Femme Fatales in Greek Mythology: Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

They both feature in Greek mythological connotations that are dated back to the period of Greek dominance. They both adapt big screen movies and pictures that are scary and with intent. Medusa is more cryptic unlike Circe. They are fear-representation arts in human life. For instance, it is common to note the similarities of the two pieces of art in what takes place in the big screens

The description of Circe is very scary to the audience. She is a daughter of Titans Hyperion and Perseis. She is a powerful witch that hails from the family of Colchis. She is violet-haired, beautiful, and red-eyed sorcerer. She is a known creature that turns people into animals. As Medusa did, she had innate powers that transcended to her from the family protocols. She turns people into animals called Bestiamorphs. Moreover, she has the ability to control the minds of the people. She lives in the island of Aeaea. Circe has been a devoted follower of the goddess Hecate for thousands of years. She is known to have inherited a portion of capability to control human world in general. She is married and has three sons just like human beings. As compared to Medusa, Circe
Parts of this Document are Hidden
Click Here to View Entire Document
has common features that relate it with Medusa. She is artistic in nature. Everything that happens in the world of the two creatures is scary and influential to the human life.

Reference list

Bade, Patrick. Femme fatale images of evil and fascinating women. New York: Mayflower

Books. 1979

Binias, Silke. Symbol and symptom: the Femme Fatale in English poetry of the 19th century and feminist criticism. Heidelberg: Winter. 2007

Federici, Corrado, Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, and Ernesto Virgulti. Beauty and the abject:

interdisciplinary perspectives. New York: P. Lang. 2007.

Bade, Patrick. 1979. Femme fatale images of evil and fascinating women. New York: Mayflower Books

Binias, Silke. Symbol and symptom: the Femme Fatale in English poetry of the 19th century and feminist criticism. Heidelberg: Winter. 2007

Bade, Patrick. 1979. Femme fatale images of evil and fascinating women. New York: Mayflower Books

Federici, Corrado, Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, and Ernesto Virgulti. Beauty and the abject: interdisciplinary perspectives. New York: P. Lang. 2007

Binias, Silke. Symbol and symptom: the Femme Fatale in English poetry of the 19th century and feminist criticism. Heidelberg: Winter. 2007

Federici, Corrado, Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, and Ernesto Virgulti. Beauty and the abject: interdisciplinary perspectives. New York: P. Lang. 2007

Binias, Silke. Symbol and symptom: the Femme Fatale in English poetry…

Sources Used in Documents:

Reference list

Bade, Patrick. Femme fatale images of evil and fascinating women. New York: Mayflower

Books. 1979

Binias, Silke. Symbol and symptom: the Femme Fatale in English poetry of the 19th century and feminist criticism. Heidelberg: Winter. 2007

Federici, Corrado, Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, and Ernesto Virgulti. Beauty and the abject:

Cite This Term Paper:

"Femme Fatales In Greek Mythology " (2013, February 01) Retrieved October 20, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/femme-fatales-in-greek-mythology-85626

"Femme Fatales In Greek Mythology " 01 February 2013. Web.20 October. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/femme-fatales-in-greek-mythology-85626>

"Femme Fatales In Greek Mythology ", 01 February 2013, Accessed.20 October. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/femme-fatales-in-greek-mythology-85626