Jazz "Blues After Dark," Feat. Dizzy Gillespie Term Paper

Length: 4 pages Sources: 1 Subject: Music Type: Term Paper Paper: #41797416 Related Topics: Sense And Sensibility, Listening Skills, Plagiarism, Head Start
Excerpt from Term Paper :

Jazz

"Blues After Dark," Feat. Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Sonny Stitt (tenor sax), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums). In Belgium, 1958

Starting with the dueling instruments, it almost sounds like two muted trumpets, because the harmonics are intense. For a few notes, it remains that way until I see that it is not two trumpets but rather, a trumpet and a saxophone. They are playing together brilliantly.

A smooth stand up bass kicks in, with background elements that respond to the lead instruments. The bass is not playing a melody like the trumpet and saxophone are; and the bass is also not playing in unison with the tenor saxophone or the trumpet. However, the bass is working in the spot it should be working in, offering a continual walking bass line that keeps the structure of the song together throughout. Sometimes, the bass does play the same notes as the trumpet and saxophone.

The timing is brilliant, as there are many moments of silence that say just as much as the notes. There are some riffs that are repeated, but also some improvised sections. A piano provides some counterpart of melody to the lead instruments of trumpet and saxophone.

The saxophone provides a few notes that suddenly stand apart. Something is about to take place,...

...

His cheeks are alive, and it is a long extended solo. However, the solo that I am focusing on is the piano.

In fact, there is a piano solo toward the end of the piece. Although by no means the central solo of the song, this piano solo works well and is worth mentioning. It is accomplished only with the bass as its accompaniment. The piano solo follows the trumpet and saxophone solo. The piano follows the general principle of an improvisational solo, allowing for an absolute beginning and end so that the rest of the instruments can play again. Notes are played with heavy and intense style, and there are chords as well as single notes. The piano, as a percussive instrument, is able to punctuate in the same places the bass and drums do. This creates a solid, well-constructed, and highly successful piano solo. In addition to the other solos, this features the unique roles each instrument plays.

The drummer uses brushes so softly, that it seems barely there. I can see this happening in the video. I note that the drumming brushes add more texture than they add rhythm or beats. The drummer also uses very soft cymbals in a riding pattern, but this is completely obscured by the lead instruments.

"Sunny Side of the Street," Feat. Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet); Sonny Stitt (tenor sax); Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums). In Belgium, 1958

Style = BeBop

Role of Piano = Stride and Comping

Role of the Bass = Walking

Role of the Drums = Brushing and Riding

Role of the Trumpet and Saxophone = Lead and Melody

"Sunny Side of the Street" has a saxophone solo. It begins…

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