Philosophy of Happiness Psychological Well-Being Term Paper

Download this Term Paper in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Term Paper:

In fact, both Weiner and Cutler have described the same thing, in a sense, yet through very different lenses. For some, money becomes less and less important if there is enough, but for others who truly know happiness, this is something that truly has no bearing on how one leads his or her life.

How Society and Media Impact One's Happiness

This last section will describe how media impact happiness. For even if a person is truly happy, there are always outside forces that can disturb this sense of well-being. The media in this country in particular makes happiness seem as though it is solely constructed through money and power. In fact, it is duet to this wrong concept of what happiness means that most people believe that happiness is objective, for all agree on this very definition.

However, as can be seen from the paragraphs above, money is only a means towards achieving happiness, and happiness is the end result of a long, sometimes life-long quest, that does not necessarily revolve around money. The best example of how media portrays happiness is its constant obsession with celebrities, yet the best example that refutes this wrong belief is that mentioned above, which discussed the HIV positive man and how he achieved happiness.

Though the media strives to prove itself over and over again, it has created a very negative, sometimes vengeful and hurtful opinion in society that can lead to some pretty horrible, difficult, and even morally and ethically wrong things to happen in order to achieve fame, power or glory, which are believed to be the accepted societal equivalents to what happiness should truly be. Whereas the media should focus more on how people can achieve happiness and how this can lead to peace, it is clear by its utilization of celebrities that the media can never truly guide society in this matter.

Conclusions

One of the sources utilized for this paper states, "There are dramatic differences in average happiness across nations ranging from 3.24 in Togo to 8.00 in Denmark on a 0 -- 10-points scale. These differences are an indication that collective conditions in nations are important for happiness…"

This latter source argues what this paper has aimed to prove so far: that there are many forces at work that can change one's perception of happiness, and even how this is defined or whether it is felt. This paper has aimed to examine various concepts revolving around happiness, and has argued that happiness is completely subjective and can be achieved by very simple means.

The paragraphs above have also examined what societal constructs do to impact one's psychological well-being and the inevitable search for happiness, and have proven that even though various forces try to change one's concept of happiness, there is always a sense of happiness when one does not connect it with money, but that, paradoxically, there is also an ever-present necessity to do so. Though further studies on this matter should be undertaken, happiness is a subjective matter that can certainly be achieved, and does not necessarily need to be connected with money and finances, and this is a certainty.

Sources:

In order of citation:

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics-Book X." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics-Book II." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics -- the End." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Eric Weiner. "The Geography of Bliss." 12 Books. New York/Boston (Year (did not have the year in the attached source)). Print.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, MD. "The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living." Riverhead Books: New York (1998). Print.

Jan Ott. "Greater Happiness for a Greater Number: Some Non-controversial Options for Governments." Happiness Studies (2010). Print Journal: DOI 10.1007/s10902-010-9206-x (Source provided by customer).

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics-Book X." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics-Book II." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Aristotle. "Nicomachean Ethics -- the End." The Internet Classics Archive (350 BCE). Print.

Eric Weiner. "The Geography of Bliss." 12 Books. New York/Boston (Year (did not have the year in the attached source)). Print.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, MD. "The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living." Riverhead Books: New York (1998). Print.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, MD. "The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living." Riverhead Books: New York (1998). Print.

Jan Ott. "Greater Happiness for a Greater Number: Some Non-controversial Options…[continue]

Cite This Term Paper:

"Philosophy Of Happiness Psychological Well-Being" (2012, May 25) Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/philosophy-of-happiness-psychological-well-being-58308

"Philosophy Of Happiness Psychological Well-Being" 25 May 2012. Web.5 December. 2016. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/philosophy-of-happiness-psychological-well-being-58308>

"Philosophy Of Happiness Psychological Well-Being", 25 May 2012, Accessed.5 December. 2016, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/philosophy-of-happiness-psychological-well-being-58308

Other Documents Pertaining To This Topic

  • Philosophy of Happiness Are There

    Religion has the ability to give people hope especially the hopeless. Despite the harsh situations and challenges that people face, religion plays a fundamental role of giving them hope and optimism from which they draw strength. Religion is also an agent for socialization. It is no doubt meeting with other believers for religious events is more than just practicing faith (Reeve 2006). People use the opportunity to meet old friends

  • Philosophy Plato Socrates and Zen

    He believes that fear of punishment for injustice is all that maintains our praise of justice. Gyges was willing to discard all sense of justice and nobility once the opportunity to act freely presented itself. 5. Socrates' use of the city as metaphor in his discussion of justice is the long way of describing the usefulness of justice and its application in human life. His description of a good city

  • Philosophy Take Home Exam Selection Spinoza Rousseau

    Philosophy Take Home Exam Selection: Spinoza, Rousseau, and Sartre Philosophy and Biography in Spinoza According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Benedict de Spinoza was among one of the most important of the post-Cartesian philosophers "who flourished in the second half of the 17th century" and dealt with the implications of free will, mathematics, and science in answering questions about the mind body problem first posed by Descartes. (Dutton, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • Happiness the Pursuit of Happiness

    " This could not even be termed a desire to do good, as then it would be fulfilling someone's desire to do a good deed, and would therefore have a selfish motive. Kant is one of the very few that attempted to divorce happiness from morality; even though lying to the mass murderer would save many lives, Kant believed that lying was wrong, and therefore one could not lie even

  • Philosophy Human Existence PHILOSOPHICAL

    ." The universal moral idea owed its original psychological potency to the link with religion. Yet, in another sense, that close association was fatal for the moral idea. Monotheistic religion acquired different forms with various peoples and groups. Although those differences were by no means fundamental, they soon were felt more strongly than the essentials that were common, and in that way, religion often caused enmity and conflict instead of binding

  • Seligman Martin Authentic Happiness

    Seligman's Authentic Happiness Martin Seligman's Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment Martin Seligman is a pioneer in the movement of "Positive Psychology." This new branch of research examines our ability to cultivate happiness. This ability is what Seligman calls "learned optimism" and is the basis for his bestselling book, Authentic Happiness. Seligman says that by focusing on our strengths and positive emotions as opposed to negative

  • Human Being Development and Change L What

    Human Being, Development and Change l. What does being human mean: internally, relationally and in a wider social contest? There are many different viewpoints on what it means to be human, but most boil down to the struggle between right and wrong and the role of personal responsibility. Internally, human beings struggle daily with "good" versus "bad" impulses; responsible human adults have learned to delay gratification and make use of the


Read Full Term Paper
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved