Epic of Gilgamesh, Considered a Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :



Leed (1991) notes another commonality Gilgamesh shares with contemporary society, and that is the habit of travel. In contemporary society for example, millions of people travel far from their homeland each and every day, whether for work, in the pursuit of knowledge, to reclaim new lands or to vacation. Gilgamesh engages in his pursuits in frequent travel, as noted by the questions often queried of him regarding his appearance, "...why is despair in your heart and your face like the face of one who has made a long journey;... why do you come here wandering... In search of the wind" (Sanders, 103).

Universal truths associated with Gilgamesh's travels center around "fatigue, hardship and danger" and suggests journey or travel has the ability to change individuals and create "shepherds" of peace from "predators," often with characters like Gilgamesh and even Odysseus traveling in search of immortality, which they are not to find (Leed, 6). It is here that we also see the acceptance of the frailty of human beings as immortals, as destined to die fatigued, withered and old; carrying with them often a fear much like man would today, no matter their status in society.

Conclusions

Universal truths are common in contemporary society as much as they were considered in ancient times, as evidenced by the triumphs and hardships of favored kings of great lands, including Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh demonstrates the nature of human beings as life, curious, loving, filled with love and lust and idealisms, as well as human beings desire to capture immortality or understand the afterlife.

References

Kovacs, G. Maureen. The Epic of Gilgamesh, Stanford: Stanford University, 1989.

Leed, Eric J. The Mind of the Traveler: From Gilgamesh to global tourism. New York:

Basic Books, 1991.

Sanders,…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Kovacs, G. Maureen. The Epic of Gilgamesh, Stanford: Stanford University, 1989.

Leed, Eric J. The Mind of the Traveler: From Gilgamesh to global tourism. New York:

Basic Books, 1991.

Sanders, Nancy K. The Epic of Gilgamesh, New York: Penguin Books, 1975.

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