it has on the drug abuser from different perspectives such as psychological, social, biological, and the impacts of addiction on social law, economics and politics. On the other hand, psychologists perceive drug addiction as a disease. From a religious worldview, addiction is a sin. Therefore, it is possible to view addiction from a medical, behavioral, and spiritual angle. As stated, the concept of addiction is complex, and there are many definitions of addiction reflecting the complexity of the phenomenon (Sremac, 2010).

Notably, all the definitions of addiction portray a negative judgment on addiction, but owing to…… [Read More]

References

Caldwell, K., & Claxton, C. (2010). Teaching Family Systems Theory: A Developmental-

Constructivist Perspective. Contemporary Family Therapy, 32(1), 3-21.

Gruber, K.J., & Taylor, M.F. (2006). A Family Perspective for Substance Abuse: Implications

from the Literature. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 6(1), 1 -- 29.
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Defining or Redefining Normal

Words: 1450 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65822118

Human behavior can be a very fickle and complex thing. Just as human behavior is a rather complex and variable thing, solution-focused therapy variations are much the same way. Indeed, there different viewpoints and methods like postmodernism, general systems, biopsychological, spiritual/ecological and the very important contributions of people like Bronfenbrenner. egardless of the influence or the method, the overall focus of any solution-focused therapy is to find solutions and better outcomes. The major thing that varies is the precise pathway and method that is used to get to that end. Indeed, the patterns and facets of a given method will vary based on the ideology and logic that underpins it. While there are multiple ways and methods that can all accomplish good things for a therapy patient, it is important to know the desired endgame and find a way to move towards the same.

Analysis

When it comes to postmodernism,…… [Read More]

References

Hodge, D. R. (2000). Spiritual ecomaps: a new diagrammatic tool for assessing marital and family spirituality. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 26(2), 217-228.

Lau, J., & Ng, K. (2014). Conceptualizing the Counseling Training Environment Using

Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory. International Journal for The Advancement of Counselling, 36(4), 423-439.

Neal, J. W., & Neal, Z. P. (2013). Nested or Networked? Future Directions for Ecological
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URL Http Search ebscohost com ezproxygateway'sastudents uwi tt 2048 Login aspx direct true& db eoah& an 21643894&'site ehost-live the Provision of

Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23918513

Keller and Helton (2010) explore the "application of a strengths-based empowerment approach in the delivery of counseling. A case study is the research design chosen for this exploratory research.

The research question examined in this work is: How can specific counseling theories be utilized in accordance with specific Appalachian cultural values for client assessment and empowerment? The case study was conducted involving a 28-year-old female. The woman was divorced and at the time was living with her two sons on the west side of Cleveland. The researchers examined the life of the case through observation and in-depth interviews. The data were subsequently analyzed using a strengths-based empowerment framework. The strength-based empowerment framework allowed the researchers to examine existing theoretical frameworks such as feminism, existential therapy and solution focused therapy in addition to others.

The case study demonstrated that strength-based counseling approaches could be used successfully with clients from the Appalachian…… [Read More]

References

Akers, A.Y., Gold, M.A., Borrero, S., Santucci, A., & Schwarz, E.B. (2010). Providers'

Perspectives on Challenges to Contraceptive Counseling in Primary Care Settings.

Journal of Women's Health, 19(6), 1163-1170. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Keller, S., & Helton, L. (2010). Culturally Competent Approaches for Counseling Urban
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Family Systems Theory A Case Study

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90599096

Family Systems Theory: Vignette II

Discussion of what's going on in this family

Claudia and Margaret had suffered violence at a young age and therefore, are prone to commit acts of aggression, with the chances of developing more symptomatology like anxiety, aggression, depression and low levels of self-esteem, as compared to those who led a violence-free childhood. Being victims of, and exposed to, family violence during childhood years can make Claudia and Margaret victims or offenders. Margaret was a victim of violence when she was young and resorted to aggression as the means to resolving conflicts in her relationships; her personality structure incorporates shame, anger and guilt. Claudia, also being victimized in childhood, cannot regulate her emotions, particularly anger, and exhibits more tolerance to adult intimate abuse. As they were both victimized or exposed to abuse, they not only display aggressive behaviors, but also possess ineffective ways of coping and…… [Read More]

References

Substance abuse and dependence within the gay/lesbian community. (2008). Retrieved April 8, 2015, from http://www.hebpsy.net/articles.asp?id=1804

Beatty, D.M. (2013).Effects of Exposure to Abuse and Violence in Childhood on Adult Attachment and Domestic Violence in Women's Same-Sex Relationships (Doctoral dissertation, Seton Hall University).

Kolko, D.J., Simonich, H., & Loiterstein, A. (2014). Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Overview and a Case Example. In Evidence-Based Approaches for the Treatment of Maltreated Children (pp. 187-212).Springer Netherlands.

Trepper, T.S., McCollum, E.E., De Jong, P., Korman, H., Gingerich, W., & Franklin, C. (2008). Solution focused therapy treatment manual for working with individuals research committee of the solution focused brief therapy association. Retrieved July, 23, 2008.
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Marriage Preparation From the Perspective

Words: 1473 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58560674



SBFT focuses on the aim a couple wants to achieve. It centers on talking about the present and future conditions of both the partners. Some of the major contributions in the field were made by Milton Erickon, who provided the basics of hypnotic techniques. He asserted the use of hypnosis techniques to discuss with couples the existing and potential problems in their marital life. He focused on the effective and open two way communication regarding all issues of marital life including trust, expectations, sex, and excessive alcohol use (or abuse) by one of the partners and other similar issues (Erickson, 1976). Erickson made use of his proposed hypnosis techniques in counseling couples for solution of all the problems by letting them speak their heart. A

wide variety of hypnotic techniques is of great importance in marriage preparation for the couples who have some issues between them before marriage.

