American History Mccarthyism Is a Term That Term Paper

Download this Term Paper in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Term Paper:

American History


McCarthyism is a term that originated in the early 1950s during America's campaign against the spread of Communism in Asia and other parts of the world. Technically defined, McCarthyism is "the political practice of publicizing accusations of disloyalty or subversion with insufficient regard to evidence" and "the use of methods of investigation and accusation regarded as unfair, in order to suppress opposition." These definitions of and the term itself originated through the person of Senator Joseph McCarthy, who became popular because of his accusations that Communism has infiltrated the American government, giving rise to the "Red Scare," reflecting the country's aversion and disapproval over Communist beliefs and methods (which has been popularly subsisted to by the Chinese and Russians).

The Baby Boom

The Baby Boom was the event in which American population had exploded during the post-World War II era. The Baby Boom had brought out an increase in America's population from 1946-1964, resulting to a population of 76 million, solely belonging to the Baby Boom generation. The Baby Boom has created a large impact not only in the country's population statistics, but also through economic developments. The Baby Boom had triggered American consumerism and led to the progress and development of urbanization in America. The Baby Boom continues to play a large part in today's American society because they are often the target market of most business companies in introducing products for a certain age group, especially since Baby Boomers occupy the largest segment in America's population today (ranging from mid-30s until 60s).

Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka

Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka is a court case that helped abolish racial segregation in educational institutions in America. By declaring segregation in schools based on race as unconstitutional, society was able to improve on the quality of educations and basic commodities and facilities needed by black American students. The case was named after the Oliver Brown, one of the plaintiffs who filed a case regarding the issue of racial segregation in schools in the states of Delaware, Virginia, Kansas (where Brown lives), and the District of Columbia. Earl Warren, America's chief justice during that time gave the decision on the said case, stating the importance of desegregation in schools as the students' rights under the 14th amendment of the Constitution, which cites that every state must provide equal protection to all persons, "regardless of race."

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a staunch activist against racial prejudice and discrimination during the civil rights movement in America during the 1950s and 1960s. King also helped establish the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), which conducted peaceful demonstrations against racism, of which he was once jailed in Birmingham, leading to the creation of the popularly-known "Letter from Birmingham Jail," which discusses Luther and the organization's struggle against racial discrimination. King was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968. King, upon his death, became the symbol of the religious and patriotic fight against African-American discrimination in America.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a law passed during the John F. Kennedy's administration, and became controversial because it concerns one of the most important changes that will happen in American society -- that is, legally abolishing racial discrimination in people's everyday lives and activities. The Act includes the following provisions: (1) prohibition of discrimination in registration procedures; (2) prohibition of discrimination in public places such as restaurants and similar establishments; (3) desegregation of public facilities and schools; (4) expansion of the powers of Civil Rights Commission; (5) prohibition of use of federal funds that supports activities and causes for discrimination; (6) right to equal employment and union membership; and (7) the creation of Community Relations Service't resolve local civil rights problems.

Cuban Missile Crisis

The Cuban Missile Crisis was the conflict that happened between the United States and USSR in 1962 over the issue of the establishment of USSR-supplied installation missiles in Cuba. This became an international even and even speculated as might leading to a large-scale war because the installation missiles have the capacity to carry nuclear weapons, a danger that U.S. fears Cuba will be capable of since it has conflicts with Cuba's leader Fidel Castro because of U.S.'s disapproval of Cuba's Communist government. The Cuban Missile Crisis led to the removal of the missile installations in Cuba and the formulation and implementation of the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in 1963.

Tonkin Gulf Resolution

The Tonkin Gulf Resolution was a policy passed by the U.S. Congress in 1964, wherein then-President Lyndon Johnson will be permitted to launch an air war against the Communist North Vietnam region and the launching of ground troops in defense of South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The Tonkin Gulf Resolution marked the large-scale U.S. participation in the Vietnam War, resulting to millions of deaths in civilians and soldiers in both American and Vietnamese camps. It also resulted to the lost Battle of Ia Drang and the massacre of many innocent Vietnamese by American soldiers who indiscriminately fired on suspected Viet Cong members and supporters (as illustrated in the My Lai Massacre).

Viet Cong

Viet Cong refers to the Vietnamese Communist movement that fought against the U.S. And South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The Viet Congs are the Communist forces originally formed under the leadership of Ngo Dinh Diem, who later became the South Vietnam president after the Viet Congs retaliated against Diem's anomalous and corrupt government. The Viet Cong are referred to by Americans as "Commies," and fought alongside the North Vietnamese Army during the Vietnam War. Viet Congs have been renowned by their skills in guerilla warfare, making it easier for them to conduct the battle during Vietnam War against the U.S. And South Vietnam army in the jungles of the country. The Viet Congs and North Vietnam won the Vietnam War because of their extraordinary abilities in guerilla fighting and assault.

