Managing Organizational Culture essay

Download this essay in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from essay:

Human Resources

Managing Organisational Culture

The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization make up the organizations culture. Organizational culture is the summation total of an organization's past and current suppositions, incidents, viewpoint, and values that hold it together, and is articulated in its self-image, inner workings, connections with the outside world, and future prospects.

In dealing with the management of organisational culture, it is firstly essential to recognize as fully as possible the characteristics of the existing or new target culture to include the myths, symbols, rituals, values and assumptions that strengthen the culture. Organisational culture is not something that can be viewed very easily it is consequently quite hard to replace it. Usually when certain leaders form a company, their values are converted into the actions of the members of that organisation. When other leaders take over, it may not be as easy to alter those perspectives right away. Sometimes some of their actions; like rewards may transform the ways workers go about their day-to-day activities but it may be hard to change their culture.

Companies that wish to manage cultures should encourage participation of other members of the organisation in the development activities, decision making and input to the organisation. This will make the workers feel as though they are valuable members of the organisation and they will be motivated to work harder. Lastly, the company should go out of its way to facilitate better communication between members of the organisation. This can be achieved through teamwork integration. It will go a long way in maintaining systems that help the company to stay ahead of its competitors.

Aims - Objectives

The purpose of this paper is to define culture management is and its conceptual underpinnings and then look to see how cultural management is important to the successes of a company. The different approaches to implementing culture management in practice will be looked at and practical ways of implementing culture management will also be discussed. Strategies for using HRM to improve company culture will be discussed in the UK, China and India in order to determine how HRM can be used to make the transition from doing business in the UK to doing business in China and India.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Aims - Objectives

Introduction

Literature Review

Culture as a Broad Concept

Managing Organizational Culture

Organizational Culture in the UK

Managing Organizational Culture in the UK

Organizational Culture in China

Managing Organizational Culture in China

Organizational Culture in India

Managing Organizational Culture in India

Cultural Comparisons

19 UK and India

20 UK and China

Analysis and Discussion

How to Improve Corporate Culture

Theories of Culture

Edgar Schein Theory

Hofstede's Theory

Charles Handy's Culture Theory

Trompenaars's Culture Theory

Cultural Relativism

How to Improve Corporate Culture in the UK

How to Improve Corporate Culture in China

How to improve Corporate Culture in India

Conclusion

Recommendations

References

Introduction

Organizational culture is the workplace environment formulated from the association of the workers in the workplace. "Organizational culture is defined by all of the life experiences, strengths, weaknesses, education, upbringing, and so forth of the employees" (Organizational Culture: Corporate Culture in Organizations, 2012). While executive leaders play a large role in defining organizational culture by their actions and leadership, all employees contribute to the organizational culture. The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization make up the organizations culture. Organizational culture is the summation total of an organization's past and current suppositions, incidents, viewpoint, and values that hold it together, and is articulated in its self-image, inner workings, connections with the outside world, and future prospects (Organizational Culture, 2012).

It is founded on collective attitudes, beliefs, and customs, express or implied contracts, and written and unwritten rules that the organization expands over time and that have worked well enough to be considered valid. Also called corporate culture, it manifests in the ways the organization performs its business, treats its workers, customers, and the wider society, the degree to which autonomy and freedom is permitted in decision making, developing new ideas, and personal appearance, how authority and information flow through its hierarchy, and the strength of worker commitment towards collective objectives. It is phrased strong or weak to the extent it is diffused throughout the organization. It affects the organization's output and performance, and provides strategies on customer care and service; product excellence and security; attendance and promptness; and concern for the environment. It expands also to production-methods, marketing and advertising practices, and to new product formation. While there are many common elements in the large organizations of any country, organizational culture is unique for every organization and one of the hardest things to change (Organizational Culture, 2012).

Although every company and its corporate culture are individual, three important components present in successful management. First, the vision, mission and value definitions of the company owner are clear and concise, permitting workers to better comprehend the focus of the business. Second, workers understand their expected contributions to attain company goals and objectives, based on the leader's mission. Finally, employees should adopt attitudes that support and focus on the company's goals and strategies (Pirraglia, 2012).

Edgar H. Schein developed a model to clarify the basic fundamentals of cultures. Edgar Schein's model looks like the functionalistic models put forward by cultural theorists such as Geert Hofstede and Fons Trompenaars, and can be used to examine all kinds of cultures including corporate and national cultures. The models put forward all suppose that cultures can be clarified and understood by looking at the core principles and suppositions of a given culture (Edgar H. Schein's Model of Organizational Culture, 2010).

This report will look at the relevant literature that exists in regards to organizational culture and how it can be managed via human resource management in the Literature Review section. Organizational culture will be looked at in respect to the UK, China and India. An analysis and discussion on how to improve corporate culture will follow the literature review. Major theories of culture will then be discussed followed by a conclusion and recommendations.

