Africa Colonialism Events in Europe's Term Paper

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His dynasty would rule Egypt and Sudan until the Egyptian Revolution in 1952.

Born to Albanian parents and the son of a tobacco and shipping merchant, he was made collector of taxes, then achieved the rank of Second-in-Command when the Ottoman Empire was sent to re-occupy Egypt. There he manipulated the situation of anarchy to ease himself into a position of power, and, very soon, he made himself dictator by eliminating the Mamluk forces and transforming Egypt into a regional power.

Determined to change the government and military, Mohammed Ali was intent on having his country, Egypt, adopt Western ways. He confiscated large tracts of land owned by the ulama, putting much of their land under state control, thereby wiping out the tax farmers and the rural aristocracy, and, most importantly, gaining control over Egypt's agricultural land. He enabled his country
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to make the shift from subsistence agriculture to cash-crop farming, and using those revenues financed his schemes for industrial and military development.

Finally, Mohammed Ali imported European advisors and sent his citizens off to the West in order to receive their technical and military training. He pursued Western advice in medicine, engineering, and industrial themes and established a new Arabic press for printing translated textbooks. Egyptian literature, influenced by Europe, became considered the dawn of Arabic renaissance. In the meantime, his military campaigns throughout the Middle East were so successful that Europe had to intervene time and again else he and later his son, Ibrahim, it was feared, would have swallowed the entire Ottoman Empire.

Mohammed Ali died in August 1949, universally respected as a great man.

Source

Colonialism in Africa. Africa: Cradle of Humanity. Available at: http://www.africaforever.org/colonialism.aspx

Gelvin, J.L. The Modern Middle East. U.K: Oxford Univ. Press, 2008.

Sources Used in Documents:

Source

Colonialism in Africa. Africa: Cradle of Humanity. Available at: http://www.africaforever.org/colonialism.aspx

Gelvin, J.L. The Modern Middle East. U.K: Oxford Univ. Press, 2008.

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