Clinical Psychology, Psychodynamic, Cognitive-Behavioral, Humanistic, Research Proposal

Excerpt from Research Proposal :

Also known as person-centered or client-centered, Rogerian therapy, it "places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role" Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders). However, although effective with some clients: "Person-centered therapy, however, appears to be slightly less effective than other forms of humanistic therapy in which therapists offer more advice to clients and suggest topics to explore," as the client may use the therapy sessions more to complain or go over old grievances, than use the therapy to move forward in his or her life (Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders).

Another type of therapy that has radically escalated in popularity is that of family or marital therapy, which, like cognitive-behavioral therapy, tends to be focused on specific problems and of a fairly short duration. "Marriage and family therapists regularly practice short-term therapy; 12 sessions on average" FAQs, 2009, AAMFT). The advantage to the therapy is that all individuals affected by the behavior, not just the person who is labeled 'mentally ill' become involved in the treatment: "Research indicates that marriage and family therapy is as effective, and in some cases more effective than standard and/or individual treatments for many mental health problems such as: adult schizophrenia, affective (mood) disorders, adult alcoholism and drug abuse, children's conduct disorders, adolescent drug abuse, anorexia in young adult women, childhood autism, chronic physical illness in adults and children, and marital distress and conflict" (FAQs, 2009, AAMFT).

Works Cited

FAQs about marriage and family therapy. (2009). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.aamft.org/faqs/index_nm.asp

Mulhauser, Greg. (2009). An introduction to cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Counseling Resource. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/

Park, C. (2006, October 18). Best evidence summaries of topics in mental healthcare.

BEST in MH clinical question-answering service.

A www.bestinmh.org.uk.RetrievedFebruary 28, 2009 at http://www.bestinmh.org.uk/answers/pdf/BestInMHAnswer176.pdf

Person-centered (humanistic) therapy. (2009). Mind disorders. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.minddisorders.com/Ob-Ps/Person-centered-therapy.html

Clinical psychology

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

FAQs about marriage and family therapy. (2009). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.aamft.org/faqs/index_nm.asp

Mulhauser, Greg. (2009). An introduction to cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Counseling Resource. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/

Park, C. (2006, October 18). Best evidence summaries of topics in mental healthcare.

BEST in MH clinical question-answering service.

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