Emotional Recognition of Written Expressions Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

2006). The neurological degeneration caused by this disease has also been found to reduce cognitive abilities pretty much across the board, and the inclusion of emotional recognition in its list of reduced functions suggests a stronger neurological basis for the phenomenon (Winblad et al. 2006). This also suggests a definite relationship between the neurological functions recognized in conscious cognition and the processing of emotional inputs (Winblad et al. 2006).

Much of the information regarding the psychological mechanisms that allow for the phenomenon of emotional recognition via facial features also comes from the study of unhealthy or abnormal cases. Interestingly, in one study involving "average" college students, the existence of primary psychopathic traits was positively correlated with recognition of fearful faces, but seemed to show no effect on the ability to recognize other emotions (Del Gaizo & Falkenbach 2008). This suggests a psychological predisposition to the recognition of certain emotions even when all anatomical and neurological mechanisms are functioning properly. Somewhat paradoxically, another study found that sex offenders were less able to identify frightened, disgusted, or surprised faces when compared to control groups, again without significant impact on their ability to recognize other emotions (Gery et al. 2009). These studies and other similar findings show a clear possibility of the psychological alteration of a phenomenon that has its foundation in the anatomy of the brain and the neurological system.

Hypothesis

Facial expression is only one of the myriad ways in which humans are able to recognize the emotions of others. Besides the psychological factors mentioned above, self-monitoring and the level of internal control felt by an individual can also hugely impact their ability to correctly identify emotions expressed facially (Lufson & Nowicki 1991). Furthermore, such basic and normative internal adjustments to the human body such as in the balance of hormone levels can have adverse affects on both the facial recognition of emotions and empathy (Rubinow et al. 2007). For this reason, this study will examine the efficiency of other methods of emotional recognition as compared to that provided by facial features. Specifically, it is hypothesized that respondents will recognize written expressions of happiness faster and more accurately than they will recognize facial expressions of happiness.

References

Cheng, Y.; Chou, K.; Decety. J.; Chen, L.; Hunge, D.; Tzenga, O. & Lin, C. (2009). Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of human mirror-neuron system: A voxel-based morphometric investigation. Neuroscience, 158(2), pp. 713-20

Del Gaizo, a. & Falkenbach, D. (2008). "Primary and secondary psychopathic-traits and their relationship to perception and experience of emotion." Personality and Individual Differences, 45(3) pp. 206-12

Elkman, P. (1994). "Strong evidence for universals in facial expressions: A reply to Russell's mistaken critique." Psychological bulletin 115(2), pp. 268-87.

Focquaert, F.; Braeckman, J. & Platek, S. (2008). "An evolutionary cognitive neuroscience perspective on human self-awareness and theory of mind. Philosophical Psychology, 21(1), pp. 47-68.

Frank, M.; Elkman, P. & Friesen, W.V. (1993). "Behavioral markers and recognizability of the smile of enjoyment." Journal of personality and social psychology, 64(1), pp. 83-93.

Fujie, S.; Namiki, C.; Nishi, H.; Yamada, M.; Miyata, J.; Sakata, D.; Sawamoto, N.; Fukuyama, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Murai, T. (2008). "The role of the uncinate fasciculus in memory and emotional recognition in amnestic mild cognitive impairment." Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders, 28(5), pp. 432-9.

Gery, I.; Milijkovitch, R.; Bethoz, S. & Soussignan, R. (2009). "Empathy and recognition of facial expressions of emotion in sex offenders, non-sex offenders and normal controls." Psychiatry research, 165(3), pp. 252-62.

Kano, F.; Tanaka, M. & Tomonaga, M. (2008). "Enhanced recognition of emotional stimuli in the chimpanzee." Animal cognition, 11(3), pp. 517-24.

Lufson, S. & Nowicki, S. (1991). "Factors affecting the accuracy of facial affect recognition." Journal of social psychology, 131(6), pp. 815-22.

Rubinow, D.; Smith, M.; Schenkel, L.; Schmidt, P. & Dancer, K. (2007). "Facial emotion discrimination across the menstrual cycle in women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Cheng, Y.; Chou, K.; Decety. J.; Chen, L.; Hunge, D.; Tzenga, O. & Lin, C. (2009). Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of human mirror-neuron system: A voxel-based morphometric investigation. Neuroscience, 158(2), pp. 713-20

Del Gaizo, a. & Falkenbach, D. (2008). "Primary and secondary psychopathic-traits and their relationship to perception and experience of emotion." Personality and Individual Differences, 45(3) pp. 206-12

Elkman, P. (1994). "Strong evidence for universals in facial expressions: A reply to Russell's mistaken critique." Psychological bulletin 115(2), pp. 268-87.

Focquaert, F.; Braeckman, J. & Platek, S. (2008). "An evolutionary cognitive neuroscience perspective on human self-awareness and theory of mind. Philosophical Psychology, 21(1), pp. 47-68.

Cite This Research Paper:

"Emotional Recognition Of Written Expressions" (2009, April 12) Retrieved March 31, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/emotional-recognition-of-written-expressions-23014

"Emotional Recognition Of Written Expressions" 12 April 2009. Web.31 March. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/emotional-recognition-of-written-expressions-23014>

"Emotional Recognition Of Written Expressions", 12 April 2009, Accessed.31 March. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/emotional-recognition-of-written-expressions-23014