Urban Geography Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Urban Areas

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9462953

Urban Area

Globalization has created a profound impact on society. Through globalization, emerging markets continue to grow and develop. New and innovative products are created that provide solutions to societal problems. As such, wealth is created that is distributed to nations that provide services to humanity. As wealth is distributed, urban areas are created and cultivated. These cities, over time, become populated with the new inhabitants, and continue to thrive. The development of cities and urban areas correlates directly with economic growth and development. With an economic system that continues to innovate, produce product and provide jobs, urban areas cannot be properly developed. The documentary, Urbanized is a testament to the merits of a market economy and how the city of the future may be fundamentally different from the city of today (Kolb, 1972).

To begin Urbanized provides enlightening insights into which the colonies or social formations, in which we…… [Read More]

References:

1) Kolb, Frank (1984). Die Stadt im Altertum. Munchen: Verlag C.H. Beck. pp. 51-141: Morris, A.E.J. (1972). History of Urban Form. Prehistory to the Renaissance. London. pp. 22-23

2) Taylor, Nigel, (2007), Urban Planning Theory since 1945, London, Sage.

3) Wheeler, Stephen (2004). "Planning Sustainable and Livable Cities," Routledge; 3rd edition
View Full Essay

Geographies of Global Change 1

Words: 2794 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35757888

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice or maize) undermines other native crops. Routledge writes, "The project destabilized traditional farming methods, which further rationalized the use of new technologies from the West, and the displacement of traditional foodstuffs by the HYVs" (316). The whole agro-food system has damaged the soil fertility and made dependent the poorer nations, who are compelled to use the seeds of the manufacturers and their means of industrial growth (fertilizer, experts, credit, etc.). People are viewed as irrational and a hindrance to progress. State control over natural and financial resources consolidates the power of the national ruling party who serves the interests of transnational corporations. Routledge writes, "In the process, traditional subsistence economies and their associated cultures are being destroyed; people face displacement from their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, R.J., Peter J. Taylor, and Michael J. Watts, eds. Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World at the End of the Twentieth Century. 2nd edition. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 2002; reprint, 2007.
View Full Essay

Racism and America's Urban Cycle

Words: 1303 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87201027

Essentially, those in the lower tiers of the urban
socioeconomic hierarchy, rather than having been drawn out of despair, have
been thrust to the periphery of America's 'revitalizing' cities.

Question 2:
One of the most important points raised by the course reading
material would be that underscoring a clear proclivity toward urban design
and planning in those who would first colonize the new lands. Though
massive and ripe with natural resources and incredible frontiers, the new
land was also flowing with inherently profitable waterways, brimming with
commercial trade prospects and inhabited by a native population which,
though Chudacoff reports it to have been significantly underestimated as an
city-dwelling peoples as well, would appear ripe for exploitation. More
importantly though to this discussion would be the text's consideration of
the inherency of the European urban culture to America's development.
Indeed, according to Chudacoff's (2005) account, "the Europeans who
colonized North America…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Chudacoff H. & J.E. Smith. (2005) The Evolution of American Society,
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0-13-189824

Jacobs, Jane. (1961). The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New
York, Vintage Books. ISBN:067974195X

Massey, D. and N. Denton. (1998). American Apartheid: Segregation and the
View Full Essay

Geography on Political Cultural and Economic Development

Words: 994 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81771943

Geography on Political, Cultural, and Economic Development of Early Civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley

The focus of this study is the effect of geography on the political, cultural, and economic development of early civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley. The characteristic that Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley all have in common is that they were all river valleys. Therefore, the geography of these locations was very much alike and likewise their culture, political landscape, and economic development were all very much the same.

Statement of Thesis

The civilization of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley were highly affected by the geography of these regions, which resulted in rapid expansion, and growth of these civilizations and which affected the cultural, political, and economic environment of these areas of the world.

Mesopotamia & Egypt

What is known as the Urban revolution occurred in Mesopotamia and Egypt…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ancient Civilizations to 300 BC Introduction: The Invention and Diffusion of Civilization (2006) The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Retrieved from: http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/lecture_ancient_civ.htm

Guisepi, R.A. (nd) The Indus Valley and the Genesis of South Asian Civilization. Retrieved from:  http://history-world.org/indus_valley.htm
View Full Essay

World Regional Geography

Words: 1755 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26051413

Geography

Questions On World Regional Geography

Generally speaking, African colonies during the colonial period were seen as expensive liabilities by the great European powers, especially in relation to trading concessions. Toward the end of the 19th century, the attitudes of these powers altered as rival industrial nations like Great Britain, Germany, France and Belgium, attempted to locate and develop overseas markets for their goods. In 1885, the Berlin Conference was convened to resolve conflicts of interest in Africa by allotting areas of exploitation to these colonial powers. As a result, the so-called "scramble for Africa" began in which these powers sought to establish their "rightful" claims to vast expanses of land.

When this conference was convened, most of Africa was under colonial control and was subsequently broken up into numerous states, made up of some fifty separate countries with very irregular geographical boundaries. One major problem linked to this break-up…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

French Geography Help to Broaden and Deepening

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21780371

French geography help to broaden and deepening your knowledge of France? Does learning geography help to change preconceived notions or stereotypes about France and the French people? What in your view is a good way to learn about a country's geography?

Have you ever stopped to wonder if your geographic origins have affected how you think about yourself?

For example, I have always noticed that I sound a lot like the people who grew up in my town, but if I go 100 mles south or north, I no longer quite fit in. If I go further than that, I sometimes sound foreign to people aoround me. In 1977, I went from my home town of York to Portsmouth on the south coast of England. I moved about 300 miles from the north to the south. During try-outs for the volleyball team, one of the coaches, hearing me speak, asked…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Region of Megalopolis Urban Area in Northern

Words: 1883 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63836943

Region of Megalopolis (urban area in Northern America) and its sub-Region of Nantucket (off Cape Cod)

This paper describes the geographic region of Megalopolis (urban area in Northern America) and its sub-region of Nantucket (off Cape Cod). It also deals with the history of Nantucket and the causes that led to the formation of the megalopolis in northeastern USA. Megalopolis comes from the Greek words for 'very large' (Mega) and city (polis). It basically means a very large city. Jean Gottmann, a Frenchman, coined this term to refer to northeastern USA extending from oston to Washington DC. The idea of Megalopolis existed in Ancient Greece where they attempted to create a very large city in the Peloponnese Peninsula. Their attempt was unsuccessful but the small city of Megalopolis that they created still exists. The concept of Megalopolis lies in the fact that cities are not viewed as individual units but…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gottmann, Jean. Megalopolis: The Urbanized Northeastern Seaboard of the United States. New York: The Twentieth Century Fund, 1961.

J. Gottman, The Coming of the Transactional City, University of Maryland Institute for Urban Studies, 1983.

Mittleman, Earl. "An Outline of American Geography. United States Information Agency, 1995.

Basingstoke. "Megalopolis: The Giant City in History" Macmillan, 1993
View Full Essay

California Geography Fresno The Desert

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16494747

1). Ironically, these workers who feed others are often hungry themselves, even when they bring home some of the rejected crop they harvest to feed their families. A 2007 study of agricultural workers in the area found that nearly half (45%) met the criteria of food insecurity. 34% of respondents were food insecure without hunger while an additional 11% were food insecure with hunger (irth et al. 2007, p.1). "Nearly half (48%) of eligible respondents reported utilizing the food stamp program, which is comparable to 53% of eligible Fresno County residents. However, food stamp participation varies by season. hereas 55% of eligible respondents utilized the program in the winter, only 37% of eligible respondents did so in the summer. Many respondents interviewed during the summer believed they were not eligible for this program because they were working or earned too much" (irth et al. 2007, p.24). They had little or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fresno California. Greenwich Mean Time. February 29, 2009. November 29, 2009.

http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/time-zone/usa/california/fresno/index.htm

Drury, Pauline. "Fresno." Ancestry.com. November 29, 2009.

 http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hummingbird/Fresno-County/fresno_county.htm
View Full Essay

Social Geography of the Los

Words: 1242 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3147336

57). This makes the idea that the minority communities that are using the community as a "springboard" for assimilation because there are less of the domestic non-Hispanic whites in the areas in which immigrants would typically assimilate.

There has even been the development of what is referred to as planned communities. Irvine California serves as a good example of such a development. Irvine was developed from ranch lands from a single developer that constructed "urban villages" in Orange County (Maher, 2004, p. 782). The particular site selected for this 1-997 study was in many ways a "typical" Irvine neighborhood. A planned community developed in the mid-1970s, Ridgewood comprised 246 single-family homes on a collection of cul-de-sacs connected by three public through streets: on average, residents were highly educated- 39% had graduate or professional degrees- and most of those who were employed worked in professional, managerial, technical, or sales positions (Maher,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maher, K. (2004). Borders and Social Distinction in the Global Suburb. American Quarterly, 781-806.

Zhou, M., Tseng, Y., & Kim, R. (2008). Rethinking Residential Assimilation: The Case of a Chinese Ethnoburb in the San Gabriel Valley, California. Amerasia Journal, 55-83.
View Full Essay

World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
View Full Essay

Water Geography Part One Terms

Words: 2762 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16776764

But after local wastewater plants were "...upgraded and farms' management practices were improved, the amount of phosphorus declined and the copper sulfate was no long considered necessary" (Royte, 2007). The Times' story reports that to prevent the dumping of partially treated sewage water into the waterways, septic tanks need to be upgraded and "cleaning the water in sewage treatments plants even more thoroughly before it is discharged into the watershed..." is necessary. That will be quite a job, because "more than two dozen of the roughly 100 wastewater treatment plants that discharge into the city's watershed use a suboptimal cleaning process."

TO: The flooding problem. hy has it become a more serious problem in recent years? Taking New York City as an example of the problem and its roots, the New York Times article alluded to in the previous section points out that recently, as developers began clearing more and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clausen, Jan. (2000). Northwest Tribes Fight Against Formidable Odds to Save Endangered

Salmon. Nation. 270(3), 22-24.

Gelt, Joe. (2005). Managing the Interconnecting Waters: The Groundwater-Surface Water

Dilemma. University of Arizona. Retrieved Oct. 16, 2007, at http://cals.arizona.edu/axwater/arroyo/081con.html.
View Full Essay

William Renwick The Content of

Words: 5769 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76841378

The biosphere consists of all living organisms on the planet. The atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere function collectively to provide he environment which sustains the biosphere. These four spheres interact to create ecological systems. These ecosystems, as they are called, are groups of organisms and the nonliving environment which they exist in.

In the process of living and working in an area, people modify the landscape to suit their purposes or tastes. These are called cultural landscapes. Many geographers maintain that the entire surface of the earth constitutes a cultural landscape, as humans have changed the face of the planet to such a great degree. Some geographers also put forth environmentalist theories, which emphasize the role of the environment in human life. The interaction between humans and the environment is a circular effect- environment affects human life and culture, while humans alter and transform the environment. Geographers have studied the ways…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

camden new jersey and corruption exploitation

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41373571

Camden, New Jersey is a city that symbolizes racial segregation and embodies the worst of American capitalism. In Camden, "poverty is a business," (Hedges and Sacco 88). George Norcross, aka "King George" -- is the de facto big man of Camden. Only, Norcross does not live in Camden, has no official elected position, and is white -- unlike the vast majority of Camden residents. Camden is not the typical white flight story, either. The history of Camden reveals potent trends in American urban geography, particularly the theme of how intersections between race, class, gender, and power entrench corruption in American society. One research question that can be elucidated through a deeper analysis of Chapter 2 in Hedges and Sacco's Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt would be how the people can reclaim their cities from the wanton destruction, alienation, and exploitation symbolized by the likes of King George.

King George…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Globalization the Intent of This

Words: 1581 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59953415



In summary, globalization is essential for global economies to continually grow. Protectionism is allegorical to a person going on strike and not working; it is imperative for nations to not pursue this strategy and instead realize that each of them competes on a global playing field every day. While the critics of globalization voice their fears, they need to realize that the many aspects of competing globally have been in existence within economic systems for centuries, and that the gauntlet of efficiency and ability to respond quickly and accurately to customer's needs, no matter where they are, is the gauntlet any company must pick up if they hope to survive in the 21st century.

eferences

Friedman, (1999) - the Lexus and the Olive Tree. Anchor Press. May 2, 1999. New York, NY

Friedman, T. (2005) - the World Is Flat. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. New York, NY. Published 2005

Geert…… [Read More]

References

Friedman, (1999) - the Lexus and the Olive Tree. Anchor Press. May 2, 1999. New York, NY

Friedman, T. (2005) - the World Is Flat. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. New York, NY. Published 2005

Geert Hofstede (1983). The cultural relativity of organizational practices and theories. Journal of International Business Studies (pre-1986), 14(000002), 75. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 83259133).

Hall, Peter V (2005). Globalizing L.A.: Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development. Economic Geography, 81(3), 329-330. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 884511621).
View Full Essay

Edward Robinson 1794-1864 Was an

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67527594

Dr. David Livingstone seemed to epitomize this view, "These privations, I beg you to observe, are not sacrifices. I think that word ought never to be mentioned in reference to anything we can do for Him….Can that be a sacrifice which is simply paid back as a small part of a great debt owing to our God, which we can never repay… it is a privilege."

With this attitude of sacrifice for the greater glory, and it was certainly that for many who endured pain, pestilence, disease, hunger and bodily harm, also came a certain attitude about modernizing and bringing the native populations into the modern world through Christ. In places as diverse as Hawaii, the Philippines, central Africa, and even the Muslim world, these well-meaning missionaries invariable also brought with them cultural baggage and xenophobia. While wishing to save the population from the fires of Hell through Christianity, there…… [Read More]

Smith, E. (1834). Missionary Researches in Armenia: Including a Journey Through Asia Minor. London, J.S. Hudson. Cited in: http://books.google.com/books?id=-c0NAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Eli+Smith&hl=en&ei=e0Y9TN3FG4rCsAP3xLjaCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CFYQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

Hallote, 2006, p.12.

Williams, J. (1999). The Times of Edward Robinson: Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature.
View Full Essay

Contested Public Space Memories and History

Words: 3233 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54232899

CONESED PUBLIC SPACE: MEMORIES & HISORY

Contested Public Space: Memories and History

Das Denkmal fur Die Ermordeten Juden Europas

he Memory Landscape.

Mary's is a large old-style brick church belonging to the council of the Hanseatic city of Lubeck. On the floor at the rear of the church, broken pieces of two large bells remain where they fell during an air raid in World War II. he third largest church in Germany, it took 100 years to construct St. Mary's but just one Palm Sunday night in March of 1942 to nearly destroy it. As with so many churches ruined by bombing during the war, parishioners debated about restoration. Citizens living on war-torn homeland are caught: here is a lingering desire to preserve physical destruction as a message or signal to subsequent generations, or as an effort to share the horror of war time experience. If the physical evidence of…… [Read More]

The Construction of the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin.

A competition for the design of the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin was held in April of 1994. Twelve artists were invited to submit a design and a stipend of 50, 000 German Marks was provided to each candidate. The proposals would be reviewed by a jury with representatives from architecture, urban design, art, history, administration, and politics. Interest in the project grew and at the end of the competitive period, 528 proposals had been submitted. Rounds of reviews commenced and 13 proposals were selected. But during the interim period between meetings, the jurors -- who ostensibly were then able to review the critiques of their fellow jurors -- asked that 11 proposals be put back in the running. Two proposals were finally recommended to the foundation for feasibility study. One proposal was designed by Simon Ungers architectural group from Hamburg, and one proposal was designed by Christine Jackob-Marks. Jackob-Marks' work included names of murdered Jews engraved in a large concrete plate, with empty spaces signifying Jews who could not be identified by name. Her proposal also included debris from Massada where the Jewish inhabitants avoided capture by invading Romans by killing themselves. Chancellor Helmut Kohl vetoed this proposal. It was considered too "German" and too similar to the Nazi death rosters. The controversy continued under many different guises.

In June of 1998, Peter Eisenman's design was chosen, but it was scaled down to 2,711 blocks, or stelae, after considerable controversy.[footnoteRef:22] Daniel Liebeskind, who was pupil of Eisenman's, claimed that Eisenman stole his design from the Berlin Jewish Museum's Garden of Exile. In July of 2001, billboards reflecting Holocaust denial sentiments appeared in Berlin triggering a funding controversy. [footnoteRef:23] In October of 2003, there was a major disruption to the project. Degesch, a subsidiary of the German company Degussa, was revealed by a Swiss newspaper to be the same firm that made Zyklon-B, the gas used in the gas chambers to murder Jews in the extermination camps. Degussa had been hired to coat the concrete slabs with an anti-graffiti substance. In fact, many stelae had already been coated and the anti-graffiti substance had been discounted as in-kind sponsorship of the memorial. Degussa had National-Socialist leanings during the war and this fact was ostensibly known to the construction management company and to Lea Rosh. Rosh declared that she had no prior knowledge of the connection, and she is reported to have said that, "Zylon-B is obviously the limit."[footnoteRef:24] Another subsidiary of Degussa had, but this time, already poured the concrete foundation for the stelae. Members of the Jewish community were outraged at Degussa's involvement and wanted them out of the project. Politicians on the Board of the foundation did not want to impose further expense on the project by stopping construction, or worse, destroying any construction that Degasse had already accomplished. The cost of this action was estimated at €2.34 million. One Board member, Wolfgang Thierse, was reported to say, "[T]he past intrudes into our society."[footnoteRef:25] The Zentrairat der Juden in Germany was outspoken about not continuing the work with Degrasse. Hezryk Broder emphasized that, "The Jews don't need this memorial, and they are not prepared to declare a pig sty kosher." [footnoteRef:26] Peter Eisenberg, perhaps in a bid to see his work finished, supported continuing the project with Degrasse. In November 2003, work restarted with Degrasse. In May of 2005, the Das Denkmal fur Die Ermordeten Juden Europas was completed. At the opening ceremony, Peter Eisenberg spoke about the significance of the Mahnmal, saying that, "It is clear that we won't have solved all the problems -- architecture is not a panacea for evil -- nor will we have satisfied all those present today, but this cannot have been our intention."[footnoteRef:27] [22: Historic Sites -- Berlin, Op. Cit. ] [23: Ibid. ] [24: Translated from "Die Grenze ist ganz klar Zyklon B." Leggewie / Meyer, 2005, p. 294. ] [25: Translated from "Die Vergangenheit ragt in unsere Gesellschaft hinein." Claus Leggewie and Erik Meyer (2005) "Ein Ort, an den man gerne geht." Das Holocaust-Mahnmal und die deutsche Geschichtspolitik nach 1989. Munich, DE: Carl Hanser Verlag Publisher. Munich. p. 294.] [26: Translated from "Di Juden brauchen dieses Mahnmal nicht, und sind nicht beriet, eine Schweinerei als koscher zu erklaren." Leggewie / Meyer, 2005, p. 294] [27: Berstein, Richard. (2005, May 11) Holocaust Museum opens in Berlin, The New York Times. Retrieved  http://www.nytimes.com /2005/0511/international/europe/11germany. ]
View Full Essay

Globalization on Culture

Words: 1299 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76581162

Globalization and Culture

It is stated in the work of Lieber and Weisberg that culture "in its various forms now serves as a primary carrier of globalization and modern values and constitutes an important arena of contestation for national, religious, and ethnic identity." (2002, p.273) Technology was envisioned by Bill Clinton to be such that would further the cause of liberty however the other side of technology is more ominous in nature. Lieber and Weisberg write that from the view of both an artist and a political scientist it is possible to delve into the meeting of culture and politics with a synergistic effect that enables one to gain a better view that would be gained in a study on culture or politics alone. (Lieber and Weisberg, 2002, paraphrased) From all appearances, for everything gained by globalization, something is also lost. The example stated in the work of Lieber and…… [Read More]

References

Lieber, R.J. And Weisberg, R.E. (2002) Globalization, Culture, and Identities in Crisis Author(s): International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 2002),pp. 273-296.

Appiah, K.A. (2006). Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a world of strangers. New York and London W.W. Norton.

Foer, J.S. (2005). Extremely loud and incredibly close. New York: Mariner Houghton Mifflin.
View Full Essay

Geopolitics of Illegal Migration in the U S

Words: 938 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67823459

GEOPOLITICS OF ILLEGAL MIGATION IN THE U.S.

Illegal Immigration

Slowing or stopping the flow of immigrants across the U.S. Mexico border has remained a hot political issue for several decades. The events of 9/11 only added fuel to the fire and politicians have repeatedly promised to plug the leaky border. Although the budget and manpower of the Border Patrol has been tripled since 9/11, leaders in congress felt more needed to be done. In 2006 the Secure Fence Act was passed into law, which authorized funding to build 700 miles of fencing along the most troublesome stretches of the Mexico/U.S. border (Ellis, 2011). By the end of 2008 only 120 miles had been completed. In 2006 the Secure Border Initiative awarded a billion dollar contract to Boeing to build a virtual fence along the border and by the end of last year only 53 miles had been completed. The past…… [Read More]

References

Coleman, Matthew. (2008). Between public policy and foreign policy: U.S. immigration law reform and the undocumented migrant. Urban Geography, 29, 4-28.

Ellis, Ashton. (2011, Jan. 21). Border fence update: Governing elites use promises to ease resistance for illegal immigrants' amnesty. Texas Insider. Retrieved Oct. 20, 2011 from http://www.texasinsider.org/?p=41295

Jackson, Melinda S. (2011). Priming the sleeping giant: The dynamics of Latino political identity and vote choice. Political Psychology, 32, 691-716.

PEW Hispanic Center. (2011). The Mexican-American Boom: Births overtake immigration. Retrieved Oct. 20, 2011 from http://pewhispanic.org/files/reports/144.pdf
View Full Essay

How to Commemorate History

Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54340656

Memorials

There are events throughout history that are tragic, historic and/or are forever burned into the minds of those that experience and witness them. The burning question asked by many is how to (or how NOT to) commemorate and memorialize such events. Just a few examples of events that could be cited are the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Columbine shootings and 9/11. This report shall compare and contrast the perspectives of Marschall and Mitchell. While people generally agree that remembrance of the fallen and of events is a good thing, the "how" that is used to do that is sometimes a question with many different answers.

Marschall has her primary focus, at least initially, on the aftermath and memorials relating to South Africa and the time of Apartheid. Indeed, she notes that "many new monuments and memorials have been built or proposed since the advent of the post-apartheid…… [Read More]

References

Marschall, S. (2006). Visualizing Memories: The Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto. Visual Anthropology, 19(2), 145-169. doi:10.1080/08949460600598695

Mitchell, K. (2003). Monuments, Memorials & The Politics of Memory. Urban Geography, 24(5), 442-459.
View Full Essay

Little Odessa

Words: 1045 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57761070

Ethnography

Little Odessa, the predominantly ussian-speaking enclave of South Brooklyn, has been a thriving community for decades that achieved political power on its own. The area comprising Brighton Beach and Coney Island had once been a "summer getaway for wealthy New Yorkers," but morphed into a working class ethnic enclave after World War Two (obinson & D'Onfro, 2014). Subsequent waves of refugees from ussian-speaking areas of Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and ussia -- about 50 countries in total -- have poured in, lending the community a multi-ethnic and vibrant character. Since the 1970s, about 400,000 more refugees and immigrants from former Soviet republics have streamed into New York City and most have congregated in Brighton Beach (Miyares, 1998). In the 1980s, Soviet emigration policies started to become even more lax, enabling the inflight of more refugees from the Soviet Union, most of whom were Jewish. For a while now, Brighton…… [Read More]

References

Belenkaya, V. (2007). Little Odessa: A Russian mecca that smells just like home. NY Daily News. Dec 3, 2007. Retrieved online: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/odessa-russian-mecca-smells-home-article-1.271332

DiNapoli, T.P. & Bleiwas, K.B. (2012). An economic snapshot of Coney Island and Brighton Beach. State of New York Comptroller. Retrieved online:  http://www.osc.state.ny.us/osdc/rpt8-2012.pdf 

"Little Odessa," (2011). Retrieved online:  http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Little-Odessa-Brooklyn-NY.html 

Litvinskaya, A.A. (2011). Linguistic landscape of 'Little Russia by the Sea.' Indiana University of Pennsylvania Master's Thesis. Retrieved online:  http://dspace.iup.edu/handle/2069/297
View Full Essay

Extra Credit

Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73758829

Geography

In each case, what are the symbols of Irishness and Englishness?

The symbols of Irishness according to the Irish-Americans who organized the parade in Boston included heterosexuality. Their definition of their "nation" did not include those with alternate sexualities. This may have been reinforced by the strong Catholic ties in the group. In the case of Blacks in the English countryside, the Black woman feels accepted as "English" when she accepts the "sense of place" from the larger society that she belongs in urban areas but not in the overwhelmingly White countryside.

Whom did you feel sympathy for in each case? Why?

I felt sympathy for both groups. Those who organized the parade were blind to the gays and bisexuals among them, and for whatever reason, alternate sexualities just weren't part of what they thought of when they thought of "Irish." But at the same time, it's hard to…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Blue Mountain Big White on

Words: 1979 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11912502

These waterfalls provide a contrast to Blue Mountain and other mountains. As mountains rise, waterfalls fall. Another question that this project is focused on is the different ways in which waterfalls and mountains are valued differently as well as how they are valued the same in other situations.

This is how the government of Ontario describes and honors the Niagara Escarpment:

Designated a UNESCO World Biosphere eserve in 1990, the Niagara Escarpment is an internationally recognized landform and is the cornerstone of Ontario's Greenbelt. A landscape of rich biodiversity, home to hundreds of Ontario's Species at isk, vital watersheds, agricultural areas and 450-million year old geological history, the Niagara Escarpment is a treasure to protect for future generations of Ontarians. (Niagara Escarpment)

Perhaps it is that waterfalls can be seasonal while mountains remain all year round. But for a mountain that is defined by snow as opposed to just by…… [Read More]

References

Blue Mountain Skiing, http://www.bluemountain.ca/

Campbell, C.E. (2005). Shaped by the West Wind: Nature and history in Georgian Bay. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Harris, R.C. (Ed.) (1987). Historical Atlas of Canada, Volume I: From the Beginning to 1800. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Niagara Escarpment,  http://www.escarpment.org/home/index.php
View Full Essay

Economic and Geographical Restructuring of

Words: 1667 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1880304

However, when it comes to the long-term effects, the policies are exacerbating social problems, by forcing the poor and middle class from their homes. This is because many of these communities are targeted by wealthy developers. Over the course of time, this causes large projects to be constructed that are not economically viable. At which point, many governments are facing the twin forces of having to maintain such facilities, while seeing an increase in social assistance from those who lost their homes. In order to prevent this situation from becoming worse, alternative policies need to be coordinated with members of the community. There also needs to be a long-term economic viability studies conducted in the initial stages of planning, where various members of the community and businesses should play a major role. This will help to determine if such projects are sustainable in the community. If these two elements can…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Poor People Skills Threaten Urban Renewal." BBC News,  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/file_on_4/4327431.stm  (accessed June 21, 2010)

Funck, Bernard. Labor, Employment and Social Policies. Washington DC: World Bank, 2001.

Kok, Herman. "Restructuring the Retail Property Market in Central Europe." Multi-Development, AW Gouda, 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/w4179688574042h8/fulltext.html (accessed June 21, 2010)

Mucha, Thomas. "Greek Debt Crisis." Global Post,  http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/commerce/100505/greek-debt-crisis-unrest  (accessed June 21, 2010)
View Full Essay

Globalization Fostered by Free Flow of Information

Words: 1644 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35048602

Globalization, fostered by free flow of information and rapid progress in technology, is a driving force that no country can turn back. It does impose market discipline on the participants which can be harsh, but is the mechanism that drives progress and prosperity. Globalization emerged as a buzzword in the 1990s but the phenomena it refers to are not entirely new. As a ubiquitous term, what does "globalization" mean? Some observers emphasize the rapid and free flow of capital as the essential element. Others emphasize labor-that capital flows to where labor is highly productive while relatively cheap, that different parts of the production process can be performed in various far flung places by multiple sources of labor, and that workers themselves move within and between nations often and more easily.

According to Micklethwait and Wooldridge there are "three engines" driving globalization today. The first of those three engines is technology.…… [Read More]

References

Bowring, Philip. Thinking at Cross-Purposes About Globalization., International Herald Tribune, 02-01-2001.

Godfrey, B.J. 1984. Inner-City Revitalization and Cultural Succession: The Evolution of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury District. Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 46: 79-91.

1985. Ethnic Identities and Ethnic Enclaves: The Morphogenesis of San Francisco's Hispanic Barrio. Yearbook of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers 11: 45-53.

Godfrey, Brian J., Urban development and redevelopment in San Francisco. (California). Vol. 86, The Geographical Review, 07-01-1997, pp 309(25).
View Full Essay

California's Coastal Ocean Region

Words: 1547 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32670433

China Sample

California's costal ocean region is characterized with both positive and negative attributes. The California Coastal egion is along the coast of the Pacific Ocean. This area is a beautiful, desirable area to live in, causing real estate to be among the highest in the United States. In fact, this area was one of the fastest to recover after the great recession of 2008, due primarily to its natural beauty. In addition, the per capita income for families in the area is also usually higher than the general population in the country. This fact is intuitive as higher income families are those best able to afford the beauty and natural elements in which the California costal region offers. There are many rivers and streams that lead out to the ocean. The popular edwood Forest is also within the vicinity of the costal region. There are beautiful mountains and sand…… [Read More]

References:

1) Beckey, Fred W. (2000). Cascade Alpine Guide: Columbia River to Stevens Pass. Mountaineers Press. p. 11

2) Harris, S.L. (2005). Fire Mountains of the West: The Cascade and Mono Lake Volcanoes. Mountain Press. p. 61. ISBN 978-0-87842-511-2.

3) Smith, Genny; Putnam, Jeff (1976). Deepest Valley: a Guide to Owens Valley, its roadsides and mountain trails (2nd ed.). Genny Smith books. ISBN 0-931378-14-1.

4) Sawyer, John O. (2006). Northwest California. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
View Full Essay

National Planning Dynamics of National

Words: 590 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29630375

36). The United States is very much a patchwork of different approaches.

The Netherlands is a much smaller and more homogeneous country, especially in terms of the major factors that have the most immediate impact on urban planning (unhaar, Driessen, & Soer, 2009). The country is indeed -- as the name suggests -- a low-lying nation, a fact that has required central planning over generations to avoid catastrophic flooding and to ensure that the nation has sufficient arable land. Unlike the United States, which includes lands ranging from desert to tundra and densely population urban areas to very sparsely population plains, the Netherlands as a nation is bound together by its shared geography as well as by a population that has until recently been highly homogeneous. This has meant that almost all planning takes place on the national level and reflects shared cultural ideals about what the nation should and…… [Read More]

References

Garvin, a. (2002). The American City: What Works, What Doesn't. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Runhaar H., Driessen, PJ., Soer, P. (2009). Sustainable urban development and the challenge of policy integration: An assessment of planning tools for integrating spatial and environmental planning in the Netherlands. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 36(3): 417 -- 431.
View Full Essay

Role and Process of Suburbanization in Creation

Words: 1246 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81131562

ole and Process of Suburbanization in Creation of Metropolitan Areas

The divide between city and rural areas and the rise of the metropolis were features of the previous century. While the development of cities had its own problems, the development of the cities into metropolises created new hinterlands that other cities did not have. The new type of development across the metropolitan areas and its periphery came to be called urbanization. The process of suburban development in the United States was a result of the growth of the middle and upper classes. But there was also urbanization in industrial cities resulting in employment by the working-class that created settlements in industrial suburbs. Modern scholars identify three types of suburban growth- One the residential suburbs created by the rich and the second the industrial suburbs and the third, the development of 'unincorporated districts at the urban fringe.' (Harris; Larkham, 91)

One…… [Read More]

References

Banfield, Edward C; Grodzins, Morton. Government and Housing in Metropolitan Areas.

McGraw-Hill: New York.

Clawson, Marion. Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process. Resources for the Future: Baltimore, 1971.

Fellmann, Jerome Donald; Getis, Arthur; Getis, Judith. (1997) Human geography: landscapes of human activities. William C. Brown Pub.
View Full Essay

Role of Geoinformatics in 21st

Words: 2707 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83456614

Some of the key examples of where geospatial information can be important are during emergency responses during natural disasters especially for purposes of evacuation arrangement, and damage estimation assignments. MarcFarlane (2005) indicates that it is important to use geoinformatics to prevent disasters rather than try to deal with them after they happen. Geoinformatics assists those involved in the emergency processes by providing the necessary data and giving appropriate plans on how and from what point the hit areas should be approached. This makes the whole process convenient and effective since there is no time wasted in guessing the steps to take and the actions taken are accurate and appropriate (Oosterom et al. 2005). It has to be noted however that there are a number of difficulties that are faced in using geoinformatics to manage disaster as explained by Zerger & Smith (2003).

The transport network in any region is highly…… [Read More]

References

Cutter, S.L., et al. (Eds) (2003). Geographical dimensions of terrorism. London: Routledge.

DeMers, M.N. (1997). Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. New York: Wiley.

Greene, R.w. (2002). Confronting catastrophe: A GIS handbook. Redlands: ESRI Press.

Jha, M.M. & Singh, R.B. (Eds.) (2008). Land Use-Reflection on Spatial Informatics, Agriculture and Development. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company.
View Full Essay

GIS Software for the Department of Housing

Words: 538 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76764763

Geographical Information System (GIS) is any system that can captures, stores, bring an analysis, managing, and data that is linked to a particular location. Technically, a GIS system includes mapping software and its various applications adapted to remote sensing, surveying of land, aerial photography, arithmetic's, photogrammetric plus tools that can be implemented with use of GIS software. Even though, many refer to "Geographic Information System" as "the GIS" even though it doesn't cover all tools connected to topology. The GIS system merges together cartography and technology.

GIS technology can be employed for the purpose of scientific investigations, management of resources, management of assets, archaeology, impact assessment, urban of environmental planning, cartographic analysis, criminology, geographical history, marketing, logistics and planning, the process prospectively mapping, and other major objectives. For example the GIS may allow emergency planners to easily calculate the emergency response times (i.e. The logistics) in the event of an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bolstad, P. (2005) GIS Fundamentals: A first text on Geographic Information Systems, Second Ed. White Bear Lake, MN: Eider Press

Elangovan, K (2006) GIS: Fundamentals, Applications and Implementations," New India Publishing Agency, New Delhi

National Research Council, GIS for housing and urban development

Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. And Rhind, D.W. (2005) Geographic Information Systems and Science. Chichester Thurston, J., Poiker, T.K. & J. Patrick Moore. (2003) Integrated Geospatial Technologies: A Guide to GPS, GIS, and Data Logging. Hoboken, New Jersey
View Full Essay

Gendered Spaces in the Modern

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33553251

Suggesting the significance of food as a social activity, kitchens in suburban homes sometimes have their own entrances. The kitchen entrances are convenient for carrying in groceries. Regardless of where the kitchen is located in relation to the front door, it is almost always a shared space in which guests and residents may linger and socialize. Built-in items like countertops and breakfast bars encourage guests and residents to set down their drinks while chatting or to eat food.

