American Revolution in the Mid- Term Paper

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The British Parliament came out with further unjust laws, designed to recoup war losses, that further fanned the flames of revolution. In 1765, parliament passed the Stamp Act, requiring all legal documents and permits, newspapers, and even playing card produced in the Americas carry a tax stamp. The law caused widespread resentment, and was never fully enforced.

Economic growth

The period of 1690 to 1760 saw massive changes in the social, political and economic landscape of early America. The colonies were self-sufficient and had distinct cultures. However, they were also linked by commerce and navigation. By the early 18th century, New England colonies like Boston and Salem were established shipbuilding communities as well as important ports for ships from around the world (Nath 22). Colonies in Virginia and Maryland, on the other hand, would grow agricultural economies and export tobacco internationally.

These economic changes would spur several changes as well.. The prosperous economies attracted impoverished immigrants from Old World countries like Italy, Germany and Ireland. The immigration gave rise to ethnic-based conflicts. However, this immigration also spurred in the growth of the nation's population, with people who were eager to start their lives away from the influence of Europe.

Summing Up

In conclusion, a myriad of events and conditions came laid the foundation for the American Revolution, which culminated in the birth of the country in 1776. Fifty years earlier, the Seven Years War drove out the French colonizers, decimated Native American nations and also crippled the British military. The British Parliament scrambled to make up for the economic shortfall by taxing the American colonies. The American colonists, however, rightfully questioned the legality and morality of these taxes, contributing to the revolutionary fervor.

These factors had several intangible contributions to the American Revolution. Colonial participation in the wars planted the seeds of cooperation and solidarity among the colonies. Economic independence from Mother England provided a foundation for a new country. Together, these factors helped to light the fire that would grow into the American Revolution.

Works Cited

Anderson, Fred. Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 to 1766. New York: Vintage Books, 2001.

Henretta, James and Gregory Nobles. "Evolution and Revolution: American Society, 1600 to 1820." Excerpted in The American Revolution. Kirk Werner, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

Nash, Gary. The Urban Crucible:…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Anderson, Fred. Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 to 1766. New York: Vintage Books, 2001.

Henretta, James and Gregory Nobles. "Evolution and Revolution: American Society, 1600 to 1820." Excerpted in The American Revolution. Kirk Werner, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

Nash, Gary. The Urban Crucible: The Northern Seaports and the Origins of the American Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986.

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