Literature Review

Culture as a Broad Concept

In its very broadest sense, culture serves to outline different groupings of people on the foundation of the extent to which each group is professed and perceives itself to divide similar ways of seeing and interrelating with the animate, inanimate and spiritual world. Cultures are based in history, developing over time as groups establish patterns of behaviour and belief that seem effective in helping them to interpret and interact with the world in which they find themselves. In addition to providing implicit guidelines for behaviour and the channelling of emotion, cultures serve to give people a sense of belonging through collective identity and thus break down the inherent segregation of the individual. It is also significant to comprehend that culture can also define differences amid groups. Culture identifies exacting groups by their resemblances as well as their differences. Even though cultures are self-motivated to the degree that altered circumstances can lead to the amalgamation of new patterns of behaviour or ideologies, characteristically these are overlaid on existing middle assumptions and therefore a culture may exhibit what seem to be multifaceted uncertainties or inconsistencies until such time new behavioural alterations to the environment give rise to a new belief system and set of core assumptions. This can be clearly seen in the case of egalitarianism, a value that is probably associated with a core assumption that life should be lived cooperatively, rather than competitively and commercialisation of labour, they also now show eagerness for job or salary-related status which tends to be linked with spirited behaviour. It may be that over time, as behaviours and values move towards competitiveness, deeply held suppositions about the feasibility of supportive relationships will also shift to highlight the superior viability of competitive associations (Organizational Culture and Performance, n.d.).

Managing Organizational Culture

In dealing with the management of organisational culture, it is firstly essential to recognize as fully as possible the characteristics of the existing or new target culture to include the myths, symbols, rituals, values and assumptions that strengthen the culture. Subsequently, action can be instigated in any of several key points of leverage:

recruitment, selection and replacement -- culture management can be affected by ensuring that appointments strengthen the existing culture/s or support a culture shift; removal and replacement may be used to dramatically change the culture;

socialisation -- induction and subsequent development and training can provide for acculturation to an existing or new culture and also for improved interpersonal communication and teamwork, which is especially critical in fragmented organisational cultures;

performance management/reward systems -- can be used to highlight and encourage desired behaviours which may or may not in turn lead to changed values;

leadership and modelling -- by executives, managers, supervisors can reinforce or assist in the overturning of existing myths, symbols, behaviour and values, and demonstrates the universality and integrity of vision,…[continue]

Cite This Essay:

"Managing Organizational Culture" (2012, August 21) Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/managing-organizational-culture-75245

"Managing Organizational Culture" 21 August 2012. Web.30 November. 2016. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/managing-organizational-culture-75245>

"Managing Organizational Culture", 21 August 2012, Accessed.30 November. 2016, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/managing-organizational-culture-75245

Other Documents Pertaining To This Topic

  • Managing Organizational Culture Organizational Culture

    Taking the relationship of employee morale and its linkage with organizational culture to the most extreme case, Yaghi (2007) studied how decision-making processes are implemented in companies where there is a dominant organizational culture. Selecting a faith-based organization as one of the cases for the study, the author determined how decision-making is mainly influenced by the organizational culture, influenced by the values of solidarity, guardianship, and (belief in a) mission

  • Organizational Cultures Annotated Bibliography and Summary Annotated...

    Organizational Cultures: Annotated Bibliography and Summary Annotated Bibliography Aronson, Z. And Patanakul, P. 2012. "Managing a group of multiple projects: do culture and leader's competencies matter?" Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 3(2): pp. Web. Retrieved from: LexisNexis Database. [Accessed on 21 May This article focuses significantly on how team culture within an organization is a pivotal factor that contributes to a team being able to successfully complete a project. A focus is made on

  • Organizational Culture Change Is Noted by Kotler

    Organizational culture change is noted by Kotler et al. .(1996) noted to be a common aspect of every organization. This is due to the fact that change is the only thing that can be said to be constant in any given organization. Organizational change is often met with a lot of resistance. This resistance can undermine the operations and the performance of any given organization. Kudler Fine Foods Virtual Organization

  • Organizational Culture and Sustained Competitive Advantage Organizational...

    Organizational Culture and Sustained Competitive Advantage Organizational culture is a defining feature of every organization. The unique culture that every organization displays has an affect on its ability to remain profitable. Culture can have either positive or negative affect on the ability of the organization to remain competitive. Much academic research up to this point has focused on theory and defining what is meant by culture and sustainable competitive advantage. This

  • Organizational Culture The Walt Disney Company Relationship

    Organizational Culture: The Walt Disney Company Relationship between the design of your selected organization and its organizational culture The Walt Disney Company is a popular company in many homes all over the world because of the magical treatment given to visitors. The magic starts with the excellent training given to each employee that makes visitors have a memorable experience. The Disney Institute uses a structured learning atmosphere to offer training to employees

  • Organizational Culture Nursing Organizational Culture & Characteristics...

    Organizational Culture Nursing Organizational Culture & Characteristics: In simple terms, organizational culture is "the way we do things here," as one online site described the evolution of the idea behind what is now thought of as being the working whole of the combination of beliefs, assumptions, values and behaviors that reflect the commonality of the people who work together in a given setting (Dodek, et al., 2010:669-670). It is a system

  • Organizational Behavior Terminology and Concepts Organizational Culture...

    Organizational Behavior Terminology and Concepts Organizational Culture An organization's cultural composition encompasses a wide array of structural variables, all of which comprise the ultimate operational atmosphere of the company. Productive capacities and efficiency levels are almost always determined by the effectiveness and receptiveness of an organization's culture. The culture within an organization is also a key determinant of why and how leadership bodies will integrate strategic decisions. Depending of the various specificities


Read Full Essay
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved