Kung People Essay

Length: 2 pages Sources: 2 Subject: Family and Marriage Type: Essay Paper: #79218337 Related Topics: Artificial Intelligence, Documentary Film, Colonialism, People
Excerpt from Essay :

¶ … People Feed Themselves?" The authors discuss global hunger problems and food insecurity as a direct result of colonialism. Colonialism left a legacy of exploitation of both human and natural resources. "One side was on top largely because the other side was on the bottom," (Lappe and Collins 182). Colonialism dismantled traditional social and political structures successively over multiple generations, disrupted the transmission of knowledge related to the natural world, led to patterns of forced migration of laborers to work on plantations as slaves or slave-like laborers, and systematically preventing people from growing their own food on a small subsistence scale. Through a collection of nefarious interventions, colonial governments and their successors in modern nation-states have maintained an imbalance of power. The answer to the question "why can't people feed themselves" cannot be answered with the overly simple response of "overpopulation." Instead, the answer lies in a deeper examination of social, political, and economic injustice. People cannot feed themselves because of the "heritage of a colonial order," (Lappe and Collins 183).

Two important statements or points made by the authors in support of their overall argument include the concept of colonies as "agricultural establishments," and the "overemphasis on export productions" that later arose from the capitalist agricultural model. On the first point, Lappe and Collins argue that colonial powers like France and England treated their colonies as extensions of themselves. As "agricultural establishments," the colonies were deemed ripe for the taking. All natural and

...

On the second point, Lappe and Collins note that the rise of agribusiness relied on a system in which labor was devalued and laborers dehumanized. The "divorce of agriculture from nourishment" was essential to the capitalist model (Lappe and Collins 184).

2. Filmmaker John Marshall began filming the !Kung people in northern Namibia in the 1950s, and follows up on N!ai's life several decades later. The first portion of the film is therefore decidedly different from the second portion, after which N!ai and her family have been forced to live on a small parcel of government land. In the 1950s, when the documentary was first being filmed, N!ai lived a more traditional life, whereas now, they can no longer practice their traditional means of hunting and gathering for food. Instead of connecting their labor with their food, the !Kung people now have to earn money in the…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Lappe, Frances Moore and Collins, Joseph. "Why Can't People Feed Themselves?"

Marshall, John and Linden, Adrienne. "N!ai: The Story of a !Kung Woman." {Documentary Film}


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