The basis…… [Read More]

References

Bowen, Murray (1990) Family Therapy in Clinical Practice: Jason Aronson Publishing.

De Shazer, S. (1985). Keys to solution in brief therapy. New York: W.W. Norton.

Erickson & Rossi (1976) Two-Level Communication and the Microdynamics of Trance and Suggestion, The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 1976 Reprinted in Collected Papers Vol.1

Fisch, R., Weakland, J.H., & Segal, L. (1982). The tactics of change. San Francisco:
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Training and Development

Words: 1469 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21673545

Training and Development

"Training is an intensive process whereby an employee's job behavior is modified.

Training prepares and enables a person to perform job tasks at a greater level of efficiency"

(Hertig, as cited in Colling & York, 2009, p. 233).

Training Method Options

If Equipped for Life does not successfully train its staff and volunteers to more effectively confront current challenges Staff and volunteers regularly experience regarding maintaining order at the group's weekly dinner and socially-oriented meetings -- the organization's programs could ultimately "fail." At times, according to Shek and Wai (2008) in their study, "Training workers implementing adolescent prevention and positive youth development programs: What have we learned from the literature?" when an adolescent program reflects negative results rather than preventive effects, the organization's program could be attacked. ather than the program or its curriculum constituting the problem, however, the organization's lack of implementing training for Staff and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Colling, R.L. & York, T.W. (2009). Hospital and healthcare security. Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Connie, E.E. & Metcalf, L. (2009). The art of solution focused therapy. New York, NY

Springer Publishing Company.

Ghul, R. (2005). Working with multiple stakeholders. In Education and training in solution focused brief therapy. London, England: Psychology Press. Hamilton, N.L. (2010). Family support network for adolescent cannabis users. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Rockville, MD: DIANE Publishing.
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Terrorism Convergence Between Terrorism Organized Crimes in

Words: 3267 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46580878

Terrorism: Convergence Between Terrorism Organized Crimes in Mexico

Assessment eport for Marceline

Demographic Information

D.O.B. 1/10/1993

123 Crawford Lane

Age

Florida

Sex: Female

Phone: +54-675 5545

Ethnicity: Caucasian

Presenting Problem or eason for eferral

Marceline is a 19yr old that is self-referred, with a 26-month-old male child. Marceline is very frustrated with her child and her boyfriend, Leon, for whom she is seeking counseling. Marceline's frustration with her child is making her think of giving him off to her mother-in-law. M reports feeling frustrated, uses alcohol and other substances to calm her nerves, is miserable from her job loss four months ago, and mounting bills. M also indicates to be confused on to stay with Leone her current live in boyfriend or gets back to her husband Michael the father to Michael Junior. She also indicates to be depressed with suicidal thoughts, which she overcomes with alcohol and substance abuse.…… [Read More]

References

Burwell, R.P. & Chen, C.P. (2006). Applying the principles and techniques of solution-focused therapy to career counseling. Counseling Psychology Quarterly, 19(2), 189-203.

Buss, D.M. & Larsen, R.J. (2002). Personality psychology: dimensions of knowledge about human nature (1 de edition). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Including 2010 Amendments. (2012). American Psychological Association, APA. Retrieved http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/index.aspx?item=7.

Kaplan, R.M., & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2005). Psychological testing: principles, applications, and issues. (6th edition). Belmont, USA: Thomson Wadsworth.
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Conflicts in Marital Counseling Although

Words: 5050 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54799142



You can't simply say you're going to integrate the science of psychotherapy with scripture." Moore argues, "because there are only sciences and theories of psychotherapy that are contradictory and incoherent." The implication that pastoral care and counseling and not and have not been Biblical, Vicki Hollon, executive director of the Wayne Oates Institute in Louisville, insists, was creating a false dichotomy. Hollon contends that Southern officials created the proverbial straw man. "And their movement away from science reveals a lack of faith, or at least a fear that somehow science is outside the realm of God's creation and domain." Some secular counselors encourage clients, including those in marital counseling, to refrain from reading the Bible and to stop going to church if that made them feel worse. Stuart Scott, a former pastor and current professor and convert to biblical counseling, became disillusioned with the answers psychology gives. Scott states he…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5019987790

Briggs, M.K., & Rayle, a.D. (2005). Incorporating Spirituality into Core Counseling Courses: Ideas for Classroom Application. Counseling and Values, 50(1), 63+. Retrieved January 24, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5019987790

The Columbia World of Quotations. (1996). New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved January 24, 2008, from: www.bartleby.com/66 / www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108786083

Vacc, N.A., Devaney, S.B., & Brendel, J.M. (Eds.). (2003). Counseling Multicultural and Diverse Populations: Strategies for Practitioners. New York: Brunner-Routledge. Retrieved January 24, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108786085 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108786083

Daniel, R.L. (2003). Chapter 10 Counseling Men. In Counseling Multicultural and Diverse Populations: Strategies for Practitioners, Vacc, N.A., Devaney, S.B., & Brendel, J.M. (Eds.) (pp. 189-207). New York: Brunner-Routledge. Retrieved January 24, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108786293 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5005843832
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Mental Health Counseling and Research

Words: 3990 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65935118

However, more empirical studies have been published in recent years which have both reported outcomes but also have acknowledged the complexity of the interaction of the number of variables involved in predicting outcome effects on children whose parents are substance abusers (Dworkin & Hirsch, 2004). This literature is particularly important because of the large number of children affected by substance abuse of various kinds and the social policy directed toward substance abuse offenders including parents.

Although the empirical research base is growing on the relationship of parental disability to child outcome effects (Emerick & Zirpoli, 2000) there continues to be a need for research that methodologically addresses specific critical parental disability factors.

