Career in Law Enforcement Although Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :



The U.S. Marshal Service position involves perhaps more dangerous duties than that of the FBI agent. Responsiblities include locating fugitives, going on lengthy assignments that often involve surveillance and stakeouts. Accordingly, essential skills include patience. It is also noted that agents working for the U.S. Marshal Service should be experienced, organized writers who can efficiently file reports. The video also noted that those with experience in law enforcement stand a greater chance of getting hired.

My qualifications for the U.S. Marshal Service position are similar to my strengths regarding the FBI agent position. I am an accomplished, lucid writer and my strong physical build would assist me when engaged on dangerous assignments. Additionally, my itinerant upbringing makes me uniquely qualified for extended, two-week assignments. Although I do not have experience in law enforcement, I feel my skills in other areas more than compensate for this particular deficit.

The ICE Special Agent position is different from the other two professions in that it involves focusing on those who import and export illicit materials. Similar to the U.S. Marshall Service position, the job involves a good deal of travel, although in this case the travel is often concentrated in Latin America. Agents are typically involved in gathering information for prosecution; the job therefore requires extreme patience and the mental fortitude to not become frustrated by lack of progress. There are also hours of boredom involved (in addition to exciting situations) and so an ICE Agent should be able to remain alert during periods of little activity.

Of the three jobs, I am perhaps best qualified for this position. I am Hispanic and fluent in Spanish (foreign language skills are a stated requirement for the position), and my itinerant upbringing makes me uniquely qualified for the extensive travel associated with the job. In his book on the life of an FBI agent, Mike Gorman (2007) describes how one of the main obstacles facing law enforcement officials is an inability to relate to the indigenous culture of the criminal. My Hispanic heritage and experience living in multiple cultures makes me able to see the world from the eyes of Mexican aliens (who are often the focus of ICA investigation) as well as those from other cultures. Although I would welcome any of the three professions described, the emphasis on foreign language skills the fact that real-life experience is not required make a career as an ICE Special Agent my preferred profession.

References

German, Mike. (2007). Thinking Like a Terrorist: Insights of a Former FBI Agent. Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books, Inc.

Blumstein, a., Farrington, D., & Piquero, a.R. (2003). The criminal career paradigm. Crime and Justice, 30, 359-506.

Sources Used in Document:

References

German, Mike. (2007). Thinking Like a Terrorist: Insights of a Former FBI Agent. Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books, Inc.

Blumstein, a., Farrington, D., & Piquero, a.R. (2003). The criminal career paradigm. Crime and Justice, 30, 359-506.

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