Domestic Violence on Children Studies Article

Excerpt from Article :

Each day, thousands of New Yorkers experience violence at the hands of someone they love. But only a fraction of victims know where to get help" (p. 3).

Moreover, many domestic violence victims are coerced by the perpetrators into not testifying against them. In this regard, Glaberson (2011) reports that, "The defendants in domestic violence cases are in constant contact with their victims, and they use various means and methods to try to have the case dropped. Many of them cannot seem to stop themselves from sweet-talking, confessing to, berating and threatening . . . The women they were charged with abusing" (p. 3). Because even abusive relationships can be strong, some women who have experienced domestic violence -- even many times -- may be reluctant to prosecute their spouses or partners. In some cases, domestic violence shelters encourage abused partners to seek formal divorces in order to facilitate the receipt of support payments. For instance, according to Duchon-Voyles (2010), "Most shelters want women to file for divorce as soon as they arrive so they can start getting child support" (p. 3).

In some cases, the short-term solution to preventing recurrences of family violence require legal injunctions against the perpetrator, or respondent, that keeps him or her away from the family's minor children, or which provides for temporary parenting arrangements (Temporary injunction for protection against domestic violence with minor child (ren), n.d.). In this regard, WomensLaw.org report that, "An injunction for protection against domestic violence is a court document that orders the abuser to stop doing certain acts and makes the abuser do other acts such as leaving your home, and paying you temporary child support. It can also give you certain rights such as temporary custody of your children" (Injunctions for protection against domestic violence 2012, p. 2). In most cases, though, temporary injunctions are only available when the abusing spouse or partner lives in the home (Instructions for Florida Supreme Court approved family law form 12.980(a), petition for injunction against domestic violence 2012).

Conclusion

The research showed that there have been some significant trends in domestic violence in recent years that have important implications for policymakers and victims alike. While there has been a general decline in the numbers of domestic violence cases reported in the United States in recent years, some authorities suggest the problem remains underreported and understudied. Furthermore, despite the declines in domestic violence reported in the mainstream media, thousands of domestic violence reports are still filed every day and millions of children remain in abusive and violent homes. Because the research also showed that witnessing or experiencing violence in the home can have life-changing implications, it is clear that more needs to be done to address the fundamental problems that contribute to the incidence of domestic violence in the United States.

References

Duchon-Voyles, a. (2010, October 21). From dangerous home to safe house. The New York

Times. [online] available: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/24/magazine/24lives-t.html?ref=domesticviolence.

Glaberson, W. (2011, February 25). Abuse suspects, your calls are taped. Speak up. The New

York Times. [online] available: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/26/nyregion/26tapes.

html?ref=domesticviolence.

Goode, E. (2012, September 19). Fewer children are found exposed to violent crime. The New

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Injunctions for protection against domestic violence. (2012). WomensLaw.org. [online]

available: http://www.womenslaw.org/laws_state_type.php?id=496&state_code=

FL#content-7784.

Instructions for Florida Supreme Court approved family law form 12.980(a), petition for injunction against domestic violence. (2012). State of Florida Courts. [online] available:

http://www.flcourts.org/gen_public/family/forms_rules/980a.pdf.

Jimenez, Y.B. (2011, March 14). Domestic violence. The New York Times. [online] available:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/opinion/l22domestic.html?ref=domesticviolence.

Legal definition of domestic violence. (2012). WomensLaw.org. [online] available: http://

www.womenslaw.org/laws_state_type.php?id=496&state_code=FL#content-7784.

McGinty, J.C. (2012, January 20). Sobering report describes trends in deaths of abused and neglected children. The New York Times. [online] available: http://www.nytimes.com/

2012/01/21/nyregion/report-describes-trends-in-deaths-of-abused-and-neglected-children.html?ref=domesticviolence.

Temporary injunction for protection against domestic violence with minor child (ren). (n.d.).

State of Florida Courts. [online] available: http://www.flcourts.org/gen_public/

family/forms_rules/980c1.pdf

Sources Used in Document:

References

Duchon-Voyles, a. (2010, October 21). From dangerous home to safe house. The New York

Times. [online] available: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/24/magazine/24lives-t.html?ref=domesticviolence.

Glaberson, W. (2011, February 25). Abuse suspects, your calls are taped. Speak up. The New

York Times. [online] available: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/26/nyregion/26tapes.

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