Implementing Culturally Sensitive Crisis

In conclusion, when faced with an individual who is recognizably from a culture different from the crisis worker, some modification in approach will be considered. However, there is sufficient cultural diversity present in our…… [Read More]

References

Colangelo, N. (2007). Counseling gifted students: Issues and practices. In N. Colangelo and G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of Gifted Education (2nd ed.), (pp. 353-381). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Colangelo, N., & Assouline, a. (1993). Families of gifted children. A research agenda. Quest, 4, 1-4.

Dworkin, M., & Hirsch, G. (2004). Responding to managed care: A roadmap for the therapist. Psychotherapy in Private Practice, 13, 1-21.

Emerick, L., & Zirpoli, T. (2000). Different concerns, different needs? Perceptions of gifted children and parents of children with disabilities. Paper presented at the conference of the American Association of Gifted and Talented, Little Rock, AR.
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Comorbid Diagnosis of ADHD & ODD

Words: 1701 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45991338

journal and literature review that all centers on the same single test case of a patient situation that is known to the author. Indeed, the case in question is one the author of this report is aware of from an internship as a social work intern. The specific case is that of a seven-year-old Hispanic male that has been diagnosed with both Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The boy in question comes from lower socioeconomic status and, obviously, is of a racial minority group at the same time. The author will cycle through five different book excerpts and journal articles that pertain in whole or in part to the plight and diagnosis faced by the boy mentioned above and the learning gleaned from each source will be applied to his case. While the boy in question has a comorbid diagnosis and faces some societal roadblocks…… [Read More]

References

Corcoran, J. (2003). Clinical applications of evidence-based family interventions.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Drake, K., & Ginsburg, G. (2012). Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders. Clinical Child And Family Psychology

Review, 15(2), 144-162. doi:10.1007/s10567-011-0109-0
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Intervention for Depression Among Young Mothers With Disabled Children

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47211835

Depression for Young Mothers

Depression has emerged as one of the most common psychiatric disorders among mothers with disabled children. Actually, this condition is regarded as the second most incapacitating condition among psychological disorders that affect young mothers of disabled children. As a result several studies have been carried out to examine the various issues relating to this trend. An example of a quantitative study conducted on this issue is the study by Venetike Merkaj, Migena Kika and Artan Simaku on the symptoms of depression, stress and anxiety among parents of autistic children. The objective of the research was to compare these symptoms between parents of children with disability and those whose children are developing normally. As a quantitative study, the researchers employed a self-administered questionnaire i.e. DASS (Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Scale 42). They found that parents with children with this disability tend to suffer from depression as well as…… [Read More]

Reference

Merkaj, V., Kika, M. & Simaku, A. (2013, July). Symptoms of Stress, Depression and Anxiety between Parents of Autistic Children and Parents of Typically Developing Children. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, 2(2), 345-352.
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Intervention for Depression Among Young Mothers With Disabled Children

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65786496

Depression for Young Mothers With a Disabled Child

One of the most common psychiatric illnesses that have become prevalent in the recent past across the world is depression, which is the second most incapacitating condition among psychological and physical disorders. The prevalence of this disorder and its severe impacts on patients has contributed to numerous studies that have focused on different issues regarding the condition. An example of a study that has been carried out on this issue is a research on levels of depression among mothers with children with disabilities by Seyed Hadi Motamedi, eza Seyednour, Morteza Noorikhajavi, and Susan Afghah. This study was not only carried out to examine the depression levels among mothers with disabled children but was also geared towards examine the need to support these parents and improve treatment for their children. The study found that depression levels for this population is equal to 3-5…… [Read More]

Reference

Motamedi et. al. (2007). A Study in Depression Levels among Mothers of Disabled Children. Iranian Rehabilitation Journal, 5(5,6), 3-7.
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Dialectical Behavior Therapy Dbt Dialectical

Words: 2722 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12226336

For them to survive crisis they are equipped with the skills to; self-soothing, thinking of the pros and cons, improving the moment and looking for destructive things to do. They can also exhibit acceptance skills by turning the mind to accept, radical acceptance and willingness vs. willfulness.

Individuals with under this therapy are taught how to regulate their emotions. This is because most of those suffering from this disorder are known to be angry, depressed, intensely frustrated and anxious among other behaviors. The steps taught towards emotional regulation include; identification and labeling of emotions, identification of obstacles to any change of emotion, reducing of vulnerability to having an emotional mind, by having more positive emotional events, giving the patient the ability to control the current emotions and wherever a negative one presents itself he/she can take the opposite action, and lastly, he/she can apply the distress tolerance techniques taught (Heard,…… [Read More]

References

Clarkin, J.F., Levy, K.N., Lenzenweger, M.F., & Kenberg, O.F. (2007). Evaluating Three Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Multiwave Study. The American Journal of Psychaiatry, 164(6).

Heard, M.A.S.H.L. (2009). Dialectical behaviour therapy: distinctive features: Routledge.

Westen, D. (2000). The efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder. Clinical Psychology. Science and Practice, 7(1), 92-94.

Willem H.J. Martens. (2012). Therapy on the borderline: effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association.
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Cognitive Therapy Provides a Structured Framework for

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76925730

Cognitive therapy provides a structured framework for change. Describe your understanding of how this form of therapy works.

According to Cherry (2012), cognitive behavior therapy, also known as CBT focuses on helping clients to understand the thoughts and feelings that create their behaviors. If such behaviors are problematic, the client is encouraged to work on the way they think and feel about certain situations, which, it is assumed, would then also create change in the behavior. Commonly, phobias, addiction, depression, and anxiety are treated by means of CBT. This type of therapy is generally used to create short-term solutions to very specific problems, which focus on helping people to change by focusing on destructive or disturbing thought patterns that influence their behavior negatively.