Any other side or back doors that offer entryways into the home are used for special occasions. Sometimes a side or back door becomes a default front door depending on the layout of the home. In cases in which the family has a housekeeper, the housekeeper is often told to enter through a side-door, denoting differences in class and social status.

A garage can become the main entrance because of the car-centered…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Nuclear Waste Yucca Mountain Nuclear

Words: 2153 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13810735



There are several groups involved in fighting the Yucca Mountain site, including local grassroots organizations in Nevada and larger organizations around the country. Many Native American tribes do not support the site, as it is located on their ancient tribal lands. The Nevada Piutes are one group who is organized in opposition to the site, as are several other western Native American tribes. A larger organization is the Nevada Nuclear Waste Task Force, a group who opposes the site for a number of reasons, including transportation safety issues, the geology of the site, and the fact that other sites were not seriously considered.

What are the future prospects of Yucca Mountain? That is still not clear. Congress OK'd the dumpsite in 2002, but since then, many things have changed politically in Washington and around the country. Many groups and citizens are protesting the dump, mainly due to safety and transportation…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "Earthquakes in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain." State of Nevada. 1996. 4 Dec. 2007.  http://www.state.nv.us/nucwaste/yucca/seismo01.htm 

Editors. "Yucca Mountain Repository." U.S. Department of Energy. 2007. 4 Dec. 2007. http://www.ocrwm.doe.gov/ym_repository/index.shtml

Fraud Allegations Roil Yucca Mountain Project." Issues in Science and Technology Summer 2005: 20+.

Rosenheck, Dan. "Digging a Deeper and Deeper Hole." New Statesman 29 Sept. 2003: xxii+.
View Full Essay

Impact of Local Economic Development Initiatives

Words: 4311 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43161334

Local Economic Development Initiatives

THE IMPACT OF LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Concept of Sustainable ural Communities in Local Areas

The Concept of ural Development in Local Areas

The Concept of Endogenous Development Initiatives in Local areas

Transformation is key when it comes to local economic development initiatives. Ever since World War II economies in so many different rural areas have been faced with the rising harsh economic circumstances that have been threatening people's everyday existence. A lot of the situations that they are going through have a lot to do with depopulation resulting for the most part from low growth in job opportunities, out-migration, an aging population, underemployment rate, high unemployment and low family income, lack of socio-economic infrastructure ( shopping centers, health centers, schools, power and electric supply water supply,). esearch show that the rural economy in both developed and developing nations countries has also gone through a big…… [Read More]

References

Andolina, R. (2012). THE VALUES OF WATER: Development cultures and indigenous cultures in highland ecuador. Latin American Research Review, 21(12), 3-26,231,235.

Blignaut, J. & . (2011). The impact of water scarcity on economic development initiatives. Water S.A., 34(12), 123-145.

Cole, M.A. (2009). imits to growth, sustainable development and environmental kuznets curves: An examination of the environmental impact of economic development. . Sustainable Development, 12(4), 23-67.

Gordon, T.M. (2009). Bargaining in the shadow of the ballot box: Causes and consequences of local voter initiatives. Public Choice, 23(14), 45-56.
View Full Essay

Baby Food Preferences Among Ethiopian Consumers

Words: 6884 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86208361

Consume Behavio: Puchasing Local Baby Food vs. Impoted Baby Food in Ethiopia

Liteatue Review Desciption

A systematic eview of the liteatue is povided in this chapte in ode to develop infomed and timely answes to the study's guiding eseach questions and to confim o efute its guiding hypothesis. In this egad, Faenkel and Wallen (2001, p. 48) advise that, "Reseaches find out what has aleady been witten about the topic they ae inteested in [by] investigating the opinions of expets in the field and othe eseach studies. Such eading is efeed to as a eview of the liteatue." Likewise, Gatton and Jones (2003) epot that a well-conducted eview of the liteatue epesents an essential pat of vitually any type of scholaly eseach poject today. Fo example, Gatton and Jones (2003, p. 51) note that, "No matte how oiginal you think the eseach question may be, it is almost cetain that…… [Read More]

references for foreign and domestic products." Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 151-162.

Kucukemiroglu, O. (1997, March). "Market segmentation by using consumer lifestyle dimensions and ethnocentrism: An empirical study." European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 33, No. 5-6, pp. 470-491.

"Lifestyle definition." (2016). Business Dictionary. [online] available: http://www.business dictionary.com/definition/lifestyle.html.

"Lifestyle definition." (2016). Dictionary.com. [online] available:  http://www.dictionary.com/browse/lifestyle .

"Lifestyle definition." (2016). Merriam-Webster. [online] available: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lifestyle.
View Full Essay

Geographic Information System GIS and Client Server System and the US Government

Words: 3197 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64769544

Client server systems are a group of inter-related subsystems which collaborate together to provide a specific solution or service. This computing model structures diverse and distributed applications, which separates tasks between the providers (servers) and service seekers (clients). Keeping the purpose of this paper in view, the provider-server is the Geographical Informative System and the client is the U.S. government. This paper analyzes Geographical Informative System (GIS) as its client server system. GIS are quite pricey with respect to installation. The primary concern while setting up GIS is:

Attaining the data

Performing quality assurance tests

Quality checks on data

Syncing hardware and software

This case study will go through many GIS projects implemented over the years by various U.S. government agencies. It has tremendous benefits to U.S. organizations, which have gone ahead and implemented them successfully. There are tons of benefits can attained from GIS, by both public and private…… [Read More]

References

Freeman, M. (2008). Government Technology, available from http://www.govtech.com/gt/392026?Id=392026&topic=117676&full=1&story_pg=1

Giglierano, J. (2009). Iowa Geographic Information Council, 20 May 2009, available from http://docs.google.com/Present?docid=dfpg82pj_5hjtxs5c7&skipauth=true

Leidner, A. (2007). American City & County: Payback Figures, available from http://americancityandcounty.com/mag/government_payback_figures/

Maguire D. et al., eds. (2008). The Business Benefits of GIS: An ROI Approach (Redlands, CA:ESRI Press), 3-10.
View Full Essay

City Character and Attraction of People and

Words: 1200 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61157978

City Character and Attraction of People and Industry and City Project Planning Success

The character of a city serves to attract or to repel both people and industry. The work of Caves (2005) states that the term 'city "means anything and everything" or in other words Caves speaks of the many activities and events that are conducted within a city including art, film, written publications, location, culture, institutional governance environmental and economic matters. In fact, Caves describes the city as a sentiment being indeed alive.

The Difficulty in Defining 'City'

There is not definition that should be taken in the nature of a cut-and-dried cooker-cutter type of definition of what it is precisely that comprises a city. This is because cities are so very diverse and so readily differentiated one from the other due to the different characteristics possessed by the individual cities throughout the world. While there are cities…… [Read More]

References

Caves, R.W. (2005). Introduction. In Caves, Encyclopedia of the City (pp. xxi -- xxix). London and New York: Routledge.

Caves, R.W. (2005). Introduction. In Caves, Encyclopedia of the City (pp.xxi -- xxix). London and New York: Routledge.

Foroohar, R. (2006). Unlikely Boomtowns. Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13528594/site/newsweek/

The Development of Cities. (2008). City. How Stuff Works: http://geography.howstuffworks.com/terms-and-associations/city1.htm
View Full Essay

New York Real Estate and Office Markets

Words: 2269 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47899782

New York eal Estate and Office Markets

NEW YOK CITY OFFICE MAKET

New York is one of the premiere metropolitan areas of the world, exerting a significant impact on global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York City is an important center for international affairs and is widely deemed the cultural capital of the world. With its unmatched scope of building types, diverse tenant base and extensive transportation system, the city has earned an iconic and prominent place in the global market.

