Atomic Bombings Of Hiroshima And Term Paper

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The nuclear bomb lacks any precision in targeting solely military targets without causing casualties. Although its use cannot be justified from a moral perspective, it can be seen as a means to put an end to a war that had taken millions of lives up to 1945. The impact the attacks had on Japan determined, or at least influenced, the Emperor's decision to surrender unconditionally. In this way, the death of approximately 200 thousand people can be pragmatically viewed as a price for the survival of possibly other millions of people that would have lost their lives should the war had continued. Overall, it can be concluded that, despite the tragic loss of human lives, the nuclear attacks from Hiroshima and Nagasaki could find justification in the historical context, the economic and geopolitical framework of the time. Although morally, it lacks justification, it might have saved millions others from death.

Bibliography

Calvocoressi, Peter. World politics since 1945. Budapest: Open Society Institute, 1996.

Goldschmidt, Bertrand. Le complex atomique: histoire politique de l'energie nucleaire. Paris: Librairie Artheme Fayard, 1980.

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Newman, Robert P. Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. Michigan State University Press, 1995.

Thomas, Gordon, and Max Morgan Witts. Enola Gay....

...

New York: Stein and Day Publishers, 1977.
Walker, Samuel. Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

Robert P. Newman, Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. (Michigan State University Press, 1995), 2.

Samuel Walker, Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), 1-3

Robert P. Newman, Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. (Michigan State University Press, 1995), 2-3.

Bertrand Goldschmidt, Le complex atomique: histoire politique de l'energie nucleaire. (Librairie Artheme Fayard, Paris, 1980), 29.

Peter Calvocoressi, World politics since 1945. (Budapest: Open Society Institute, 1996), 199-203

Robert P. Newman, Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. (Michigan State University Press, 1995), 1.

Samuel Walker, Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), 3.

Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan Witts, Enola Gay. (New York: Stein and Day Publishers, 1977), 16.

Henry Kissinger, Diplomacy. (London: Simon & Schuster, 1995)

Idem.

Robert P. Newman, Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. (Michigan State University Press, 1995), 115-119.

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

Calvocoressi, Peter. World politics since 1945. Budapest: Open Society Institute, 1996.

Goldschmidt, Bertrand. Le complex atomique: histoire politique de l'energie nucleaire. Paris: Librairie Artheme Fayard, 1980.

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Newman, Robert P. Truman and the Hiroshima Cult. Michigan State University Press, 1995.


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