The underlying cause for disturbed behaviors is then regarded as thoughts and feelings, more than repressed subconscious disturbances created by the individual's past. As such, these are…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2012). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy? Retrieved from: http://psychology.about.com/od/psychotherapy/a/cbt.htm

Haggerty, J. (2006). Psychodynamic Therapy. PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/psychodynamic-therapy/
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Is Reparative Therapy for Homosexuals Possible and Ethical

Words: 886 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46317732

eparative Therapy for Homosexuals

The issue of homosexuality needs to be a major controversy within the social environment. All across the world people are still struggling with the idea that they may or may not be, homosexual, especially within the context of society that tends to look down and discriminate against individuals based on sexual orientation. In the light of this controversy, there are some therapeutic methods which have been created and regarded by many within conservative or religious institution as being effective in helping remold one's sexual identity. Also known as reparative therapies, these are psychological or other style implementations of therapeutic methods designed at rewiring one's sexual identity. Still, the majority of psychologists and professionals view these therapies as more harmful than beneficial; this makes it crucial for pastor therapist to help guide potentially concerned individuals towards more productive use of therapeutic models that would focus on self-acceptance…… [Read More]

References

Herek, Gregory M. (2012). APA council of representatives passes resolution on so-called reparative therapy. Resolution 97. Web. http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/rainbow/html/resolution97.html

National Committee on Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Issues. (2000). Reparative and conversion therapies for lesbians and gay men. National Association of Social Workers. Web.  http://www.naswdc.org/diversity/lgb/reparative.asp 

Schumacher-Matos, Edward. (2012). The furor over gay conversion therapy. NPR. Web. http://www.npr.org/blogs/ombudsman/2011/08/05/138963061/the-furor-over-gay-conversion-therapy
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Feminist Therapy and Postmodern Approaches

Words: 1662 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21054697

A teen might be asked to tell their own story from the point-of-view of other people they know, looking at themselves from other viewpoints. These clients are freed to invent stories and play parts in that serve the purpose of providing a framework of meaning and direction for themselves. The stories are never singled out as "true" or "false," but a recognition that truth is complex and no one story can encompass all of the truth aids the client in seeing him or herself as a complex and meaningful role-player. And in that context, since one story may not be claimed to be the whole truth, no one story may not dominate a person's life. Life, to the client and narrator of these "stories" becomes an adventure in which trials are meant to be overcome and designed to prepare one for the future, rather than to defeat. The religious story…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Laura S. Feminist Therapy, Part of the Systems of Psychotherapy, APA Psychotherapy Video Series (2006)

Brown, L.S. (1994). Subversive dialogues: Theory in feminist therapy. New York: Basic Books.

Bruner, J. (1986) Actual Minds, Possible Worlds, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dutton-Douglas, M.A., & Walker, L.E.A. (Eds.). (1988). Feminist psychotherapies: Integration of therapeutic and feminist systems. Norwood NJ: Ablex Publishing.
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Minority Youth Substance Abuse Solutions

Words: 1033 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19411318

, Ellingstad,

Timothy, and Brown, Sandra A. (2006). Adolescent Self-Selection of Service Formats:

Implications for Secondary Interventions Targeting Alcohol Use. The American Journal on Addictions, ol. 15, 58-66.

The authors employed three formats of intervention (individual, group, and website) on youth in four schools over a four-year window of time. The results of this survey (which involved "Project Options") of 1,147 students is that minority teens who willingly sought alcohol services preferred to receive interventions in a private context rather than in group therapy.

Gil, Andres G., Wagner, Eric F., and Tubman, Jonathan G. (2004). Culturally sensitive substance abuse intervention for Hispanic and African-American adolescents: empirical examples from the Alcohol Treatment Targeting Adolescents in Need (ATTAIN) Project. Addiction,

2(99), 140-150.

This article offers a strategy that (in this case) significantly reduced use of marijuana and alcohol in all ethnic groups involved in the project. Some 213 juvenile offenders participated in…… [Read More]

Von Wormer, Katherine, and McKinney, Robin. (2003). What Schools Can do To Help Gay/

Lesbian/Bisexual Youth: A Harm Reduction Approach. Adolescence, 38(151), 409-420.

Von Wormer asserts through this article that because adjusting to heterosexual environment in public schools -- and dealing with the bias that often is in evidence -- is difficult, it is a "major cause of psychological problems" which leads these minorities to alcohol and drug abuse issues.
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Dysfunctions and Their Therapies Dysfunctions and Remedies

Words: 1220 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16972289

Dysfunctions and Their Therapies

Dysfunctions and emedies involved

Treatment and Control of Dysfunctions

The Thought Focused Treatment System

The thought focused treatment systems are those which narrow down to thought processes and systems of belief. The system believes in the child developing process being the cause of dysfunction. Social learning and modeling of ideas result to the personalities of an individual. The personalities result to experiences such as thoughts and feelings, critical learning, and the imitation of these behaviors. For instance, the child develops thoughts and behaviors from the parents. If the parents hide their feelings and never cry, the child grows knowing that crying is not the solution. The environment directly affects the child's thoughts. Therefore, if an individual's development is distorted in any manner, there is likely to be an experience of dysfunctional issues or poor health. An individual learns how to cope with stress and problems in…… [Read More]

References

Grohol, J.M. (2004, September 21). Types of Therapies: Theoretical Orientations and Practices of Therapists. Retrieved from  http://psychcentral.com/therapy.htm 

Grohol, J.M. (2011). 15 Common Cognitive Distortions. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/2009/15-common-cognitive-distortions/
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Reality Therapy in Marriage and

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99784069



From this discussion, Dubin (2009) then moves to presenting a new and unique model for implementation in both marriage and family counseling contexts. The current article models the "Basic Needs Genogram" as the primary method to be tested in contemporary therapy structures. This is a genogram that is based off the works of Glasser (1998) and breaks down our complexity of needs into five basic categories: "self-preservation, love and belonging, power or self-worth, freedom or independence and fun or enjoyment" (Dubin, 2009). These needs are interconnected and help drive behavior within the context of relationships, whether those relationships are marriage of familial structures. Dubin (2009) suggests that the Basic Needs Genogram will allow individuals, as well as family members to consider how current and past generational patterns influence the formation of their 'picture albums,'" which then dictate how their own relationships are formed and maintained (Dubin, 2009, p 17). It…… [Read More]

References

Duba, Jill A. (2009). Introducing the 'basic needs genogram' in reality therapy-based marriage and family counseling. International Journal of Reality Therapy, 28(2), 15-19.
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Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners Research Question

Words: 3099 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52728944

Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners

ESEACH QUESTION AND JUSTIFICATION

On average, women make up about 7% of the total federal and state incarcerated population in the United States. This has increased since the 1980s due to stricter and more severe laws that focus on recreational drug use, a lack of community programs, and fewer treatment centers available for outpatients (Zaitow and Thomas, eds., 2003). According to the National Women's Law Centers, women prisoners report a higher than statistically normal history of domestic violence in their immediate past, and the fastest growing prison population with a disproportionate number of non-Whites forming over 60% of the population. In fact, over 30% of women in prison are serving sentences for murder involving a spouse or partner. The incarceration of women presents far different cultural and sociological issues than those of men -- issues with children, family, sexual politics and more (NWLC, 2012).

The…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ethical Research Guidelines. (2012). Marketing Research Association. Retrieved from:  http://www.marketingresearch.org/ 

National Women's Law Center. (2012). retrieved from: http://www.nwlc.org/our-issues

Total U.S. Correctional Population. (2010, December 11). Retrieved from Office of Justice Programs: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=11

Women in the Criminal Justice System. (2012). The Sentencing Project. Retrieved from:
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Treat

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48352032



Problem Solving: There are times when the patient can find himself in a situation, which may present problems for the recovering alcoholic. For this reason, these patients are taught a series of techniques to determine the correct solution of a given problem. The training involves a number of simulated scenarios and the patient is made to come up with moral solution to resolve the situation. This may involve the patient analyzing the situation, suggesting a way out of the situation and weighing the odds. This training helps the patients to be well equipped to come up with possible solution when the need arises.

Coping Skills Training: It is hard to undermine the value of relieving a person's psychological dependence. As stated earlier, alcohol and drug abusers are attracted to them as they find relief from them. The reason for this is the psychological acceptance that such things bring happiness and…… [Read More]

Reference:

ROOM, R.; BABOR, T.; and REHM, J. (2005) Alcohol and public health. Lancet 365(9458):519-530. PMID: 15705462

MOKDAD, a.H.; MARKS, J.S.; STROUP, D.F.; and GERBERDING, J.L. (2005) Actual causes of death in the United States, 2000. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association 291(10):1238-1245, 2004. Erratum in: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association 293(3):298, 2005. PMID: 15010446

MILLER, W.R.; ZWEBEN, a.; DICLEMENTE, C.C.; and RYCHTARIK, R.G. (1995) Motivational Enhancement Therapy Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Therapiests Treating Individuals with Alcohol Abuse and Dependence. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Project MATCH Monograph Series, Volume 2. NIH Pub. No. 94-3723. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Miller, W.R., & Pechacek, T.F. (1987). New roads: Assessing and treating psychological dependence. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 4, 73-77.
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Gestalt and Behavioral Therapies the

Words: 1762 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43622402

The primary difference between the two however, is gestalt therapy concentrates more on the ability of the individual to make proper choices regarding their care. This theory or approach to therapy reminds the client of the connection between mind, body and spirit. The behavior approach is less concerned with the paradigm of holistic health, and more concerned with a therapist-driven approach to identifying problems and selecting appropriate solutions.

In this sense, gestalt therapy seems like it is a more effective approach, because it encourages the individual to make judgments about their health and understand the connections existing between their behaviors and emotions. Because gestalt therapy is patient-driven more so than psychotherapist drive as behavior therapy, many believe patients are able to realize relief and successful outcomes more quickly, as well as retain greater self-esteem (James & Jongeward, 1996; Palmer, 1996). If a patient wants patient-centered care that provides effective relief,…… [Read More]

References:

Cleland, C., Foote, J. Kosanke, N., Mabura, S., Mahmood, D. & Rosenblum, a. (2005). Moderators of effects of motivational enhancements to cognitive behavioral therapy. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 31(1): 35.

Diemer, R.A., Hill, C.E., Lobell, L.K., & Vivino, B.L. (1996). Comparison of dream interpretation, event interpretation, and unstructured sessions in brief therapy. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 43(1): 99.

Fine, M.A. & Schwebel, a.L. (1994). Understanding and helping families: A cognitive-behavioral approach. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum.

James, M. & Jongeward, D. (1996). Born to win: Transactional analysis with gestalt experiments. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing.
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Family Therapies Structural Family Approach Major Contributors

Words: 1993 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86892175

Family Therapies

Structural family approach

Major contributors of Structural family approach

Structural family approach mainly operates by considering problems within the family structure, it emphasizes on dealing with the individual symptom through examination of the whole family interaction pattern. Furthermore, this theory does not insist on the relation between family interactions and pathology but, it associates the symptoms with family's interaction. Structural family theory has three operating areas, these include; the family, the problem itself and the change process. First stage entails, the therapist knowing the kind of family he/she is dealing with, the composition and hierarchy of the family. he/she tries to fit in the family's environment so as to capture the real picture. In the second stage, the therapist identifies is specifically stopping the family from living harmoniously. he/she also finds out the function and position of the problem behavior Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008()

History of Structural family…… [Read More]

References

Bobrow, E., & Ray, W.A. (2004). Strategic Family Therapy in the Trenches. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 23(4), 28-38. doi: 10.1521/jsyt.23.4.28.57840