The borough of Manhattan serves as its hub and is the nation's largest single office market with 450 million square feet of space (Brown, 2007). Its office inventory is greater than the next five largest U.S. markets combined and features some of the world's most iconic properties (Beauregard, 2005). This paper explores the current state of…… [Read More]

References

1. Beauregard, R.A. (2005). The textures of property markets: Downtown housing and office conversions in New York City. Urban Studies (Routledge), 42(13), 2431-2445. doi:10.1080/00420980500380345

2. Brown, J.L. (2007). Demolition in Manhattan Gains Momentum. Civil Engineering (08857024), 77(8), 34.

3. Gong, H., & Keenan, K. (2012). The Impact of 9/11 on the Geography of Financial Services in New York A Few Years Later. Professional Geographer, 64(3), 370-388. doi:10.1080/00330124.2011.603654

4. Gregor, A. (2011). Demand for Office Condos Grows in Manhattan. New York Times. p. 6.
View Full Essay

How to Market a Free Service in Real Estate

Words: 8571 Length: 28 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71242895

Marketing Plan for a KW Service Designed to Generate New Clients

Product Idea

The product idea for this marketing plan is a service that Keller Williams could provide to potential home buyers/investors that no other competitor is currently offering: that is, free educational classes for the public about the process of buying, investing, owning, keeping up or rehabbing houses. The purpose of this service would be that it draws potential clients into the office and generates leads for agents working within the office.

Keller Williams is a national real estate brokerage with offices in districts around the U.S. The office branch of Keller Williams for this marketing plan is located in Houston, Texas, which is the "home" of Keller Williams -- the place where the brokerage began.

The problem that this service would target is the problem that a lot of new home buyers often experience, which is that they…… [Read More]

References

Abram, C., Pearlman, L. (2012). Facebook for Dummies. NJ: Wiley and Sons.

Baloun, K. (2006). Inside Facebook. CT: Baloun Publications.

Collis, D., Rukstad, M. (2008). Can you say what your strategy is? Harvard Business

Review (April): 82-90.
View Full Essay

City of Alexandria -- Time Series Data

Words: 1819 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86422683

City of Alexandria -- Time Series Data

Tufte (2001) and other ambassadors of the visual display of data have shown us how easily it is to understand complex data when it is graphically represented in ways that our minds are designed to understand. Tufte argues that "experience with the analysis of data…is essential for achieving precision and grace in the presence of statistics, .but even textbook of graphical design are silent about how to think about numbers" (Tufte, 2001, p. 104). Tufke remarks, that "Illustrators too often see their work as an exclusively artistic enterprise -- the words "creative," "concept," and "style" combine regularly in all possible permutations -- a Big Think jargon for the small task of constructing a time-series a few data points long" (Tufte, 2001, p. 204). Visual display of data has other uses than simply an elegant way to view, appreciate, and analyze data. The process…… [Read More]

References

Averch, H.A. (XXX). Chapter 10 Using expert judgment. [In XXXX].

Gladwell, M. (2007, November 12). Dangerous minds: Criminal profiling made easy. The New Yorker.

Miller, J.E. (2005). The Chicago guide to writing about multivariate analysis. Chicago, Il.: University of Chicago Press.

Meier,, K.J., Brudney, J.L., and Bohte, J. (2005). Applied statistics for public and nonprofit Administration, 6th ed. Belmont, CA: Thompson Wadsworth.
View Full Essay

Homebuilding Industry the Industry Dominant Economic Features

Words: 3729 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6231972

Homebuilding Industry

The Industry Dominant Economic Features

Market Size and Rivals:

Pace of Process and Product Technology Change

Economies of Scale in Purchasing

PORTER'S FIVE FORCES

Industry Competitors

Threat of New Entrants

Substitutes

Suppliers

Buyers

THE DRIVERS OF CHANGE IN THE INDUSTRY AND THEIR IMPACT

Demographics

The Economy and Interest Rates

COMPANY POSITION

Centex Corporation

Horton

Pulte Homes

KEY SUCCESS FACTORS FOR COMPETITIVE SUCCESS

Understanding the Markets

Understanding Local Regulations

Reputation

INDUSTRY'S ATTRACTIVENESS, LONG-TERM PROFITABILITY AND CONCLUSION

HOMEBUILDING INDUSTRY

The homebuilding industry plays a major role in the United States economy, as a significant employer and cash generator. Each year the industry hires more than 3.5 million workers and the housing investment and consumption accounts for one-fifth of the United States' gross domestic product (GDP). Recent figures support the role of homebuilders as vital to the American way of life (AzPath). In 2001, the homebuilders were responsible for building 1,602,700…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AzPATH Research Series Report No. 03. Del E. Webb School of Construction. "Supply Chains in Residential Construction." 2.2. "Integrating the Supply Chain." December 2001. Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://construction.asu.edu/azpath/Documents/Reports/Report03.pdf.

Grey, Joseph. "Construction and Building Materials." Hoover's Online. 2001. Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://www.hoovers.com/industry/snapshot/profile/0,3519,14,00.html.

Handley, John. "Boomers Shun 'R' Word" May 18, 2003. Baltimore Sun www.sunspot.net.Retrieved June 5, 2003 at http://www.nbnnews.com/NBN/issues/2003-05-26/bnc2c.html#5.

Hoover's Online. "Centex Corporation." 2003. Retrieved June 6, 2003 at http://www.hoovers.com/co/capsule/8/0,2163,10308,00.html.
View Full Essay

Building Engineering Services

Words: 2100 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56076024

Buckingham Palace -- Heating Engineering Structure

Buckingham Palace - Heating Structure

The average temperatures of the groundwater systems are primarily maintained at the recorded depths of 10-15m under the ground surface (this is estimated at the mean yearly air temperature for the specific region) with further depths increase based on the geothermal gradient of the region (this is estimated to be 2.6°C for every added 100m of depth). Consequently, there's a temperature velocity and difference between the two estimates of the air temperatures and underground or groundwater temperatures for all the year; the analysis shows that the groundwater temperature maintain to be cooler in comparison that the air temperature throughout the year even during summers. We have seen numerous building engineering structures hence utilize the groundwater temperatures to control the heat/cold within the buildings. Buckingham Palace in the United Kingdom is one exemplary illustration of the use of groundwater temperatures.…… [Read More]

References

Abesser, C. (2010). Open-loop ground source heat pumps and the groundwater systems: A literature review of current applications, regulations and problems. British Geological Survey.

Coopers (2010). KoolShade Solar Control. Available from: http://www.coopersfire.com.au/documents/literature/Koolshade/Koolshade%20brochure.pdf

Green Energy 360. 2008. [cited 27 May 2010]. Available from http://www.greenenergy360.org/heat_pumps/heat_pump_economics.php

Energy Saving Trust. 2010. [cited 27 May 2010]. Available from http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Generate-your-own-energy/Ground-source-heat-pumps
View Full Essay

Regional Analysis Chinatown Manhattan Is

Words: 882 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71788281

ccording to the National Geographic Society, formal regions are those that are generally recognized as such as a result of being shared by people with common cultural characteristics or goals. Chinatown can therefore be characterized as formal, as it is generally occupied by Chinese immigrants, as the case has also been in historical terms.

functional region is referred to as a central area serving the neighborhoods around it. It is generally connected to the areas it serves by means of transportation routes. Chinatown is connected with its surrounding regions, but does not serve them for purposes other than tourism or entertainment. In broad terms, it is unlikely that the region can then be characterized as formal.

Finally, a vernacular, or what the National Geographic Society refers to as "perceptual" regions, are those without particular physical boundaries, but that are based upon human attitudes or feelings. Examples are Dixie, southern California,…… [Read More]

Asian-American Federation of New York (AAFNY). Neighborhood Profile: Manhattan's Chinatown. 2004.  http://www.aafny.org/cic/briefs/Chinatownbrief.pdf 

National Geographic Society. Geography Standards. 2008. http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/standards/05/index.html

Tung, Larry. Chinatown Looks for a Way to Survive and Thrive. Gotham Gazette, April 2009. http://www.gothamgazette.com/article/immigrants/20090420/11/2888
View Full Essay

Cal Housing Market the Southern

Words: 1116 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94557195

The fall in demand derives from the increase in gas prices, which has altered consumer spending habits and encouraged home buyers from buying in outer suburbs. Demand has also fallen because of the lack of easy credit and the high price of homes. Much of the rise was attributable to easy credit, reasonable home prices and low fuel prices. The reversal of these factors has resulted in a steep dropoff in demand, which is causing most of the decline in prices. One exception may be the outer suburbs, however. That is the area where new supply was being created, and so those areas had a large number of new homes constructed. This gives those regions a greater supply problem than inner suburbs. That is why prices have fallen much further in the outer suburbs than they have in the inner suburbs and city. These less desirable areas have suffered steep…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Vincent, Roger. (2008). Gas Prices Latest Worry for Housing Market. LA Times. Retrieved July 23, 2008 at http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-homes17-2008jun17,0,2766175.story

Showley, Roger & Pierce, Emmet. (2008). Housing Slump in No Hurry to End. San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved July 23, 2008 at http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20080716/news_1b16housing.html

Hong, Peter. (2008). Bargain Hunting Picks up as Southern California Home Values Fall Further. LA Times. Retrieved July 23, 2008 at http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-homesales17-2008jul17,0,3250369.story

Vincent, Roger. (2008). Gas Prices Latest Worry for Housing Market. LA Times.
View Full Essay

Red & Blue Ocean' Industries Red and

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48716443

ed & Blue Ocean' Industries

ed and Blue Ocean Industries: Quick Service estaurant Industry

Location, location, location. This is the mantra of retailers who depend highly on getting the best location as the key to increasing the presence (both physical and perceived presence) of the business, brand, and product or service to the consumer's psyche. This is especially applicable in the case of the fast food or quick service restaurant industry. Food is a universal need and commodity, and differences among consumers depend on their taste preference, perception of the brand, and value for money, among many others. But location is a very critical component for consumers, and a brand or store's presence in a trade area most often becomes the primary basis for patronizing the brand or store. If the store is not present in the consumer's location, then the store has just lost an important share of the…… [Read More]

References

Rogers, D. (2007). "Retail location analysis in practice." Research Review, Vol. 12, No. 2.

