Evidence-Based Care for Urinary Incontinence Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

The condition was shown to be the second-most common cause of older adults being institutionalized because of the inordinately demanding nature of caring for them that is typically beyond the ability of many spouses or other family members. In the final analysis, the chances of older adults suffering from urinary incontinence are fairly high given that the population will increasingly include older adults, many of whom will be among the very old.

References

Beling, J. (2004). Impact of service learning on physical therapist students' knowledge of and attitudes toward older adults and on their critical thinking ability. Journal of Physical

Therapy Education, 18(1), 13-14.

Burke, M. & Laramie, J.A. (2000). Primary care of the older adult: A multidisciplinary approach. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Ebersole, P. & Hess, P. (1999). Toward healthy aging: Human needs and nursing response.

St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Fantl, J.A., Newman, D.K., Colling, J. et al. (1996). Managing acute and chronic urinary incontinence. In Ebersole & Hess at 288.

Mezey, M., Fulmer, T. & Abraham, I. (2006). Geriatric nursing: Protocols for best practice.

New York: Springer.

Pachana, N.A. (1999). Developments in clinical interventions for older adults: A review. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 28(2), 107.

Proctor, E.K. (2008). Notation of depression in case records of older adults in community long-

term care. Social Work, 53(3), 243-245.

Schulz, R., Noelker, L.S., Rockwood, K. & Sprott, R.L. (2006). The encyclopedia of aging.

New York: Springer.

Strange, C.J. (1999, July-August). Incontinence can be controlled. FDA Consumer, 31(5), 28-

29.

Appendix A

Types of Urinary Incontinence

Type of Urinary Incontinence

Description

Stress incontinence

This condition occurs when intraabdominal pressure exceeds urethral resistance. A number of causes are rooted in anatomic damage to the urethral sphincter and weakened bladder neck supports. This phenomenon may occur when an individual sneezes, coughs, bends over, or lifts a heavy object. The amount of urine leakage is small, and the volume would be low if a postresidual urine were obtained.

Urge incontinence

This type is caused by central nervous system lesions such as stroke, demyelinating diseases, and local irritating factors such as bladder tumors or urinary tract infections. Individuals sense the urge to void but cannot inhibit urination long enough to reach a toilet. The volume of urine lost is moderate, and episodes occur every few hours. Postresidual urine would reveal a low volume.

Overflow incontinence

This type is a result of neurologic abnormalities of the spinal cord that affect the contractility of the detrusor muscle of the bladder. Any factor disrupting detrusor stability such as drugs, tumors, strictures, and prostatic hypertrophy will cause the bladder to become overdistended, leading to frequent or constant loss of urine.

Functional incontinence

This term refers to a situation in which the lower urinary tract is intact but the individual is limited by musculo-skeletal disability or severe cognitive impairment. Urine is lost because the individual is unaware of the need to void or is unable to reach a toilet because of arthritis, Parkinson's disease, or for hospitalized patients, their condition or raised bed rails. Environmental conditions and prescribed drug use are additional examples of factors that can create functional incontinence.

Iatrogenic incontinence

This condition is associated with medication side effects. This can be managed by decreasing the dosage of medication to maintain the primary drug effect but eliminate the secondary effects. It may…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Beling, J. (2004). Impact of service learning on physical therapist students' knowledge of and attitudes toward older adults and on their critical thinking ability. Journal of Physical

Therapy Education, 18(1), 13-14.

Burke, M. & Laramie, J.A. (2000). Primary care of the older adult: A multidisciplinary approach. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Ebersole, P. & Hess, P. (1999). Toward healthy aging: Human needs and nursing response.

Cite This Essay:

"Evidence-Based Care For Urinary Incontinence" (2010, September 12) Retrieved May 27, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/evidence-based-care-for-urinary-incontinence-12212

"Evidence-Based Care For Urinary Incontinence" 12 September 2010. Web.27 May. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/evidence-based-care-for-urinary-incontinence-12212>

"Evidence-Based Care For Urinary Incontinence", 12 September 2010, Accessed.27 May. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/evidence-based-care-for-urinary-incontinence-12212

Advertisements