Dream Community Unlike The Popular Term Paper

Length: 4 pages Sources: 1+ Subject: Teaching Type: Term Paper Paper: #38566663 Related Topics: Ecological Footprint, Dream Act, Dreams, Community Resources
Excerpt from Term Paper :

Older people could receive tax incentives to act as teachers to students in areas of expertise, or simply to help out as coaches or staff. Ideally, private educational institutions would be few, to ensure a lack of a drain of community resources from the public schools, although private schools could supplement student education for students with special needs that could not be met by the public system.

Transportation

Unless it was required for their daily work-related commute, residents would agree to drive fuel-efficient cars and receive tax credits if they drove hybrid or electric cars.

Safety

Community watch groups would supplement the police force. Both police and volunteer organizations would also engage in educational efforts with the school system regarding anti-drug, anti-bullying, and anti-violence campaigns. Fire safety would be ensured by a professionally trained core force, supplemented by a group of volunteers for less vigorous conflagrations.

Waste collection

Collection would occur twice weekly for trash, and there would be mandatory weekly recycling of paper, plastics, and aluminum.

Public utilities

Indigent residents would receive assistance.

How are services paid for?

Property taxes, solicited contributions for fire and safety services, and state and federal government grants for cutting-edge educational initiatives and environmental conservation efforts.

Physical Structure of the Community

All structures would be easy to reach by walking or bicycle, ideally all community members could walk or bike to school for at least part of the year.

Type of housing

Most people would own their own homes, but houses would be modest and relatively closely located, to create a true communal feeling.

Parks and recreational areas

Areas for local student sports teams, and general areas to play would be plentiful, encouraging community and personal health through athletic initiatives.

...

Also, humidity levels around 30%, and 15 to 20 inches of rain a year, an area not prone to natural disasters, are considered ideal for containing costs for residents, and drawing in tourists. (Schmidt, 2005)

How would your community meet a sustainable ecological footprint?

An ecological footprint reflects the town's use of nonrenewable resources. (Best Foot Forward, 2005) to minimize this impact, the use of recycling, the encouragement of non-fossil fuel burning transportation, and community wide cleanups are all crucial

Food resources

In addition to encouraging local community gardening, school cafeterias could buy from local merchants, and provide healthy rather than franchised food to students.

Energy needs and resources

When feasible, in addition to encouraging foot traffic and bicycle path usage, areas such as solar, water, and wind power, especially during the summer months could be explored, perhaps with government funding.

Works Cited

Best Foot Forward. (2004) "Ecological Foot printing." Retrieved 24 Mar 2005 at http://www.bestfootforward.com/foot.html

CNN Money. (2005) "Best Places to Live in USA." Money Magazine Survey. Retrieved 24 Mar 2005 at http://money.cnn.com/best/bplive/details/3710740.html

Frantz, Douglas & Catherine Collins. (2000) Celebration, U.S.A.: Living in Disney's Brave New Town. New York: Owl Books.

Schmidt, Wayne. (24 Mar 2005) "Best Places to Live" This & That Website. Retrieved 24 Mar…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Best Foot Forward. (2004) "Ecological Foot printing." Retrieved 24 Mar 2005 at http://www.bestfootforward.com/foot.html

CNN Money. (2005) "Best Places to Live in USA." Money Magazine Survey. Retrieved 24 Mar 2005 at http://money.cnn.com/best/bplive/details/3710740.html

Frantz, Douglas & Catherine Collins. (2000) Celebration, U.S.A.: Living in Disney's Brave New Town. New York: Owl Books.

Schmidt, Wayne. (24 Mar 2005) "Best Places to Live" This & That Website. Retrieved 24 Mar 2005 at http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/bestplacetolive2.htm


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