Stone, K. And G. Artz. (1999). "Determining the Market for Your Goods & Services." Iowa Cooperative Extension Service. Iowa University.

Thrall, I. (2002). Business Geography and New Real Estate Market Analysis. NY: Oxford University Press.
View Full Essay

Sales Promotion Personal Selling and Consumer Behavior in Norway

Words: 1230 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63412125

Marketing Alcoholic Icecream in Norway

Geography

Norway is part of the Scandinavian Peninsula located in the Northern part of Europe. The Norwegian territory also houses the Arctic Archipelago and Jan Mayen of Svalbard. Most parts of the nation share a border with Eastern Sweden, to the South is Finland and ussia to the East. The extensive coastline of Norway faces the Barents Sea and North Atlantic Ocean. With 323,802 square kilometers (Great Britain 1986), the country has a total population of five million people. It is the most sparsely populated European nation. Its population is spread throughout the mountainous and narrow landscape. It is a democratic and vibrant economy. Drawing from global per capita, Norway is one of the wealthiest economies in the world. This is attributable to its position as the world's sixth largest crude oil exporter and second largest natural gas exporter. The even distribution of income makes…… [Read More]

References

Bly, R. W. (2009). Marketing Plan Handbook: Develop Big Picture Marketing Plans for Pennies on the Dollar. Irvine, Calif.: Entrepreneur Press.

Great Britain. (1986). Norway: A Country Profile. Place of Publication Not Identified: Exports to Europe Branch, DTI.

Int'l Business Publications, USA. (2012). Business in Norway for Everyone: Practical Information and Contacts for Success. International Business Pubns USA.

McKinney, A. (2003). Real Business Plans & Marketing Tools: Including Samples to Use in Starting, Growing, Marketing, and Selling Your Business. Fayetteville, NC: PREP Pub.
View Full Essay

Overview of Article About Online Offline Shopping

Words: 2377 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88556783

Marketing

Schroder and Zaharia (2008) looked at the buying habits of retail consumers in Germany, in particular how consumers behaved with respect to multi-channel shopping. They had noticed a trend that retailers were running multiple channels, and that there were times when these channels would complement one another. An example would be a company that has an online store and bricks-and-mortar stores. A consumer might research the product in one, and then purchase in another. The authors looked at the flow of information from company to consumer, and how consumers used that information in their purchasing habits.

Multi-Channel etailing

One of the core concepts of the paper is multi-channel retailing. etailers have utilized multiple channels for decades, but the issue has become more prominent with the advent of online retailing. Online retailing has lowered the barrier to entry to retailing, so that most offline retailers now have an online shop…… [Read More]

References

Schroder, H. & Zaharia, S. (2008). Linking multi-channel customer behavior with shopping motives: An empirical investigation of a German retailer. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services. Vol. 15 (2008) 452-468.
View Full Essay

Industrialization After the Civil War Introduce Your

Words: 1211 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10664020

Industrialization After the Civil War

Introduce your paper with your previously crafted thesis statement.

After the Civil War, the United States became a much-industrialized society. The country was characterized by several industrial developments. More investments were put on establishing industries that could facilitate the production capacity of the country. Key policies were laid to drive the growth of industries in many of the sectors leading to the growth of industrialization in the country. These developments took place amidst an agrarian society that characterized America before the civil war. Before the civil war, many investments were made in agriculture with farming being a major economic activity for the American people. However, this affected the growth of the economy as the American population shot up (ees, 2008).

The nation resorted to industrialization after the civil war. This saw a change in lifestyle among many Americans as more people got jobs in the…… [Read More]

References

Aronowitz, S. (1999). Industrialization: the Shaping of American Working Class Consciousness. New York: SAGE.

Dubofsky, M. (1996). Industrialism and the American worker, 1865-1920. New York: Davidson.

Rees, J. (2008). Industrialization and the Transformation of American Life: A Brief Introduction. New York: M.E. Sharpe.

Vapnek, L. (2009). Breadwinners & Industrialization 1865-1920. New York: University of Illinois Press.
View Full Essay

Childhood Immunizations

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36150639

Findley, S., et al. (2009). Effectiveness of a Community Coalition for Improving Child Vaccination Rates in New York City. American Journal of Public Health. 98 (11): 1959-62.

Abstract and Citation -- the title of the article was quite specific, indicating a narrow topic -- how effective a community coalition would be for helping improve vaccination rates in a specific city, in this case New York. The abstract was rather weak in this case, and while it did provide a broad overview, it was very succinct: what was done, who the population was, and what the outcome was. One could not infer nor glean more than cursory knowledge about the topic through the Abstract.

Research Question- the research question was primary within the documents. Essentially, the question was would a community coalition using reminders, tracking and outreach improve the likelihood that children in New York City would receive appropriate and timely…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Catch Planning. (2013) Community Access for Child Health. Retrieved from:  https://www2.aap.org/catch/funding.htm 

Centers for Disease Control, (2009). The Importance of Childhood Immunizations. Retrieved from education.com at: http://www.education.com/reference / article/importance-childhood-immunizations/

Findley, S., et al. (2009). Effectiveness of a Community Coalition for Improving Child Vaccination Rates in New York City. American Journal of Public Health. 98 (11): 1959-62.
View Full Essay

History of the Atlantic Slave

Words: 4085 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86148004

A "linguist" would bring the slave broker on board the ship that had traveled upriver, and at that point there were negotiations and the broker (owner of the slaves that he had kidnapped) wanted to know of course what merchandise was being offered, what the commission the captain of the vessel was to receive, and he wanted to know what other offers might be out there on the coast from the other slavers. At the end of the day, if the broker liked the deal, and if the trader liked the slaves that the broker brought to the river (or the coast), the company "surgeon" was called in to check the health of the prisoners, and if that passed muster, a deal was struck. The male slaves were put in irons on the main deck; the children and women (not ironed) were placed on the quarterdeck; and the boys were…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anstey, Roger. (1975). The Atlantic Slave Trade and British Abolition 1760-1810. Atlantic

Highlands, NY: Humanities Press.

Dodson, Howard, Moore, Christopher Paul, and Yancy, Roberta. (2009). Becoming American:

The African-American Journey. New York: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
View Full Essay

how artists drive gentrification and political issues

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49679618

.....gentrification" was first coined in 1964 by sociologist Ruth Glass, who commented on the changing "social character" of districts in London (Smith 1996, 33). Glass critiqued the process of gentrification, however inevitable it might seem to a realist, on the grounds that it threatened to undermine social welfare. Gentrification cannot be discussed without reference to the intersections between race, class, and power. However, gentrification may be an unreasonably maligned concept and term. Artists have consistently and historically stood at the forefront of gentrification, as the earliest pioneers of urban gentrification around the world. Ironically, though, artists have frequently been framed as the "victims" of gentrification (Makagon 2010, 26). The conceptualization of artists as victims and not as instigators of gentrification is a racialized critique of the process of gentrification because it ignores, discounts, or even denigrates the contributions made by non-white counterculture and bohemian pioneers of aesthetic urban revitalization. Although…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Mayan Lowlands and the Environmental Changes

Words: 3391 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69606458

lowland Maya decimation is much more than at any time before, and there are currently several studies that concentrate on the period from roughly A.D. 750 to A.D.1050. Previously, researchers have had a tendency to sum up clarifications of the decimation from individual locales and areas to the marshes in totality. Later methodologies push the extraordinary differences of changes that took place over the swamps amid the Terminal Classic and Early Post classic periods. Along these lines, there is presently a general agreement on the view that Maya culture and civilization in general did not fall, albeit numerous zones did experience significant change

Present scenarios are the result of the long haul elements of human-environment interplay. The fact of the matter is that, we have a long-term viewpoint, keeping in mind the end goal to best comprehend continual changes in ambient environs we observe in present times

. Analysis of…… [Read More]

References

Aimers, James J. "What Maya Collapse-Terminal Classic Variation in the Maya Lowlands." Springer Science+Business Media (2007): 330-337.

