Cardiac Arrests: A Comparison Sutdy Research Proposal

Excerpt from Research Proposal :

Of the new consults 23 were transferred to ICU and 43 remained on the wards. The transfer of these patients was greatly facilitated and the inpatient ward staff was greatly satisfied with the interaction with the Outreach Team. Bedside education, expert resources and better patient-family communication were the most valued features of the team when the in-patient ward staff was surveyed. We noted a tremendous increase in the accessibility of the ICU to the hospital population. We did not, however, notice a decrease in the number of cardiac arrests in the hospital." (Simone, et al., 2007)

It was reported in the work entitled: "Pilot Project at TGH Shows that Critical Care Response Teams Can Significantly Reduce Cardiac and Respiratory Arrests and Hospital Deaths" in 2007 that data gathered between May 2005 and May 2006 "on the impact of the critical care response teams on 342 patients in Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network (UHN) showed that there was a seven percent reduction in heart attacks and a 25% reduction in respiratory arrests (when patients stop breathing and need mechanical assistance to breathe)." (University Health Network, 2007) This equals approximately 80 saved lives in one years' time. Data is also stated to have shown that "...after the response teams intervened, 71% of patients were able to remain on the ward, and 21% were transferred to the ICU. Others were transferred to units with more intense care that the wards." (University Health Network, 2007)

The work of Baxter (nd) entitled: "Critical Care Outreach at the Ottawa Hospital" reports that critical care outreach enables:

(1) Earlier recognition of patients at risk of significant deterioration and better use of vital signs; and (2) Early aggressive and adequate resuscitation by experienced personnel. (Baxter, nd)

This has led to:

(1) Prevention of physiological deterioration; and (2) Improved outcomes for patients. (Baxter, nd)

Resulting as well were the following benefits:

(1) Better follow up of patients discharged from the ICUE; and (2) Avoidance of inappropriate admission or readmission to the ICU. (Baxter, nd)

METHODOLOGY

The methodology proposed for the research is one of a quantitative nature and one that will involve collection of data related to cardiac arrest outcomes as well as mortality due to cardiac arrests over the period of one month's time in two hospital intensive care units.

DATA COLLECTION/ANALYSIS

Each of the hospital intensive care units in this study will be required to keep a log of patients admitted for cardiac arrest along with the prognosis, outcome and survival rates of those patients. Data will be analyzed through comparison of data on the hospital with and the hospital without a critical care outreach team for patients with cardiac arrest incidents over the period of one month's time.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS

As none of the patients in this study will be identified by any personal information, there will not be a requirement of consent or authorization forms for participation in this study.

SUMMARY & CONCLUSION

There is a great desire among members of the medical community to understand whether critical care outreach teams enable the reduction of cardiac arrest for patients admitted to the critical care unit of hospitals and if a critical care outreach team increases the chance for a patient's survival following a cardiac arrest incident.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Smith GB, Poplett N. (2004) Impact of attending a 1-day multi-professional course (ALERT) on the knowledge of acute care in trainee doctors. Resuscitation 2004; 61: 117-122.

Smith, Gary B. And Nolan, Jerry (2002) Medical Emergency Teams and Cardiac Arrests in Hospital: Results May Have Been Due to Education of Ward Staff. BMJ 2002 May 18; 324(7347): 1215.

White RJ, Garrioch MA.(2002) Time to train all doctors to look after seriously ill patients -- CCRiSP and IMPACT. Scot Med J. 2002; 47: 127.

Simone, Carmine, et al. (2007) the Introduction of a Critical Care Rapid Response Team in a Canadian Community Hospital. Critical Care: ICU Organization. 22 Oct. 2007. Online available at:…

Sources Used in Document:

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Smith GB, Poplett N. (2004) Impact of attending a 1-day multi-professional course (ALERT) on the knowledge of acute care in trainee doctors. Resuscitation 2004; 61: 117-122.

Smith, Gary B. And Nolan, Jerry (2002) Medical Emergency Teams and Cardiac Arrests in Hospital: Results May Have Been Due to Education of Ward Staff. BMJ 2002 May 18; 324(7347): 1215.

White RJ, Garrioch MA.(2002) Time to train all doctors to look after seriously ill patients -- CCRiSP and IMPACT. Scot Med J. 2002; 47: 127.

Simone, Carmine, et al. (2007) the Introduction of a Critical Care Rapid Response Team in a Canadian Community Hospital. Critical Care: ICU Organization. 22 Oct. 2007. Online available at: http://meeting.chestpubs.org/cgi/reprint/132/4/445.pdf

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