Ghatotkacha the Story of Ghatotkacha Thesis

Excerpt from Thesis :

" 1). The story also portrays the roles of women as incredibly passive. When Ghatotkacha dies, his mother is left vulnerable and is "rendered helpless at the unexpected death of the main pillar of her security," (Bandyopadyay "A Study in Folk 'Mahabharata:' How Balarama Became Abhimanu's Father-in-Law." 1). This was then adopted by Islamic tradition to show the nature of the woman's role within typical life.

The two versions of the Indonesian and Indian portrayals of Ghatotkacha's story have their similarities and differences. According to research, the Mahabharata entered into Indonesia through Java around the first century CE. As it traveled deeper into Indonesia, there were slight variations which were created out of adapting the tale to traditional Indonesian culture. The two are incredibly similar, "the Indonesian version of Mahabharata has great resemblance with the Indian folk-versions," (Bandyopadyay "A Study in Folk 'Mahabharata:' How Balarama Became Abhimanu's Father-in-Law." 1). Yet the slight differences show the adaptation into Indonesian culture as it spread further and further from its original source in India. In the Indonesian version. Ghatotkacha marries Arjuna's daughter Perigwa and her twin sister, proving to be a unique twist within Indonesian versions of the great hero (Bandyopadyay "Variations in Indonesian Mahabharata."1). Also within the Indonesian version of the tale, Arjuna and Karna look exactly alike. This leaves Draupadi to desire Karna, accidentally thinking he his Arjuna (Bandyopadyay "Variations in Indonesian Mahabharata."1). Karna is not beheaded in the Indonesian version like he is in the Indian version.

The main difference between the two versions is the Indonesian adaptation into traditional Wayang theater, which focuses on the implementation of puppets to express the values of the tale. The traditions of Wayang are excellent sources for the study of early Mahabharata in Indonesia (Bandyopadyay "Variations in Indonesian Mahabharata."1). Wayang theater is unique to Indonesia, with incorporations of puppets with live actors to present the story. According to research, "For more than a thousands years Indonesians have used wayang theater as a method of addressing the conundrums of life," (Foley & Morris 9). This form of theater presented "epic stories that shrank the cosmos down to a miniature world," (Foley & Morris 9). Thus, the puppeteer creates a parallel relationship with the divine forces that are in rule in the context of the play. This stylistic adaptation shows the Indonesian adoption of Indian stories and their morals; "Wayang is a key to Indonesian thinking, reflecting the lives and world view of the Indonesian people," (Foley & Morris 9). Thus, by adapting sacred Indian texts to fit into Wayang theater, Indonesians put their unique stamp on an ancient and shared text.

References

Bandyopadyay, Indrajit. "A Study in Folk 'Mahabharata:' How Balarama Became Abhimanu's Father-in-Law." Epic India. 17(28). 2008. Retrieved 14 Nov 2009 at http://www.epicindia.com/magazine/Culture/a-study-in-folk-mahabharata-how-balarama-became-abhimanyus-father-in-law

Bandyopadyay, Indrajit. "Variations in Indonesian Mahabharata." Boloji. 2009. Retrieved 14 Nov 2009 at http://www.boloji.com/hinduism/145.htm

Chaturvedi Badrinath, The Mahabharata: An Inquiry in the Human Condition, New Delhi, Orient Longman. 2006.

Chidambaram, Vijay. "Ke Sera." Word Press. 2007. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://thevc.wordpress.com/2007/12/01/ke-sera-sera/

Dharma Universe. "Veer Abhimanyu." Free India. 2009. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://www.freeindia.org/biographies/greatpersonalities/veerabhimanyu/page4.htm

Foley, Kathy & Morris, Tonja. "Warrior Kings and Divine Jesters: Indonesian Rod Puppets." Asian Art Museum. 2003. Retrieved 14 Nov 2009 at http://www.asianart.org/pdf/education/Warrior-Kings.pdf.

Ganguli, Kisari Mohan. "Dhorna Parva Section 1." The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa. The Sampradaya Sun. 2009. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://www.harekrsna.com/sun/editorials/mahabharata/dhrona/mahabharata174.htm

Janvier, Ernest Paxton. The Madhyma Vyayoga: A Drama Composed by the Poet Bhasa Translated from the Original Sanskrit with Introduction and Notes. University of Pennsylvania. 1921. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://www.archive.org/stream/madhyamavyayogad00bhas/madhyamavyayogad00bhas_djvu.txt

Paradise Property Bali. "Balinese Culture." Paradise Bali. 2009. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://www.ppbali.com/balinese-culture.php

Rajagopalachari, Chakravarti. Mahabharata. Diamond Pocket Books. 1976.

Sources Used in Document:

References

Bandyopadyay, Indrajit. "A Study in Folk 'Mahabharata:' How Balarama Became Abhimanu's Father-in-Law." Epic India. 17(28). 2008. Retrieved 14 Nov 2009 at http://www.epicindia.com/magazine/Culture/a-study-in-folk-mahabharata-how-balarama-became-abhimanyus-father-in-law

Bandyopadyay, Indrajit. "Variations in Indonesian Mahabharata." Boloji. 2009. Retrieved 14 Nov 2009 at http://www.boloji.com/hinduism/145.htm

Chaturvedi Badrinath, The Mahabharata: An Inquiry in the Human Condition, New Delhi, Orient Longman. 2006.

Chidambaram, Vijay. "Ke Sera." Word Press. 2007. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://thevc.wordpress.com/2007/12/01/ke-sera-sera/

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