D'Angelo, S.L. (1995). The Milan approach to therapy revisited. PsycCRITIQUES, 40(4), 352-352. doi: 10.1037/003578

Goldenberg, H., & Goldenberg, I. (2008). Family Therapy: An Overview: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

Rosen, K.H. (2003). Strategic family therapy. In L.L. Hecker & J.L. Wetchler (Eds.), An introduction to marriage and family therapy. (pp. 95-121). Binghamton, NY U.S.: Haworth Clinical Practice Press.
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Cognitive and Behavioral Techniques Therapy

Words: 1586 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9470176

Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive and behavioral techniques / therapy

Cognitive Therapist Behavioral Techniques

Case of the Fat Lady

Cognitive behaviorist therapy is a blend of two therapies; cognitive therapy and behavioral therapy. Cognitive therapy first developed by Aaron Beck in 1960 has its focus on individual beliefs and their influences on actions and moods. Its core aims are to alter an individual mindset to be healthy and adaptive (Beck, 1976; athod, Kingdon, Weiden, & Turkington, 2008). Behavioral therapy focuses on individual aims and actions towards changing patterns in unhealthy behaviors (athod et al., 2008). Cognitive behavioral therapy assists an individual to focus on their current difficulties and relate on how to resolve them. Active involvement of both the therapist and the patient helps in identification of the thinking patterns in distort bringing into foresight a recognizable change in thought and behavior (Leichsenring & Leibing, 2007). Exploring and encouraging discussions…… [Read More]

References

Beck, A.T. (1976). Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. New York: International Universities Press.

Burns, Kubilus, Breuhl, Harden, R.N., & Lofland, K. (2003). Do changes in cognitive factors influence outcome following multidisciplinary treatment for chronic pain? A cross-lagged panel analysis. . Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 81-91.

Leichsenring, F., & Leibing, E. (2007). Psychodynamic psychotherapy: a systematic review of techniques, indications and empirical evidence. Psychology and Psychotherapy, 80(2), 217-228.

Rathod, S., Kingdon, D., Weiden, P., & Turkington, D. (2008). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for medication-resistant schizophrenia: a review. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 14(1), 22-33.
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Reality Therapy it Was During

Words: 3568 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60708715

Perceptions are generally based on the present, and therefore, the need to explore the past by delving into it in great detail becomes totally unnecessary. Glasser felt that even if the person exhibited bizarre and extremely strange types of behavior at a particular time, it was because of an innate reason of trying and attempting to find the best solution in order to meet the person's needs at that particular time in his life, and therefore, it was logical and sane to him, if not to others who would sometimes label him as strange or insane. (the Use of eality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools) delinquent would make choices based on the best way to meet his basic needs at that time, and therefore, must not be criticized. This, in essence formed the theory of eality Therapy of William Glasser, wherein the concept of 'Choice Theory' was emphasized…… [Read More]

References

Hazelden, Paul. "Reality Therapy" Retrieved at  http://www.hazelden.org.uk/gr01/art_gr003_reality_therapy.htm . Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Historic Overview of Psychiatric Care" Retrieved at http://www.jcjc.cc.ms.us/faculty/adn/jmcmillan/psychcl1.html. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "From Reality Therapy to Reality Therapy in Action" Retrieved at http://www.socc.ie/~wgii/articlebl.htm. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "The Use of Reality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools" Retrieved at  http://www.ncge.ie/handbook_docs/Section1/Reality_Therapy_Guide_Sch.doc . Accessed on 30 November, 2004
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Reality Therapy

Words: 1693 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8235670

Reality Therapy

William Glasser wrote the book reality therapy in 1965. Since its publication, it has gained increasing prominence in the United States, as well as the world. Dr. Glasser developed his ideology to address the limitations he found in the Freudian model of psychology. The methods and practices intrinsic to reality therapy differ substantially from conventional therapy. Dr. Glasser challenges several widely accepted notions of psychiatry, such as mental illness and the role of therapists. Glasser founded the William Glasser Institute to encourage the spread of his ideas into psychiatric practice.

Over the last thirty-five years, Glasser's ideology has proven to be an effective form of therapy, with successes in both institutional settings and private practices.

Reality therapy concentrates on the client's needs and getting them to confront the reality of the world. In Reality Therapy, these needs are classified into power, love and belonging, freedom, fun, and survival.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Corey (2000). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy, 6th Ed. Brooks/Cole, 2001.

Glasser, Naomi (1989). Control Theory in the Practice of Reality Therapy. New York: Harper & Row.

Glasser, Carleen and William (2000). Getting Together and Staying Together. New York: HarperCollins.

Glasser, William (1965) Reality Therapy: A New Approach to Psychiatry. New York: Harper & Row.
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talk therapy and psychotherapy in psychology

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61716960

1. The term “depth psychology” is appropriate for referring to psychoanalysis, but not for all types of psychotherapy. Any psychotherapy that involves in-depth self-assessments through the exploration of unconscious or subconscious urges, dreams, or childhood memories can be considered depth psychology. As the term suggests, depth psychology presumes that psychological issues have deep roots, requiring a process of systematic digging. Self-awareness is only possible through an understanding of all psychic content that has been and still is being repressed or suppressed (Axelrod, 2012). Depth psychology is therefore important for persons who experienced childhood traumas, or people seeking to understand the causes of their lingering anxiety or depression. Other therapeutic models like cognitive-behavioral therapy or positive psychology do not focus on the subconscious or unconscious but mainly on manifest behaviors.

