Fatwas Of The Virtuous Vampire: Essay

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" After effectively damning her to a life as a vampire, Ibrahim, himself abused by the man who made him one of the undead, tries to 'make good' on his promise to himself to help Lina: "Despite the many shortcoming of Ibrahim's moral probity, he had known from the start that he would live his life as a vampire much the same way he had lived his life as a normal human -- trying to be good, even if he failed miserably most of the time." This is, Taylor suggests, not unlike that of a terrorist who rationalizes his conversion of another man (or woman) to the cause, that he is at least trying, and saving the new convert from a worse fate. Taylor's extended metaphor of Islamic terrorism and fundamentalism and vampirism, of one life as an outsider in...

...

Taylor makes terrorism emotionally, if not intellectually comprehensible. This shows the great power of science fiction -- to take readers outside of their current ways of thinking and conceptualizing the world and humanity, and to give them greater clarity, balance, and perspective.
Works Cited

Ahmad, M.A. "Islam and Science Fiction: Islam SciFi Interview of Pamela Taylor."October

13 th, 2010.

Taylor, Patricia. "50 Fatwas of the Virtuous Vampire." November 1, 2010.

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Ahmad, M.A. "Islam and Science Fiction: Islam SciFi Interview of Pamela Taylor."October

13 th, 2010.

Taylor, Patricia. "50 Fatwas of the Virtuous Vampire." November 1, 2010.


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