Oldfield, F., ed. 1998. Past global changes (PAGES): Status reportand implementation plan. IGBP Report 45. Stockholm: International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme

Dunning, Nicholas, et al. Arising from the Bajos: The Evolution of a Neotropical Landscape and the Rise of Maya Civilization. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2002.

Chase, A.F., and Chase, D.Z. (1992). El norte y el sur: pol?'tica, dominios y evolucio'n cultural maya.Mayab 8: 134 -- 149
View Full Essay

Occidentalism the Title of Ian

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91879132

These conservatives are, in the authors' estimation, anti-Western, even though they perceive themselves to be upholding Western values.

But is this really a useful or complete understanding of the complexities of the religious and cultural debates that exist within the Middle East, America, or the larger world? Although the use of the term Occidentalism helpful to some extent in examining why 'they' hate 'us' in the Islamic vs. Western world's culture wars, ultimately the term is so broad its value is somewhat limited, especially if their construct is applied to Nazi Germany vs. The West. Further confusing the issue is that the authors note that many Western critics come from within the system itself, from the ultimate critic of Western bourgeois values Karl Marx to Western-educated fundamentalist terrorists. This makes the definition of 'the Occident' even slipperier, especially as Marx was pro-urban, pro-science, in contrast to religious fundamentalists.

This blurry…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

French Associate Their Country With a Geometrical

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11459333

French associate their country with a geometrical shape.

Hexagon

Circle

Octagon

Square

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and cold sometimes snowy winters

North and Western Coastal Regions

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

Central and Eastern France

The South (also known as the Midi)

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and mild winters often made colder by the cold Mistral wind

North and Western Coastal Regions

2.

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

3.

Central and eastern France

4.

The south (the Midi)

Question 4

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Water in the Middle East

Words: 22307 Length: 75 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58217118

While on one hand, the Nile gets the highest discharge from rainfall on the highlands of Ethiopia and upland plateau of East Africa, located well outside the Middle East region; on the other hand, discharge points of the other two rivers, Euphrates and Tigris, are positioned well within the Middle East region, prevailing mostly in Turkey, Syria along with Iraq. In other areas, recurrent river systems are restricted to the more northern upland areas of Iran and Turkey, in common with the coastline of Levant (Peter eaumont, Gerald H. lake, J. And Malcolm Wagstaff, 1988).

The conflict in the Future

It is widely believed by many experts that those who control the waters in the Middle East; control the Middle East; and those who control the Middle East; control the oil supply of the world (David M. Hummel, 1995). From the above mentioned facts it is clear that the water…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anthony H. Cordesman. Peace is Not Enough: The Arab-Israeli Economic and Demographic Crises. Part Two. Population Growth, Fertility and Population Doubling Rates, Regional Trends, National Trends, and the "Youth Explosion" Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1998.

Adel Darwish. Troubled waters in rivers of blood. Water Issues. 3 December 1992. http://www.mideastnews.com/water004.html

Adel Darwish. Inadequacy of international law. Taken at http://www.mideastnews.com/WaterWars.htm

Ashok Swain. A new challenge: water scarcity in the Arab world. Arab Studies Quarterly (ASQ). January, 1998.
View Full Essay

Function of This Study Is

Words: 3518 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84974468

In other words, when the total number of people characterized by each variable (or stratum) oscillates within the population, to the researcher would choose the size of each sample for each stratum according to the research requirements. uch a choice is prejudiced by the probability of obtaining an adequate number of sampling units from each stratum within the final sample. As a rule, disproportionate stratified samples are used either to compare two or more particular strata or to analyze one stratum intensively (Creswell, 1994). Therefore, when researchers use a disproportionate stratified sample, we have to weight the estimates of the population's parameters by the number of units belonging to each stratum. In this sample, weighting strategies were not performed in the original data.

Once researchers have defined the population of interest, they draw a sample that adequately represents that population. The actual procedure involves selecting a sample from a sampling…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Bicycle Messengers Bicyclists in the City

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34870625

Bicycle Intervention

Bicycle Messengers in New York City: Interventions for Greater Safety and Success

With over eight-million inhabitants, nearly one million separate businesses, and a geographic spread of over three-hundred square miles, New York City is the largest and one of the densest urban areas in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). The streets are heavily trafficked, the business needs are intense and hurried, and the growth of the city in terms of both its population and its economy will continue to make the city more densely packed and more quickly paced over the coming decade (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). Spatially, physically, and economically, New York City is both constrained and explosive, tightly bound into its geographic borders, street patterns, etc. But also still growing at a rapid pace, and as such it provides a highly interesting and complex context within which to situate this research. It is also…… [Read More]

References

Cowan, K. (2012). Cost of living comparisons. Accessed 26 April 2012. http://www.payscale.com/cost-of-living-comparison.html

Fincham, B. (2004). Bicycle couriers in the "new" economy. Cardiff University School of Social Sciences (Working Paper 46).

Gehring, A. (2009). Dangerous jobs. New York: Skyhorse Publishing.

Gothamist. (2009). New York traffic second worst in nation. Accessed 26 April 2012.  http://gothamist.com/2009/07/09/new_york_traffic_congestion_second.php
View Full Essay

Deindustrialization in the Rust Belt

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52745716

Deindustrialization

When an urban area undergoes deindustrialization there are several things that happen to the urban and social geography. In general, there is often a transition from an industrial economy to a service economy, which has significant socioeconomic implications. While it has been argued that deindustrialization has done little to change the basic disparities between core and periphery in the global economy, this argument is not entirely true. While it is true that industrialized nations have mostly been able to transition to a post-industrial economy, there has also been a transfer of wealth from those nations to newly-industrialized nations. eal wages in many Western nations have stagnated, while they are increasing rapidly in many parts of the developing world, reducing disparities.

It should also be noted that deindustrialization and the move to the service economy is not necessarily done on even terms geographically. Some formerly-industrialized areas have struggled with this…… [Read More]

References

Bluestone, B. (2013). Detroit and deindustrialization. Dollars & Sense. Retrieved November 10, 2014 from http://dollarsandsense.org/archives/2013/0913bluestone.html

Hobor, G. (2012). Surviving the era of deindustrialization: The new economic geography of the urban Rust Belt. Journal of Urban Affairs. Vol. 35 (4) 417-434.

Russo, J. & Linkon, S. (no date). The social costs of deindustrialization. Youngstown State University.
View Full Essay

Slavophilic Russian Ideas vs The

Words: 4190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57183615

This similarly encourages modest investment in ussia, a market of 150 million, even in the face of continuing economic difficulties and political uncertainty (Saunders, 105).

According to Sunders, the strategy developed to "globalize" ussia was known as "shock therapy." And its implementation began with the January 1, 1992 elimination of price controls on most goods. The objective of "shock therapy" was, in essence, to create a market economy in ussia as quickly as possible. Sunders claim that this was to be achieved by freeing prices and liberalizing trade policies, which would stimulate competition; and by privatization, which would create private property with all its attendant behavioral incentives for enterprises. At the same time, it was essential to make the ruble convertible and ensure that its value remained relatively stable. This meant controlling inflation and, therefore, keeping tight control of currency emissions and government spending.

Consequently, Saunders appreciates that successful economic…… [Read More]

Reference:

Batygin, G. S. 'The Transfer of Allegiances of the Intellectual Elite'. Studies in East

European Thought 53 (2001)

Boris Yeltsin quoted in Urban, M. Re-mythologizing the Russian State. Euro-Asia Studies

50/6 (1998): 969
View Full Essay

Forest Fire Management Systems and

Words: 17324 Length: 63 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50516012

It was then important to see the degree at which technology and training played a role in combating each fire.

1.2.4.ationale of the Study

What is that can be gained from this study? The reasoning behind such a study is born out of a need to provide better training for fire fighters so that fire management systems will improve and reduce the amount of loss due to the fire. By studying such a topic, one can gain the knowledge of how to better train fire fighters and how to make his or her job safer in the process. This in turn, results in reduced losses due to the fire. This also results in higher service ratings for the fire department and an increase in morale for the community.

1.3.Definition of Terms

Fire

The Underlying Causes of Fire.

It has already become a general knowledge that the majority of forest and…… [Read More]

References

Allan, C. (2003). A Ponderosa Natural Area Reveals its Secrets. USGS. Retrieved July 11, 2005 from the World Web Wide: http://biology.usgs.gov/s+t/SNT/noframe/sw153.htm4/10/03.

Anderson, H.E. (1983). Predicting Wind-Driven Wild Land Fire Size and Shape. Research Paper INT-305. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, pp. 1-26.

Beer, T. (1990). The Australian National Bushfire Model Project. Mathematical and Computer Modeling, 13, 12, 49-56.

Calabri, G. (1982). Recent evolution and prospects for the Mediterranean region, Forest Fire prevention and control. Proceedings of an International seminar.