According to Firestone (2009), depth psychology has its detractors because of the long periods of time required to complete the therapeutic…… [Read More]

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Impact of meditation on addiction therapy

Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31783494

A synthesis of what the studies reveal about the current state of knowledge on the question developed

The mindfulness meditation theory appears to have the potential to treat addictive disorder patients. Zgierska and coworkers (2009) state that such models seem to be safe if implemented within the context of clinical studies. One can find considerable methodological shortcomings in a majority of existing works on the subject. Further, which addiction-diagnosed individuals may derive maximum benefits out of mindfulness meditation isn’t clear. But, of late, related initiatives and practices in the role of complementary clinical aids for treating multiple physical and psychological ailments have grown in popularity. MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) and MBSR (mindfulness-based stress reduction) as clinical initiatives have specifically been analyzed, with a sound evidential pool recording their efficacy. Integration of the latter initiative’s aspects and cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive psychology strategies resulted in the former’s creation. At first,…… [Read More]

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Psychedelic Therapy Psychedelic or Hallucinogenic

Words: 2192 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95412737

" Long-term use may develop psychoses, like schizophrenia and severe depression. The use of MDMA may produce psychological difficulties, like confusion, depression, sleep problems, drug craving, severe anxiety and paranoia, even weeks after the use of the drug. MSMA develops symptoms, such as muscle tension, nausea, blurred vision, rapid eye movements, faintness, chills, sweating, and increased heart rate and blood pressure. it, therefore, poses a special risk for those with heart disease. Overuse can lead to death (Kurtzweil).

West Africans used ibogaine as a stimulant and aphrodisiac in the early 1900s (Kurtzweil 1995). Native Americans used mescaline from peyote cactus in religious rituals. LSD was first synthesized in 1938. Throughout history, it was considered a source of many types of medications. Its psychedelic effects were first discovered in 1943. Two decades after World War II, LSD was used to determine its effects on patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kotler, Steven. Drugs in Rehab. Psychology Today: Sussex Publishers, Inc., April 2005

Klotter, Jule. End-of-Life and Psychedelic Research. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients: The Townsend Group, July 2005

Kurtzweil, Paula. Medical Possibilities for Psychedelic Drugs. FDA Consumer: U.S. Government Printing Office, September 1995

Luke, David P. And Marrios Kottenis. A Preliminary Survey of Paranormal Experiences with Psychoactive Drugs. Journal of Parapsychology: Parapsychology Press, 2005
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Thermo Therapy

Words: 3365 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52189201

Thermo Therapy

Application of healing thermal agents to certain body areas that feel wounded or dysfunction is heat treatment. The main use of a heat treatment is to help alleviate pain, support muscle repose, increase function of the tissue cells, improve blood flow, and remove poison from cells and to increase the extensibility of soft tissues. Superficial and deep are the two types of heat treatment. Superficial heat treatments apply heat to the exterior part of the body. Heat aimed at certain inner tissues through ultrasound or by electric current is deep heat treatment. Heat treatments are favorable before exercise, giving a limbering up result to the soft tissues involved. Heat treatment using conduction as a form of heat transfer in hot pacts is very common. Damp heat packs are easily available in most hospitals, physical treatment centers and sports teaching rooms.

For tissue heating many thermal agents are on…… [Read More]

References

Bigos S, Bowyer O, Braen G. et al. Acute lower back problems in adults. Clinical Practice Guideline, Quick Reference Guide Number 14. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, AHCPR Pub. No. 95-0643. December 1994.p.3-6

Biundo JJ Jr., Torres-Ramos FM: Rehabilitation and biomechanics. Curr Opin Rheumatol 1991 April; 3(2): 291-99

Fedorczyk J: The role of physical agents in modulating pain. Journal of Hand Therapy 1997 Apr-June; 10(2): 110-21

Grana WA: Physical agents in musculoskeletal problems: heat and cold therapy modalities. Instructional Course Lecture 1993; 42: 439-42.
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Schopenhauer Cure Group Therapy in

Words: 941 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52813116

Stuart's willingness finally to insert himself into the group with some vulnerability would demonstrate a legitimate step for which he would receive ample support from the group. The functionality of this process would be rewarding to Julius, who took it is with some comfort which had been scarce in the prior two weeks.

Still, Stuart's case remains a difficult one throughout the process, with his strong professional and intellectual capabilities often undermined or sullied by his disengagement. This causes some resentment from others in the group and results in Stuart associating many of the women in the group with his wife, who responds similarly to the sense that he stands passively aside and witnesses human interaction without ever fully partaking. From the perspective of Julius, this is a mixed-bag, with the group causing confrontations with Stuart that often force him to mediate through his emotions. On the other hand, as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Yalom, I. (2005). The Schopenhauer Cure: A Novel. Harper Collins.
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An indepth analysis of The Postmodern Therapy Models

Words: 3747 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47612930

Shifting the Meanings and eliefs of Clients

Collaborative practice is variously and commonly referred to as conversational practice, social construction, postmodern, or dialogical, practice. It has evolved from assumptions in the wider postmodern movement in human and social sciences. It has also derived its elements from dialogue and social construction theories. Collaborative relations refer to the manner in which we orient ourselves; act, respond and be with another human so as to have them join in a therapeutic engagement that is shared and joint action (Shotter, 1984). This is also referred to as shared inquiry. In an earlier proposition, Shotter (1984) stated that all humans only exist in joint action; in meeting and interactive discourses with others in mutual fashion. He has lately opted to use ''relationally responsive'' notion (Shotter 2008). He implies that we are naturally relational beings with mutual influence on each other. Thus, the self cannot be…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, H. (2009). Collaborative Practice: Performing spontaneously. Finland Collaborative Practice, 1-24.