The New Left

The New Left was an organization formed during the civil rights movement of 1960s. This organization aims to create an American society wherein liberal freedom and equal rights in the political and social realm are given to all citizens. It supports the participatory democracy instead of representative democracy, wherein the latter appoints a representative to 'represent' a state in political elections, while the former (participatory democracy) decrees the right of every American citizen to participate actively in American politics through a nationwide consensus, giving Americans the right to solve among the citizens (the whole nation) issues of public and national concern. The New Left also led to the emergence of the Beat Generation culture, a cultural movement aimed at deviating from the status quo of the American society by introducing new ones.

Watergate Scandal

The Watergate Scandal involves the president Richard Nixon, who was serving his second term of office as the U.S. President. The Watergate scandal concerns the burglary that happened in the Democratic National Committe in 1973, which led to the discovery that the burglary was connected to high officials within the U.S. government. The Watergate burglary resulted to the discovery that Nixon had been involved in political espionages and sabotage for four years, supported by the tapes from Nixon's taping system in the White House. Due to these scandals, Nixon resigned from office as an alternative to facing an impeachment by the U.S. Senate.

National Organization for Women

The National Organization for Women or NOW is the largest feminist organization in the United States. It was established during the 1970s, and has been significant in its efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment in Congress, a law that guarantees and provides women with equal rights with men. NOW emerged from the National Conference of the Commission for the Status of Women, a committee established during the Kennedy administration whose primary function is to evaluate women's rights in the United States. Aside from the enactment of ERA as U.S. law, NOW has also been significant in the provision or ERA amendments, which include the reproductive rights of women and equal rights for lesbians and gay men.


Reaganomics was a term applied to "Reagan economics" or the state of U.S. economy during Ronald Reagan's term as president of the U.S. Reaganomics is defined as an "economic program utilized during the Reagan administration, which emphasized low taxes, low social services spending, and high military spending." Reaganomics contributed to the country's low interest rates, low inflation, and large budget deficits, which resulted to the increase of the country's federal budget deficit of up to $220B a year, leading to the decrease in incomes and standard of living of Americans because the country's economy is primarily based on its large debt.

Strategic Defense Initiative

The Strategic Defense Initiative of SDI was a U.S. military program for the development of the country's antiballistic missile defense or ABM defense. Developed by the Ronald Reagan administration, SDI will help U.S. become prepared and be protected by potential attacks…[continue]

Cite This Term Paper:

"American History Mccarthyism Is A Term That" (2003, May 05) Retrieved October 26, 2016, from

"American History Mccarthyism Is A Term That" 05 May 2003. Web.26 October. 2016. <>

"American History Mccarthyism Is A Term That", 05 May 2003, Accessed.26 October. 2016,

Other Documents Pertaining To This Topic

  • Anticommunism and Mccarthyism for a Modern Audience

    Anticommunism and McCarthyism For a modern audience, the ideas of anticommunism and McCarthyism may be difficult to distinguish because they are frequently discussed in the same context. However, it is inappropriate to view the two ideologies as synonymous because they actually reflect two related, but very distinct, political viewpoints. This distinction is critical because there are moral issues connected to McCarthyism that should not be connected to anticommunism. Anti-communism refers to

  • 20th Century in American History

    And we know that the subsequent international crisis, which was especially intense during the summer and autumn of 1961, threatened the world with the risk of a military conflict, one that seemed as if it could escalate at any time into nuclear confrontation between the U.S. And the Soviet Union" (p. 44). Over the next 25 years, the Berlin Wall grew both in terms of its physical dimensions as

  • History Social Science Textbook Controversy History

    So let's change the interpretation a little bit so that it will be the way we wished it were." Well, that's not what history is. History is what happened, and history ought to be nothing more than the quest to find out what happened. Now, if you want to get into why what happened, that's probably valid too, but why what happened shouldn't have much of anything to do

  • 19th and 20th Centuries Americans

    In this regard, Frye notes that, "The social changes appeared most profoundly to the majority of citizens not in the statistics of gross national product or the growth of technological inventions but in the dramatic occupational changes that faced fathers and sons and mothers and daughters" (1999, p. 4). The innovations in technology that followed the Industrial Revolution also served to shift the emphasis on education for agricultural jobs to

  • American Political Culture and Values

    First, American ideas about freedom have evolved over time, and this might be the natural model for freedom. To believe that an emerging democracy would immediately look like modern day America ignores the fact that freedom continues to evolve in America. Moreover, freedom is guaranteed by certain institutions, such as an independent judiciary, that generally develop over time. In Presidential address: American freedom in a global age, Eric Foner gives

  • American Politics for the Presidential Party to

    American politics, for the presidential party to lose congressional support in a midterm election. As any administration struggles in the early part of a term to define itself, it's likely to fall in and out of favor with a public still not inundated of the White House's identity and intentions. This is an opportunity rarely missed by the opposition, as sophomore year presidencies have commonly been forced to tolerate

  • Best and Worst in Post 1877 US History

    U.S. History 1877-Present America has changed so vastly since the U.S. Civil War that it is hard to single out three events that have had the most beneficial impact from the later nineteenth century to the present day. However, in terms of selecting events that have had the greatest impact on the daily lives of Americans in this time period even to the present day it is possible to nominate some

Read Full Term Paper
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved