Radical Change Management Processes in Term Paper

  • Length: 9 pages
  • Subject: Business - Management
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #21283307

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Change systems

Change often occurs in our society and previous experience has thought us that the primary instinct is that of reticence to the new features. Change can be brought about by both the company as well as the stockholders. Stockholders are represented by all individuals and groups which are directly or indirectly affected by the company's actions. As such, a company's stockholders include, but are not limited to, its purveyors, its clients, its shareholders, its investors, the general public or the state's government.

In order for a change system to function, it has to be properly designed and modelled. "System modelling is a technique to express, visualise, analyse and transform the architecture of a system." It generally includes drawings, diagrams or any other visual features that might ease the understanding of the system. Change systems are complex models which cannot be universally valid. As such, they have to be independently created to fit the unique features of the company or the sector on which they will be implemented. Subsystems are branches of the entire model which also must be designed to fit the particular features. Potential subsystems for a change system could include the changes upon employees, upon consumers, their behaviour or upon the company's divisional and functional structures.

Important components of the modelling system are the multiple cause diagrams. These diagrams are composed from a system boundary, phrases, arrows and a title. They are mainly used to explain a past event in terms of factors that generated it. They do not foresee future behaviour of the analyzed features, but they may "be used to develop a list of factors to bear in mind when considering comparable circumstances in the future." A multiple cause diagram could look like this:

Source: Open Learn, 2007

Another model highly popular amongst companies is the input - transformation - output model. This model analyzes the factors that enter the company, their transformation and their final form, as output. Take for instance milk, the raw material used for the production of dairies. It enters the production company in an input form; it then suffers several transformations and is highly processed, in order to leave the company as yogurt, cream, butter or any other dairy product - the output.

Change systems could be developed based on the two major marketing strategies: pull and push strategy. Here are two examples of change systems based on the two strategies:

1. Concern for protecting

Demand for Manufacturing and selling

Nature fuel economic of fuel-efficiency

Engines automobiles

This system shows how customers' demands and concerns can change the manufacturing features of companies. But companies can also change customers' preferences, even if at first they might feel reluctant to trying a new product. Take for instance the case of developing technologies. Some customers, out of a multitude of reasons, might prefer the old products, even though the new ones, produced with superior technologies are better. Considering that the usage of new technologies generates reduced costs, increased productivity and a higher quality of the items produced, the company has to change the customers' purchase behaviour.

2. Technological

Production with Marketing -> Sales of the new

Developments new technologies

Strategies Products

In order for the change systems to be properly implemented and retrieve the desired results, companies have to possess adaptable employees committed to their teams' as well as the organization's development. Companies have to increase their awareness of the changes occurring at both micro and macroeconomic levels. They also have to charge the most skilled and experienced workers with the tasks of increasing the company's adaptability to environmental forces, developing a strong culture and a positive image for the company and promoting it worldwide, through all media channels, including television, radio and the internet.

Bibliography

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Allen, G., 1998, Organizing Process, Dallas County Community College District

Technology Briefing Report, System Modeling, Renaissance Esprit Project

Multiple Cause Diagrams, System Department Website

Radical Change Management Processes within Organisations

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