Andresen, R., Caputi, P., Oades, LG. (2000) Inter-relater reliability of the Camberwell assessment of need short appraisal schedule (CANSAS). Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 34: 856-861

Anderson, H. (1994) Good Mother, Bad Mother: A Dissolving Dilemma [Video File].

 http://www.viddler.com/v/f67bef08?secret=82067950
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Resistance Group Therapy for Decades

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82208573



Multiple studies support the use of cognitive behavioral approaches in individual therapy combined with group therapy sessions to support self-care behavior, self-efficacy and positive patient outcomes (Van der Ven, et. al, 2005; Bernard & Goodyear, 1002; Alterkruse & ay, 2000). Altekruse & ay (2000) also support the notion that group therapy may be interchangeable with individual therapy to promote positive outcomes among patients.

Conclusions

esults of the studies reviewed suggest a new approach to group therapy should include individual and group sessions that encourage patients to focus on their successes rather than failures. At this time the evidence supporting group therapy over individual therapy is conflicting. Much of the research suggests that both approaches may be equally effective. egardless many therapists still advocate group therapy as a primary modality for overcoming patient issues.

Pre-group training sessions may help members of the group adopt a new attitudes toward therapy that enables…… [Read More]

References

Altekrsue, M. & Ray, D. (2000). "Effectiveness of group supervision vs. combined group and individual supervision." Counselor Education and Supervision, 40(1):19.

Bernard, J., & Goodyear, R. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision (2nd ed.).

Boston: Allyn & Bacon

Classen, C. (2000). "Group therapy for cancer patients: A research-based handbook of psychosocial care." New York: Basic Books.
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How to Provide Positive Therapy for a Depressed Anxious Person

Words: 2810 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67558079

afternoon, light rain falling and predictions of thunder storms on the way. Client was eight minutes late to his appointment. "It doesn't matter that you're a few minutes late, I am glad to see you -- but is everything going okay this afternoon?" he was asked by therapist.

Client seems defensive when no pressure at all is put on him. First he said his watch stopped, then he admitted he lost track of time because he was into playing a new video game. He asked if video games are a bad thing and was assured that entertainment was his choice.

"Oh, also," he added. "After I was in my car I went back to my apartment to get my umbrella." Client is trying to maintain a good relationship with the therapist.

The client was sweating when he sat down, and it was humid in the room so we agreed the…… [Read More]

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CBT Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Case Study

Words: 5334 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41705783

Cognitive Behavior Therapy- A Case Study

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Case Study

Case report

K is a forty-eight-year female who referred to Midlothian's clinical psychology psychosis service. K has a twenty-year history of mental health conditions. She first decided to contact mental health services because of the episodes of paranoia and severe depression she had experienced. During her initial contact with the mental health services she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 1996. When she was first referred to the mental health services department she was a single. She told of having only two close relationships in her past life. She however also said that she found these relationships challenging when it came to intimate contact. She also generally described that she found it somewhat difficult to form friendships or to trust people in her life. Despite the mental health conditions her general physical well-being was good. K was prescribed…… [Read More]

References

Bladek, M. (2014). Against memory: Acts of remembering in Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. Retrieved from http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/2007%20Fall%20Documents/Affect%20Abstracts/Abstracts.htm

DeJong, P. & . Berg I.K (1998): Interviewing for solutions. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Drisko, J. (2014). Research Evidence and Social Work Practice: The Place of Evidence-Based Practice. Clin Soc Work J. 42:123-133 DOI 10.1007/s10615-013-0459-9

Freud, S. (1924) A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Boni & Liveright.
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Limited Therapy Effects of Managed

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20624228



Gervaise et. al, (1999) point out that increasingly financial reimbursement restrictions from managed care agencies play a critical role "in the quality of patient care" (1). According to the researchers, "complicated contractual arrangements among multiple providers obstruct rather than facilitate provisions for continuity of patient care" (Gervaise, et. al, 1).

New Advances In Modern Care - Addressing Time Limited Therapy

In the short- and long-term it is likely that limits on therapy will remain. Thus new treatment models must be developed to ensure adequate care. New requirements and restrictions placed by managed care organizations necessitate change in the health care field. Much of the research available supports more training for psychologists so they learn techniques for succeeding using group therapy practices (Drotos, 1997; Kent, 2000; Joseph, 1997). Group oriented approaches enable successful time limited treatments and cost effective services that health maintenance organizations are more likely to support.

There is…… [Read More]

References

Ackley D.C. (1997). Breaking free of managed care. New York: Guilford.

Bistline, J.L, Sheridan, S., & Winegar, N. (1992). "Implementing a group therapy program in a managed care setting: Combining cost effectiveness and quality care." The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 73(1): 30.

Drotos J.C. (1997). "Upheavals in the land of the giants." Behavioral Health

Management, 17 (8), 39-40.
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Dr Murray Bowen Family Systems Therapy Contribution

Words: 1273 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36071808

Dr. Murray Bowen family systems therapy contribution family therapy. Explain the Bowenian

Dr. Murray Bowen's place in family systems therapy is secure and is one of the most prominent of theorists within this field. He has helped to pioneer a number of important concepts within this discipline, which have actually served to revolutionize the field itself and its very conception of not only human nature, but of human interactivity at the family level. In fact, Bowen's work in family systems therapy has transcended this field alone, and has been applied to others aspects of erudition such as crisis situations and how people respond to them -- as denoted by his work with the Environmental Protection Agency (Baege, 2005). In contemporary times, Bowen's theory (alternately referred to as the Bowenian model) serves as the basis for family systems therapy.

Throughout the course of his Bowen's professional career he uncovered numerous theoretical…… [Read More]

References

Baege, M. (2005). Dr. Murray Brown. Vermont Center for Family Studies. Retrieved from  http://www.vermontcenterforfamilystudies.org/about_vcfs/dr_murray_bowen/ 

Brown, J. (1999). Bowen family systems theory and practice: illustration and critique. A.N.Z.J. Family Therapy. 20(2), 94-103.

The Bowen Theory. (No date). Bowen theory. www.thebowencenter.org. Retrieved from http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/theory.html