James Fenimore Cooper the Life Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

According to Mctiernan (1997), "James Fenimore Cooper's the Spy is interesting precisely because no genre had yet hardened around spying when he wrote it. Cooper relies instead on the conventions of other genres -- primarily, the domestic romance and the historical adventure, which, unlike spy fiction, did not evolve in part to justify the dishonesty and covert manipulation central to espionage" (3).

As noted above, Cooper was also able to draw on the inspiration of an unspoiled American wilderness that few people today can imagine without his help. It is this aspect of Cooper's early works, perhaps, that continue to make them popular today just as they did in his own time. As Ringe (1962) advises, though, this is unfortunate because Cooper matured as a writer over the years and some of his best work was during the last part of his career. "Ironically, Cooper is best known for what is essentially his apprentice work," Ringe writers. "Except for the Littlepage series, the late novels are all but unknown to the non-specialist, yet they include some of his most vigorous books" (18).

Conclusion

The research showed that James Fenimore Cooper was an early 18th century American writer whose more famous works included the five Leatherstocking Tales and the Spy. While some of his critics may point to the flaws in Cooper's works, the fact remains that he was writing during a period in American history where there were few precedents to help model the way. Despite the paucity of historical events upon which to base his accounts, Cooper managed to create a number of enduring characters that have appeared in literature and the entertainment industry ever since. In the final analysis, it is reasonable to conclude that papers such as this one will still be written by students in the 22nd and 23rd centuries since Cooper was one of the first who is still widely regarded as one of the best.

Works Cited

Becker, May Lamberton. "Introduction" to the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957.

Davis, Randall C. (1994). "Fire-Water in the Frontier Romance: James Fenimore Cooper and 'Indian Nature.'" Studies in American Fiction 22(2): 215.

Dekker, George and John P. Williams (Eds.). James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1997.

Mctiernan, Dave. (1997). "The Novel as 'Neutral Ground': Genre and Ideology in…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Becker, May Lamberton. "Introduction" to the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957.

Davis, Randall C. (1994). "Fire-Water in the Frontier Romance: James Fenimore Cooper and 'Indian Nature.'" Studies in American Fiction 22(2): 215.

Dekker, George and John P. Williams (Eds.). James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1997.

Mctiernan, Dave. (1997). "The Novel as 'Neutral Ground': Genre and Ideology in Cooper's 'The Spy." Studies in American Fiction 25(1): 3.

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